Author Archives: thelegocarblogger

MiGnette

The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 is perhaps the defining fighter aircraft of the 1950s (sorry America…). It had a career a lot longer than just the 1950s though, with an estimated 18,000 units built – making it one of the most-produced jet aircraft in history – some of which are still in active service in the air forces of the Republic of North Korea and the Republic of Guinea-Bissau. This neat MiG-15 vignette (hence our genius title!) comes from BigPlanes of Flickr, who is making his TLCB debut. Custom mini-figures and decals add to the build’s authenticity and there’s more to see at BigPlanes’ photostream via the link.

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Atomic Bug

This is the Atomic Bug. Is it sci-fi? Is is steampunk? Is it a mech? Is it a spacecraft? All questions we don’t know the answer to, but even if we did it probably wouldn’t help us. Whatever this is it’s a neat bit of building and there’s more to see courtesy of Kobalt on Flickr. We’d better stick to cars…

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The Martian

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. The world no doubt thought following NASA’s incredible achievement in 1969 that lunar exploration would become routine. As it turned out man last visited the moon just 3 years later, leaving a vast 47 year wait (and still counting) for a return.

Space it seems, is now pretty boring (we suppose it is mostly empty anyway), only utilised in 2019 to enable aubergine emojis to be sent around the world and to allow drivers to completely ignore road signs.

Hollywood however hasn’t forgotten the romanticism of a proper space adventure, and in 2015 ‘The Martian‘ showed us via incredible attention to detail how a manned mission to Mars might look. It even had it’s own star car, the funky and yet very probable-looking Mars Rover.

This is that vehicle, albeit in Technic form, as built by Samolot of Eurobricks. Underneath the movie-realistic exterior Samolot had included an array of clever remote control functionality, all of it powered by LEGO’s own Power Functions motors and controlled via the third-party SBrick bluetooth brick and mobile app.

Each of the rover’s four enormous wheels is powered independently by a separate L Motor which – due to their size – are ingeniously housed inside the wheels themselves. All four wheels steer too, courtesy of a Medium Motor, whilst independent suspension allows the model to traverse the rocky martian landscape.

Finally two more Medium motors power the rover’s winch and rear crane (switchable via a gearbox) and an on-board compressor that feeds air to the crane’s pneumatic cylinders and those that open the cockpit doors.

Samolot’s creation is superbly accurate to the ‘real’ vehicle that starred in the movie and there’s loads more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, including a video of the model in action. Click the link above to make the trip, and remember that help is only 140 million miles away…

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The Fake Prince of Bel-Air

The ’50s Chevrolet Bel Air is a regular here at TLCB. A favourite in the classic car scene it’s become an icon of its era, more than the sum of its parts and possibly a bit over-hyped. Not that car fans ever do that (cough Toyota Supra A80 cough). However it’s not the only great-looking Chevy from the period, as the Bel Air had a smaller, slightly more affordable brother.

Always in the Bel Air’s shadow the Chevrolet 210 was just as pretty if slightly less glamorous, and it too could be had with the same ‘Blue Flame’ I6 and V8 powerplants. And a two-speed automatic transmission, Seriously, two. Shortage of gears aside we rather like the 210. It was comprehensively outsold by its larger Bel Air sibling too, so it’s more of a rarity these days.

This 1:18 Model Team recreation of the ’57 Chevrolet 210 4-Door Hardtop comes from TLCB debutant Tenderlok who has done an excellent job of replicating the classic Chevy in Lego form, helped by the application of a lot of custom chrome. Head to Eurobricks via the link above for more images of Tenderlok’s build and a full description.

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LEGO Technic H2 2019 | Set Previews!

Our Elves have been sneaking! Following our reveal of the H1 2019 Technic sets another batch of Elves were dispatched to The LEGO Company’s HQ to uncover the H2 additions to the Technic line-up. The survivors returned home over the summer and after much consideration we’re now able to offer our ‘expert analysis’ of LEGO’s latest sets! So, here you go, the H2 2019 LEGO Technic line-up…

– 42098 Car Transporter –

There’s a theme running through the H2 2019 Technic range and, much like your Mom, it’s size. We’ll start with the largest. Or longest at least. This is the 2,500 piece, 3ft long 42098 Car Transporter, a vehicle type that LEGO have dabbled with in the past in the Technic range, but never really tackled properly.

Three models in one, 42098 includes a truck, trailer and a muscle car, all of which are packed with mechanical functions like Technic-of-Old. The aesthetics are very much Technic-of-New though, with plenty of stickers and an increased level of visual realism.

42098 can fit five cars on board by our count, leaving room for four of your own once built. Both the truck and muscle car feature ‘Hand of God’ steering and miniature working piston engines, whilst the truck and trailer include ingenious hand-powered mechanisms to access the top decks, with gears lowering and extending a multitude of ramps to enable a full load to be driven on board.

42098 looks like a really interesting addition to the Technic range, and it’ll be nice to be able to store other sets and MOCs neatly on top of it. Expect the new set to cost c$180/£140 when it reaches stores later this year.

– 42099 4×4 X-treme Off-Roader –

Next we have a set that’s got the Elves very excited. It’s huge, it’s orange, it’s remote controlled, and it features LEGO’s penchant for poor spelling when words contain the letter ‘x’.

The 42099 X-treme Off-Roader looks… well, nuts, and it features LEGO’s new bluetooth remote control, finally catching up with third-party providers such as SBrick and BuWizz who have been offering control-via-phone for some time.

Like the 42098 Car Transporter above, 42099 is a complicated set aimed at ages 11+, but this time it swaps mechanical functionality for LEGO’s Power Functions motor system, now with the addition of the new ‘Control’ bluetooth-compatible app-based operating system.

This gives 42099 superb-looking playability, provided the set’s all-wheel-drive, remotely controlled steering, and suspension are up to the job. Judging by the images we’re hopeful, and if the number of stickers is a measure of off-road ability, the X-treme Off-Roader will be able to climb Everest.

Like all the sets previewed here 42099 will reach stores later this year. We’ll do our best to resist testing its Elf-smushing ability when we get our hands on it…

– 42097 Compact Crawler Crane –

The last H2 2019 Technic set we’re previewing today (but not the last in the range…) is this, the 920 piece 42097 Compact Crawler Crane. Featuring an all-mechanical array of functions including boom extension and raising, four spidery legs that use the huge stabiliser parts from the 42078 Mack Anthem set reviewed here earlier in the year, a winch, and a set of manual tracks, it looks like no crane we’ve ever seen but contains some excellent gear-driven functionality nonetheless.

Still towards the top of Technic’s age range, 42097 is aimed at ages 10+ and will cost around $100/£80, making the H2 2019 line-up one of considerable size and complexity, earning LEGO a few TLCB Points after a slightly lacklustre H1 range.

There’s one more set in the H2 2019 line-up left to reveal, and we’ll do just that later this summer. In the meantime you can check out our preview of the H1 2019 Technic sets here, plus you can visit our Review Library where 100 LEGO sets past and present have been reviewed so far via the link.

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Y-Wing

Regular readers of this dilapidated little corner of the internet will know that here at The Lego Car Blog we do not have an unconditional love for Star Wars. In fact, in a couple of ways (primarily any form of dialogue whatsoever), George Lucas’s most famous movie franchise is so awful it’s almost a parody of itself.

However, in plenty of other regards the Star Wars movies are an absolute triumph, one example being the incredible attention to detail paid to the vehicles in the Star Wars universe. This is one of the most famous, the Koensayr Manufacturing BTL-S3, or ‘Y-Wing’ as it is commonly known.

A multi-role starfighter/bomber, the Y-Wing could serve in both atmospheric conditions – where it could hit 1000km/h – as well as in space, and was in use within the Republic Navy as early as 22 BBY. No, we don’t know when that is either, we pulled it from ‘Wookiepedia’, so best direct any follow up questions there…

This jaw-dropping recreation of the famous Star Wars spaceship comes from Jerac of Flickr, who has recreated the Y-Wing in unbelievable detail. The build is made all the more impressive when you consider that whilst it may not look it, Jerac’s model is only mini-figure scale.

There’s much more to see of Jerac’s incredible creation at his photostream via the link above, which includes the Y-Wing in both its movie and original specifications (which might just be the nerdiest thing we’ve ever written), and if you’d like to learn more about the ‘real’ spaceship (and to see where we plagiarised the stats from) you can visit Wookiepedia here or wait for one of the proper blogs to find this creation too…

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Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB | Picture Special

This beautiful recreation of a beautiful car has just become our favourite creation of 2019 so far. The Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB was launched in 1959 for road and GT racing, fitted with both steel and aluminium bodies and with between 240 and 280bhp. Just 176 GT Berlinetta SWBs were produced and it became an instant classic, consistently rated as one of the best Ferrari’s of all time.

This wonderful Model Team replica of the Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB comes from previous bloggee Noah_L (aka Lego Builders) who has absolutely excelled himself with this stunningly accurate recreation of the iconic historic racing car, complete with a beautifully detailed engine and interior, opening doors, hood and trunk, and the coolest stripes we’ve ever seen.

An extensive gallery of fantastic imagery is available to view at Noah’s Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB Flickr album via the link above or via MOCpages here – click the links to make the jump to our favourite creation of the year so far.

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G-Spot

This is the ‘G-Wing’, so called because female pilots experienced unexplained sensations when piloting it. Or because it’s in the shape of a giant ‘G’. Whatever the reason, you can see more courtesy of Flickr’s Dave Kaleta who has been working his way through the alphabet for his three year old son, which might mean that we should reconsider this post’s title. Moving on!…

Today’s second creation is another space-based mini-figure scale vehicle, the ‘Centauri Industries Crater Maker 5000’, a vehicle so dangerous that flying it on Earth is apparently prohibited. This makes it the the sci-fi equivalent of the English Electric Lightning, which really is banned from flying for the same reason. Or this, which should be. If you’re feeling brave Flickr’s Blake Foster might be able to let you have a go – take a look via the link!

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Space Container

Oh. Crap.

That’s what went through this writer’s head when he entered TLCB Towers this morning. The Elves don’t have a bedtime as such, returning to the office as and when they find a blog-worthy creation, although they often sleep in their cage room when we turn the lights out in-between foraging for builds.

Normally this is a peaceful affair, with only minor scuffles reported the following morning. That was not the case today.

Squashed Elves where everywhere, ingrained into the carpet or slammed against furniture. They’re resilient little creatures so they’ll all be fine (probably), but recovering our Elven workforce to a functioning state and cleaning up the Elven bodily fluids spilt during the night is not a fun job. Still, at least we get paid to do it. No that’s not right…

The cause of the destruction was found abandoned in the corridor with an Elf squashed underneath it and another swinging miserably from the crane mounted on the rear.

But what on Earth was it? Well it turns out ‘on Earth’ is the wrong place to start, as this amazing machine is apparently a ‘Martian Heavy Transporter’, a six-wheel-drive, skid steer, off-road crane truck, built to carry containers across the Martian landscape.

Each of those six wheels is fully suspended and powered by an individual XL Motor, with all six hooked up to a BuWizz bluetooth control that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system. No wonder it could catch the fleeing Elves.

Mounted on the top of the chassis is an enormous remotely operated linear-actuator powered crane that can pull a large container onto the rear of the vehicle with ease, in a manner somewhere between LEGO’s neat 1994 6668 Recycle Truck and something from Robot Wars, or slide it to the ground by unfurling itself rearwards.

It’s a seriously slick piece of engineering and one we’re properly impressed by, even if it the cause of some considerable tidying up plus the need to administer a bit of Elven healthcare. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of this remarkable vehicle courtesy of desert752 of Eurobricks / Kirill Mazurov (aka Desert Eagle) of Flickr.

Head to Eurobricks and/or Flickr via the links for more, where a video of Desert / Kirill’s ‘Martian Heavy Transport’ and a complete gallery of imagery can also be found.

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They See Me Rollin’

The Rolls-Royce Phantom isn’t just for new money. In fact it’s been around almost as long as the brand itself, with this example being the Phantom II, launched way back in 1929.

The Phantom II came powered by a 7.7 litre straight-six mated to a four-speed gearbox, with semi-elliptical spring suspension and servo-assisted brakes. At the time Rolls-Royce only made the chassis and running gear for their cars, with the customer choosing a body from one of several ‘coachbuilders’, including Park Ward, Mulliner, Hooper and others. We don’t know which bodywork this example by Flickr’s Lennart C (aka Everblack) is wearing, but it looks lovely whatever it is.

There’s more to see of Lennart’s beautiful Rolls-Royce Phantom II at his photostream – click the link above to see how they rolled in the 1930s.

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I Ain’t Afraid of No Ghost

If there’s something strange in you neighborhood
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
If there’s something weird
And it don’t look good
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
I ain’t afraid of no ghost
I ain’t afraid of no ghost
If you’re seeing things running through your head
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
An invisible man
Sleeping in your bed
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)

 

This excellent (and enormous) Technic recreation of the ‘Ecto-1’ Cadillac Ambulance from ‘Ghostbusters’ comes from thewdarren of Flickr and it’s packed with bustin’ paraphernalia. And a V8 engine, because that’s cool. There’s loads more to see at thewdarren’s Ecto-1 album via the link above, you can check out LEGO’s own official Ghostbusters set here, and you can watch the video for very probably coolest movie theme ever by clicking here!

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Vanburger

Andy might look like a bearded hipster but there are no plant-based all-natural ethical peace crisps in the back of his van. This lovely classic Chevrolet comes from TLCB favourite (and Master MOCer) Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74 and it’s part of a much larger and utterly wonderful hamburger restaurant scene.

Head to Andrea’s Flickr album for more of Andy’s Van and his Burger Joint and make ours a double beef with bacon!

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M-Strider

M-Tron have gone badass! This marvellous contraption was found on Brickshelf by one of our Elves today, and it continues M-Tron’s transformation from nerdy magnet collectors to fearsome space heroes. Or something like that. This M-Tron ‘M-20 Neon Strider’ by CP5670 not only looks bloody brilliant, but feed it compressed air and eight pneumatic cylinders and fourteen switches will cause it automatically (and probably very spookily) march its way across the floor. Now there’s a way to terrify your cat. Head to the Brickshelf gallery via the link above to check it out!

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Creator Expert 10269 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy | Set Preview

LEGO’s officially licensed replicas just keep coming! This is their latest, in partnership with motorcycle manufacturer Harley-Davidson, the 10269 Creator Expert Fat Boy.

The first motorcycle in the Creator Expert line, the Harley-Davison Fat Boy becomes the second bike to be recreated in LEGO form following the excellent 42063 Technic BMW Motorrad R 1200 GS Adventure released a few years ago, and brings another new manufacturer partnership to LEGO’s already impressive back-catalogue.

With just over 1,000 pieces the new 10269 set is a hefty thing befitting its name, and it features a few new parts too – including printed Harley-Davison tiles that appear on the neat tear-drop shaped fuel tank and new authentic ‘Lakester’ wheels with very probably the widest tyre ever fitted to a LEGO motorcycle.

The new 10269 set also features a few working functions, including handlebar steering, a moveable gearshift pedal, kickstand and brake levers, and a working replica of the Fat Boy’s ‘Milwaukee-Eight®’ V-Twin engine with a brick-built engine block and pistons, making the Fat Boy the first LEGO set to use a non-specialised brick-built engine since the Technic sets of the 1980s. The model’s authenticity is completed with accurate ‘wicked red’ colouring as well as bespoke decals for the badging, speedometer and license plate.

10269 looks to be another fine addition to LEGO’s officially licensed range, and with Harley-Davison having such a loyal (often fanatical) following worldwide we expect the set to have an appeal as wide as that ludicrous rear tyre. Expect the Creator Expert 10269 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy set to cost around $100/£85 when it reaches stores later this month.

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Not a Car

Neither of the two creations featuring in this post are cars. Which means our explanations are likely to be mediocre at best. So, on to the explanations!

First up (above) we have Marco Marozzi’s ‘Ma.K 7 Anti Riot Urban Mech’ which looks terrifying enough to quell any dissent. Maybe we should ask him to make a bigger one for us to control the Elves with here at TLCB Towers…

Second, and following on from his build that featured here last month, we have Blake Foster‘s ‘Prickly Minnow Assualt Craft’ which features two enormous ion cannons mounted above and below the tiny cockpit, inside which a fantastically aggressive mini-figure pilots the controls. And we totally knew that and didn’t just rob it from the description.

There’s more to see of each build on Flickr via the links above, and we’ll be back soon with a car and a proper description…

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