Tag Archives: Ferrari

Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB | Picture Special

This beautiful recreation of a beautiful car has just become our favourite creation of 2019 so far. The Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB was launched in 1959 for road and GT racing, fitted with both steel and aluminium bodies and with between 240 and 280bhp. Just 176 GT Berlinetta SWBs were produced and it became an instant classic, consistently rated as one of the best Ferrari’s of all time.

This wonderful Model Team replica of the Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB comes from previous bloggee Noah_L (aka Lego Builders) who has absolutely excelled himself with this stunningly accurate recreation of the iconic historic racing car, complete with a beautifully detailed engine and interior, opening doors, hood and trunk, and the coolest stripes we’ve ever seen.

An extensive gallery of fantastic imagery is available to view at Noah’s Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB Flickr album via the link above or via MOCpages here – click the links to make the jump to our favourite creation of the year so far.

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Enzo Again

Ferrari’s Enzo has been around for seventeen years now(!), inspiring very probably thousands of LEGO versions. Four of those were built by Noah_L / Lego Builders (the last of which you can find here when it was blogged back in 2015), who has now added a fifth iteration of his Enzo design to his impressive back-catalogue. His latest version reduces the scale to 1:16 from 1:12, yet keeps all the detail, including an opening trunk, clamshell engine cover, and butterfly doors. There are lots more images to see at both Flickr and MOCpages – take a look via the links.

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One of the Rest

Of all the teams in Formula 1 right now, Ferrari are the most irritating. With Mercedes-Benz utterly dominant once again, and big names such as McLaren, Williams and Renault simply making up the numbers, it’s down to Scuderia Ferrari to make F1 interesting. They have a genuinely fast car, an enormous budget, and – for reasons known only the Bernie Ecclestone and the mafia – the largest proportion of F1’s revenue regardless of where they place. And yet they’ve been about as good at winning races as Donald Trump is at empathy.

Silly strategical errors and an illogical favouritism of one driver have cost the team not just points and wins, but the fans an interesting race every so often too, with Ferrari now just one of the rest. That said the 2019 Scuderia Ferrari car does look most excellent, as you can see here. This Lego recreation of the SF90 Formula 1 car comes from Noah L (previously ‘Lego Builders‘), and it joins his excellent roster of every Ferrari F1 car from the past few years. Cunning techniques abound and there are lots more images to see at his Flickr album or on MOCpages via the links above, which make for much more interesting viewing than any recent Formula 1 race.

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Striped Horse

The Lego Car Blog Elves like pretty much anything with a racing stripe as, in their minds, it adds at least 40bhp. They might be on to something too, as Ferrari’s 458 ‘Speciale’ increased the base Italia’s output by around that figure when it launched in 2013 with improved aerodynamics, forged wheels, and – most importantly – a centre-stripe. This excellent 1:24 Lego homage to the famous Italian supercar comes from TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka and there’s more to see of his 458 Speciale, complete with stripe, at the link above.

Lego Ferrari 458 Speciale

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Ferrari Testrossa | Picture Special

We’re rounding out the weekend with something rather special. This bewitchingly beautiful Ferrari Testarossa is the work of car-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, and it is – as you can see here – astonishingly good.

Firas’ spectacularly presented creation is 100% LEGO (those excellent rims are genuine LEGO pieces that have been custom chromed) and includes a superbly detailed engine and interior inside the opening engine cover and doors.

There’s much more of Firas’ Ferrari to see at his Testarossa Flickr album by clicking here, and you can read our interview with the man behind the model by clicking here.

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GT4586

Lego Toyari GT4586

Ok, this might be digital, but it’s too cool not to post! This is a GT4586. What’s that you ask? The 4.5 litre V8 engine from a Ferrari 458 fitted inside the engine bay (mostly) of a Toyota GT86. The result is one hell of a drift car, and it’s street legal too, as builder/racer Ryan Tuerck demonstrates in this rather excellent video. Sadly the real car is no more following an accident, but TLCB favourite Simon Przepiorka has brought the Toyrari/Feryota back to life in Lego form with this awesome-looking render. Make the jump to see more via the link!

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Fresh Ferrari

Lego Ferrari 458 Italia

This might just be the cleanest-looking creation we’ll post all year. It is of course a Ferrari 458 Italia, recreated perfectly in Model Team form by Flickr’s Lennart C, and there’s more to see of his exquisitely presented model at the link.

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Maranello Magnum

Lego Ferarri 308 GTS

This is a Ferrari 308 GTS, made (more) famous by its continued appearance in 1980s Hawaii-based drama ‘Magnum PI’, and built from 1975 in Maranello Italy before being replaced a decade later by the 328.

Designed by Pininfarina the 308 also has the claim of being the slowest Ferrari ever made, as a 2 litre version (known as the 208) was produced to dodge a tax in Italy that applied to cars over 2000cc. Strangely the 208 was still a V8, just a pointlessly small one, and thankfully ‘Magnum PI’s Thomas Magnum got the proper 2.9 litre 240bhp version.

This excellent recreation of Magnum’s mid-’80s Ferrari 308 GTS comes from Flickr’s Peter Blackert aka Lego911 and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

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Miami Vice

Lego Ferrari Daytona Miami Vice

Ferrari didn’t allow Miami Vice to use their cars, because they are – famously – dicks when it comes to their brand protection. The producers decided they wanted Ferraris anyway, and commissioned Corvette-based replicas to create their desired movie cars. We’re not sure who had the last laugh there, the Miami Vice production company or Ferrari, who received marketing for free without even having to lend out a couple of cars.

This neat replica of a replica of a Ferrari Daytona Spider in Miami Vice black on Magnolia spec comes from previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott, and a rather splendid job he’s done too. See more at the link above.

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Ferrari Before Ferrari

Lego Alfa Romeo P3

‘Scuderia Ferrari’ have been around longer than you might think…

Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1929, Scuderia Ferrari were winning races decades before their own cars would wear the famous prancing horse shield. The young Italian began his career driving for Alfa Romeo in 1920, winning the Coppa Acerbo in 1924. By 1929 Enzo took a step back from racing himself to manage the Alfa Romeo team, which became known as Scuderia Ferrari and wore the crest of Enzo’s friend Count Francesco Baracca, a logo which has now become synonymous with Ferrari cars.

Enzo’s partnership with Alfa Romeo gave his team access to the best racing car of the era, the glorious eight-cylinder supercharged  P3, and they translated this into a string of victories. However by 1938 Alfa Romeo wanted to race under their own name, and an unhappy Enzo decided to leave to build his own cars. Mussolini had other ideas though, and racing was duly halted during the kerfuffle whilst Enzo’s factory was converted to build military tooling.

After the war ended Enzo Ferrari finally got the chance to build and race his own car under his own name, and… Alfa Romeo won absolutely everything – in 1950 Enzo’s Italian rivals won all eleven races. However in 1951 the unbelievable happened; the ex-driver-turned-manager beat his old team, winning the 1951 British Grand Prix and becoming the first team to break Alfa Romeo’s dominance in over a year.

Ferrari would compete in every Formula 1 Championship thereafter, making them the only team in the sport’s history to do so, whilst the once mighty Alfa Romeo exited Formula 1 just a year later.

This wonderful diorama containing one of Scuderia Ferrari’s first race-winning cars (even though it’s not actually a Ferrari) comes from previous bloggee and TLCB regular PixelJunkie, whose stunning recreation of the Alfa Romeo P3 – complete with Scuderia Ferrari crest – is one of the finest mini-figure scale vintage racing cars we’ve seen. There’s more to see of this Ferrari-before-Ferrari on Flickr at Pixel’s photostream – head back to the early 1930s via the link above.

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Ferrari 312 | Picture Special

Lego Ferrari 312 Grand Prix Racer

In the mid-1960’s Formula 1 was, perhaps surprisingly, nearly as restrictive technically as it is today. Engines had to be just 1.5 litres or less, which meant they were often comically smaller than those available to the general public. In 1965 the teams requested more power, and to their almost complete surprise the governing body responded by doubling the allowed engine capacity for 1966. We can’t image the FIA being that responsive today…

Lego Ferrari 312 Formula 1

The Three Litre era of Formula 1 was born as the existing teams scrabbled to take advantage of the new regulations. Ferrari were lucky, having a larger V12 engine available to them from their sports car racing programme, which they modified to keep within the maximum 3000cc allowed and shoved in the back of their F1 chassis. It was a bit of bodge-job though, being heavy and down on torque, and thus the resulting ‘312’ racer wasn’t a Championship winner, taking only three race wins from thirty-eight starts.

With limited success the 312 is sadly most famous for the tragedy that struck Lorenzo Bandini in the 1967 Monaco Grand Prix. On the 82nd lap Bandini caught the guardrail whilst entering the Marina and his car overturned, rupturing a fuel line as it did so. The shower of sparks ignited the car, and with the straw bales lining the track also catching fire Bandini was trapped in the inferno. Marshalls managed to pull him from the car, but he died in hospital a few days later.

Lego Ferrari 312 Formula 1

Ferrari continued to race the 312 with little success for several more years, with no money to develop a new car and the Cosworth DFV engine used by many other teams winning absolutely everything. Eventually Enzo Ferrari sold a stake of his business to FIAT, and in 1970 used the money to develop a new purpose-built flat-12 engine for Formula 1 racing, finally returning the team to a race winning position.

The 312 was quickly forgotten, but whilst it certainly wasn’t one of Ferrari’s more successful designs, it was – as you can see here – surely one of their most beautiful. The impeccable Model Team replica of the 312 shown in these images comes from Andre Pinto, who has captured every detail of the 312’s the suspension, interior, bodywork, and the (spectacular) V12 engine to create one of the finest classic Formula 1 cars ever built in Lego form.

There’s more to see of Andre’s beautifully photographed 1967 Ferrari 312 at both his Flickr album and at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Take a look via the links above, and if you’d like to hear what that slightly bodged 3.0 V12 sounds like, take a listen here.

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Speed Champions 2019 | Set Previews!

LEGO Speed Champions 2019 Sets

A few weeks ago a crack team of The Lego Car Blog Elves were dispatched over the perimeter wall of The LEGO Company’s HQ by way of the office catapult. Tasked with uncovering LEGO’s new-for-2019 sets, those that made it back to TLCB Towers would be revered as heroes, whilst their fallen comrades would be mourned for around 15 minutes, before we all moved on with our lives.

Today the lucky survivors able to out-run a Danish alsatian see the fruits of their courageous mission revealed to you, our readers – and what tasty fruits they are! So without any further pointless preamble, here are the brand new 2019 LEGO Speed Champions sets!

LEGO 75893 Dodge Challenger Demon & Dodge Charger

LEGO’s partnerships with real-world car manufacturers is (and we may be a bit biased given the title of this website), one of their best ever decisions. The sets resulting from the tie-ups to date have been almost universally excellent, so it’s little wonder that LEGO and other manufacturers are looking to partner. Dodge become a new addition to LEGO universe for 2019, joining the likes of Mercedes-Benz, Aston Martin, Porsche, Volkswagen, Ford, Volvo, Ferrari and others.

Their first set is 75893 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon & Dodge Charger RT, a wonderful duel car homage to Dodge’s fastest products. A brilliant classic 1970 Charger (complete with a huge drag-racing supercharger) competes against the brand’s latest 2018 SRT Demon at a drag strip, with three mini-figures and the drag racing ‘christmas tree’ lights included. Each car looks faithfully accurate – although some of that accuracy is admittedly due to stickers, and with just under 500 pieces 75893 looks to be an excellent addition to the expanding officially-licensed Speed Champions line-up.

LEGO 75890 Speed Champions Ferrari F40 Competizione

Next we have a vehicle from one of the first manufacturers to partner with LEGO – it wouldn’t be Speed Champions without Ferrari! With 198 pieces the new 75890 Ferrari F40 Competizione set marks the entry point to the 2019 Speed Champions range, and brings one of the most famous supercars ever made back into LEGO form after its last appearance as the 1,158-piece 10248 Creator F40 set from 2015.

Although considerably smaller than its predecessor, 75890 is nevertheless a brilliantly accurate little set. This version of the F40 is the Competizione, or racing car to you and me, and thus it features a mini-figure racing driver, an all-important spanner, and switchable parts to convert the F40 from race to road. 75890 will reach stores in early 2019 and will be a roaring success.

LEGO 75892 Speed Champions McLaren Senna

LEGO’s third new Speed Champions set brings another previous partner back into the range; McLaren, with their mind-bending track-only Senna. With 219 pieces the 75892 McLaren Senna set is slightly more complicated than the Ferrari above, as is required by the fantastically intricate design of the real car. It’s an aesthetic that doesn’t seem to translate too well to LEGO in our opinion, and – despite what appear to be a few new pieces to help replicate the real Senna’s shape – 75892 looks to our eyes a bit of mess. Nevertheless for McLaren / supercar fans it’s sure to be a winner when it arrives alongside the other Speed Champions sets in January of next year.

LEGO 75891 Speed Champions Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

Chevrolet first joined the Speed Champions range a few years ago and they return to the line-up for 2019 with the 75891 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Race Car set*. Another single-car set, 75891 brings Speed Champions into the world of NASCAR, although for licensing reasons you won’t find that link anywhere on the box. What you will find are 198 pieces, some of which are uniquely printed, a mini-figure complete with fuel-refill tank and the ubiquitous spanner, and a wealth of stickers to help recreate the ZL1 in LEGO form.

We’ve bemoaned the over-use of stickers rather than bricks to recreate real-world replicas in the past and the same is true here, but LEGO know their market, and also the most cost-effective way to hit the spot aesthetically. 75891 should be hit – especially amongst NASCAR fans!

*Plus an exciting new addition to the 2019 Technic range… but more on that another time!

LEGO 75894 Speed Champions Mini Cooper-S Rally & John Cooper Works Buggy

The fifth and final Speed Champions set new for 2019 brings another old favourite back onto shelves; Mini, with a pairing of the iconic 1960s Cooper-S and a 2018 John Cooper Works Buggy. A tricky thing to make from rectangular bricks, LEGO seem have done a superb job recreating the original Mini in mini-figure scale, and whilst there are stickers present they’re not used to create the shape of the car – bravo LEGO! The classic Cooper comes in rally car spec, complete with quad spot-lights and a roof-rack, and includes a mini-figure rally driver.

The John Cooper Works Buggy isn’t quite as successful, looking not all that much like the real thing. But we’re guessing that if you’re reading this and you’re eight, that won’t matter one bit! Featuring big rubber tyres, a workshop complete with tools, and some cool stickers, if we were eight we’d absolutely love it!

75894 Mini Cooper-S Rally and MINI John Cooper Works Buggy is the largest set in the 2019 range at 481 pieces including four mini-figures and will join the rest of the line-up in stores from January.

Which set is your favourite? We’ll take the classic Dodge Charger and recreate the train-jump scene from the first Fast and the Furious movie, although we’d really need a Speed Champions Toyota Supra to do it properly. Over to you LEGO…

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F1 of Ages

Lego McLaren MP4-6

The 2018 Formula 1 season is all but over, so we’re heading back in time to some of the sport’s greatest racing cars. TLCB regular Angka Utama is the builder behind them and he’s done a simply spectacular job of recreating three of F1’s most iconic entries.

First up (above) is the McLaren-Honda MP4/6 in which Ayrton Senna won the 1991 F1 World Championship. Angka’s model captures the real car beautifully, including a neat brick-built miniaturisation of the famous Marlboro livery.

Lego Ferrari 641

Angka’s second historic F1 car comes from the previous year, when Ferrari’s 641 took second in the F1 Constructors Championship driven by Alain Prost and Nigel Mansell. Like the McLaren above Angka’s model perfectly captures the famous racer’s shape and livery, and also includes some wonderful suspension and brake detail too, thanks to the ingenious use of mini-figure hands and Technic cogs.

Lego Williams FW14

Angka’s third and final classic Formula 1 car recreates one of the most advanced cars ever to enter F1. The Williams-Renualt FW14 was launched in 1991 with active suspension, traction control, and a semi-automatic transmission, and by 1992 it was utterly dominant, winning nine out of sixteen races and taking Nigel Mansell to the World Championship.

The model includes the FW14’s famous Canon/Camel livery and the superbly replicated bodywork and suspension of the Ferrari and McLaren too. There’s more to see of each brilliant miniature F1 car at both Angka’a Flickr photostream and via MOCpages – click the links to make the jump and ask Angka to build some more!

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Ferrari SF71H | Picture Special

Lego Ferrari SF71H

We’re only at the mid-way break in the 2018 Formula 1 season and it’s already more interesting than the last few seasons put together (which still isn’t that interesting, but it’s a start). The arrival of the ‘halo’ and slightly laxer penalties (thankfully) were the only changes versus 2017, but such consistency allows teams to make progress, and gosh was that needed.

Lego Ferrari SF71H

Years of Mercedes-AMG domination has, maybe, come to an end, as Scuderia Ferrari have at last got their act together and turned out a car that’s really quite good. Sadly Sergio Marchionne, Ferrari’s chairman, died this summer aged just 66, but what better way to celebrate his work than with a Championship win.

Lego 2018 Ferrari F1This is the car that Scuderia Ferrari and the whole of Italy hope will be able to take the Constructor’s Championship away from Mercedes-Benz, the SF71H. Powered by a 1.6 litre V6 with both an electrically driven turbocharger and an energy recovery system (as per the regulations) the SF71H produces arguably the most power of any engine on the current grid, allowing Sebastian Vettel to take four victories so far.

Lego 2018 Ferrari F1This stunning recreation of Ferrari’s 2018 title contender comes from previous bloggee Noah_L (aka Lego Builders) who, like the real teams competing in Formula 1, has heavily updated his 2017 car to meet the 2018 regulations. Modern Formula 1 aero is a mighty difficult thing to recreate in any form, let alone Lego, but Noah has done a superb job replicating the Ferrari’s incredible bodywork.

There are loads more images available to view the ingenious methods Noah has used to construct his model at his Flickr photostream and on MOCpages – click the links to take a look at how it’s done!

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Dark Horse

Lego Ferrari Enzo

Launched back in 2002, the Ferrari Enzo arguably kick-started the whole hypercar thing that’s currently going on, along with the likes of Pagani, Bugatti, Porsche, and McLaren, and with Mercedes-Benz and even Toyota rumoured to be joining soon.

Powered by a naturally-aspirated 6 litre V12 the Enzo could hit a top speed in excess of 220mph, generating over 1,700lb of downforce as it did so. Only 400 Enzo’s were made in a production run that lasted just two years from ’02-’04, each costing around $660,000 (back in 2002!). That looks like a bargain now though, as Enzo’s are currently fetching up to $4m at auction.

Lego Ferrari Enzo

Rather more attainable than the real thing is this one, designed by previous bloggee Alexander Paschoaletto over 5 painstaking months. Constructed from LEGO’s ace dark blue colour (that we think looks brilliant instead of the usual Ferrari red), Alex spent almost a month just figuring out how to build the Enzo’s fiendishly complicated doors.

Ingenious building techniques are evident throughout the design (including in those opening doors) and you can see more Alexander’s superb recreation of Ferrari’s iconic early-2000s hypercar at his photostream – click the link above for all the images.

Lego Ferrari Enzo

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