Category Archives: Community

It’s Quiet. Too Quiet…

Lego Set Review Library

The Lego Car Blog has been quieter than a Date Night at The Brothers Brick of late. We could blame the TLCB Elves of course (we normally do), but to be fair to them they do have a strict criteria to adhere to, particularly egregious failures of which are enforced by way of ejection from the building by the office catapult.

So whilst we wait for a blogworthy creation, there are a few places you can head to here at TLCB for your Lego car fix. And that continue to bring us advertising revenue to keep the Executive Washroom and Sauna operational…


The Review Library contains every LEGO set, movie, book, and third-party compatible product that we have ever reviewed.

There are over one hundred reviews in all, from classic Technic sets to the latest officially-licensed Creator products, and you can find them all via the link below.

Visit the Review Library here


Lego Microphone

The online Lego Community is a wonderfully varied place, where builders of all nationalities, ethnicities, and specialisms can create and share their brick-based talents. Here at The Lego Car Blog we love to showcase the very best vehicular models the community has to offer.

Occasionally this extends to the builders behind them too, so that you (and we) can learn from the masters.

TLCB Interviews Page contains dozens of interviews with the best Lego builders in the world, including those that have seen their models turned into official LEGO sets, become published authors, and even paid professional model-makers. Find out how they’ve done it via the link below.

Visit the Interviews Page here


Finally, if you’d like to find a particular LEGO set, vehicle brand or model, you can do just that via the ‘Looking for Something’ search function that is available on every page. Wondering if a Citroen Mehari, Trabant 601, Pontiac Aztek, or other automotive oddity has appeared here, then use the search function to navigate TLCB Archives! Cool cars are available too of course…

So there you have it, some stuff to do whilst we wait for a blogworthy build. Of course if you’d like to help us out you can suggestion a creation our Elves have missed via the Feedback or Contact Us pages. Make sure you take a look at the Submission Guidelines first to check eligibility, and drop us a note!

Suggest a Creation here

Festival of Mundanity | The Winners!

It’s Winners time in BrickNerd and TLCB’s Festival of Mundanity!

Over the past two months we’ve been looking for the delightfully dull, brilliantly bland and monumentally mundane; no supercars, monster trucks or powerboats this time!

Across both the Object and Vehicle categories almost one hundred entries were submitted, with BrickNerd looking after your boring Objects and The Lego Car Blog your soporific vehicles.

You can check out the fantastic winning entries within the Object category via BrickNerd’s Winners Announcement, whilst here at TLCB we’re delighted to announce the Vehicle category winners!

Four key criteria were considered by the judges:

  1. Mundanity – Does the MOC represent something you wouldn’t really think about in real life?

  2. Concept – Does the topic matter show creativity in its idea and overall execution?

  3. Quality – Is the MOC built well, feature any NPU (nice parts usage), and make you look twice?

  4. Presentation – Is the MOC photographed/presented and composed in a way that compliments the subject matter?


Honourable Mentions

It was really close, with vehicles or all types, sizes and functionality entered. Three entries scoop the prizes, but lots caught our eye, so before we move on to the winners here are few honourable mentions!

Caleb Flutur‘s ‘3x Upscale 6654’ recreated both a mundane vehicle and object in one go, whilst iBrickedItUp spanned both categories too with his Cozy Coupe parked by the bins on a grey Tuesday, which came seriously close to a prize spot! IBrickedItUp also entered a slew of boring vehicles, with the ‘Hurtz’ Rental car lot making us chuckle the most. Thomas Gion captured the height of dreary ’90s econo-SUVs, whilst Zsolt Nagy and Saberwing007 impressed with excellent technical functionality packaged with vehicles of utmost tedium.

There are plenty of other entries that scored highly too; from lawn-mowers to removal vans we can’t mention them all, but a big boring thank you to everyone who entered!


Winners!

1st Place | Toyota Corolla Sedan (1saac W.)

Scoring highly in every category, it’s the most default, boring, and unimaginative vehicle in existence, looking for a parking spot and finding only a loading zone. 1saac W. is the, um… lucky owner of a mid-’00s Toyota Corolla Sedan in real life, and has captured one of life’s most mundane tasks in brick-form. Keep looking 1ssac, there’ll be a space around the corner. Probably.

1saac W. wins a Golden Nerdly Trophy & BrickNerd Swag Box, a $50 LEGO Gift Card (or local equivalent) from BrickNerd, an awesome BuWizz 3.0 or 2.0 Bluetooth Brick, an iDisplayIt case/stand bundle for LEGO models, and a Game of Bricks lighting kit of their choice!

2nd Place | Hyundai Venue (Tim Inman)

In second place is what will undoubtedly overtake the Corolla Sedan as the most dreary vehicle on the roads; the Korean crossover. Bought to give an impression of adventure and dynamism, crossover SUVs instead portray nothing more than an imagination deficit created by the force-feeding of endless marketing drivel. Tim Inman‘s Model Team Hyundai Venue captures the segment brilliantly, being about as interesting as your Aunt’s Facebook feed. We’re bored just thinking about it.

Tim Inman wins a $25 LEGO Gift Card (or local equivalent) from BrickNerd, and a Game of Bricks lighting kit of their choice!

3rd Place | Er… Shopping Cart (Nikolaus Lowe)

Yes it is a vehicle. We’ve all driven one, they’re all crap, and if you do try to extract fun from one it immediately veers towards the watermelons and your parents / security / other shoppers shout at you. There is nothing more disappointing than a shopping trolley. They even make you put a coin in to gain access to the trundling misery. Nikolaus Lowe takes third spot (and very nearly earned a podium over at BrickNerd too) with his inspired homage to modern-day mundanity.

Nikolaus Lowe wins a Game of Bricks lighting kit of their choice!


And so concludes The Festival of Mundanity. Thank you to our amazing prize sponsors, BrickNerd for choosing to partner with us idiots here at TLCB, and to all of you who participated! Winners; we’ll be in touch via your online channels to discuss your prizes!

The Festival of Mundanity is Closed!

Like all the best mundane things, like heading to the shop for milk and finding it shut, BrickNerd and TLCB’s Festival of Mundanity is now closed!

Around one hundred creations have been entered across the two categories (Objects and Vehicles, with a few cunningly spanning both!), many of which can be viewed at the Flickr Group of Mundanity here.

We’ll be rounding up some of the recent vehicular entries shortly, before judging begins (and some really rather excellent prizes are handed out).

Until then, thank you to each and every brilliantly boring, delightfully dull, and magnificently mundane entry, and best of luck!

One Week of Mundanity!

There’s just one week to go in BrickNerd and TLCB’s Festival of Mundanity!

We’re looking for your builds of boring vehicles. No Lamborghinis, Ferraris or Porsches here! There have been over forty competition entries so far, including a white Toyota Corolla, a Geo Tracker, a Hertz rental car lot, and a (rather inspired) shopping trolley.

There are some awesome prizes on offer for the winners including Game of Bricks lighting kits, iDisplayIt display stands, and a BuWizz Pro programmable bluetooth control!

To be in with a chance of scooping the swag get your mundane entry uploaded before the end of March 2022!

Where’s Our Facebook Page Gone?

For those of you who follow us on Facebook, The Lego Car Blog is no longer visible on the platform. It looks like we’ve been ‘unpublished’ due to our stance on the war in Ukraine.

Hopefully this is an error, as Facebook battle to remove disinformation surrounding the conflict (a good thing). It would be very odd if not, as we’ve mocked Trump regularly and that’s been fine. Maybe Putin’s more powerful than we thought!

Hopefully we’ll reappear soon, but if not thanks for following us there. If we have been unpublished for raising Russia’s invasion of Ukraine (and the threats we have received when we’ve criticised the Russian Premiership), we’ll stand by it, and with Ukraine.

TLCB Team

Build in Blue & Yellow

We published a post last year in which some famous lyrics were mildly amended to highlight a certain murderous rat-faced tyrant. In it we wrote, but then left out, a verse about his intent to invade Ukraine. It was too provocative and an unnecessary addition we thought. We thought…

Perhaps we should build only in yellow and blue this week.

How to Make (and Sell) Building Instructions!

The single most common comment we receive here at the Lego Car Blog (besides “Buy cheap Cialis here”) is “Can I have building instructions?’

In some cases it’s a yes, but most of the time the answer is no. They’re tricky, and it can be seen as a bit of a dark art. However the very talented SaperPL is here to explain how you can do it!

Yes, we’ve finally got round to the fifth instalment of the ‘Become a Lego Professional’ series, in which previous bloggee and prolific building instruction creator SaperPL provides the top ten tips for writing your very own LEGO building instructions.

Fame, glory, and maybe even a few $ could await! Read how you can get started in the building instructions game via the link below.

Become a Lego Professional – Part 5;

SaperPL – How to Make (and Sell) Building Instructions

Prizes of Mundanity!

BrickNerd & The Lego Car Blog’s

Festival of Mundanity Competition is Go!

That right, enough Lamborghinis, monster trucks and fighter jets for a bit, we want to see the most boring creations. The tedious. The unexceptional. The bland. White Toyota Corollas. A suburban street filled with identical grey crossovers. A tired minivan in a Wallmart parking lot.

But why build boring? Well firstly because boring can actually be very interesting (we’ve published more Ferrari’s here than we have Hondas), and secondly because there are some awesome prizes on offer for the winners, and they’re not mundane at all!

The Prizes!

Yup, the incredible BuWizz 3.0 Pro bluetooth battery (or a 2.0 if preferred) is up for grabs! Able to control up to six motors, whilst delivering much more power, there is no way to make your Lego creations faster.

Programmable and controllable through your phone, the BuWizz 3.0 Pro can measure G-Force, acceleration and altitude, and enables full bluetooth remote control from up to 100m away.

We’ll let you know just how good the new BuWizz 3.0 Pro is in a full review due here soon, but even the original BuWizz 1.0’s ‘ludicrous mode’ blew our minds.

Find full BuWizz details here

Now you can display your LEGO sets (or your own creations) with purpose-built clear acrylic angled stands designed to perfectly support Lego vehicles, with the winner collecting an iDisplayit bundle for a multitude of Technic and Creator-sized models. You could even proudly display your Festival of Mundanity winning creation!

Check out the extensive range of iDisplayit purpose-built LEGO stands and cases here

The awesome guys over at Game of Bricks are giving not just the Festival of Mundanity winners, but the runners up too, the choice of any Game of Bricks lighting kit! And there are hundreds to choose from.

Architecture, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Modular Buildings, and – of course – Technic, Creator and Speed Champions vehicles, there are lighting kits for a huge variety of official LEGO sets, all of which are seamlessly integrated to spectacular effect.

See the full range of Game of Bricks lighting kits here

And that’s not all!

BrickNerd will be adding a swag bag and LEGO gift cards into the prize pot, so the winner will be able to buy a new LEGO set, supercharge it with BuWizz, light it with Game of Bricks, and then showcase it courtesy of iDisplayit.

Remember that there are similar prizes over at BrickNerd too, who are eagerly waiting to see mundane objects built in brick, whilst we’ll be brining you the best mundane vehicular entries here at The Lego Car Blog.

Get boring, er… building, and Good Luck!

Festival of Mundanity | Building Competition!

LEGO contests bring out the best in builders. You see entries with amazing castles, sleek cars, gorgeous flora, and fantastical locales. Well, this contest is different. This contest, from one of the best Lego blogs around (and The Lego Car Blog) is here to celebrate the mundane.

Welcome to the Festival of Mundanity!

You heard right! This time we don’t want to see Bugattis, monster trucks, racing stripes, or models combining all three. We want to see the vehicles that have been too boring to be built out of LEGO until now. We’re looking for the most ordinary, mundane, and uninspiring transportation methods you can think of.


Mundanity at Its Finest

There are two boring categories: objects and vehicles. Here at The Lego Car Blog we’ll be dealing in the latter, whilst our pals at BrickNerd will be looking for tedious objects. And if you’re cleverer than us you might be able to think of way to combine the two!

For vehicles that means 265,000 mile Toyota Corollas. In white. That faded red Rover 45 you saw on holiday in the UK and forgot about immediately. That Chevrolet Express van parked opposite your house for the last few days…

But be careful! There is a difference between ‘mundane’ and ‘bad’. Mundane doesn’t mean rubbish. It means common and uninteresting. So no Reliant Robins, no AMC Gremlins, and no concepts, invented vehicles, or indeed anything that in real-life would make you look twice.

However we do want you to make us look twice when it is built out of LEGO! Mundane doesn’t mean presented poorly;  your creations should still be built well, of course (NPU is still NPU!)

Entries will be judged on mundane concept, build quality, overall presentation, photo composition, and how uninspiring each is.

So get building! You have until the end of March!


Prizes!

In contrast to the boring nature of this contest, we have some flashy prizes for the top three creations in each category. These prizes may change (or be added to) at any time so keep an eye out for periodic updates, and we owe a big thank you to our prize sponsors for donating some really awesome stuff to the prize pool (more on them soon)!


Vehicle Category Prizes

1st Place

  • Golden Nerdly Trophy & BrickNerd Swag Box

  • $50 LEGO Gift Card (or local equivalent) from BrickNerd

  • BuWizz 3.0 or 2.0 Bluetooth Brick

  • iDisplayIt case/stand bundle for LEGO models

  • Game of Bricks lighting kit of your choice

2nd Place

  • $25 LEGO Gift Card (or local equivalent) from BrickNerd

  • Game of Bricks lighting kit of your choice

3rd Place


Object Category Prizes

Check out the equally awesome prizes that can be won in the Object Category at BrickNerd here, and remember that if you can build something boring that spans both categories, you qualify for both too!


Festival of Mundanity Rules

  • All entries must be new creations. Entries may be updated as long as the contest is still open.

  • Entries can be posted either on Flickr or Instagram. A link to your entry should be posted in the Festival of Mundanity Flickr group using the hashtags #FestivalofMundanity, #BrickNerd and #TheLEGOCarBlog. If you do not have a Flickr account, you can use the hashtags and tag BrickNerd on Instagram, who will post a link to your entry for you.

  • Please only add one photo/submission of each entry to the group (extras will be removed), but you may enter as many times as you want with unique creations.

  • Entries must be either a vehicle or an object (settings are welcome too). If you can figure out how to combine the two and still make it uninteresting, you could win prizes in both categories.

  • Digital renders are allowed, though the creation must be structurally sound and all the pieces must be available physically. Custom or modified parts are not allowed this time around though unique prints/stickers are acceptable.

  • These rules or the prizes may be modified at any point.

  • The contest ends on March 31st, 2021 at 11:59 pm PT (7:59 am GMT on March 31st for the Europeans). Winners will be announced a few weeks after.

  • The contest will be judged by both BrickNerd and The Lego Car Blog contributors who will evaluate entries based on mundanity concept, quality, presentation, composition, and how uninspiring the build is.

Get Building, Be Boring, and Good Luck!

Something Boring is Coming…

Huh? A building contest celebrating the unexceptional? A collaboration between one of the best Lego blogs around and, er… this smoking hole in the ground. Stay tuned for more imminent mundanity! Let’s start 2022 with a yawn.

2021 | Year in Review

It’s 2022! Which would sound super futuristic if it weren’t for the fact that it already appears to be shaping up as a repeat of the last two years (and pre-1989 if you’re Russia…).

There is newness on the horizon though, as 2022 will bring us the most corrupt Football World Cup in history, a boycotted (kinda) Winter Olympics in China, the James Webb telescope will unfurl to look back in time, and will COVID finally be vanquished?

We’ve got some news too, but we’ll get to that in a bit. Before that, here’s a look at the year that was 2021!

Stats

2021 saw a little less than a million of you join us here at The Lego Car Blog. The U.S – despite our regular mockery of its former President, guns, and cars – was once more the most prolific country by views, with more of you joining us from America than the next five countries combined.

At the other end of the scale there are just four countries with a single visitor, all of which are the remotest of islands. If you are the one person from either the Cook Islands, St. Helena, Christmas Island, or the Cocos Islands, we’re delighted to have you with us!

Google was the top referrer, followed by Pinterest and Facebook, and our most viewed individual pages were the Review Library, The Rise and Fall of MOCpages, and the Directory.

447 posts were published during 2021 (receiving 281 comments and 1,115 likes), several new reviews were added to the Review Library (some of which were written by you), one further builder was inducted into the Master MOCers Hall of Fame, and we even helped to develop a brand new lighting kit suitable for vehicle creations.

We also celebrated our 10th Anniversary! By which we mean, we forgot. But we do have something planned in 2022!

Advertisements

2021 was our first full year of allowing proper advertising to appear. We hope they haven’t been too annoying, and even that a few have been interesting enough to click on.

Most are controlled by Google (what isn’t!), and display in the right sidebar, between posts, at the header and/or footer, and will sometimes appear full screen during page navigation. The revenue generated from these is given to those who need it more than we do, so your views and clicks really do make a difference.

What’s Coming Up?

2022 will see more of the best vehicle creations, occasional set reviews, Master MOCers and LEGO news published here at The Lego Car Blog and via our Facebook page.

You can also let us know your suggestions via the Contact and the Submission Suggestions pages. Take a look at our Submission Guidelines to know what we look for!

And finally, 2022 will bring the next building competition! Stay tuned for a hint which will be appearing right here very soon…

Thank you for joining us in 2021, and we wish you all a very happy New Year

TLCB Team

Find us on Flickr, Facebook, and check out the new LED Starter Kit for vehicle creations that Lightailing launched at our request by clicking here!

Merry Christmas Everyone!

All is quiet here at TLCB Towers. The Elves are locked back in their cages, the TLCB staff have gone home for the holidays, and the only sound is the tapping of this TLCB writer’s keyboard echoing through the office.

We’ll be back in a few days, but if you need to get your Lego fix in the meantime, a few suggestions can be found below;

  • All our past posts are available in the Archives (you can search for pretty much anything and something will probably come up!)
  • The Review Library contains over one-hundred LEGO set, book, and third-party product reviews.
  • You can read interviews with some of the best Lego vehicle builders around by clicking here.
  • Proper Lego blogs, and a lot more besides, can be found in the Directory, which is full of useful links.

We’d recommend doing none of the above though. Switch off, take joy from the little things, and see what you can give back this Christmas : )

Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas

TLCB Team

We’re 10 Today!!*

‘Remember, remember, the fifth of November’. Or so the nursery rhyme popular in TLCB’s home nation goes. Well we forgot.

Not Bonfire Night, which is impossible to forget what with all the fireworks and whatnot, but our own birthday. Still, an effigy of the Brothers Brick lemur won’t set fire to itself.

So whilst we did enjoy the Bonfire Night festivities, we completely missed the ten year anniversary of our own creation. However we’ve remembered now, thus ten years (and eleven days…) later, we’re quietly marking the occasion with a Duplo No.10 brick stolen from Google images.

Of course a lot has happened in the last decade, much of which we’d like to add to the list of things we’ve forgotten, but miraculously this dingy back-alley of the internet has survived, with over seven million of you joining us since our first post back in November of 2011.

Currently around a million of you end up here at The Lego Car Blog each year (many probably by accident), whilst our most popular pages (outside of the Home Page) continue to be the Review Library (which is now pretty huge**), The Rise and Fall of MOCpages, and the Directory.

Over the last decade we’ve also interviewed many of the Lego Community’s very best vehicle builders, including boat-builders, truck-makers, Technic-masters, and creators of things altogether sillier, held three competitions, annoyed ‘patriots’ of various nations (mostly America though), and – most importantly – showcased thousands of the best Lego creations on the web.

So as we continue into double figures, all that’s left to say is a massive thank you if you’re reading these clumsily written words. Without you this site would not exist, and nor would the $thousands raised in advertising revenue for good causes, only some of which has been spent on the executive washroom and sauna.

If you’re new here and you’d like to take a look around, some good places to start can be found below;

  • Review Library: Over one hundred reviews of LEGO sets, books and third-party products.
  • Directory: The place to find links to other (usually much better) LEGO-related websites.
  • Interviews: A TLCB Elf armed with a sharpened pencil can get even the most famous builders to talk…
  • Feedback and Submission Suggestions: Let us know what you think. No, really.

Until next time, thank you for visiting us.

TLCB Team

*Almost
**Just like your Mom

Creations for Charity 2021

The world is a tumultuous place at the moment. The dumpster fire that was 2020 has continued to rage throughout 2021, and – unless COP26 achieves something meaningful this week – 2021 might be as good as it’s going to get.

But really, if you’re reading this, things are probably alright. We’re the lucky ones, and we all have the joyous privilege of being able to redistribute some of our wealth to those to whom it would be worth far more. Even better, we can do it via our favourite plastic bricks…

Creations for Charity 2021

Now in its thirteenth year, the wonderful Creations for Charity initiative has provided thousands of LEGO toys to children in need, funded via the sale of creations designed and built by members of the community. Which means that you can buy an incredible one-off Lego creation knowing that all of the proceeds are going straight to children to whom they will make the biggest difference. How awesome is that!

Get Involved

You can join the Creations for Charity 2021 fundraiser in several ways; by donating a creation to the Creations for Charity store, by buying a creation, or by giving a monetary donation. All are used to get LEGO sets into the hands of underprivileged children, providing the gift of building, imagination, and escapism to kids who really might need a place to escape to every now and then.

You can take a look at the creations already donated to the Creations for Charity store by clicking the link below, with many more models to be added over the coming weeks.

Give the gift of LEGO this fall, and help to bring a little happiness to the children who need it most.

Visit the Creations for Charity store here

Lego Technic: An Unofficial Illustrated History

Psychiatrist’s Digest, Volume XVI

INTRODUCTION

What does it take to cause an otherwise sane person to write a 400-page book in their spare time, primarily for personal satisfaction? This important question will be investigated at length herein, using a well-researched case study concerning one Cole [Redacted], who, being myself, commands significant personal interest from this researcher. Beware of disturbing psychological evidence.

TESTIMONY

I am a Canadian Lego fan by the name of Cole, but since I prefer a little anonymity on the internet, I think I’ll leave us on a first-name basis. I’ve been interested in LEGO since I was five, when I got the awesome birthday present of my Dad and uncle’s 1980s LEGO Classic Space collection. Once I was a few years older, I got heavily into LEGO Star Wars. I was an obsessive sort of kid, and wanted to know everything I possibly could about it, which mainly meant spending hours poring over the DK LEGO Star Wars Visual Dictionaries and Character Encyclopaedias. [Early signs of instability] As I matured, [Patient is unaware of the meaning of the word] though, I began searching for a new theme to become involved in.

Eventually, I decided on LEGO Technic, and acquired the 42043 Mercedes-Benz Arocs 3245 set, which struck me as being a great deal and a great parts pack. For the price of $270 CAD, I could get 2,700 pieces, including a little of almost everything in the Technic lineup, including pneumatics and electronics. After building and enjoying the main and alternate models, and getting some more Power Functions, I ripped the set apart and dove head-on into MOCing. My learning process was heavy on trial-and-error (especially heavy on the latter part) [Low self esteem?], but I soon started up my online presence on the official LEGO Technic and Mindstorms galleries. Over time I moved from there to MOCpages, and then, following its untimely demise, I joined Eurobricks, [Patient displays tendency to mash unrelated words together] where I remain to this day. (My trial-and-error crash course had brought me to a point where my stuff wasn’t a total embarrassment on this more “high-class” site.)

Anyways, the story of my Technic book [The 400-page folly of the patient] begins a bit earlier, back in the MOCpages days, I believe. Because of certain circumstances, I ended up having a lot of spare time away from home (and my LEGO), that needed filling. Somehow or other I decided that it would be fun to write a book of all the Technic sets, since this was something that I really wanted to have [Turning point in the case]. I was still the same kid who wanted to obsess over Visual Dictionaries, but all I had for Technic was a stack of old LEGO catalogues. I’m not sure how far I expected to get when I started, but I was enjoying myself, and before I knew it, I had a binder full of a hand-written first draft covering the years 1977-2017! The next step was to type and format the whole tome, and I ended up practically rewriting large sections of the book in the process. It would have been way faster to just start the whole process online, but I didn’t have a laptop or anything, so I made do with what I had. Anyways, I did a proofreading or two, and then printed the whole thing out for myself at 20c per page (I’d added 2018 by this point) Eventually, after adding 2019 and 2020, I got around to trying to make the book presentable for other peoples’ use [Could this be contagious?], so I did a bunch more proofreading and checking, and eventually was able to put the book up on Eurobricks as a free download

This year I revisited the book, making a bunch of small fixes that readers had suggested, removed my rather subjective ratings (I’ve had people who liked them and people who didn’t. They’re gone for now, but they might just come back) [Patient is indecisive and easily swayed by public opinion], and added the 2021 sets. I put this on Eurobricks as well, and, as suggested by forum moderator Milan, reposted the book in a clearer format. For now, the book is finished, but I expect to have more changes coming eventually – apart from the inevitable 2022 update, another Eurobricks user volunteered to help me with improving some formatting things, so there may be an update of that sort coming sometime or other. [The patient shows no sign of concluding their fantasy]

SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE

So, what does this book consist of? Continue reading