Category Archives: Technic

Extreme to the Max!

Lego Technic RC 4x4

How extreme can Lego can be? MOCpages’ Desert752 Kirill decided to found out with a 4×4 off-road racer fitted with four Technic buggy motors. And then he took it abseiling. See how in the video below…

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Air Ambulance Picture Special

Lego Technic Helicopter

Today’s incredible Lego creation comes from newcomer Chrismo72, who has built one of the most astounding Technic models of the year.

Featuring five Power Functions motors controlling the pitch, roll and rotation of the rotors, two sets of LED lights, two IR controllers and two IR receivers, Chrismo’s Air Ambulance helicopter is amongst the most advanced Lego aircraft ever built.

Lego Air Ambulance

As well as some brilliant Technic engineering Chrismo’s helicopter also includes some neat brickwork, such as the clever tail-rotor housing shown above.

There’s also a fully detailed interior, opening doors, and working control sticks. You can see all of the photos and read more about the build by visiting the discussion topic in the Eurobricks Technic forum.

Lego Technic Air Ambulance Helicopter

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Drag Racing

Lego Technic F1 Ferrari

Formula 1 might be constrained by four million regulations but it does still occasionally provide good racing. The surprise of the 2015 season has been Ferrari, who after a woeful 2014 seem to have mostly sorted their latest car. Don’t underestimate the role Vettel played in fixing the prancing horse though – as his previous team Red Bull seem to be going backwards (and doing so very ungracefully too). Coincidence?

Anyway, one of the more ridiculous of the four million regulations in Formula 1 these days is the DRS (Drag Reduction System). It’s a neat engineering solution that should be able to be used whenever the driver feels like it, not just when Bernie Ecclestone’s computer deems it to be OK.

TLCB regular Sariel has created a Ferrari-ish Formula 1 car that uses this feature the way we would like – his working DRS on the rear wing is deployed automatically in top gear. His fully RC model also features pushrod suspension, return-to-centre steering and a range of other Technic functions. You can see them all on MOCpages, plus a video of the car and its DRS in action.

Lego Ferrari Formula 1

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Minecraft

Lego Technic Caterpillar Dump Truck

Today a jubilant TLCB Elf set a new office record; the most colleagues squished in one event since records began. It seems that whenever an Elf finds a monster remote controlled creation its first instinct is to flatten as many of its co-workers as possible with it. One poor Elf was so ingrained into the tyre tread it was rotating with the wheel to be newly squashed every few seconds.

The tyres in question are third-party RC items, employed here because The LEGO Group simply doesn’t make any large enough. The rest of this creation is 100% authentic Lego though. It’s based on a Caterpillar 795F heavy dump truck – as found in open-cast mines all around the world – and it’s powered by two XL motors, with a further motor controlling the steering and another the lifting of the bucket.

If you’d like to see all of the images then head over to Eurobricks where builder shineyu has started a discussion topic to showcase his work. If you like this creation you might also be interested in an incredible previously blogged Terex excavator that works alongside the 795F in the real world; it’s now available on MOCpages to view, whilst we spend some time giving some lightly injured Elves a ride in the bucket of the Caterpillar.

Lego Technic Mining Truck

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Snow Tat

Lego Technic Tatra 8x8

It’s been a truck-heavy day at TLCB today, but no matter – we like trucks. This is one of our favourites, Tatra’s ridiculously capable Kolos 8×8. Horcik Designs of Flickr has built this one, complete with the legendary 8×8 drivetrain, in this case propelled by LEGO’s superb Power Functions motors. There’s more to see, including a video of the Tatra in action, at the link above.

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Eldorado

Lego Technic Cadillac Eldorado

Previous bloggee Martijn Nab is back with another cult classic reconstructed in Technic. This enormous 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz includes a whole host of Technic functions, and you can see more by clicking here.

Lego Technic Cadillac Eldorado

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Bounce

Lego Lowrider

Bounce bounce bouncy bounce. Mahjqa has created a Technic lowrider – and it really works! Check it out at the link above, and watch it in action below.

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Extreme Loggers

Lego MAZ 537 Truck

This monster MAZ-537 logging truck was discovered not by our Elves, who are now sulking, but by one of you. It’s been built by Pavol Vanek of Flickr, and it is quite simply one of the most impressive Technic models we’ve seen this year.

The MAZ-537 was designed for the soviet military (like pretty much everything else from Communist eastern Europe) and was manufactured from 1959 until 1990. It was powered by a 39 litre 12-cylinder diesel engine coupled with a three-speed hydromechanical transmission, featured 4-wheel-steering and 4-wheel-drive, and it could carry 50 ton loads.

Pavol’s superb Lego recreation features all of this (minus the crazy gearbox), plus some clever pneumatics that allow his MAZ-537 to fulfil its post-military civilian role.

There’s lots more to see at Pavol’s photostream – join in the extreme logging here.

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Three Garys

Lego Technic Gaz Trucks

Today, like every pub in Birmingham, TLCB has three Garys present. These beautifully built Technic GAZ 51 trucks – in dropside, tipper and crane flavours – were discovered on Eurobricks. They’ve been built by newcomer super-jaschka and each one features a range of Technic functionality.

Lego GAZ 51 Crane Truck

Our favourite is this one, the crane truck, which features a working engine, steering, stabilisers, lifting boom, winch, crane rotation and opening doors and bonnet. There’s more to see of all three of super-jaschka’s GAZ 51 trucks at the Eurobricks forum – click on the link in the text above to join the discussion.

Lego Technic GAZ 51 Truck

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24 Heures du Mans (Partie Deux)

Lego Le Mans LMP1 Race Car

French made, French raced, Technic LMP1 cars are like buses

The second LMP1 car to appear here this week arrived courtesy of a reader via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page. It comes from previous bloggee Nico71, and it is – as you can see – gorgeous. Underneath the swoopy prototype-class bodywork sits a fully functioning chassis complete with authentic double-wishbone push-rod suspension, a working V8 engine, steering, and opening doors and engine cover.

Lego Technic Suspension

At the time of writing Nico’s Technic LMP1 racer isn’t present at any of our Elves’ usual haunts, but fortunately it is available at Nico’s own (and excellent) website, where there is also a huge gallery of detailed photos with instructions to come. For all the details click on these blue words to visit Nico’s website.

Lego Le Mans LMP1 Racer

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A Clockwork Elf – 42034 Quad Bike – Set Review

42034_Quad-Bike_01

What could be more fun than a hoard of The Lego Car Blog Elves, balanced on top of a careering vehicle, powered by a large, metal spring? For just £17.99 for 148 pieces from our local toy shop, we decided to find out!

Opening the box revealed two bags of Lego parts and a pull-back motor plus four tyres packed loose. As usual, the tyres rolled off under the TLCB office champagne cooler and had to be retrieved by a skinny Elf. The sticker sheet was also packed loose, resulting in the usual slight crumples (come on Lego put them in a bag with some cardboard!). Lastly, came the 60 page instruction book, which thankfully no longer features the terrifying, screaming child on its back cover. Why was he so angry?

60 pages of instructions, might seem a bit over the top but remember that this model is at the “fun” end of the Technic range and aimed at builders from 7 to 14 years old. That said, some of the steps did seem a bit small, such as adding two decorative bushes to the wheel axles in the final step. If you are ever in need of a mental challenge, go and build one of the big Technic sets from the early 1980s and you’ll be thankful for Lego’s modern day approach to instructions.

Disappointingly, there is no “B” model for this set. You can buy the other “Pull-Back” model in this year’s range (42033) and combine the two sets. However, that was too much of an investment for us as we weren’t sure if this model would survive the Elves “testing” regime for long enough to be re-combined.

Having distracted all 271 Elves in the office by giving them a Smartie to fight over, we started the build. The model starts with the chassis, in short rapid steps. By step 8, the pull-back motor is already fitted. For us, the motor was the exciting, interesting bit. How powerful would it be? How long would it last? How many Elves could we smush? Just 40 more pages and we’d be there…

The build continues in, what is now, traditional Technic style, strongly embedding the motor in a frame. Disappointingly there is no gearing in this model. It’s great introduction to Technic for younger builders but perhaps some gearing would have added to the educational value and interest? Maybe the motor wasn’t up to it? Just 35 more pages to go…

The decorative “engine” of this model is a two cylinder “V”. It’s neatly made from a 57585, 3 Branch Cross Axle and a pair of wheel hubs. The stickers start to come in at this point too. Applying them looked quite fiddly. We prefer to leave our pieces clean and ready for re-use in MOCs, so fortunately we skipped that part. The instructions now moved on to make the bodywork. Lego leave adding to wheels until the end of the build. How fast would our quad bike zoom?

Page 27 has a fiddly, combined axle and peg connection, with three things to go in. It’s a bit tricky and builders at the younger end of the age range will probably need a hand here. Page 30 adds an axle to the pull-back motor and the front axle too. It turns out the at the steering handle bars are just decorative. Perhaps a simple, friction based, steering could have added to the fun by allowing the quad bike to go in straight lines or in curves? It seemed quite hard to wind the motor up. Perhaps it would be easier once the wheels were on?

A few more steps, adding familiar Technic parts and panels (there were no exciting new components hidden in this build for the collector). Then it was time to add the wheels! Even though this model is aimed at younger builders, this took three whole pages of the instructions, which seemed a little excessive. The finished article is a nicely chunky, good looking, strong toy. It easily survived being dropped 30cm onto a table, thanks to its balloon tyres.

We loaded 13 and ¾ Elves onto the quad bike in the style of the White Helmets and started to wind up its motor. After four sets of easy 30cm pull backs, which stored a lot of energy in the spring, a ratchet cut in to stop it being over-wound and broken. The model easily covered the 6 metres across the TLCB executive sun deck, spraying Elves as it went. Fortunately it is light and has a strong front bumper built into it. Parents might want to guard some of their more delicate furniture.

To sum up. Value for money: perhaps not for the parts but you can buy this model online for a couple of pounds cheaper than we bought it in a shop. The palette is just black, yellow and grey, so the parts will easily combine with parts from your other Technic sets in MOCs. There are also two pairs of useful wheels, unlike the 42033 set. The model looks good, even without the stickers and is strong, fun and fast to play with. This is the model’s best point: it’s a fun introduction to the Technic style of building and a great toy to play with once it’s built.

42034_box1_na_1488x841

P.S. If you’re wondering what an Elf on a quad bike looks like, click this link.

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The Force Awakens

Lego Technic Star Wars X-Wing

Before we get called out on whether the X-Wing is going to feature in the new Star Wars movie ‘The Force Awakens’, we’ll be honest and say we have absolutely no idea – today’s title is shameless click-bait!

Anyway, whether or not the X-Wing is set for a reappearance, Flickr’s Jeroen Ottens has built it superbly from Denmark’s finest plastic bricks. His recreation isn’t simply a static model either, as he’s packed it with pneumatic functions, including moving wings, opening canopy, weapons and landing gear.

More to see at the link above there is*.

*See, we can do Star Wars too… a bit.

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24 Heures du Mans

Lego Technic Le Mans LMP1 Racer

This mighty-looking Technic LMP1 endurance racer was discovered on Eurobricks by one of our happy little helpers. It the work of bj51 and it’s packed full of Technic functions. These include all-wheel independent suspension, a working V8 engine, steering and transmission. There’s lots more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum or at bj51’s website, and you can read our review of the offical Technic endurance racer set by clicking here.

Lego Technic Endurance Racer

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Pagani Huayra Picture Special

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra

Here at TLCB we regularly mock the efforts of ambitious but rubbish millionaires who promise the arrival of a new Bugatti-beating supercar every other month. Most such companies never start production, and the few that do go bankrupt within weeks after delivering the square root of F-all. All that is, except one…

Pagani was founded in 1992 by Argentinian-Italian ex-Lamborghini engineer Horacio Pagani. Seven years later the company’s first supercar reached production, via a partnership with Mercedes-Benz, and it quickly became the new poster car of eight year olds everywhere and cemented Pagani’s membership into the premier league of supercar makers.

Fast forward thirteen years to 2012 and it was time for the risky second album. Pagani responded by launching the incredible Huayra hypercar, a car capable of pulling over 1.6 lateral G at 230mph.

Lego Pagani Supercar

A car as astonishing as the Huayra deserves an astonishing Technic Supercar build, and today’s post sure meets that criteria. Much like the Pagani company the builder of this Technic recreation is a new entrant into the premier league of supercar builders, having only been building for a few years, but with this build Francisco Hartley has made sure he’s going to get noticed.

Underneath the remarkably accurate bodywork Francisco has engineered a working V12 engine, 6-speed gearbox with clutch, independent suspension, damped gull-wing doors and – most impressively of all – the Huayra’s ingenious active aerodynamics.

Lego Technic PaganiAll of the working features are mechanical, there’s not a Power Functions motor or pneumatic cylinder anywhere, and all are exquisitely engineered. You can see all the details of this beautiful Technic supercar on MOCpages at the link in the text above, plus you can see the features in action via the slick video below. Welcome to the premier league Francisco!

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Airport Crash Tender Picture Special

Lego Technic Airport Crash Tender

Today we have a very special creation to share with you, one that’s had the whole office pouring over it all afternoon.

This amazing Technic model is the work of previous bloggee Lucio Switch, and it’s a sight common to all major airports, the essential Airport Crash Tender. Lucio’s creation looks – as you can see from these images – remarkably lifelike, but even more impressive is what this model can do.

Lego Technic RC Airport Fire Truck

Hidden inside are fourteen Power Functions motors controlled by five IR receivers and the previously blogged SBrick. These operate everything from the 8-wheel-drive, the 4-wheel-steering, the rotation, lifting and extension of the fire extinguishing arm, the emergency lights, and the direction of second extinguisher nozzle mounted on the front bumper.

Lego Technic Airport Fire Tender

Oh, and one more function… working water cannons. Yes, this Lego model really can pump water and extinguish a small fire! LEGO’s own Pneumatic System is used to pump air into the water tanks, forcing out the water for use when things are getting a bit hot. It’s probably the most amazing Lego vehicle you will see this year – you can see all the images on both MOCpages and Flickr – we can’t recommend making those clicks highly enough!

Lego Technic Airport Crash Tender

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