Hippies on Ice

Lego Volkswagen Transporter Snowcat

Dude! We like, totally need to tie-dye some warmer threads if we’re going to take a trip in this Vee-Dub. Andrea Lattanzi aka Norton74 has transformed Volkwagen’s faithful T1 Transporter van into something far more winter-ready. Time to take the Russian President a flower of peace? Something* makes us think Putin probably won’t appreciate the arrival of hippy rainbow colours though…

*Possibly it’s the homophobic, country-destabilising megalomania.

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Wheels of Whimsy

Lego Art-Deco Trike

The inside of Vince Toulouse‘s mind must be an interesting – and rather beautiful – place to live. Vince has appeared here previously with his wonderfully art-deco spaceships, and he’s now transferred his uniquely brilliant style to wheeled wonders. These two spectacular creations can be found at Vince’s most excellent Flickr photostream, click the link above and submerge yourself in Vince’s sea of brick-built loveliness.

Lego Sci-Fi Art-Deco Car

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Skip That – Technic 42024 Alternative

Lego Technic 42024 Alternative

LEGO’s 42024 Technic Container Truck set received a fairly average review from our experts earlier in the year. Plenty of scope for improvement then. One builder to give improving the model a go is TLCB debutant Henry Quarmby, who has repurposed the pieces found within the official set for his excellent truck and trailer combo.

Featuring working steering, a linear-actuator operated load bed, a working crane, plus a tilting cab with opening doors, Henry’s 42024 alternative has play value galore. The trailer doesn’t miss out either, with a folding jockey wheel and an opening cover.

All the photos of Henry’s 42024 ‘C-Model’ can be found on MOCpages, plus you can read the aforementioned review of the original Technic Container Truck (or Skip Lorry as decreed by our reviewer) set by clicking on the link above. Which model do you prefer?

Lego 42024 C-Model

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Russian Roulette

Lego TVR Vixen

After struggling to find any cars for the past few days one of the Elves has hit an automative jackpot; previous bloggee Harry Gravett has published no less than seven TVR sports cars in one go to MOCpages! Here we pick two of our favourites.

Beginnings

TVR were founded in 1947 in Blackpool, England, producing cars in kit-form as well as turning existing production cars into specials. Soon they were building their own sports cars, using mostly off-the-shelf components from larger manufacturers such as Ford and Rover, and then hitting the race track with their products.

One of TVR’s most loved early models was the Vixen, as built by Harry in the above image. Powered by a little Ford 1600 engine from the Cortina, and later by the big Triumph six-cylinders in Tuscan form, the Vixen sold well, with around 1,000 produced between 1967 and 1973. Quite a few survive today too, as plastic bodywork meant the Vixen didn’t suffer from the no.1 British classic car killer; rust.

The Middle

The seventies ushered in a new era of wedge-shaped Rover V8-powered sports cars, like the 350S pictured below. Small, and always seemingly on the brink of financial crisis (like most independent British sports car makers of the time), TVR continued right up until the mid 2000s, by which time they had developed their own engines, raced successfully at the highest level in sports and endurance categories, and created some of the most stunning shapes ever seen on road cars.

Lego TVR 350S

The End

And then it all went horribly wrong. The architect of TVR’s modern era, Peter Wheeler, sold the company to Russian millionaire Nikolay Smolensky. The new ownership lasted less than 3 years before Smolensky first tried to move production out of England, and then folded the company altogether. And thus TVR became yet another victim of the clueless millionaire ownership club.

In the subsequent years many rumours circulated of TVR’s return to vehicle production, all of which amounted to nothing (like most independent British sports car makers of the time) and TVR quietly disappeared from the public conscious, save for the occasional child-delight when a distinctive straight 6 or V8 sports car rumbled past down a British street.

New Beginnings?

In 2013 Nikolay Smolensky decided to sell the dead TVR name to British businessman Les Edgar. Edgar has now started the long process of developing a new range of sports cars with the aim of reviving the once legendary name.

Here at TLCB we’re not expecting much (or indeed anything) to result in this well-meaning revival attempt – history is not on Edgar’s side – but we wish him the very best of luck. Who knows, one day we might even hear a new rumble…

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Elf Wish

Lego Half Track Tank

This sci-fi armoured self-propelled gun isn’t our usual TLCB fodder, but the Elves made such a fuss it was safer for all concerned just to blog it. Blog newcomer Nathan Pownell is the builder, and you can see more of his creation on MOCpages here.

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Viva Italia!

Vespa-Pascal

Another day in the office and another Elf sits happily munching a yellow Smartie, whilst fending off its envious colleagues with a bit of Technic. It has just returned with this lovely, brick-built Vespa scooter by Pascal (Pasukaru76). Click this link to Flickr for a closer look.

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Typhoon

Lego Hawker Typhoon

The RAF like aircraft named after tropical storms and their current BAE Systems Eurofighter Typhoon is one of the world’s finest fighter planes. 70 years earlier the Eurofighter’s grandfather was too. The Hawker Typhoon evolved from the Hurricane as a high altitude fighter, but teething problems meant it never fulfilled this role quite as was intended.

However, the monstrous 2000bhp engine meant that the Typhoon found a new role as a ground attack aircraft (in addition to its job shooting down the BMW-engined Focke-Wulf Fw 190), and it could carry a payload close to that of a dedicated light bomber.

Sadly only one Hawker Typhoon survives today, but K Wigboldy aka Thirdwigg has recreated the legendary World War 2 aircraft so well there might as well be two. His 1:13 Lego replica features the huge 24 cylinder engine that made the Typhoon such an effective weapon, plus an electrically powered variable pitch propellor, working landing gear, flaps, ailerons, elevator and rudder.

More photos can be found on MOCpages via the link above, and you can see all the details plus a video of the working functions by visiting Thirdwigg’s excellent website – find it in the Directory in the main menu.

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Trucks in Space

Lego Classic Space Truck

TLCB regular F@bz returns with another sci-fi marvel. This time he’s swapped wings for wheels with this striking space truck. More pictures can be found on Flickr, click here to see more.

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Orange Slice

Lego Technic Superbike

The Elves know that orange Smarties are the best kind, and thus orange creations are highly sought after amongst our smelly little workforce. This find has pleased one of them greatly, as it’s now the recipient of a meal token and a coveted orange Smartie.

Hajdekr is the builder, and his bright orange super bike features a range of quality Technic functions, including suspension, steering and a four cylinder engine. You can see more of his bike – as well as a how-to instructional – over on Flickr via the link above, plus you can see a preview of LEGO’s own Technic super bike due in 2015 by clicking here.

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Built Ford Tough (Probably)

Lego Technic Madoca1977 Truck

This spectacular Technic pick-up truck is the work of previous bloggee Madoca1977, and unusually for a TLCB post we can’t tell you much about it. That’s because Madoca has so far released only a single teaser image without accompanying details, but his latest creation looks so damn cool we couldn’t wait to post it.

Madoca will release details and further images of the Ford-esque pick-up truck (or is it a Toyota HiLux?) in due course, but until then you can see more of the image above by visiting his Google Plus account here. There might only be one picture, but it’s our favourite truck of the year!

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Yacht Club

Lego Motor Yacht

Because millionaire mini-figures need to get from Long Island to Manhattan too.

JBIronWorks has built one of the more luxurious ways to commute to Wall Street with his beautiful recreation of the 1929 motor yacht ‘Mohican’, and it looks the perfect bath-toy for TLCB executive jacuzzi.

The real classic yacht is currently up for sale for a cool $1million, but if that’s a bit out of your reach you can pretend with JB on Flickr. Money can’t buy you happiness anyway. Although it can buy you a $1million motor yacht.

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Two Tiny Trucks

Tint Fire Engine

It’s red and blue Smarties all round for the Elves at The Lego Car Blog today, as they’ve returned from MOCpages with a pair of little trucks. First up is a micro fire engine from Taiwanese builder Chung-Po Cheng, whose bin lorry we featured a couple of days ago. You can click this link to MOCpages to see more of the details that have been squeezed into this truck.

Second is Tommaso Garosi’s Unimog. Christmas is coming (there have been decorations in the shops for weeks now) and Tommaso’s crew are busy loading trees onto their truck. Underneath this classic 4×4 are prop-shafts and difs, which you can see by clicking this link to MOCpages. You can compare this with LEGO’s new, official model by clicking this link to our mini 2015 City preview.

Tiny Unimog

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Print-a-Buggy!

Lego Dune Buggy 3D Printed Parts

Well, parts of one…

We usually only publish posts that feature genuine LEGO pieces here at TLCB (in fact it’s one of our submission criteria), however today’s creation warranted a closer look.

Built by TLCB regular Sariel, this Technic dune buggy features a few parts that you won’t find with an official LEGO logo on. That’s because they’ve been created using the relatively new phenomenon of 3D printing, which enables a Computer Aided Design (CAD) to be realised for real via plastic moulding.

Over the past few years the price of 3D printing has tumbled, meaning unique parts production is now within reach of many amateur designers and engineers (or morally-bankrupt individuals who think that the ability to print-your-own firearm is something the world needs…).

Fellow previous TLCB bloggee Efferman has put his design skills to use and created a range of custom components that LEGO themselves have yet to officially produce. These include a 5 stud long steering arm (vs. LEGO’s 6 stud long version), a heavy-duty differential, and some wonderfully bouncy suspension springs, all of which Sariel has fitted to his excellent remote controlled dune buggy.

Lego Buggy Custom Suspension Springs

The custom components appear to work beautifully with the standard LEGO Technic used in the rest of Sariel’s creation – especially the springs, which we’d love to test out ourselves (hint!) – and Efferman has designed a wide variety of other custom LEGO-compatible components that are available to purchase online. These include suspension and steering parts, pneumatic tanks, custom wheels, excavator buckets, plus a lot more that we’re not clever enough to understand.

You can view Efferman’s extensive range of unofficial 3D printed Lego components by visiting the Shapeways Store, plus you can see more of Sariel’s dune buggy demonstrating some of these parts in action via MOCpages at the link above, or by watching the ace video below.

YouTube Video:

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The Trashmen

Lego City Garbage Truck

Refuse Collectors are surly the unsung heroes of the modern world. Removing the vast quantities of detritus created by our wasteful and consumerist society, without them we’d be neck deep in trash within a week.

Lego City’s knights-in-hi-vis appear here courtesy of newcomer Chung-Po Cheng and his excellent recreation of one of Taiwan’s multitude of garbage trucks. See more of his refuse truck via MOCpages.

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They’ve Saved the Best Trip For Last…

Lego Back to the Future Part IIIBut this time they may have gone too far.

In 1990’s final* instalment of the superb Back to the Future franchise the ageing DeLorean needed a little help in hitting 88mph. Flickr’s Irwan Prabowo – making his TLCB debut – has recreated the famous Back to the Future Part III movie ending sequence wonderfully in micro-scale. You can see more of Irwan’s mini DeLorean time machine and the 1885 steam locomotive pushing it at his photostream via the link above.

*Maybe…

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