Author Archives: thelegocarblogger

I Love Gooooold!

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Goldfinger, Goldmember and… er, Donald Trump would all appreciate this car. But don’t let that put you off, because it’s something rather special.

Just twenty-nine Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadsters were constructed between 1934 and ’36, each weighing around 6,000lbs and powered by a five-litre supercharged straight-eight engine that could propel the car to over 100mph. Independent suspension, 12V electrics, hydraulic brakes, and even safety glass made the Mercedes one of the most advanced cars of the time, and it had a price-tag to match.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Today any Mercdes-Benz 500K is a seriously sought-after car, with the Roadsters even more desirable due to their extreme rarity, but if you don’t have $10million at your disposal don’t worry – car building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has one that’s rather more attainable.

Firas’ 1:16 scale Model Team replica of the 500K Special Roadster took around a month to build, and features opening doors, hood and trunk, a detailed engine, and more gold than Trump Tower. OK, that’s not true, but it’s still a lot of gold. There’s much more to see of Firas’ golden masterpiece at his Flickr photostream – click here to take a look, and to catch up on Firas’ interview here at TLCB click the link in the text above.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

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Kolos Krush

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been peaceful in 2019 thus far. Too peaceful. Fear not though avid readers, today the little scumbags were back on form courtesy of this; MajklSpajkl’s incredible remote control Tatra T813 KOLOS 8×8 trial truck.

Sitting atop eight of the enormous wheels found within the 42054 Claas Xerion set is a wonderfully be-stickered body, within which is hidden a wealth of Technic brilliance. Two Power Functions XL Motors drive all eight independently-suspended wheels, the first four of which steer via an L motor, whilst a further Power Functions motor operates a high/low range gearbox. A working V12 piston engine is placed under the cab, and the model can be driven via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz brick that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own battery system.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

That makes for a model with a seriously impressive off-roading capability, which also means the Tatra had no trouble driving over a multitude of Elves here at TLCB Towers. Even in the highest of its two gears, MajklSpajkl’s KOLOS is pretty slow beast, however the Elves have learned of ways to navigate this hindrance – in this case the lucky Elf responsible for finding the Tatra slipped away unnoticed whilst its compatriots were watching cartoons, and simply arrived back in the room riding on top of it to run them over from behind. There’s no honour in Elven battle it seems.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

Those that escaped the smushing promptly dragged the assailant from its vehicle and fed it into the VHS machine, as has become customary, so now we have many broken Elves, and possibly a broken VHS machine too. Whilst we continue the clear-up you can see more of MajklSpajkl’s brilliant Technic Tatra at the Eurobricks forum by clicking these words, where you can find a full description, some superb build and on-location shots, and a video of the creation in action too.

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Digi-Max

Lego Mad Max Fury Road

Today’s find might be digital, but seeing as the Elves have been watching Sherlock, Downton Abbey, or some other period drama that’s most un-Elven, we’re willing to post it, as we get nervous when they start doing unexpected things. We can also post it because it shows how a digital creation should be presented. Designed by Nicola Stocchi it’s a rather excellent recreation of the Nux Car from ‘Mad Max – Fury Road’, and good news! Instructions are available! Head over to Flickr for more images and the all-important instructions link whilst we let the Elves watch the movie…

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Technic Traction

Lego Traction Engine

We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves this weekend, but they’re bringing back builds of a very classical nature. From the inventively old to the actually old now, and two absolutely beautiful Technic steam tractors from Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe.

An unusual choice for a Technic build we think these – somewhat oddly – qualify for ‘Technic Supercar’ status, being equipped with working steering, brakes, piston and valve gear, and a two-speed transmission.

Head over to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, where you can also find a link to vote for Nikolaus’ design on LEGO Ideas, whilst we figure out how the Elves have been watching too much ‘Sherlock’.

Lego Traction Engine

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Moon City

Lego Steampunk City

We do not understand steampunk. Effectively what sci-fi would look like if it were devised in the late 1800s, it’s a genre so alien to TLCB staff it may as well be the plot of ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. The creations that steampunk produces however, are not like the Kardashians at all. They’re wonderful.

Lego Steampunk City

This is one such build, the Moon City originating from the mind of Dwarlin Forkbeard, which is filled with such gorgeous detail that we want to move straight there and get a job mining cheese. Complete with a marvellous motorised train (although the journey does look a bit samey), working elevators, and a rotating orrery, Dwalin’s city is packed with ingenious movement too. Click on these words to head to the moon sometime in the 1880s…

Lego Steampunk City

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8880 Supercar Reloaded

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

LEGO’s 8880 Technic Supercar of 1994 is one of the brand’s most iconic and legendary sets. The largest model ever sold (at the time), 8880 featured all-wheel-drive, all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, a working gearbox, functioning steering, pop-up headlights, adjustable seats, and a V8 engine, becoming the blueprint (and inspiration) for probably every Technic Supercar MOC that this site has ever featured.

25 years after the original release, newcomer Hitchhiker has updated 8880 for the modern age, using the latest studless parts and building techniques, whilst retaining the dimensions, colour-scheme and functions of the original set.

Suggested to us by a reader, there’s more to see of Hitchhiker’s stunning 8880 Reloaded via ReBrickable, where a full gallery, video, and the all-important parts list and building instructions are available too. Click the link above to take a look.

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

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Fine Ford

Lego Ford GT

Another day, another Elf returns to the TLCB Towers in the hope of a meal token. Today’s Elf will earn just that, thanks to this splendid 8-wide Ford GT by KMP MOCs. Despite its diminutive size it’s rather wonderful to look at (the Ford not the Elf), being an instantly recognisable miniature of Ford’s 2005 blue collar supercar. There’s more of KMP’s GT to see at both MOCpages and Flickr – click the links to make the jump.

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Ferrari Before Ferrari

Lego Alfa Romeo P3

‘Scuderia Ferrari’ have been around longer than you might think…

Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1929, Scuderia Ferrari were winning races decades before their own cars would wear the famous prancing horse shield. The young Italian began his career driving for Alfa Romeo in 1920, winning the Coppa Acerbo in 1924. By 1929 Enzo took a step back from racing himself to manage the Alfa Romeo team, which became known as Scuderia Ferrari and wore the crest of Enzo’s friend Count Francesco Baracca, a logo which has now become synonymous with Ferrari cars.

Enzo’s partnership with Alfa Romeo gave his team access to the best racing car of the era, the glorious eight-cylinder supercharged  P3, and they translated this into a string of victories. However by 1938 Alfa Romeo wanted to race under their own name, and an unhappy Enzo decided to leave to build his own cars. Mussolini had other ideas though, and racing was duly halted during the kerfuffle whilst Enzo’s factory was converted to build military tooling.

After the war ended Enzo Ferrari finally got the chance to build and race his own car under his own name, and… Alfa Romeo won absolutely everything – in 1950 Enzo’s Italian rivals won all eleven races. However in 1951 the unbelievable happened; the ex-driver-turned-manager beat his old team, winning the 1951 British Grand Prix and becoming the first team to break Alfa Romeo’s dominance in over a year.

Ferrari would compete in every Formula 1 Championship thereafter, making them the only team in the sport’s history to do so, whilst the once mighty Alfa Romeo exited Formula 1 just a year later.

This wonderful diorama containing one of Scuderia Ferrari’s first race-winning cars (even though it’s not actually a Ferrari) comes from previous bloggee and TLCB regular PixelJunkie, whose stunning recreation of the Alfa Romeo P3 – complete with Scuderia Ferrari crest – is one of the finest mini-figure scale vintage racing cars we’ve seen. There’s more to see of this Ferrari-before-Ferrari on Flickr at Pixel’s photostream – head back to the early 1930s via the link above.

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The Coolest Fire Truck

Lego Technic Tatra T815 Fire Truck

All fire trucks are cool. OK, maybe not this one, but pretty much everything else. The coolest of the lot could well be this, the awesome Tatra T815-CAS32. With six-wheel-drive and a 360-degree rotating turret-mounted water canon, there’s nothing we’d rather put out a fire with.

This fantastic Technic replica of the Tatra fire truck comes from previous bloggee Horcik Designs of Flickr, and not only has he nailed the exterior of his T815, he’s engineered a fully-working miniaturisation of the Tatra’s drivetrain, suspension and fire-fighting apparatus underneath too.

Horcik’s model features six-wheel-drive courtesy of LEGO’s Power Functions Motors, with remote control steering, powered hose-reel winches, an on-board compressor, and a motorised elevating and rotating turret.

There’s more to see of Horcik’s superb creation at his photostream, including a money-shot of how all of that lot has been squeezed in. Head to Flickr via the link above to dial 911.

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Bricks in Wheels

Lego Chopper Motorbike

Flickr’s Redfern1950s is one of TLCB’s favourite builders, thanks to builds such as this one. This beautifully constructed hardtail chopper motorcycle is packed full of excellent detailing and brilliantly minimalist design cues, making it not just worthy of appearance here but – far more impressively – of display at The LEGO House in Billund, where it’s been on show to the public.

All of that is very cool, but where this build really scores is its wheels. Not satisfied with any of LEGO’s designs Redfern has created his own brick-built eight-spoke turbine-effect wheels with more ingenious building techniques contained within them than many builders achieve in a year of uploads. There’s more to see of Redfern’s brilliant wheels – and chopper they’re attached to – at his photostream; take a look via the link above.

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The Flickr Photo Snafu

Lego Bigfoot

Flickr?

The Lego Car Blog Elves search far and wide for the very best Lego vehicles that the internet has to offer. Eurobricks, MOCpages, Brickshelf and others all have little Elven footprints across them, but by far the most common source of blog-worthy finds is Flickr.

Previously owned by Yahoo, Flickr – whilst not a dedicated Lego-sharing website like those mentioned above – has proved the default destination for much of the online Lego community, with free image hosting, a mail/message feature, and vibrant community groups.

In 2018 the overlords at Yahoo decided to cash in their Flickr cheque, and sold the site to SmugMug (nope, us neither). SmugMug have wasted no time in redecorating their new house and promptly announced a raft of changes to the site, the chief amongst which is a new 1,000 photo limit for each user.

Uh-Oh Spagetti-O

This new limitation means that from this week many Lego builders will be unable to upload any more images without either opening another account or paying to upgrade to SmugMug’s subscription service. It also means that builders who have already exceeded the 1,000 photo limit will see their images automatically deleted, starting from the oldest.

Lego Bin

Impact on blogging sites

The knock-on effect for sites such as TLCB is that images may be deleted that have been used in past posts, breaking the link to the builder. Our apologies, this means that it’s likely that some links in our past posts will no longer function, and will instead return an error message like this.

Sites that use Flickr to host their images will see any deleted content disappear from their own pages too. The Brothers Brick is one such site where this would have occurred, however they have announced that they will now store all images used in their posts locally, including all past posts – so that even if an image is deleted on Flickr if it’s been blogged at The Brother Brick it will be saved.

What about The Lego Car Blog?

We’re in the fortunate position that all of our images are, and have always been, hosted here – hooray! This means that not a single image will be deleted from TLCB’s archives and that all images blogged here, whether they were found on Flickr or not, are safe.

What next?

We’ll have to see what impact SmugMug’s changes to Flickr have on the Lego community there. Perhaps very little, perhaps a lot, but either way surely the time is right for someone to fix MOCpages…

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Wet and Dirty

Lego Schwimmwagen SdKfz 2 Kettenkrad

This is a Volkswagen Type 166 Schwimmwagen and NSU SdKfz 2 Kettenkrad, and we’re going to simply call them the Schwimmwagen and NSU from here on in, because although they were opposing sides during the Second World War the Germans could give the Soviets a run for their money when it came to ridiculous vehicle names.

The Schwimmwagen was designed under Ferdinant Porsche (he of VW Beetle and, er… Porsche fame) to help settle the argument that Germany, Italy and Japan were having with the rest of the world during the 1940s. Over fifteen-thousand Swimmwagens were produced, making it the most numerous amphibious car in history, each powered by a 25hp flat-4 engine that could drive either all four wheels or a propellor for when things got wet.

Pictured alongside the Swimmwagen is the NSU which, whilst not quite as at home in the water, was incredible in the mud – being essentially a tank with handlebars. Both serve to remind us that whilst the Axis Powers thankfully lost the Second World War, the engineering they produced during the conflict was remarkable.

These marvellous mini-figure scale recreations of two of Germany’s weirdest and most brilliant World War 2 military vehicles comes from TLCB favourite Pixel Fox, who has built each vehicle beautifully and pictured them in his trademark diorama style. There’s more to see at Pixel’s photostream – click the link above to get wet and dirty.

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Supercar Designer

Lego Concept Car

LEGO bricks are a superb medium for design. Used by architects and engineers, our favourite little plastic blocks can be utilised to create prototypes and design studies for almost anything you can think of. We’re not sure if LEGO bricks are used in this way within the automotive industry, but if they are we imagine the results would look a little something like this.

Lego Concept Car

This beautiful creation is the work of Flickr’s Alexander Paschoaletto, who has designed a spectacular supercar from a raft of yellow bricks. The wonderful shape is facilitated by some ingenious building techniques, with the curvature of the roof in two directions simultaneously being a particular highlight amongst TLCB Team. Head over to Alexander’s photostream via the link above, and if you’d like to design your own car, try picking up some LEGO bricks – you might be amazed at what you can do!

Lego Concept Car

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Silvestros Supercar

Lego Technic Silvestros Supercar

Nope, us neither, but apparently the Silvestros is a concept design by freelance automotive designer Marco van Overbeeke who – it turns out – is one seriously talented guy.

So too is previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens, who has reimagined Marco’s design in Technic form to create the stunning supercar you see here. A V10 engine lives up front, there’s a working transmission, all-wheel suspension, and functioning steering too.

You can see all the images of Jeroen’s brilliant model at his photostream via the second link, and you can check out more of Marco van Overbeeke’s amazing automotive designs via the first.

Lego Technic Silvestros Supercar

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Bumblebug

Lego Transformers Bumblebee VW Beetle

Before Michael Bay, Megan Fox and General Motors sponsorship, Bumblebee wasn’t a Camaro. He was in fact a humble Volkswagen Type 1 Beetle, a car that regular bloggee Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist recreated beautifully some years ago. Using – we assume – magic, Ralph has now turned his original (and perfect) Beetle design into a fully transforming Bumblebee autobot. Take a look at the scarcely-believable image below and then join us in amazement at Ralph’s photostream by clicking here.

Lego Transformers Bumblebee VW Beetle

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