Matches for: “happiness” …

Happiness is Mini shaped

Lego Technic Mini

A Mini Mini

This Mini, recently posted to MOCpages by the incredibly talented Nick Barrett, is so lifelike it’ll probably start rusting soon. Underneath the remarkably accurate bodywork sits a real working model of the famous BMC A-Series engine, driving the fully suspended front wheels via a working gearbox. It has working lights, brakes, hand brake, door locks, tilting seats… in fact we’re fairly confident in saying this is the most accurate vehicle we’ve ever featured. Join us in awe on MOCpages.

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Open Happiness

Toyota MR2

Toyota MR2 Turbo

An unusual paint job for a race car, but somehow it seems to work. Dylan Denton is the creator behind this 1997 Toyota MR2 Race Car, complete with fizzy drink sponsorship. Unfortunately for us it got the Elves in the mood for sugar, and we’re still fixing The Lego Car Blog office as a result. So whilst we get busy with the gaffer tape, you can view the MR2’s full gallery on Flickr.

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Yacht Club

Lego Motor Yacht

Because millionaire mini-figures need to get from Long Island to Manhattan too.

JBIronWorks has built one of the more luxurious ways to commute to Wall Street with his beautiful recreation of the 1929 motor yacht ‘Mohican’, and it looks the perfect bath-toy for TLCB executive jacuzzi.

The real classic yacht is currently up for sale for a cool $1million, but if that’s a bit out of your reach you can pretend with JB on Flickr. Money can’t buy you happiness anyway. Although it can buy you a $1million motor yacht.

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The Ultimate Supercar

… Is one that goes into space…

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Until 1996, the top-of-the-range Technic set was always a car. Then Lego had another idea. Welcome to TLCB’s review of set 8480, the Technic Space Shuttle.

With only a handful of pieces more than the 8880 supercar, but the addition of some 9V electrics, this retailed for $30 or so more. Since I was recently privileged to put one together, I thought I’d tell you, our esteemed reader, all about it.

First of all, the box is huge. Ma-hoo-sive, as I’m told some people say… rather more than is necessary; although having a plastic tray to sort the pieces into is a boon. Unlike new sets of this size, there is just the one – thickish – instruction book, which covers both the shuttle and the submarine B-model. This naturally means that every build step involves quite a lot more than it would now… the assembly of this large and complex model is broken down into just 40 build steps.

You know that warm feeling of accomplishment you get when you complete a model? Well, you get a similar frisson for completing EVERY PAGE of this. You do need to concentrate, partly because of the relatively large amount of pieces added at each step, but also because there will be ONE piece added somewhere, at the other end of the model from most of the rest, that you will miss. It’s like  40 pages of ‘Where’s Waldo’… If this sounds like complaining, it isn’t; this was a properly challenging and very enjoyable build.

I do have a couple of TLCB Top Tips: At an early stage, you attach two 2×6 black plates with holes to the underside. Leave these off until much later, as you’ll only knock them off many times until they are attached at more than one end. It’ll spare your sanity, I promise… Another thing – make sure you test these near-20 year old electrics; especially the two long wires that are carefully routed along the length of the fuselage from an early stage of the build. If you discover one of these doesn’t work later on, it’s major surgery to remove it. This leads to swearing…

After many hours of careful assembly, you will have a Technic model of unusual handsomeness, and a (for the time) quite staggering technical density. Time to see what it does. Continue reading

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Creations for Charity 2012

Every year Creations for Charity invite you to help raise money to provide LEGO toys for children in need around the world. This wonderful annual event gives you the chance to buy custom LEGO MOCs from some of the most talented builders in the LEGO Community. You’ll become the owner of a unique and brilliant creation, and all proceeds are used to bring happiness and joy, in the form of our favourite toy, to children who otherwise would not get anything to play with this Christmas. LEGO is the perfect toy for such children as it can be played with for years without breaking, without needing batteries, and without age limits or gender associations.

You can participate in two ways; by bidding for a unique MOC, or by donating a MOC to Creations for Charity yourself. The Lego Car Blog wish Creations for Charity every success with this year’s fundraiser.

Creations for Charity

Visit http://www.creationsforcharity.org to find out more

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