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We Got Nukes, We Got Knives, Sharp Sticks…

Lego Aliens APC

…and a dropship containing an M577 armoured personnel carrier. The Weyland-Yutani Corporation’s APC was one of the earliest casualties in the 1986 sci-fi horror Aliens, destroying its transaxle to escape alien attack. Still, everyone else got out OK didn’t they?…

Lego Aliens APC Remote Control Sariel

This stunning recreation of the M577 APC from the Aliens movie comes from Technic legend, previous bloggee, and ‘Become a Pro‘ interviewee Pawel ‘Sariel’ Kmiec.

Sariel’s incredible creation packs in all the firepower of the original movie vehicle, with a 360° rotating, fully retractable sliding rear turret, twin roof-mounted opening missile pods, a rotating and elevating front turret, an electrically sliding cabin door, all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering with pendular suspension, and full LED lighting.

Lego Aliens APC

All of that can be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth system, allowing the half-a-metre long APC to be operated via a smartphone.

To truly see what Sariel’s spectacular creation can do we highly recommend taking a look at the brilliant video below, plus you can see all the images of the M577 APC via both Flickr and MOCpages.

And whilst you’re checking out the video and those links, we’re going to take the APC’s controls and put the fear of God into our Elven workforce…

YouTube Video:

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Just Another Jeep

Lego Jeep Mighty FC Concept

Except this really isn’t any old Jeep. This is Jeep’s little-known ‘Mighty FC Concept’, which we assume stands for ‘Forward Control’, and it’s been superbly recreated in remote control Technic form by vehicle-building legend Madoca 1977.

Lego Technic Jeep Mighty FC Remote Control

Packed inside Madoca’s brilliant creation are six LEGO Power Functions motors, three sets of LEDs, and two third-party SBrick bluetooth receivers. The first two motors are XLs, which take care of the Jeep’s all-wheel-drive via portal axles, whilst a Servo motor controls the steering. Three Medium motors drive the winch, activate the locking rear differential, and control a two-speed gearbox, all of which is powered by an on-board rechargeable battery.

Lego Technic Jeep Remote Control

The Elves, who seem to have infiltrated Jeep’s vehicle-naming department, love the Mighty FC, even though it’s much too slow to cause any carnage in TLCB office. It can carry quite a few of them at once though, which appears to be what is currently happening, so whilst we let them get on with that you can discover the build’s full details by visiting the Eurobricks forum, and you can watch Madoca’s Jeep in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

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Pneumatic Crane Truck – Picture Special

Lego Technic Pneumatic Crane Truck

After a series of small creations we’re back with something big. Really big. Measuring almost a meter long, weighing over 8KGs, and constructed from around 8,000 LEGO pieces, Lucio Switch’s astonishing remote control and pneumatically-powered crane truck is one of the most complex creations that this site has published.

With seventeen Power Functions motors, eighteen pneumatic pumps / cylinders, and six switches, Lucio’s truck takes Technic construction to the limit of what is possible with Danish plastic. Four XL motors drive the rear wheels which are suspended on live axles, whilst the two front axles are steered by twin Servo motors and are suspended independently (which makes for no less than twenty-four shock absorbers in all!).

Lego Technic Remote Control Truck

Underneath the fully suspended and tilting cab (with a working steering wheel, suspended seats and an opening engine cover) is a working V8 piston engine, with twin LiPo batteries that power the motors and six sets of LED lights hidden within the chassis.

Nine M and two L motors then drive everything from the front and rear stabilisers, crane rotation, winch, and the pneumatic pumps which provide air pressure for the three-stage crane elevation and extension mechanism, all of which are controlled via four IR receivers through an SBrick bluetooth device.

Lego Technic Pneumatic RC Crane

Fortunately for us here in TLCB office that lot is much too complicated for our Elves to figure out, so Lucio’s incredible truck was unable to cause carnage and mayhem. It is however absolutely worth checking out, either at Lucio’s Flickr photostream or via the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus you can watch the truck in action via the video below. Prepare to be amazed!…

YouTube Video:

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You Spin Me Right Round Baby…

Lego MAN TGS Cement Truck

…Right Round. An unnecessary nod to ’80s Liverpudlian pop band Dead or Alive there, which makes this TLCB writer glad he isn’t old enough to be part of that generational musical abomination. However, spinning things do seem to be an oddly visually appealing phenomenon, and the king of these on the road is the humble cement truck, which must spin its drum continually to prevent the cement inside from setting.

This superb MAN TGS 8×4 cement truck comes from previous bloggee gtahelper, and like its life-size counterpart the drum spins hypnotically as it drives. A third party SBrick allows the truck to be controlled via a bluetooth device and it features working LED head and tail lights plus automatic reversing lights too. There’s more to see at the Brickshelf Gallery – click the above to go for a spin.

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R is for Revenge

Lego Technic RC Hatchback Type R

With the Elven bodily fluids and most of the bigger body parts cleared away from today’s earlier situation, we were hoping for a quieter remainder to the afternoon. No such luck. Screeching down the corridor came this, one of the fastest remote control Technic vehicles we’ve seen in some time, entitled the ‘Hatchback Type R’, and made by the same bloody builder that caused the earlier incident. Thanks Madoca.

Ergh, we’ll get back to the story above in a bit, but for now, the model; Built by Madoca 1977 (again) it’s a generic hot hatchback (although no prizes for guessing the inspiration behind it) powered by a single L Motor, steered by a Servo, controlled via a third party SBrick, and featuring LED lights too.

That lone drive motor may not seem enough to create one of the quickest models we’ve seen in a while, but Madoca’s Type R is fantastically light, and the Elf guilty of today’s earlier smushing was still eating the rewards of its find when – launched from the other end of the corridor – the Type R shot towards it and slammed it against the wall.

The Elf at the controls, thirst for revenge satisfied, escaped into the street outside, and will no doubt claim its meal token later in the day. It’s unlikely that it was actually a victim of the earlier assault, but ‘revenge’ amongst Elves is a communal thing and it may have been holding a grudge against a totally different Elf from months ago. Either way, we have more clearing up to do, so whilst we get the mop back out you can see more of Madoca’s Type R, as well as his earlier Toyota Tacoma pick-up truck, by visiting the Eurobricks discussion for both models here.

YouTube Video:

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Going for a Massive Dump

Lego Euclid R-170 Remote Control Mining Truck

The Lego Car Blog Elves have had a Good Day today. Firstly, the last four models to be blogged here have been yellow, and the Elves love yellow. Secondly, this was the fourth of them; built by Beat Felber and following on from his huge LeTourneau L-1200 front loader blogged here earlier in the week, it’s a truly humungous Euclid R-170 mining truck, and like the LeTourneau it’s fully remote controlled.

Driven by a single Power Functions XL motor, with Servo-motor articulated steering and a dumping bucket powered by twin linear actuators, the Euclid can be controlled remotely via a Bluetooth device thanks to a third party SBrick.

As is usual for this type of creation, the Elf that found it tried use it to smush his colleagues into the office carpet, but thankfully for our cleaners – who have to try to remove Elven blood and sick on a regular basis – the Euclid is pretty slow, and the Elves finally seem to be wising up to the constant threat of impending smushery.

Happily therefore, rather than being squashed a whole hoard of them are merrily riding around in the back, which looks tremendous fun until the Elf at the controls figures out how to operate the dumping mechanism. Until then we’ll enjoy the merriment and you can check out more of this amazing machine, and the matching LeTourneau L-1200 loader that accompanies it, by clicking here.

Lego Euclid R-170 Remote Control Mining Truck

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Pagani Huayra – Picture Special

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

It’s time for something special. Really special. Poland’s Paul Kmiec, better known as Sariel, has been wowing the online Lego community for years. He’s a published Lego author and a veteran of this site, with a huge range of diverse Technic machinery published here over the years. His latest creation, in construction for months, reached TLCB yesterday, and we may only be a few weeks in but 2017 will have to be a pretty incredible year to beat it. This is Sariel’s fully remote controlled Technic Pagani Huayra…

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

Built in 1:8 scale Sariel’s Huayra is a perfect Technic replica of the ultra-rare Italian hypercar. The bodywork, constructed from LEGO’s Technic panels, flex tubing and lift-arms, is a work of art, but it’s what’s underneath it that is truly remarkable.

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

A remote control drive train, controlled by a third-party SBrick bluetooth module, powers the Huayra, with a remotely operable two-speed gearbox and fully independent adjustable suspension included too. There are opening doors, and functioning turn signals, reversing and brake lights – all engaged automatically when the Huayra turns, reverses or decelerates.

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

Yes, decelerates – because Sariel’s Pagani features remotely operated working pneumatic brakes and the Huayra’s trick active aerodynamics, including the front and rear spoilers deployed on each side when cornering and the rear-mounted airbrake used during heavy deceleration.

The whole set-up is a delight to watch and you can do so via the beautifully shot video below, plus you can see the full gallery of exquisite imagery via Sariel’s photostream – click here to view one of the finest Technic Supercars ever built.

YouTube Video

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Dashing Through the Snow

Lego Technic Snowmobile Remote Control

It’s getting all wintery here at TLCB Towers. This means a) we barely see any daylight, b) our Elves often need defrosting when they return to the office (but that’s OK, they’re elves), and c) we’ll try to direct a bit more of the advertising revenue that your visits generate to those without a roof over their heads this Christmas (so please keep visiting – no pressure!).

It also means that we’d like to go out and buy something really silly like a snowmobile for the four days a year that it snows here. Luckily Eurobricks’ Kevin Moo has just the creation to scratch that itch, with his brilliant fully remote controlled Technic Ski-Doo.

Powered by two L Motors, with Servo steering, and with both front and rear suspension, Kevin’s snowmobile is pretty capable in powder, and it can be controlled via a Bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick receiver too. There’s more of Kevin’s build to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to make the trip.

Lego Technic Snowmobile Remote Control

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Mercedes-Benz Actros Heavy Haul – Picture Special

Lego Mercedes-Benz Actros

Featuring two Mercedes-Benz Actros 8×4 trucks, a Nooteboom steered-trailer and a Volkswagen Transporter, this heavy haulage team is very probably the most impressive multi-model build of the year.

The complete set has been designed and built by the immensely talented Jaap Technic, and each vehicle is one of the most astonishingly well detailed Lego creations that we’ve ever published.

Lego Mercedes-Benz Actros

Each Mercedes-Benz Actros truck includes a fully detailed cab inside and out, with the interior reached through opening doors and the V8 engine accessed via a tilting cabin.

Twin XL Motors power the trucks’ driven wheels whilst a Servo Motor turns the front two steering axels of each tractor unit, plus there are working LED lights front and rear, all controlled by a third-party SBrick bluetooth-compatible receiver.

Lego Mercedes-Benz Actros

The Volkswagen Transporter convoy support van isn’t left out either, with a trick Brickstuff sourced working light-bar and custom decals throughout.

Jaap has photographed the complete haulage team beautifully and we highly recommend taking a look. Click here to see the full gallery on Flickr and here to read further details of the build and join the discussion on Eurobricks.

Lego Mercedes-Benz Actros

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Whatta MAN…

Lego MAN TGX Truck

…whatta man, whatta man, whatta man, what a mighty good man. Sorry about that. Anyhoo, this is a mighty good MAN, built by Beat Felber of Flickr, and featuring remotely controlled 8×6 drive, steering on the first and second axles, motorised trailer coupling, working headlights and warning beacons, opening doors and hood, and a pneumatically tilting cab.

Lego MAN TGX Truck

It’s a spectacular creation, and it looks absolutely stunning on the outside too (and orange isn’t an easy thing to pull off if you’re a man). There’s lots more of this incredible creation to see at Beat’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump to the full gallery and technical details.

Lego MAN TGX Truck Remote Control SBrick

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World of Tanks

Lego A39 Tortoise Tank Sariel RC

It was a quiet morning here at TLCB Towers. Then an Elf triumphantly rode into the office atop this, Sariel’s ridiculously impressive fully remote controlled A39 Tortoise tank. But a quiet morning it remained, as this might well be the slowest remote control creation that we’ve ever featured.

It is however, one of the most accomplished. Controlled via two SBricks (meaning a Playstation controller can be used to operate it, which is seriously cool!), Sariel’s tank features full RC drive and steering, gun elevation and panning, turret rotation, working suspension and a V12 piston engine.

There’s more to see on MOCpages here, plus you can watch all those features in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video

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Toyota Land Cruiser Prado – Picture Special

Lego Technic Toyota Land Cruiser Prado RC

The best 4×4 in the world is not a Land Rover. Or a Jeep. Or a Hummer (and if you were thinking of suggesting that last one go back to school). It’s this, Toyota’s ubiquitous Land Cruiser Prado. Now quite a rare beast in TLCB’s home nation, having lost favour to far more efficient – but far less capable – cross-overs, the Land Cruiser is still the 4×4 of choice for most of the world.

Lego Technic Toyota Prado 4x4 Remote Control

This awesome remote control Technic recreation of Toyota’s iconic 4×4 is the work of KevinMoo, and it’s a really trick bit of kit. There’s four-wheel-drive complete with remotely locking differentials, independent front and live axel rear suspension, working steering, gearbox, head and tail lights, and opening doors and tailgate, plus Kevin’s Prado can be operated remotely via a bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick control unit.

There’s a whole lot more to see of this brilliant build at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to take a trip into the rough stuff.

Lego Remote Control Toyota Land Cruiser Prado 4x4

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Dropped D21

Lego Technic Nissan D21 Remote Control

No sooner had we published a reader review of LEGO’s infamous buggy motor than two Elves returned to TLCB Towers with a Buggy Motor powered creation. Maybe they can read after all? The first of their Buggy Motor propelled finds you can view below, the second is this; Filsawgood’s brilliant 1991 Nissan D21 Hardbody pick-up.

Like today’s other blogged model Filsawgood’s D21 uses the combination of a Buggy Motor driving the rear wheels, a Servo for steering, and a third-party SBrick for control via bluetooth device, plus there’s all-wheel suspension and custom stickers.

The D21 hardbody is also a damn cool antidote for our deep-rooted loathing of the pick-up truck genre at the hands of hateful crap like the Dodge Ram. You can see more of Filsawgood’s glorious early ’90s Nissan at both Flickr and Eurobricks – click the links for the full gallery, build details, and a video of the truck in action.

Lego Datsun Nissan D21 Hardbody Pick-Up

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Lego Technic RC Drift Car

Entitled simply ‘SBrick Powered Streetcar’, Horcik Designs’ latest creation extols the virtues of one of LEGO’s most sought after pieces, the 5292 ‘Buggy’ Motor. Linked to a third-party SBrick, a LEGO LiPo battery, and a Servo Motor for steering, the aforementioned motor gives Horcik’s car a rapid turn of speed, and makes it capable of drifts on a shiny floor too.

There are 3D printed wheels, custom decals and cut LEGO tyres alongside that non-LEGO control unit, and there’s more to see at Horcik’s photostream here or via the Eurobricks forum here. Get sideways at the links.

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Remote Control Racers Review

Lego Racers 8366 8475 Review

It’s time for another Set Review here at The Lego Car Blog, and this summer we’ve been handing the Reviewer’s Pen over to you – our readers. Today we have a double review, courtesy of Saberwing007, and he’s feeling all Top Gun…

So, do you feel the need? The need for speed? I hope so, because we are going to be reviewing some really fast sets today.

Back in 2002, Lego released set 8475, which was the debut of their new system for making remote control models. I actually saw the set in catalogs at the time, but I did not realize how special it was, and I kicked myself for missing out on it down the line. However, I recently got both 8475 and 8366, partially for the parts, and partially to get a set I missed out on. There is another set, 8376, which uses the same system, but we won’t be covering that here today.

As some background, all three of the sets, 8475, 8366, and 8376 use the same basic RC parts, but are otherwise quite different. At the end of this review there will be an overview of the RC system, but for now, let’s head off to the races!

Lego Racers 8475 Review

8475 The first set released, 8475 retailed for $130 in the US, but only had 284 parts. That seemed like an awfully high price for such a set, but today it’s a bargain, considering how much these sets go for on the secondary market. The set build is fairly simple, with most of the structure being made of the RC receiver, and motors. Despite this the finished set has fully independent suspension, which works well for keeping all the wheels on the ground. The styling is very much in line with the other Racers and Technic sets of the era, being mostly a wire frame made up of flex tubes, with only a few panels. This allows the set to have a fairly low part count, and keeps the weight down. In spite of the limited bodywork, it is an attractive model, probably due to the fact that most dune buggies actually look like that. The color is quite nice as well, with most of the parts being pearl dark gray, a very rare color that was only included in sets of this era.

Driving the set is a blast, due to its speed, and the ability to use the set outdoors, where said speed can actually be used. The set is actually much too fast to be used indoors, unless you have a large house or an empty gym to use (or TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna, Ed.). Unfortunately, the center of gravity is a bit high, which could cause a flip if you’re not careful. Luckily, controlling the model is easy, as the controller is not only quite ergonomic, but the joystick for drive and steer are proportional. In an unusual move, the B model for the set has different tires than the A model. Said B model is far less attractive, being a rather sad looking pseudo F1 car with off-road suspension. As a hilarious side note, in the instructions for this set there is a mini comic that shows 8475 losing a race against another set, 4589, in spite of the fact that 4589 is much slower, does not have suspension, and uses IR remote control.

Lego Racers 8366 Supersonic RC Review

8366 Ultimately, between 8475 and 8366, 8366 is my favorite, as it looks really neat, has more parts, and is faster as well. Like 8475, it retailed for $130, but had 429 parts. Although there is an increase in part count 8366 does not have suspension, but it really isn’t needed. Like 8475, the build structure is primarily based on the RC Receiver and motors, with most of the parts going into body work. Unlike 8475, 8366 is much more paneled, but there are still many flex hoses used, particularly around the cockpit. It also has an actual cockpit interior, although it is neither mini-fig nor Technic-fig scale. Like 8475, it included many dark pearl gray parts, but mixes it up with some light gray panels, and red highlights, although those are only sticker details. In a somewhat odd twist, 8366 actually includes two different types of large panels, the 20 and 21 panels, and the 3 and 4 panels, with no other set including both. An additional unusual part is a pair of fully plastic wheels. These wheels are identical in size to the wheels used on the model, and are used to make it into a drift machine. However, this is an inelegant solution at best, as the model is really fast, and really hard to control with the drift wheels fitted. As well, the drift wheels scratch easily, so using them outside is something I would not recommend. Performance wise, 8366 uses the fast outputs of the RC motors, and so is faster than 8475. The lack of suspension actually helps, and keeps the car from flipping. Since the controller is the same as 8475, it is still easy to control, in spite of the speed. Also like 8475, the B model of the set is rather weird, being some sort of dragster that can pop wheelies due to how much torque the motors have, although I must confess I’ve never built the B model, it just does not appeal to me.

So, in conclusion, both of these models are quite fun to drive, and have useful parts for your own creations, even if the building process for the sets themselves is not the most interesting. It took me a long time to get my hands on these sets, and man was it worth the wait!

Now, let’s take a look at that RC system in detail….

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