Tag Archives: B-Model

My Other Car’s The Batmobile

Not many people can say that. One really. And we suspect if he knew anyone else was saying it he wouldn’t be happy.

However thanks to TLCB Master MOCer Nico71, you dear readers, can say ‘My Other Car’s the Batmobile’, as this deeply cool hot rod – instructions for which are available – is constructed only from the parts found within the new LEGO Technic 42127 Batmobile set.

There’s working steering, a V8 engine and… er, that’s it. Because to be fair it’s all the 42127 set is equipped with. Plus some unnecessary light-up bricks, but our thoughts on those being a Technic ‘feature’ mirror Batman’s feelings on impersonators.

You can convert your own 42127 Batmobile set into Nico’s hot rod alternate via his excellent website, where building instructions, further imagery and a video are available. Click the link above to take a look.

My Other Big Crane Truck’s a Big Crane Truck

This is a big crane truck, and it’s built from… er, a different big crane truck. Still, it is about as different from the source big crane truck as it can get, whilst still being a big crane truck itself.

Previous bloggee damjan97PL (aka damianPLE) is the builder who has converted the official LEGO Technic 42128 Heavy Duty Tow Truck set into a European flatbed truck, complete with a rather excellent rear-mounted folding crane.

The aforementioned crane can rotate, elevate and extend thanks to three pneumatically-operated booms, whilst the truck itself features working outriggers, an inline 6-cylinder engine underneath a tilting cab, ‘HOG’ steering, and dropping flatbed sides.

It’s a top quality (and brilliantly presented) B-Model, and one that owners of the 42128 set can create for themselves as building instructions are available. Head to the Eurobricks discussion forum or Bricksafe to find out more, plus you can click here to see an alternative ‘alternative’ big crane truck built from LEGO’s big crane truck…

Ice Lorry

This is a Scania XT crane/tipper truck, and it has been constructed entirely from the parts found within the enormous LEGO Technic 42128 Heavy Duty Tow Truck set.

Builder mpj hasn’t used all 2,000 pieces though. In fact the donor set’s pneumatics have been foregone completely, but that doesn’t mean this appropriate-if-accidentally Ice Planet coloured alternate is short on functions, with working steering, a lifting third axle, a folding, rotating and extending crane, working stabilisers, and a tipping bed.

We say appropriate, as even with all of that functionality quite a few pieces remained, so mpj has utilised a few more of 42128’s parts to equip his Scania XT B-Model with a gritter (which spins by drive from the truck’s differential) and fully positionable snow plow.

Building instructions are available and there’s more of mpj’s airless icy alternative to see on Brickshelf and at the Eurobricks discussion forum – Click the links to plow your way there.

My Other Car’s Also a Classic Truck

This is a UAZ 452-3303, one of many imaginatively named Soviet off-road van truck thingies designed during the Communist era.

The UAZ 452 was launched in 1965 with a 75bhp 2.45 litre petrol engine that could run on fuel as low as 72 octane (basically spicy water), and it’s still in production today, with nine different variants available.

This one, the 3303 dropside pick-up truck, is affectionally know as the ‘tadpole’, because it looks rather like one, and has been recreated beautifully in brick form by ArtemyZotov of Eurobricks.

It also continues our run of B-Models, being constructed entirely from the 10290 Creator Pickup Truck set. Opening doors, dropping bed sides, and a load of fruit and veg all feature, and there’s more to see – including a link to building instructions – at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

My Other Car’s a Porsche

LEGO’s excellent 10295 Creator Porsche 911 set has produced some wonderful alternates to date, and this might be our favourite so far.

The Chevrolet Corvette C3 was America’s answer to the Porsche 911 of the time, and is – at least in the eyes of this TLCB writer – still one of the best looking American cars ever made.

Capturing the C3 Corvette brilliantly, and using only the pieces from the 10295 Porsche 911 set to do so, is Lego-building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber.

Firas’ expertly presented creation recreates the iconic classic Corvette in T-bar form, with pop-up headlights, opening doors and hood, a superbly detailed engine bay and interior, and a removable targa roof.

It makes for one of the finest alternates from any set that we’ve seen yet, and best of all if you own the 10295 Porsche 911 set you can turn it into a Chevrolet Corvette C3 yourself, as Firas has produced building instructions too.

Head over to Firas’ ‘Corvette C3’ album on Flickr for the complete gallery, you can find the building instructions at his website here, and you can click here to read Firas’ interview in the Master MOCers series if you want to find out more about how he creates his amazing models such as this one.

My Other Car’s Also Really Small

Fiat’s original 500 was really small. But back in the 1950s you could go even smaller.

Microcars, often dubbed ‘bubble cars’, were popular in post-war Europe, thanks to limited metal supplies, a need for cheap transportation, and a population that was still largely moving itself about by motorcycle. Or horse.

This is one of the most well known bubble cars, the BMW Isetta. Less well known is the fact it was actually an Italian design by ISO Rivolta that BMW produced under license, so it’s fitting therefore that this one is also built from the bits of an Italian car.

The work of previous bloggee Tomáš Novák (aka PsychoWard666), this beautifully presented BMW Isetta is constructed only from the parts found within the official 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set, although such is its accuracy you’d never know. Unless you see it alongside the 10271’s rather pointless easel of course…

Building instructions are available and there’s lots more of Tomáš’ BMW B-Model to see (including that give-away image) at both Eurobricks and Flickr – click the links above to take a look.

My Other Car’s a Bus

This is a Trabant 601 Combi, one of the great mobilisers of the people, and it comes from Eurobricks’ PsychoWard666 who has constructed it solely from the parts found within another historic people mover, the 10258 London Bus.

Both the Trabant and the AEC Routemaster bus are icons of their time and location, and – despite being rather different classes of vehicle – are more similar that you might think.

Each was designed to mobilise as many people as possible, and thus had a monopoly in its respective market, and both designs endured long beyond their intended lifespans, with the Trabant produced from 1960 right up until the fall of the Berlin Wall, whilst the Routemaster remained in service until 2005, outlasting far more modern bus designs.

Of course whilst this meant each became a symbol of the society they mobilised, they were also seen as polluting, noisy, uncomfortable, and dangerous by the end of their lives. And if you don’t think a Routemaster is dangerous you’ve never been on one at 2am. Although to be fair that applies to all of London’s buses.

Back to the model, and PsychoWard’s Trabant 601 captures the East German peoples’ car beautifully, particularly considering the parts limitation of the 10258 donor set. Building instructions are available too, so if you own the 10258 London Bus set and you’d like to turn one classic transportation icon into another you can find out how to do so at the Eurobricks forum – Click the link above to take a look.

My Other Car’s a Pick-Up

LEGO have released a whole host of Porsche 911 sets in recent times, including the enormous 42056 Technic 911 GT3 RS, the 42096 Technic 911 RSR, the 10295 Creator 911 and the 75895 Speed Champions 911 Turbo 3.0.

But what if you own the 10290 Creator Classic Pick-Up set instead of any of the above, and you’d like to join the 911 club too? Ex-LEGO set designer Nathanael Kuipers has the answer!

This lovely early Porsche 911 is built only from the pieces found within the 10290 set, and – save for a few mis-coloured hinges – you’d never know there was a strict parts limitation.

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

My Other Jeep’s a Truck

LEGO’s 42129 Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros set offers the chance to get a fully remote controlled ‘truck trial’-capable model off-the-shelf. And we like that.

What we like even more is taking the ready-to-go RC components and off-road hardware from the official set, and using them to create something entirely new. It’s what LEGO is all about.

Cue gyenesvi of Eurobricks, who has dismantled his 42129 Mercedes-Benz Zetros set, repurposing the pieces within it to create this; a splendid Jeep Wrangler Rubicon alternate.

LEGO of course already make an official Technic Jeep Wrangler Rubicon set, but it’s nowhere near as capable as this one. And nor does it look as good.

Gyenesvi’s 42129 B-model includes floating axle suspension front and rear, remote control drive and steering (operating via the Control+ app), a high/low range gearbox with selectable four-wheel-drive, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a detachable hardtop.

All in, it’s a far more convincing Technic Jeep than LEGO’s version, and if you own the 42129 Mercedes-Benz Zetros set you can create it for yourself, as building instructions are available.

Find out more via the link to Eurobricks above, plus you can watch gyenesvi’s 42129 alternate in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

Twiddling Knobs

We like a good knob twiddle* here at The Lego Car Blog. Get your minds out of the gutter – we’re talking hand-powered mechanical functions.

This is one such creation imbued with knob twiddling goodness, and it comes from previous bloggee M_Longer, who has repurposed the pieces found within the LEGO Technic 42121 Heavy Duty Excavator set to create it.

Loosely based on a JCB skid-steer loader, M_Longer’s 42121 alternate utilises a pair of knobs to mechanically control the arm and attachment tilt, so you’ll need to play with the knobs a bit before you can get forking. Ask your Mom.

There’s more of M-Longer’s B-Model to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where links to both further images and to building instructions can also be found. Twiddle your knob via the link above!

*Except in this case. As it’s ridiculous.

My Other’s Truck’s a Bugatti

Is there anything in the vehicular world more pointless than truck racing? OK, The Brothers Brick’s review of the blue LEGO Fiat 500 set – which is exactly the same as the yellow one, only blue – probably takes the win, but truck racing is a close second.

Why take something designed specifically to pull heavy things long distances in the most fuel efficient way, and adapt it to go a short distance quickly whilst pulling nothing? It’s like using an airliner as the basis for a powerboat.

Anyway, pointlessness of source material aside, TLCB Master MOCer Nico71 has created a rather excellent racing truck from his 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set, with steering, an eight-speed sequential gearbox, functioning suspension, a working piston engine, and a tilting cab.

Nico’s made building instructions of his alternate available too, so you can convert your own 42083 Bugatti Chiron set into this brilliant Lego version of the world’s most pointless racing vehicle at home.

There’s more of Nico’s Bugatti B-Model to see at his Brickshelf gallery by clicking here, you can read his Master MOCers interview here at TLCB via the link in the text link above, and you can watch all of the race truck’s features in action in the video below.

YouTube Video

My Other Truck’s a Mack

This excellent looking Technic Mercedes-Benz truck was discovered by one of our Elves on Brickshelf today, coming from previous bloggee mpl and being constructed solely from the parts found within the enormous Technic 42078 Mack Anthem set.

Like its parts-source, mpl’s Mercedes-Benz alternate features a detailed cab interior, opening doors, functioning steering, and a working fifth wheel.

Interestingly, mpl has chosen only to re-use the parts from the tractor portion of the 42078 set, whilst retaining the infuriating trailer. We’d probably have had a go at improving that too, but that’s only because it annoys us.

There’s more to see of mpl’s 42078 Mercedes-Benz B-Model (and that carry-over trailer) on Brickshelf via the first link above, plus you can read our review of the original set via the second.

My Other Car’s a Mustang

Is there anything more American than a Ford Mustang? OK, Type 2 diabetes and gun ownership, obviously, but apart from those laudable attributes only this* comes close; the Jeep Wrangler.

Borne from the Second World War, the Wrangler has endured for decades, carrying the same aesthetic and legendary off-road ability throughout.

Even if most Wranglers aren’t used for anything beyond transporting a human and their gun to KFC, it’s nice to know they could do a lot more.

Which brings us to this one, as built by Flickr’s Jakub Marcisz entirely from the pieces found within the 10265 Ford Mustang set.

Jakub’s captured America’s second* most iconic vehicle brilliantly from the repurposed parts of its first, and there’s more to see of this all-American-alternate via the link above.

*We’ve just remembered the Ford F-150.

Dude, We Could Totally Jump That Lake!

You might think that a Ford Mustang and a golf cart have nothing at all in common.

One’s a loud, (usually) V8-powered muscle car designed for bros who think that wheel-spin is the single greatest achievement in motoring, whilst the other is a slow, (usually) electric-powered mobility scooter designed for Donald Trump-types to avoid doing any exercise whatsoever during their ‘sport’.

But they’re actually much more alike than they first appear…

That’s because they are both driven by absolute morons. As evidenced here. And here. And here. And here. Oh, and here.

See, they’re exactly the same. Which makes the humble golf cart the perfect vehicle to recreate from the pieces found within the official LEGO 10265 Ford Mustang set, as demonstrated today by Jakub Marcisz who has done just that.

There’s more to see of Jakub’s alternate at his ‘10265 B-Model Golf Cart’ album on Flickr, where it’s only a matter of time before someone jumps it over an ornamental flower bed.

B-Grade

So often Technic’s B-Model, road graders like this Volvo G990 are the vehicles that give almost everything else we post a place to exist in the first place. So here to shine a light on their significance is Eric Trax, and this brilliant, er… 42114 B-Model…

OK, a B-Model this Volvo G990 may be, but it doesn’t feel compromised for it. Utilising around 90% of the parts from the 42114 6×6 Volvo Articulated Hauler set, Eric’s alternate redeploys the Control+ motors, control unit and app to give his grader remote control drive, steering, a three-speed automatic gearbox, and to power the main blade’s elevation.

The model features a few mechanical functions too, including a working piston engine, manually controlled ripper, and a seven-position blade angle. Best of all, Eric has released instructions for his road grader so you can build it for yourself if you own the 42114 set, and there’s more of Eric’s Volvo G990 B-Model to see on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum. Click the links above to earn yourself a B Grade.

YouTube Video