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Nico71

Lego Technic Buggy

The Lego Car Blog’s Master MOCers Series is now well into its second season, with fifteen of the internet’s very best Lego vehicle builders already having earned an accolade that is literally priceless. Which is handy as they can redeem their award for precisely nothing at all. Nevertheless, Technic-building legend Nico71 has accepted the call to join some esteemed company, becoming the sixteenth builder to earn a permanent page here at The Lego Car Blog. Over to Nico to tell his story…

Hello TLCB Readers! My name is… Nicolas, aka nico71 on the internet, I am a French mechanical engineer, currently working as a project manager in mechanical design office for a company that manufactures industrial x-ray radioscopy and CT-scanners. I am also a prolific Lego Technic designer who creates machines, devices and vehicles like those you see here at TLCB.

What car do you drive in real life, and what would you like it to be (and who would be in the passenger seat)? 
I drive a Honda Legend 3.2 V6 from 1994 and a Honda Civic 1.4 from 1998. I also have a motorcycle which is a old Honda Transalp 600 from 1994, a very good motorcycle for traveling. As you can see, I am a huge fan of Honda (which also affects my Lego hobby!) My dream car is a old Honda NSX, which I have driven once and it was amazing. It’s powerful and comfortable with unique look, and the passenger would obviously be my girlfriend for traveling and holidays.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

If you were a LEGO brick, which type would you be and why?
Hard to say because when building studless Technic I do not use many different types of parts as in other fields, however I guess the most useful bricks is a connector to attach different parts together. But no, I would say the axle, because motion always starts with axle in my machines, and I like motion, so yes, an axle!

What was your first ever LEGO set, and which is your favourite LEGO set or theme?
My first set (according my parents) was the 8837 Pneumatic Excavator which combined stud-full design and pneumatics, which were really good! I had some other LEGO after that like the 8880 Supercar and the Technic Space Shuttle my story really restarted in 2007 when I bought the 8420 Street Bike, and in doing so discovered the new way Technic was designed with studless pieces. I then bought the 8436 truck which I have modified many times!

I do not buy many LEGO sets per year though; I have a small collection because I don’t want to have too many parts for my available space (and it takes more time to find them!). I also don’t need 80% of a set’s parts like beams and pins for my own creations. I have only what I need, and sometimes make an occasional Bricklink order to complete a model. This is a huge advantage in studless design, as you don’t need to have a huge collection to make something good. However, now my collection is nearly 10 years old, so I do need to renew the broken and faded parts!

Lego Technic

How and why did you get started in the online Lego Community?
In 2007 I searched for some inspiration about Lego on the internet. Only Brickshelf existed back then, and I discovered many builders there like Zoli, Sariel and so on. Some months after, the French forum techlug opened, and I started to post regularly and I was a moderator on this forum from 2007 to 2014. In parallel I created my own Youtube channel in 2008 and uploaded some videos, and in 2010 I created my blog in order to centralise all my work.

Today I focus on my Youtube channel, creating instructions, and my blog. I am not very active on forums, but I do read them and follow many builders. When Nathan, the owner of Rebrickable, contacted me for advice in 2011 to create the website I was really excited about his idea because it allowed people to add MOCs to their collections via instructions made available online (funny, the first MOC indexed on Rebrickable was my Jeep). I started to make more instructions and focus on the building experience, and in 2017 Mochub followed to enable fans to buy the whole package of a MOC, including parts and instructions.

Compared with 2007 when I started Lego, when there was only Brickshelf and Peeron, we now have many ways to find inspiration, upload videos, share pictures, forums, sell and buy instructions, or indeed even complete MOCs. I think the community has all it needs : )

Lego Technic Racing Car

How do you start a build, and what makes your designs unique to you?
I have a big list of ideas, and when I have time I look into it and start something. I try to work on only one idea but it is hard – sometimes I need to move on to a different subject if I get stuck. As I have a small collection I can’t keep all the creations I build because I need parts for the next one, so my models live only for duration of shooting photographs and video! Sometimes I can make a creation really fast without a problem, with all things gathered in a perfect way, and sometimes I need to retry things many times. I have some pet peeves in my to do list..

I find my design pretty unique because all builders have their own particular way to build , so when you see a creation, you can recognise who did it.

For my creations, I mainly focus on functional conception for a machine. For vehicle I always try to envisage the completed car, because you can make a nice front bumper and hood, but the edge connection between them can be a hard thing to do. This what I call the homogeneity or cohesion of the design, in order that all big parts of a car fit perfectly with each other, for instance to avoid a model having  a nice front, but a bulky rear and poor side profile. All the different parts of a car need to form a coherent whole. This is a hard thing to do in Lego (and the original designer of a real car has to do the same!).

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

What’s coming next?
I am currently working on a C-Model of the new 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, because I don’t think the official B-Model is very good. I plan to make building instructions too which takes time! For other projects, I still have many things to explore and try; new cars, new machines. I can say for sure that I will try new colour for a car, build bigger machines, and start to make small didactic creations to present mechanical principles. I have less and less time though, what with my job, home, family, friends, and other hobbies, but even if a creation takes a lot of time to complete, the important thing is to finish and release it : )

Where will you put your TLCB Master MOCers trophy?
I’ve been invited to visit the Johnson Space Centre and drive the SEV at the NASA next year thanks to one of my Lego creations. Plus LEGO officially recognise my work, so that I’m featuring here is the third awesome achievement of this year for me, now I can stop building! (Of course not). It’ll definitively go on my Lego desktop with a big thanks to TLCB : )

A big thank you to Nico for joining us here at TLCB and becoming our sixteenth Master MOCer. You can find more about Nico’s builds at his excellent wesbite, and all of his builds are available on Brickshelf too. You can check out everyone that’s made it into TLCB’s Master MOCers Hall of Fame by clicking here, and we’ll see you soon for No. 17!

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Honda S2000 | Picture Special

Honda’s S2000, built from 1999 to 2009 during the company’s peak, was a gloriously unhinged machine. Its 2-litre engine made an astonishing 240bhp without turbocharging, and it took Ferrari to finally beat the S2000’s highest-output-per-litre record for a naturally aspirated engine with the 458 Italia, a full decade after the S2000’s launch.

Honda achieved this engineering witchcraft through the most Japanese of approaches; revs. The S2000’s F20C engine could rev to 9000rpm, with VTEC only engaging well above 6000rpm. It engaged with a bit go a bang too, and as the S2000’s handling wasn’t quite up to Porsche levels it meant that more than a few cars ended up travelling backwards through hedges.

This wonderful Technic recreation of Honda’s legendary sports car comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71, who has done an incredible job replicating the AP2 series S2000 inside and out.

Not only does Nico’s model look the part (helped by 3D-printed wheels and a few well chosen custom stickers), it’s packed with technical detail too, including working steering, accurate double-wishbone suspension, a replica F20C 4-cylinder engine driven by the rear wheels, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a working convertible roof.

There’s lots more of Nico’s superb Technic Honda S2000 AP2 to see on Brickshelf or at his website by clicking here, including the complete image gallery, full build details and yes – instructions! Click the link above to feel VTEC kick-in yo!

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2018 | Year in Review

Lego 2019

The Lego Car Blog’s infamous New Year’s Party is fast approaching, so whilst we still have the capacity to write let’s take a look back on the year that was 2018. A cave rescue, a Royal wedding, Facebook douchbaggery, #MeToo, and one Presidential scandal after another, it’s been a busy year!

Stats; The Lego Car Blog passed the 5 million visitor mark a few weeks ago! However as usual we weren’t paying attention and forgot to blog about it. 2018 saw another 900,000 of you joining us here, a roughly 10% drop on the last two years when the site surpassed 1 million visitors per annum.

We mused as to the reasons why this may be a little while back, looking at the rise of Instagram, the fall of MOCpages, and various other factors, but we’ve since realised we’ve written just over 10% fewer posts this year than last. Oops.

Search engines brought just over a quarter of a million visitors to these pages (who knows what they were searching for!), whilst Pinterest and Facebook another 50,000 combined. The rest of you – we assume – came here on purpose, mostly from the United States, with Germany, the U.K and the Netherlands the next post popular.

The Lego Car Blog

Creations; Hundreds of new cars, trucks, motorcycles, aircraft, and the odd spaceship were blogged here at The Lego Car Blog in 2018, albeit around 10% fewer than last year. Top posts were our reveal of LEGO’s new 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set, Leviathan’s own Bugatti Chiron creation, and – as always – our Set Review Library, which expanded this year to include the third-party Bluetooth devices SBrick and BuWizz – take a look at what we thought of them via the links.

Lego Master MOCers

Interviews; The Master MOCers series added another two of the world’s finest builders to the Hall of Fame, with Mahjqa and Nico71 earning a permanent place in the archives. Linus Bohman, the creator of the brilliant LEGO set review aggregator Brick Insights, also joined us here at TLCB Towers – make sure you check out his amazing website via the link above!

Lego Treasure

Advertising; In 2018 we continued to show limited ads via our hosts WordPress, with all profits donated to good causes. This really does mean that your views and clicks here at The Lego Car Blog can make a positive impact – thank you!

So it seems 2018 has been quite a year for The Lego Car Blog too. We’ve added another 442 posts, written 77,060 words, received 260 comments (including 3 threats from Putin supporters), and raised $thousands for those in need.

For 2019 we aim to continue to showcase the very best Lego vehicles from all around the world, review more LEGO sets and third-party products, and bring you the latest LEGO news and exclusive interviews. Until then we’d like to thank you for joining us here at The Lego Car Blog, and we wish you all a very Happy New Year!

TLCB Team

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Monster Mash*

Lego Technic Monster Truck

It’s the final day of 2018 and most of the Elves – caged over Christmas – are away searching hungrily for the very best Lego vehicles the interweb has to offer. A few Elves returned with finds pretty quickly, and another joined them today at the controls of this, a rather cool looking remote control Monster Truck from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71.

Unfortunately for the Elves already back in TLCB Towers, the speed of their return meant they became unwilling participants in the latest (and hopefully last – for 2018 at least) smushing.

With all-wheel-drive, torsion bar suspension, and portal drive for mega ground clearance, the Elf at the controls of Nico71’s monster truck had no problem running down several of its unsuspecting colleagues in the halls of the office.

With the truck now in the hands of TLCB staff and the squashed Elves mostly patched back together the perpetrator has wisely absconded back from whence it came, meal token in hand, whilst we clean a variety of Elven bodily fluids out of the office carpet.

You can check out Nico’s remote control monster truck at his website, where an extensive gallery of images is available and – to the joy of those that reply to TLCB inbox – instructions can be found too. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Monster Truck

*The final title song of 2018! Enjoy.

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The Cog (and 25 Rough Terrain Cranes)

Take four of the most inventive Lego builders (including one TLCB Master MOCer), twenty-five 42082 Technic Rough Terrain Crane sets, and inspiration from Honda’s ‘Cog’, one of the greatest car commercials of all time, and you get one heck of a cool video.

One of the four builders behind LEGO’s brilliant piece of marketing is Nico71, who has also taken 42082 and repurposed it to create an excellent telehandler/wheel-loader ‘C-Model’ using only pieces found within the set. Nico’s model features a motorised tilting and raising fork via LEGO’s Power Functions system, mechanical steering, rear suspension, and all-wheel-drive linked to a V6 piston engine.

Lego 42082 Telehandler

There’s more to see of Nico’s brilliant telehandler at his website, where if you own a 42082 Rough Terrain Crane set and fancy building this C-Model for yourself you can, as Nico has made instructions available too. You can read full details of the model, view the complete gallery of images, and find building instructions via the link above.

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Super Eight

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

Take that Audi Q7! We hate the Audi Q7, and the other pointlessly-enormous, overly-aggressive, status-symbols-on-wheels in the segment in which it occupies. We’ll happily take one of these though, as if you’re going to have a vehicle that’s impossible to park, won’t fit down a country lane, and drinks fuel, it may as well do all of those things to absolute excess!

This is an articulated 8×8 off-road truck, loosely based on those by companies such as Foremost, and resembling some of the Soviet Union’s more impressively weird machinery. It’s been built by previous bloggee and Technic-building genius Nico71, and it’s an astonishing piece of engineering.

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

Using eight wheels and tyres from the brilliant LEGO Technic Claas Xerion 5000 set, Nico’s truck features all-wheel-drive, with one XL Motor driving the front two axles, and another the rear. None of the axles are steered as the entire truck articulates in the middle thanks to an L Motor and a pair of linear actuators.

Lego 8x8 Off-Road Truck

Each axle is suspended by an ingenious leaf-spring system, there’s an inline-6 engine next to the asymmetrical cab, and a set of four outriggers stabilise the truck for when it’s using the neat folding crane mounted over the articulation point. Powered by another two Power Functions motors this can extend, rotate and winch (see the image below), and like the drive and steering is operable remotely via bluetooth thanks to two third-party SBrick bluetooth bricks.

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

There’s loads more to see of Nico’s ridiculously impressive build at his website, where full technical details and instructions (yes really, so please don’t message us!) are available, plus the complete gallery of images is available to view via Brickshelf.

Nico has also become the sixteenth Master MOCer to be awarded such status here at The Lego Car Blog, joining an impressive roster of builders including Sariel, Crowkillers, Bricksonwheels and Firas Abu Jaber amongst others.

Read Nico’s Lego-building story and and find out how he created his amazing Technic vehicles such as this one via the link to his Master MOCers interview below!

Master MOCers Season 2, Episode 5

Nico71

Lego 8x8 Off-Road Truck

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Skid Marks

Lego Technic RC Skid Steer Loader BuWizz

Sometimes you don’t need a million-horsepower hypercar as inspiration for a brilliant Technic build. This is a humble skid-steer compact tracked loader, and it is one of the most fun-looking Technic models TLCB Elves have discovered in ages.

Built by Nico71 of Brickshelf this tiny Technic toy is packed with working remote control functions, which – thanks to a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery/controller – are super-powered too.

Two Medium Motors power the tracks, providing both drive and skid-steering, whilst a further pair of motors linked to linear actuators operate the bucket arm and tilt-mechanism.

Thanks to its small size and the extra power from the BuWizz battery Nico’s loader is a riot to chase Elves down the corridor with, er… we mean rigorously test, so whilst we do that you can see more by clicking the link above, and you can read our review of the BuWizz bluetooth battery that powers it by clicking here.

Lego Technic RC Skid Steer Loader BuWizz

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Lean on Me

Lego RC Trike

Weird electric city vehicles seem to pop up all the time in concept form tasked with easing urban congestion and cutting pollution. And then no-one ever builds one because, frankly, consumers would rather sit traffic breathing polluted air in a giant SUV.

Still, one day maybe these things will take off, but until then we’ll make do with previous bloggee Nico71‘s BuWizz-powered leaning tricycle. Similar to Toyota’s limited production i-Road concept, or those weird three-wheeled Piaggio scooter thingies, Nico’s concept can actively lean into corners to keep it stable, and with up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system from the BuWizz bluetooth brick, it probably needs that function.

It’s not our usual fodder here at The Lego Car Blog, but it’s a rather cleverly engineered build and one that we’ll probably all be driving in real life at some point. See more on Brickshelf via the link above.

Lego RC Trike

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Technic Snail

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

The Citroen 2CV, affectionately (and unaffectionately) known as ‘ the tin snail’ owing to its looks and glacial speed, is one one of the world’s most important cars. Yes, you did read that right.

Designed in the 1930s, Citroen’s Car-for-the-People was intended for France’s numerous rural workers who were largely still dependent upon the horse for transportation. Reliable, fuel efficient, easy to maintain, and above all cheap, the 2CV was engineered to mobilise an entire population class. And then Hitler decided to be ‘a bit of a dick’.

The German invasion and the subsequent commandeering of French factories to build stuff for blowing up the British meant production for the innovative and much-needed 2CV never started. Fearful of the Nazi’s stealing the design, Citroen hid their 2CV prototypes across France in the hope they would remain undetected (some of which are still being unearthed today).

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

The Allied victory in 1945 left behind a ruined France, but thankfully for Citroen an undetected cache of 2CV prototypes. Three years later, and a decade after the car was first engineered, the 2CV finally reached production.

As much as Europe’s poor workers needed cheap reliable transportation before World War 2, they really needed it afterwards, and the little Citroen was a huge success. Half the price of Germany’s ‘People’s Car’ – the Volkswagen Beetle, the 2CV sold almost 4 million units in a production run that spanned five decades and nine different countries.

When Citroen 2CV production finally ceased in 1990 the car had become a bit of a joke, but for much of its life the 2CV was the most important car in Europe, and is surely one of the greatest car designs ever created.

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

This fitting tribute to one of France’s icons of motoring comes from previous bloggee and Technic building legend Nico71 who has recreated the simplicity of Citroen’s engineering beautifully. The 2CV’s legendary leading and trailing arm suspension (designed so a peasant could carry eggs unbroken across a ploughed field) has been faithfully reproduced in Lego form, plus there’s working steering and the doors, hood and trunk all open.

There’s lots more of Nico71’s brilliant Technic 2cv to see via Brickshelf, plus you watch a video of the model on YouTube by clicking here.

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Honda NSX – Picture Special

Lego Technic Honda NSX

After over a decade out of the supercar game Honda’s new NSX supercar has just gone on sale, a near-600bhp hybrid-powered torque-vectoring computer with wheels. But that’s not the one we have here today.

Launched in 1990 the original Honda NSX was designed to take on the established supercars from manufacturers such as Ferrari, only at a lower price point, and to upset the supercar order through the virtue of it, well, being a supercar that actually worked.

Honda F1 driver Ayrton Senna helped to tune the handling in the final stages of development, and although the NSX was powered by ‘only’ a transversely mounted naturally aspirated 3.0 V6 making 270bhp (albeit with an 8,000rpm redline), it quickly gained a reputation for being one hell of a drivers’ car.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

Lightweight (the NSX was the first mass produced car to be made from aluminium) and beautifully nimble, Honda showed that you didn’t need all-wheel-drive, turbos, or a prancing horse on the hood to build a superb supercar. And unlike pretty much every other supercar at the time the NSX was reliable, because above all else, it was a Honda.

These days something of the original NSX’s simplicity is missing from the latest crop of overpowered, over-assisted supercars – the new NSX included, and arguably the same is true for their Technic equivalents. Packed with Power Functions electric motors, remote control, and bluetooth, we seem to have lost the joy of hands-on mechanics. Luckily for us though, Nico71 has not only recreated one of the finest old-school supercars ever made, he’s done it in a profoundly old-school way too…

Lego Technic Honda NSX

This is Nico’s Technic Honda NSX, and it’s as delightfully manual as the real car. An accurate transversely mounted V6 engine is turned by the rear wheels, which are independently suspended along with those at the front. The front wheels also steer by hand, thanks to a connected steering wheel plus a ‘hand-of-God’ connection mounted on the roof. The pop-up headlights are also manually raised and lowered via lever mounted on the dashboard, and the seats can slide fore and aft manually too. Lastly the doors, hood, rear window, engine cover and glovebox all open by hand, and there isn’t a Power Functions motor in sight.

Nico’s Honda NSX is – much like the real car – a triumph of mechanical engineering, and well worth a closer look. Check out the full details at Nico’s discussion topic at the Eurobricks forum, and you can find all the images, a video of the model’s features and instructions (yes, really, so we we won’t be getting the usual ‘Can I have instructions?’ messages for once!) at Nico’s own excellent website – Click here to take a look.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

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Tip-Off

Lego Technic Tipper Truck

Such is the success of LEGO’s excellent Power Functions system that we rarely seem to publish a purely mechanical Technic model. However recent bloggee Nico71 has allowed us to do just that with this superbly executed tipper truck.

Lego Technic Tipper Truck

Mechanical functions include a 6-cylinder engine driving (or rather being driven by) the rear wheels, working Hand-of-God steering, and a hand-cracked tipping load bed. We think Nico’s model could easily be an official Technic set, and there’s more to see courtesy of his Brickshelf gallery via the link above.

Lego Technic Tipper Truck

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Halo Warthog – Picture Special

Lego Halo Warthog Remote Control

Halo. It’s one of the most successful video game franchises of all time, with over 65 million sales worldwide and grossing almost $3.5billion to date. And it’s also the cause of more awful Lego creations than probably any other genre in history. Besides Bionicle of course.

A Halo Warthog is therefore not an unusual creation. The online Lego community is plagued with them. But today’s find is an unusual creation. Because it’s a Halo Warthog… that’s really bloody good.

Lego Halo Warthog Remote Control

Built by previous bloggee and TLCB favourite Nico71 this fully remote controlled Technic Halo Warthog is a spectacularly well-engineered creation. Featuring remote control all-wheel-drive complete with diff locks, all-wheel-steering, all-wheel suspension, and a remotely operable gun turret, it’s very probably the Elves’ favourite creation of the year so far. Until it squashed them of course, but they’re used to that by now.

There’s lot’s more to see of this incredible Technic Halo Warthog at Nico71’s Brickshelf gallery – click the link to join the fight.

Lego Technic Halo Warthog RC

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Go Nuclear

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

The news is full of nuclear war hysteria at the moment, thanks to the orange leader of the free world and overweight North Korean despot Kim Jong-un. As a classy blog not interested in clickbait we’re seamlessly jumping on the bandwagon with this, Nico71‘s glorious Fallout 4 inspired retro-futuristic nuclear concept car.

Back in the ’50 and ’60s wild concept cars were all the rage, and were often powered by a variety of unusual fuels, including gas turbines, electricity and yes, even nuclear reaction.

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

Nico’s brilliant Technic concept car perfectly captures the ambitions of the age, and it’s clever too, featuring remote control drive and steering, electronically opening doors and a sliding roof canopy, plus working suspension and lights.

Control of the electrically-powered functions is taken care of thanks to a third-party BuWizz bluetooth unit, which allows graduated control via a bluetooth device and delivers up to 8x more power to the motors than LEGO’s own system.

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

You can see all of the build details and the full image gallery courtesy of Nico71’s excellent website by clicking here, and you watch the nuclear concept car in action (which is worth doing for the roof mechanism alone!) via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

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Civic Duty

Lego Technic Honda Civic EG

Ah, the humble Honda Civic. Built in TLCB’s home nation, and once – even if not any more – the byword for advanced yet reliable hatchbackery.

The Civic has since been overtaken by the Korean brands here in Europe, but early examples are still a reasonably regular sight on the roads due to their legendary reliability. It’s an even more common sight on the banger track, as early Civics are worth about £5 and they can take a serious amount of punishment before heading to the great carpark in the sky.

America is where the Honda Civic was really successful though, where – despite it being basically the same car as the one we have in Europe – the little Japanese hatch has trodden a very different path in the annuls of automotive history.

Today early Stateside Civics seem to all have one thing in common; modifications. Bad modifications. Here at TLCB we’re not really sure why this is, seeing as gas, cars, and insurance are so cheap in the ‘States why not just buy a faster car in the first place?

Lego Honda Civic

The upshot of this is that finding an original unmodified early Civic is like trying to find an educated climate change denier – it’s virtually impossible. Which is a shame, as the late ’80s and early ’90s Civics were great little cars when left as Honda intended.

If you’re reading this in America and have a hankering for an unmolested slice of early ’90s Honda pie, get on Craigslist, find 78 year old Mavis who’s recently given up driving, and buy her Civic. It’ll be a classic one day. Probably.

Alternatively though, you could build your own, which is exactly what TLCB regular Nico71 has done. Based on the ’90s fifth generation (EG) Civic hatch, Nico’s creation is gloriously simple looking. It’s not simple inside though, as a full RC Power Functions drivetrain and rear suspension system have been squeezed in.

It’s quite a feat of packaging and handily Nico has taken photos that show how it’s all been done. You can see all of the images of Nico’s little Technic Honda, inside and out, via Brickshelf – click the link above to make the jump to ’91.

Lego Technic RC Honda Civic

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Crawler Grabber

Lego Technic RC Tracked Grab

This weird-looking device is apparently a Crawler-Grabber, and we suppose it is, seeing as it both crawls and grabs. It’s the work of TLCB favourite Nico71, and it can lift a TLCB Elf surprisingly high into the air before dropping it into the toilet. Don’t worry, we didn’t press the flush.

Controlled remotely via LEGO’s Power Functions system, Nico’s creation is able to drive, skid steer, and elevate and extend the boom. It looks a bit like one of those RC bomb disposal robots and as such we may well put it to use removing Elf droppings from the Cage Room. Whilst we get cleaning you can see more on Brickshelf – click here to grab a look.

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