Johnni D Goode


Dutch builder Johnni D’s Photostream is home to some great, small Lego cars. Recently it’s been filling up with comic style, 4-wide hot rods of all sorts of shapes. There are over 120 at the time of writing. They range from rat-rods (above) to custom Transit vans (below), via hatchbacks, campers and pick-ups. It’s well worth clicking this link to enjoy the variety of these builds.


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And Now for Something Completely Different


Unijob Lindo’s Photostream is full of strange, amusing things; just like our Elvish workforce. It includes a tank driven by parrots and these vehicles, which are charming in a violent way; just like our Elvish workforce. Fortunately for us, these are small scale models, rather than Technic Power Functions and so the only noises in our office today were Elvish giggles and the sound of pointy teeth gnashing on red and yellow Smarties.

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An Elegant Weapon From a More Civilised Age…


…to paraphrase Obi Wan Kenobi. Marc R.unde has produced this 6-wide Ferrari 275 GTB. It recalls a more elegant age of sports cars, with its flowing lines. Click this link to see more photos of this car and Marc’s massive space-battleships, by way of contrast, on Flickr.

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A $1,000 Thank You

Lego Nurse

Some time ago WordPress, our landlords here at, selected us as a pilot for their WordAds programme. Up until this selection TLCB was, in contrast to the proper Lego blogs, entirely advertisement free. Since then we have allowed the appearance of one or two advertisements per page (you can probably see one now, either above or below this post), managed through the WordAds programme.

These advertisements generate a small amount of revenue, and as we operate with an unpaid mythical-creature-based workforce our overheads are nice and low, even once we’ve paid for the Executive Washroom and Sauna.

This leaves us with a bit of a surplus, and because it’s a privilege to write for a million visitors a year, we don’t really feel like we need to keep it. And thus we owe all of you a huge thank you, because your visits, clicks and comments here at TLCB have – from one little ad – generated over $1,000 for good causes around the world so far.

The money raised through your visits has been used for projects as diverse as building essential facilities in India, children’s homes in Romania, the Syrian refugee crisis, the Red Cross, Unicef, and many more.

We’re mooting whether to restructure this site to allow a similar quantity of advertisements to show as the proper Lego blogs ($1,000 is great, but $20,000 would be better!), but we’re not sure about that yet. In the meantime, we’ll keep blogging, please keep clicking, and between us we can keep on doing a little bit of good : )


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Civic Duty

Lego Technic Honda Civic EG

Ah, the humble Honda Civic. Built in TLCB’s home nation, and once – even if not any more – the byword for advanced yet reliable hatchbackery.

The Civic has since been overtaken by the Korean brands here in Europe, but early examples are still a reasonably regular sight on the roads due to their legendary reliability. It’s an even more common sight on the banger track, as early Civics are worth about £5 and they can take a serious amount of punishment before heading to the great carpark in the sky.

America is where the Honda Civic was really successful though, where – despite it being basically the same car as the one we have in Europe – the little Japanese hatch has trodden a very different path in the annuls of automotive history.

Today early Stateside Civics seem to all have one thing in common; modifications. Bad modifications. Here at TLCB we’re not really sure why this is, seeing as gas, cars, and insurance are so cheap in the ‘States why not just buy a faster car in the first place?

Lego Honda Civic

The upshot of this is that finding an original unmodified early Civic is like trying to find an educated climate change denier – it’s virtually impossible. Which is a shame, as the late ’80s and early ’90s Civics were great little cars when left as Honda intended.

If you’re reading this in America and have a hankering for an unmolested slice of early ’90s Honda pie, get on Craigslist, find 78 year old Mavis who’s recently given up driving, and buy her Civic. It’ll be a classic one day. Probably.

Alternatively though, you could build your own, which is exactly what TLCB regular Nico71 has done. Based on the ’90s fifth generation (EG) Civic hatch, Nico’s creation is gloriously simple looking. It’s not simple inside though, as a full RC Power Functions drivetrain and rear suspension system have been squeezed in.

It’s quite a feat of packaging and handily Nico has taken photos that show how it’s all been done. You can see all of the images of Nico’s little Technic Honda, inside and out, via Brickshelf – click the link above to make the jump to ’91.

Lego Technic RC Honda Civic

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Black and Yellow

Lego BMW M3 (E30)

BMW’s first generation M3 is one of our very favourite cars. Small, light, and not particularly powerful, it’s the antidote to the ridiculous ongoing power-war between the premium brands that’s resulting in ever faster, yet ever fatter and ever more expensive ‘drivers cars’.

Lego E30 BMW M3

The E30 M3 takes us back to basics, when drivers cars were about, well… driving. We’re not alone in thinking this either, as the values of these early M3s are soaring, putting them well out of reach of appearing in TLCB staff carpark.

Fear not though, as MOCpages’ Daniel H. has a plan to make the E30 BMW M3 a whole lot more affordable. Daniel’s slickly recreated Model Team replica of the famous sports saloon was suggested to us by a reader, and it’s available to vote for on the LEGO Ideas platform now.

Lego BMW M3 E30

Featuring a detailed interior, chassis and engine, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, Daniel’s M3 would make a superb addition to LEGO’s expanding officially-licensed vehicle line up.

You can see all the images at Daniel’s MOCpage via the link above, and you can vote for this creation to become an official LEGO set by clicking here.

Lego BMW M3

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9398 4×4 Crawler Review


Lego Technic 9398 4x4 Crawler Review

The Lego Car Blog reviewing Anorak, hanging nerdily for a short while, has today been removed from the office coat-rack and thrust at one of you for another Reader Review! Doubling his chances in the ongoing Review My Set Competition is Marco. qm of MOCpages, who adds another set to the Set Review Library. Over to Marco…

The 9398 4×4 Crawler, around $200 when I bought it, and it looked great on the shelves at the shop. A little expensive? Not really, it comes with 2L motors, a Servo motor, a battery pack and the signal receiver with the controller. Plus another 1,321 pieces.

The set comes in a big grey box, containing many different bags filled with bricks, the building instructions, and nothing more. It’s definitely not the box of the 42056 Porsche 911 Gt3.

Building 9398 you start with the chassis – as always in Technic sets – adding the two L motors for power to all four wheels and the Servo motor for steering at both the front and back of the vehicle. However after a time you’ll notice that the gear ratios are aggressively slow, which some builders won’t like, and for such a big set there is no V8 engine… in fact there is no engine at all! Even the little 8256 set has an engine! If mechanical functions are your thing then unfortunately 9398 will prove disappointing.

On to the looks of the set, where things don’t get much better. 9398 resembles a modern El Camino monster truck, yet looks neither strong nor powerful, more like a graffiti artist has spray painted Barbie’s Jeep. Not good. (Agreed! Ed.)

Lego 9398 Crawler Review

OK, let’s stop talking about all the bad stuff. 9398 is the type of LEGO set which is useful if you’re the kind of builder that buys sets for the parts, where it is a good investment. With multiple electric components and those great-looking (and huge) tyres that are under-utilised here, there’s plenty to pilfer for your own creations. Continue reading

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Biggie Smalls

Lego Nieuw Statendam Cruise Ship

Micro-scale creations are usually pretty, well… micro. Not this one though. Measuring a massive 1.5 meters long, built from around 25,000 LEGO bricks, and weighing 23KGs, Edwin Kornstanje’s 1:200 replica of Holland America Line’s Nieuw Statendam cruise ship is one of the largest fan-built models we’ve ever featured.

Decks feature full interiors, with bars, restaurants, lounge rooms, a spa, a casino, and two swimming pools, all of which have been recreated beautifully in miniature. The real ship is currently being constructed in Italy and is due to launch in 2018, but Edwin’s magnificent replica is ready to sail now. Book your ticket to see all of the incredible details at Flickr or Eurobricks, and you can read more about the builder in Series 1 of our Master MOCers interviews by clicking here.

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Crawler Grabber

Lego Technic RC Tracked Grab

This weird-looking device is apparently a Crawler-Grabber, and we suppose it is, seeing as it both crawls and grabs. It’s the work of TLCB favourite Nico71, and it can lift a TLCB Elf surprisingly high into the air before dropping it into the toilet. Don’t worry, we didn’t press the flush.

Controlled remotely via LEGO’s Power Functions system, Nico’s creation is able to drive, skid steer, and elevate and extend the boom. It looks a bit like one of those RC bomb disposal robots and as such we may well put it to use removing Elf droppings from the Cage Room. Whilst we get cleaning you can see more on Brickshelf – click here to grab a look.

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Four Over Two

Lego Motorcycle

Redfern1950s has appeared several times over the past year with his wonderfully original motorcycle designs. This is his latest, with a highly detailed inline four-cylinder engine and the most brilliant motorbike seat we’ve ever seen. There’s more to see at Redfern’s photostream, and you can see all of his builds to feature here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking here.

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Lego Technic RC Mecalac MTX

Suggested by a reader, and looking like a cross between and ant and an elephant, this Mecalac MTX articulated excavator is one of the weirdest (and ugliest) vehicles we’ve featured in some time.

However, much like the real Mecalac, this remote controlled replica by newcomer proran of Eurobricks is a very clever bit of kit. No fewer than five Power Functions motors, five linear actuators, and three IR receivers control everything from the drive and articulated steering to the outriggers, 360 degree slew, four-section independent boom elevation, and bucket articulation.

You can see how all of that works at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where there are also digital renders of the mechanics and a video of the MTX in action.

Lego Technic RC Mecalac MTX

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Buzzin’ Hornet

Lego McDonnell-Douglas F-18C Hornet

Much like the news, TLCB seems to be quite military focussed currently. We’ll try to rectify that and send some Elves further afield to happier places, but in the meantime here’s today’s military creation – Dornbi’s 1:22 McDonnell-Douglas F-18C Hornet in Swiss airforce specification. Grey and warfare-y it may be, but it’s also an absolutely superb build, with working landing gear, aeronautics and an opening cockpit. There’s loads more to see at Dornbi’s photostream which you can access here.

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World of Tanks

Lego A39 Tortoise Tank Sariel RC

It was a quiet morning here at TLCB Towers. Then an Elf triumphantly rode into the office atop this, Sariel’s ridiculously impressive fully remote controlled A39 Tortoise tank. But a quiet morning it remained, as this might well be the slowest remote control creation that we’ve ever featured.

It is however, one of the most accomplished. Controlled via two SBricks (meaning a Playstation controller can be used to operate it, which is seriously cool!), Sariel’s tank features full RC drive and steering, gun elevation and panning, turret rotation, working suspension and a V12 piston engine.

There’s more to see on MOCpages here, plus you can watch all those features in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video

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Seventies Scania

Lego Scania LBS141

This stunning model is a near perfect replica of one of the most powerful trucks of the 1970s, the 375bhp V8-powered Scania LBS141.

Built by Master MOCer Dennis Bosman aka LegoTrucks it’s very probably one of the most accurate recreations of a real-world vehicle that this site has ever featured; there are even parts of this build where offsets are less than half-a-stud in width. Much like a bumblebee shouldn’t – by all mathematic calculations – be able to fly, we’re pretty sure that an offset of less than half-a-stud is an impossibility too, but nevertheless Dennis has confounded the maths.

There’s lots more to see of this incredible creation at Dennis’ photostream, which is packed full of exquisite models such as this. Click the link above to gaze in wonder, and you can read more about the builder via Season 1 of our Master MOCer series here.

Lego Scania Truck Dennis Bosman

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Boxing Clever

Lego Warehouse

We’re used to featuring far more glamorous vehicles here at The Lego Car Blog, but the humble forklift and pallet trolley really do deserve your appreciation.

The vehicular backbone of modern society, everything in your possession – from the chair you’re sitting on to the device with which you’re reading these words – will have at some stage been lifted, lowered or moved by one of these little mechanised workhorses.

Entitled ‘Warehouse Life’, this superb recreation of the most humdrum of scenes comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Norton74, it was suggested to us by a reader, and you can see more of the build in detail by clicking here.

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