Category Archives: Community

We’re 10 Today!!*

‘Remember, remember, the fifth of November’. Or so the nursery rhyme popular in TLCB’s home nation goes. Well we forgot.

Not Bonfire Night, which is impossible to forget what with all the fireworks and whatnot, but our own birthday. Still, an effigy of the Brothers Brick lemur won’t set fire to itself.

So whilst we did enjoy the Bonfire Night festivities, we completely missed the ten year anniversary of our own creation. However we’ve remembered now, thus ten years (and eleven days…) later, we’re quietly marking the occasion with a Duplo No.10 brick stolen from Google images.

Of course a lot has happened in the last decade, much of which we’d like to add to the list of things we’ve forgotten, but miraculously this dingy back-alley of the internet has survived, with over seven million of you joining us since our first post back in November of 2011.

Currently around a million of you end up here at The Lego Car Blog each year (many probably by accident), whilst our most popular pages (outside of the Home Page) continue to be the Review Library (which is now pretty huge**), The Rise and Fall of MOCpages, and the Directory.

Over the last decade we’ve also interviewed many of the Lego Community’s very best vehicle builders, including boat-builders, truck-makers, Technic-masters, and creators of things altogether sillier, held three competitions, annoyed ‘patriots’ of various nations (mostly America though), and – most importantly – showcased thousands of the best Lego creations on the web.

So as we continue into double figures, all that’s left to say is a massive thank you if you’re reading these clumsily written words. Without you this site would not exist, and nor would the $thousands raised in advertising revenue for good causes, only some of which has been spent on the executive washroom and sauna.

If you’re new here and you’d like to take a look around, some good places to start can be found below;

  • Review Library: Over one hundred reviews of LEGO sets, books and third-party products.
  • Directory: The place to find links to other (usually much better) LEGO-related websites.
  • Interviews: A TLCB Elf armed with a sharpened pencil can get even the most famous builders to talk…
  • Feedback and Submission Suggestions: Let us know what you think. No, really.

Until next time, thank you for visiting us.

TLCB Team

*Almost
**Just like your Mom

Creations for Charity 2021

The world is a tumultuous place at the moment. The dumpster fire that was 2020 has continued to rage throughout 2021, and – unless COP26 achieves something meaningful this week – 2021 might be as good as it’s going to get.

But really, if you’re reading this, things are probably alright. We’re the lucky ones, and we all have the joyous privilege of being able to redistribute some of our wealth to those to whom it would be worth far more. Even better, we can do it via our favourite plastic bricks…

Creations for Charity 2021

Now in its thirteenth year, the wonderful Creations for Charity initiative has provided thousands of LEGO toys to children in need, funded via the sale of creations designed and built by members of the community. Which means that you can buy an incredible one-off Lego creation knowing that all of the proceeds are going straight to children to whom they will make the biggest difference. How awesome is that!

Get Involved

You can join the Creations for Charity 2021 fundraiser in several ways; by donating a creation to the Creations for Charity store, by buying a creation, or by giving a monetary donation. All are used to get LEGO sets into the hands of underprivileged children, providing the gift of building, imagination, and escapism to kids who really might need a place to escape to every now and then.

You can take a look at the creations already donated to the Creations for Charity store by clicking the link below, with many more models to be added over the coming weeks.

Give the gift of LEGO this fall, and help to bring a little happiness to the children who need it most.

Visit the Creations for Charity store here

Lego Technic: An Unofficial Illustrated History

Psychiatrist’s Digest, Volume XVI

INTRODUCTION

What does it take to cause an otherwise sane person to write a 400-page book in their spare time, primarily for personal satisfaction? This important question will be investigated at length herein, using a well-researched case study concerning one Cole [Redacted], who, being myself, commands significant personal interest from this researcher. Beware of disturbing psychological evidence.

TESTIMONY

I am a Canadian Lego fan by the name of Cole, but since I prefer a little anonymity on the internet, I think I’ll leave us on a first-name basis. I’ve been interested in LEGO since I was five, when I got the awesome birthday present of my Dad and uncle’s 1980s LEGO Classic Space collection. Once I was a few years older, I got heavily into LEGO Star Wars. I was an obsessive sort of kid, and wanted to know everything I possibly could about it, which mainly meant spending hours poring over the DK LEGO Star Wars Visual Dictionaries and Character Encyclopaedias. [Early signs of instability] As I matured, [Patient is unaware of the meaning of the word] though, I began searching for a new theme to become involved in.

Eventually, I decided on LEGO Technic, and acquired the 42043 Mercedes-Benz Arocs 3245 set, which struck me as being a great deal and a great parts pack. For the price of $270 CAD, I could get 2,700 pieces, including a little of almost everything in the Technic lineup, including pneumatics and electronics. After building and enjoying the main and alternate models, and getting some more Power Functions, I ripped the set apart and dove head-on into MOCing. My learning process was heavy on trial-and-error (especially heavy on the latter part) [Low self esteem?], but I soon started up my online presence on the official LEGO Technic and Mindstorms galleries. Over time I moved from there to MOCpages, and then, following its untimely demise, I joined Eurobricks, [Patient displays tendency to mash unrelated words together] where I remain to this day. (My trial-and-error crash course had brought me to a point where my stuff wasn’t a total embarrassment on this more “high-class” site.)

Anyways, the story of my Technic book [The 400-page folly of the patient] begins a bit earlier, back in the MOCpages days, I believe. Because of certain circumstances, I ended up having a lot of spare time away from home (and my LEGO), that needed filling. Somehow or other I decided that it would be fun to write a book of all the Technic sets, since this was something that I really wanted to have [Turning point in the case]. I was still the same kid who wanted to obsess over Visual Dictionaries, but all I had for Technic was a stack of old LEGO catalogues. I’m not sure how far I expected to get when I started, but I was enjoying myself, and before I knew it, I had a binder full of a hand-written first draft covering the years 1977-2017! The next step was to type and format the whole tome, and I ended up practically rewriting large sections of the book in the process. It would have been way faster to just start the whole process online, but I didn’t have a laptop or anything, so I made do with what I had. Anyways, I did a proofreading or two, and then printed the whole thing out for myself at 20c per page (I’d added 2018 by this point) Eventually, after adding 2019 and 2020, I got around to trying to make the book presentable for other peoples’ use [Could this be contagious?], so I did a bunch more proofreading and checking, and eventually was able to put the book up on Eurobricks as a free download

This year I revisited the book, making a bunch of small fixes that readers had suggested, removed my rather subjective ratings (I’ve had people who liked them and people who didn’t. They’re gone for now, but they might just come back) [Patient is indecisive and easily swayed by public opinion], and added the 2021 sets. I put this on Eurobricks as well, and, as suggested by forum moderator Milan, reposted the book in a clearer format. For now, the book is finished, but I expect to have more changes coming eventually – apart from the inevitable 2022 update, another Eurobricks user volunteered to help me with improving some formatting things, so there may be an update of that sort coming sometime or other. [The patient shows no sign of concluding their fantasy]

SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE

So, what does this book consist of? Continue reading

Farmville

The Lego Car Blog is full of sports cars, supercars, and trucks. But for the braver builder, there’s a whole world of fantastically complicated machinery ripe for harvesting into Lego form.

Not many builders have the skills to take on the complex mechanisms found in agriculture, and as such farm equipment remains a relatively rare genre to appear here at The Lego Car Blog.

However one ridiculously-talented builder has managed it, and has appeared here with more superb brick-built pieces of agricultural equipment than probably all other builders put together.

Yes, Michał Skorupka (aka Eric Trax), whose fully operational replicas of real-world tractors, harvesters, balers, and manure spreaders have consistently wowed the entire team here at TLCB, has finally been recognised by our team of supercar-and-truck focussed writers, becoming the latest builder to be inducted into the Master MOCers Hall of Fame.

Eric Trax joins us as the eighth builder of Master MOCers Series 2, the nineteenth Master MOCer of all time, and the first to build a machine specifically for throwing poo.

Take a look at Eric’s story, find out his favourite LEGO piece, and learn who he’d have in the passenger seat of an Audi R8 via the link to his Master MOCers page below! Congratulations Eric, and we can’t wait to see what’s next.

Click here to read Eric Trax’s Master MOCers Interview

The Best LEGO Sets Reviewed by TLCB

The Lego Car Blog has many interesting pages away from the main page. Ok, that’s not true. The Lego Car Blog has some interesting pages away from the main page. One of them is the Review Library, which – according to the wizards over at Brick Insights – now contains 108 reviews. Some of which are even written by you guys.

Nearly three quarters of the reviews in the Review Library are scored (we probably forgot the rest), with the average score being 7.8/10, which probably makes sense as LEGO sets are usually rather good and we tend to review sets we like (although not always). Technic is the most popular theme, with sixty-six sets reviewed so far, and fifteen sets have received a score above 9/10 (or 5 stars) so far, versus sixteen sets with a score of below 6.

So, with over a hundred reviews now published, which LEGO sets have earned a much coveted perfect score here at The Lego Car Blog? Read on to find out! Continue reading

How Are the Ads?

Nine months ago our benevolent overlords here at The Lego Car Blog ceased support for our ancient site structure. This meant, after years of procrastination writing ‘Your Mom’ jokes and Googling pictures of Rachel Weisz, that we had to actually do some work. And that doesn’t come naturally to us.

Somehow the site remained functioning as we transferred it to its new structure, and – for the first time in TLCB’s history – we also broadened the advertising spaces beyond WordPress’s own platform.

This means – unless you have some fancy ad-blocker – that there will probably be an ad to the right of this text. Perhaps one above it. And maybe even one in the middle too.

These ads will vary depending upon where you live, the sites you’ve visited, and your demographic, and seem to encompass everything from clickbait ‘news’ to luxury cars, via toys, clothing, houses, holidays, tv subscriptions, and tech.

Of course the increase in the number of ads shown here is generating a corresponding increase in revenue, and is something we’ve stressed about doing for some time.

We know we’re very lucky to have a platform like this to a) write ‘inane blather‘ (our favourite comment from a disgruntled reader so far), and b) that such a privilege should ideally be used for good. And ‘Your Mom’ jokes.

Thus the advertising revenue brought in by the colourful boxes dotted around this site is donated to those who need it more than we do, so we really are keen for them to stay. But only if that’s OK with you, our readers.

So nine months in, if the ads are an issue, please let us know. If not, and – better yet – if they actually warrant your click occasionally, we’ll keep them going and continue to share what this crumby little corner of the internet miraculously generates with those in greater need.

Thanks for your time

TLCB Team

BrickNerd’s Back!

Good news for the online Lego community! BrickNerd, one of the Lego sites that used to do this whole blogging thing properly (unlike this smoking hole in the ground) is back, and under new management!

After spending several months as silent as Donald Trump’s conscience, a band of illustrious fans of Lego have resuscitated the dead website. We think BrickNerd’s return is good for the whole Lego community, and particularly for the team here at TLCB as it enables us to take the piss out of them constantly again for their almost fanatical devotion to a certain sci-fi movie franchise.

Here at TLCB we wish BrickNerd’s new management the best of luck, which – coming from this shower of ineptitude – means absolutely nothing. Go and and check them out via the link above, and then come back here for more pointless bickering, incompetent writing, and occasional political slurs.

Now if only someone could do the same with MOCpages

2020 | Year in Review

Well that was awful wasn’t it. As TLCB’s home nation plunges into another lockdown, the health services are overwhelmed with Coronavirus cases, and President Trump barricades himself in the oval office, 2021 looks to be carrying on where 2020 is leaving off.

Still, here at The Lego Car Blog, things have been alright…

Stats:

After two years of reducing views, 2020 saw a surge in visitors, taking us back towards the million a year mark. We know people have been bored during lockdowns but there are surely much better places to visit than here!

The U.S remains the top nation for visitors, with more than twice as many of you joining us from America than the next nearest country, despite us annoying a few of you by mentioning some of the U.S’s foibles. Visitors from over two-hundred and twenty other nations visited over the course of 2020, and if you’re the one visitor from Christmas Island, Sierra Leone, Tonga, Samoa, or Gabon an extra warm welcome to you!

Search Engines and Pinterest were the largest source of referrals, with our Review Library and The Rise and Fall of MOCpages receiving the most visits.

Oh yeah, if a killer virus, the undermining of American democracy, and race-related riots weren’t enough, 2020 also saw the surprise deletion of MOCpages. Once the bastion of creation-sharing online, Sean Kenney decided to delete the site without warning, taking with it countless creations and duly collecting the ‘Villain of the Year’ trophy in the process.

Advertisements:

After years of changing virtually nothing about this site whatsoever, our hand was forced in 2020 as our un-supported platform finally crapped out on us. Cue a shiny new platform that looks exactly like the old one, except with a proper side bar for advertisements.

We then displayed all the intelligence of an anti-vaccine group by clicking these ads to check they were OK and not leading anywhere unpalatable, and consequently got frozen by Google. Whoopsie. Anyway, they should be back soon, and the revenue they generate will continue to go to good causes that need it more than we do, only now the cheques will be much larger!

Competitions & Reader Contributions:

With many of you stuck inside during 2020’s various COVID-19 lock-downs it was the perfect time to hold a competition that we’d been mulling over for some time: Take a set you already own, and turn it into something new. The Lego Car Blog Lock-Down B-Model Competition was a roaring success, with over forty creations making the shortlist to win an awesome array of prizes from our sponsors. It was seriously close at the top, with about seven creations separated by only one or two points! Much arguing later and we had our Winner and Runner-Up, who each received some properly good SBrick Bluetooth Controller packs.

We also opened our Review Library up to our readers via our Facebook page, with several of you joining us to review official LEGO sets, and to take home some free (apart from writing a review of course) Game of Bricks lighting kits.

2021:

As we move into 2021 we’re still here to blog the best Lego vehicles that the web has to offer. We know 2020 has been exceptionally hard for thousands of you, and sadly 2021 looks to be no better at the moment, despite the promise of a Coronavirus vaccine. However, we hope LEGO can still be a source a joy, and that this crummy little corner of the internet provides an escape every once in a while.

Remember that you can suggest a creation to appear here via the Contact or Submission Suggestions pages (just make sure you read our Submission Guidelines first), you can leave a comment on any page via the feedback box, even if it’s to tell us we’re idiots, and that your views and clicks really do make a difference, particularly once we’re off the naughty step and adverts reappear, with all the revenue earned here at TLCB going to good causes.

Wishing you a very Happy New Year, and a better 2021 for all of humankind

TLCB Team

It’s Christmaaaaas!

Lego Christmas Tree

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been returned to their cages, the detritus from the office Christmas party has been cleared away, and the inevitable party-related ‘inappropriate physical contact’ reports have been filed by HR. We’re all set for the holidays.

As we take a break for a few days to remember what should be most important, we’d like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas from everyone here at TLCB, and hope – despite what a weird year 2020 has been – that you have peace and happiness is abundance over the festive period.

If you’re one of our readers who visits this site for a bit of that peace and happiness (which always shocks TLCB Team), then do remember that you can visit the Interviews, Review Library, and Archives to continue to get your Lego car fix, plus our Directory is full of excellent car or Lego-related sites that might be worth your click.

Wishing you all a very Happy Christmas

TLCB Team

Design an Iconic Ferrari Poster! | Competition

One of LEGO’s greatest strengths is their box art, which often depicts the set inside in a beautiful artistic recreation of a real-world setting (take a look at the boxes above to see what we mean). However LEGO chose to use minimalistic all-black packaging for their new 42125 Technic Ferrari 488 GTE set, eschewing the usual artwork for a classy, more adult-focussed design.

However, that’s not to say 42125 wouldn’t look great in front of a more dynamic background, and that’s where you can help!

LEGO Ideas are running a competition to design a poster for the new 42125 Ferrari 488 GTE AF CORSE set, with some awesome prizes (including a copy of the new set) up for grabs!

Winner’s Prizes

    • 42125 Technic Ferrari
    • 76895 Speed Champions Ferrari
    • 75890 Speed Champions Ferrari
    • 42124 Buggy Control
    • 2 x Prints of your poster (1 signed and one plain)
    • A Ferrari Goodie Bag

The assets required to create your poster are available for download at the LEGO Ideas website, where full competition details and entry requirements can also be found. Upload your poster design by 14th December to enter!

Click here to enter the Ferrari Poster Competition at LEGO Ideas!

What’s With All the Ads?

If you’re a regular reader of this dilapidated backwater of the internet you may have noticed some changes recently. Yes, after years of enhancing basically nothing about this site whatsoever, we’ve finally upgraded something!

We kinda had to actually, as our previous site structure had become unsupported many years ago, which we had solved by just ignoring it. Anyway, it was finally time to actually do some work and upgrade TLCB properly, which over the last few days we’ve done. Probably very badly.

No matter because the site does seem to be – somewhat miraculously – functioning as it should. However this upgrade did cost something, and thus we’ve decided (as we’ve been mooting for some years now) to permit a greater degree of advertising here at The Lego Car Blog.

This is to a) pay for our recent upgrade, and b) because we do feel some responsibility to maximise this platform for good causes, and thus we will continue to donate our profits to people and organisations who need them more than we do.

We hope the new ads aren’t too intrusive (and if you feel like clicking on them please do!), but if you have any problems or complaints, or you find something somewhere on the site has broken and we’re not paying attention, please do let us know in the usual ways.

TLCB Team

Black Friday – Nothing to See Here

Black Friday

It’s the worst day of the year, when kindness, decency, and compassion are all forgotten for a discounted smart speaker. As has become customary here at The Lego Car Blog we won’t be taking in part in Black Friday, and if you feel like joining us dodging the hoards and saving your soul then there are some great alternatives below.

Creations for Charity, Tearfund, Red Cross

Lest We Forget

Lego Red Flower

We Will Remember Them

Donate Here

We’re 9 Today!

It’s a big week! Much of Europe is entering a second Coronavirus Lock-Down, two old men are having a fight in America over the postal service, and – more importantly than any of that – TLCB has reached that greatest of birthdays; nine!

Yup, nine years ago in a derelict tower block, the bolts were slid back on a handful of metal cages. Slowly, tentatively, the mythical creatures held within them crept out and disappeared into the shadows.

Frankly sometimes we wish they’d then stayed in the shadows, but annoying as the Elves are they have found some wonderful Lego creations over those nine years, with 2020 being no exception.

In addition to blogging the best Lego vehicles the world has to offer, this year we also ran only our third competition in nearly a decade, with dozens of builders entering TLCB Lock-Down Competition and two collecting some awesome SBrick prize bundles.

We’ve also managed to add a few American patriots to the ‘I’m never visiting this site again!’ commenters’ club, joining the Russian patriots who were outraged in 2018. However despite losing a few readers, more of you have joined us here at TLCB this year than last, and we still have November and December to go. We guess people must be really bored during COVID-19…

So whether you’ve been here for all nine years or 2020 is your first, thank you very much for joining us and supporting the Lego vehicle building community.

If you are new here and are yet to discover all the sections of this miraculously-still-functioning site, take a look at the links below, and remember that the small advertising revenue that your views and clicks generate goes directly to those who need it more than we do.

Until next time, thank you for visiting us.

TLCB Team

Creations for Charity 2020

It’s Creations for Charity 2020!

2020 has sucked. Wildfires, terrorism, divisive politics, and a global pandemic that’s claimed over a million lives, it’s been a year to forget for many. However for some children, 2020 isn’t really any different to any other, with every year a struggle due to poverty, family breakdown, and domestic violence.

Creations for Charity, the wonderful annual event that provides thousands of LEGO toys to underprivileged children is back for 2020! Donated by members of the Lego Community, the Creations for Charity online store contains a wide variety of mini-figures, models, and building instructions, the sale of which raises money to purchase LEGO sets for children in need around the world. Which is thoroughly awesome.

Get Involved!

You can join the incredible Creations for Charity initiative in three ways; by donating a creation, by donating cash, or by buying the creations, building instructions, or mini-figures available via the online store.

To take a look at the creations, instructions, and mini-figures available for purchase, to donate your own, or to support the charity by a monetary gift, take a look at the new Creations for Charity website by clicking here.

Lastly, remember by visiting this dilapidated corner of the internet (The Lego Car Blog, not Creations for Charity), that you are helping to do good around the world, as all of the advertising revenue received through your clicks and views here at TLCB is donated to those who need it more than we do. To help us help others, we’d love you to spread the word about TLCB : )