Tag Archives: crane

Medium ‘Mog Magnificence

LEGO’s 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog set earned a stellar 9/10 review here at The Lego Car Blog. With working steering, suspension, engine, all-wheel-drive with portal axles, Power Functions motors, and pneumatics, it’s one of the finest sets in Technic history. However, as is often the way, you guys can do even better.

This is MajklSpajkl’s Mercedes-Benz Unimog U400, and it’s around half the size of the official 8110 set. And yet, even more incredible functions are squeezed inside.

Like the official LEGO set, MajkleSpajkl’s Unimog features all-wheel-drive with portal axles and three differentials, in this case linked to both a four-cylinder piston engine and an XL Motor that provides the model with drive. A Servo controls the steering, simultaneously turning the steering wheel, whilst a Medium Motor drives both the front and rear power take-offs.

A further L Motor powers a pneumatic compressor for the attachment functions, and can also tilt the rear bed (if fitted) in three directions. We write ‘if fitted’, because as per the real Unimog, MajklSpajkl’s creation can be equipped with a variety of attachments, with a tilting bed, front winch, rear-mounted crane, double-auger gritter, and snow plough variously pictured here.

Both the crane and snow plough movements are controlled via pneumatics, pressurised via the on-board compressor, whilst the PTOs provide motorised drive to the crane’s rotating turntable and outriggers, and the gritter’s rotating dispenser respectively. Not only that, but the cab doors open, the cab itself can tilt, and there’s a front mounted winch option, again motorised via a PTO.

All the above are controlled via a BuWizz Bluetooth battery, allowing the U400 to be operated via mobile phone, and there’s lots more to see of MajklSpajkl’s incredible (and beautifully presented) creation at the Eurobricks forum. Click here to take a closer look at one of the best Technic models of 2020.

White House Extraction

With the U.S Presidential Election recounts being rejected or – more amusingly – undertaken and still delivering the same result, rumour has it that a vehicle like this has been spotted on its way to the White House ready to extract America’s incumbent Commander in Chief.

Seeing as he spends most of his time either Tweeting or playing golf we’re not sure why he’s so bothered, as he can definitely continue to do those exciting pastimes once retired, but it seems that hoisting Trump out through the Oval Office roof might be the only way to remove him.

Much to our entertainment we can re-enact this upcoming squatter removal fantasy here in TLCB Towers, despite being thousands of miles from Washington DC, thanks to Dawid Szmandra and this fully remote controlled Liebherr LTM 1250-5.1 mobile crane.

No less than seven Power Functions motors are hidden inside Dawid’s model, providing a huge array of remotely controlled functionality. Along with working drive, all five axles can steer; turning both in unison or in opposite directions front to rear, allowing it to both ‘crab’ and steer conventionally, whilst the enormous crane boom can rotate, elevate, and extend.

Combined with a working winch this meant we could lower the hook into various Elves’ cage and pluck the unsuspecting inhabitants out through the top, in much the same manner as we hope the U.S authorities will do on January 20th. They probably won’t drive an enraged dangling Trump to the toilet and drop him in it though…

Whilst we dream of that unlikely eventuality via a tenuous Elven simile you can check out more of Dawid’s superb Liebherr LTM 1250-5.1 crane at his Flickr album and on YouTube, where a link to building instructions is available too.

Yellow Brick Road

This is a DAF FT CF 480 Space Cab with a 4-axle Floor trailer and mobile crane. A suitably long title for a suitably long vehicle. Designed to carry bricks and stone, which makes us very pleased with this post’s title (and it enables us to post this link!*), it comes from previous bloggee Arian Janssens and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click here to follow the Yellow Brick Road!

*We’re not sorry.

The World’s Most Expensive Recovery Truck

This astonishing creation is a fully working replica of the U.S Glomar Explorer, constructed by Master MOCer and world-renowned builder Paweł ‘Sariel’ Kmieć, and you’re in for a truly remarkable story…

It’s 1968, and the Soviet ballistic missile submarine K-129 has been lost with all 98 crew, plummeting over 16,000ft to the ocean floor. It’s just a few years after the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Cold War is very real indeed. The Soviet Union is looking for its lost submarine, but 150 miles in the wrong place. The U.S. however, knows where it is…

And so begins one the strangest and most expensive recovery efforts in history, as the CIA commission the building of a ship designed solely to pluck the wreck of K-129 from the seabed to learn its secrets, without the Soviet Union knowing.

Costing $1.4billion, it was one seriously expensive recovery truck, although of course its true purpose was hidden behind a ‘drilling for magenese’ cover story, fronted by millionaire aviator and film-maker Howard Hughes.

Six years later and the 50,000 ton 600ft long ship was ready. Named the Transocean Glomar Explorer, it was positioned above the wreck using radio beacons (GPS being some way off) and the CIA began the enormous recovery of the 330ft, 2,700 long ton (before it was filled with water) nuclear-armed submarine.

A giant claw dropped through a moon pool in the centre of the ship, gripping the wreck of K-129 and winching it to the surface. However during the 16,500ft ascent a mechanical failure occurred, and two thirds of the submarine broke loose and sunk back to the ocean floor, taking with it the sought-after nuclear missiles and code book. However, two nuclear-tipped torpedoes and cryptographic machines were recovered, along with the bodes of six crew members, which were not returned to the Soviet Union, but back to the sea.

The Glomar Explorer was purposeless after the mission was (partly) completed, and in 1976 it transferred to the U.S Navy for storage in a dry-dock. In 1978 however, the ship was leased to test prototype deep sea mining equipment, before being converted to a drilling ship in the 1990s. It was finally scrapped in 2015.

Recreating this incredible feat of engineering is Sariel, whose floating brick-built replica of the Glomar Explorer measures over 3 metres in length, uses 60kg of LEGO pieces, and can really (partly) recover a lost Soviet submarine, thanks to a fully working recreation of the monumental grapple crane fitted to the real ship.

We won’t write too much more here as there’s really only one way to appreciate this spectacular build – take a look at the video above (or click here to find it in the Eurobricks discussion), and watch how one of the most impressive Lego creations of all time was built, and how it can recover nearly all of a brick-built submarine from the bottom of a swimming pool…

Three-Way

This is a Hako Multicar, a common sight on European city streets, and with a fairly rubbish name until you realise how literal it is. The only surviving nameplate from the East German IFA, Multicar have been building small versatile platforms for over eighty years, with everything from floor buffers to armoured military vehicles emerging from their German factory.

However, even a single Multicar model can be multiple, er… cars, as proven here by this superb Technic Multicar 4×4 built by Sthrom (aka Blaz62). Like Multicar’s real vehicles, Sthrom’s creation is capable of switching between several purposes, with a single chassis and cab able to be equipped with multiple attachments.

Sthrom’s Multicar chassis is filled with proper Technic functionality, including all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, and all-wheel-drive with locking differentials, hooked up to an in-line 4-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cab. The front of the cab is fitted with a multi-purpose mount, allowing a range of equipment to be attached, whilst at the rear and even broader range of machinery can be added.

Sthrom’s model can be deployed to three different uses, with a mobile crane/cherry picker (often seen deployed for street light repair), a container truck/skip lorry, and a snowplough with grit spreader. Each attachment includes a wealth of realistic functionality, all operating mechanically via hand-operated linear actuators, levers, and bevel gears.

It all adds up to being one of our favourite Technic creations of the year, and there’s loads more to see of the Sthrom’s Hako Multicar, including the chassis and each attachment separately, at Bricksafe, the Eurobricks forum, and via the excellent demonstration video below.

YouTube Video

Cherry Picked

You could say that we ‘cherry pick’ the best Lego creations that the web has to offer when we publish here at TLCB. And that’s a tenuous enough link for us to use to highlight this marvellous fully mechanical Technic cherry picker truck by previous bloggee paave.

There’s functioning ‘HOG’ steering, opening doors, working outriggers, a rotating telescopic and elevating boom, and an adjustable basket so your cherries don’t fall out, all of which are operated via good ol’ fashioned mechanics.

There’s more to see of paave’s creation at the Eurobricks forum – pop your cherry via the link.

Containment

Containers are just big boring boxes right?… Er, yes actually. They really are. But what’s inside them can be very interesting indeed. Motorcycles, exotic fruits, LEGO sets, illegal immigrants… the list is endless. All make the world a more interesting place, and pretty much anything in your home that’s come from abroad will have arrived in one of these.

The vehicles that move them about can be pretty interesting too, from the trains and trucks that transport them on land to dockside cranes and giant container ships that bring them to the shores for which they are bound.

It’s these that builder ExeSandbox has digitally created for us here, with this enormous 100,000 peice container terminal that would measure 6ft wide if it were built for real. Spectacular detailing is in evidence everywhere and there much of Exe’s amazing scene to see at his ‘Tour at the Container Terminal’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above for a lot of big boring boxes making up a creation that’s really rather interesting indeed.

Tip the Man

This superbly built MAN LE 4×4 tipper/crane truck was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. It comes from previous bloggee Damian Z aka Thietmaier and it’s a deceptively brilliant bit of building.

Firstly Damian’s MAN looks excellent, with lovely attention to detail adding much realism to the model, despite it only being eight studs in width. That realism extends to an ingenuously constructed Plafinger crane mounted between the cab and the load bed, which can unfurl and sort of work thanks to some clever parts usage that employs both System and Technic peices.

The load bed properly works though, being able to tip left or right whilst the dropsides rotate upwards (does that still make them dropsides?) to allow the load to discharge.

It’s a mighty clever design and adds a level of realism to the model that’s typically found on creations far larger. There are loads more images to see of Damian’s MAN LE 4×4 crane/tipper truck at his Flickr album, which demonstrates presentation skills as good as the model itself. Take a look via the link above.

 

My Other Truck’s a Crane

LEGO’s seemingly endless supply of yellow Technic cranes continues with the new 42108 set released this year. Whilst the yellow eight-wheeled crane formula has been done to death, the 42108 set does include instructions for a more interesting B-Model, that being a heavy duty forklift that’s far more original than the main model it shares its pieces with.

However you guys are using TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition to do even better, first with the brilliant 42108 roll-off container truck published here last month, and now with this; newcomer oficinadelegodoandre‘s excellent rotator tow-truck, also built only from the parts found within the 42108 set.

A fully working rotating crane complete with a linear-actuator operated boom lift and working winch is the centrepiece of Andre’s alternate, whilst functioning stabilisers plus front and rear axle steering feature too.

There’s more to see at Andre’s ‘42108 B-Model’ album on Flickr via the link above, and you can read the competition rules and find out more about the prizes by clicking here!

B-Roll

It’s only a few days into TLCB Lock-Down Competition and we’ve had some serious contenders already, none more so than this superb roll-off container truck from previous bloggee Marek Markiewicz (aka M_longer), who’s hoping his B-Model could earn him an awesome SBrick Plus Pro Pack.

Constructed only from the parts found within the Technic 42108 Mobile Crane set, Marek’s B-Model features a wealth of brilliant Technic functionality, including two-axle working steering (by both the steering wheel and ‘HOG’), a mechanical tipper, and a ‘roll-off’ container with a locking tailgate. A hand operated winch can then be used to return the container back onto the truck, with a ratchet ensuring it stays there when the tipper is activated.

Marek’s B-Model might even be better than the official Technic set that donated its pieces, which makes it doubly good that he’s made instructions available, so that if you own one you can build your very own roll-off container truck from the 42108 Mobile Crane set. There’s more to see of Marek’s creation on both Flickr and  at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find a link to building instructions, plus you can watch the truck in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

My Other Car is a Giant Mobile Crane

LEGO’s huge 42082 Rough Terrain Crane is one the largest Technic sets the company has ever created, with over four thousand pieces. That’s a whole, lot of bricks that can be, in the very best traditions of Lego-building, repurposed.

And that is exactly was previous Master MOCer Nico71 has done with this incredible 4×4 Crane Truck, constructed only from the parts found within the 42082 set. Nico’s B-Model (in fact for Nico this is an ‘E-Model’, as he’s constructed several alternate vehicles (and all of this) from the Rough Terrain Crane set already) deploys the set’s single motor to perform a scarcely believable six separate functions, thanks to a pair of gearboxes that multiply the motor’s outputs.

Before we get onto those though, there are a host of mechanical functions too, including leaf-spring suspension, a V8 engine driven by all four wheels, opening doors, functioning steering, and the boom’s final extension.

The single motor delivers just as much on its own, thanks to those two gearboxes, powering the crane’s two-fold unfurling and rotation, the outriggers, and the truck’s tipper, which can tip both to rear and side of the vehicle depending upon which gear is selected.

It’s a brilliant feat of engineering and one that you can explore for yourself if you own a Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane set, as Nico has made instructions for this unbelievable B-Model available via his excellent website. Click this link to head over and take a look at the complete build description, the full gallery of images, and to find a link to the building instructions so you can build this amazing model for yourself.

YouTube Video

Honey, I shrunk the 8258 (and added a trailer)

We receive a lot of requests to promote LEGO Ideas entries (the platform whereby fan designs can become real LEGO sets) here at TLCB, which we must decline every time (so please don’t send us them!). However occasionally our Elves find a creation that’s so well engineered it could be an official LEGO set. This is one of those times, and even though this model is not on LEGO Ideas, if someone told us this was a set due out later this year, we wouldn’t question it.

Built by Krall of Eurobricks and Flickr, this top-quality crane truck looks every inch a Technic set (it fact it’s inspired by the official and much larger 8258 Crane Truck), adopting LEGO’s newer more detailed style and packing it with superb functionality.

Power Functions motors give Krall’s truck remote control drive and four-wheel steering, there’s a tilting cab, and then our favourite feature; a gearbox that enables one hand-operated cog to control three separate functions; the truck’s four outriggers, the crane’s rotation, and the first of its three boom extensions.

A flatbed trailer with working support legs is thrown in too and you can see more of Krall’s superbly store-worthy creation at both Eurobricks and Flickr via the links above.

Mini-‘Mog

LEGO’s incredible 8110 Mercedes-Benz Unimog was one of the first officially licensed Technic sets and – we think – still one of the all-time greats. With a vast array of functionality, motorised, pneumatic and mechanical, it’s one of the finest ever showcases of what LEGO can do. But LEGO’s not just about the big stuff, and little builds can be equally brilliant – case in point, this beautifully presented Town-scale version of the 8110 set.

Built by previous bloggee Nikolaus Lowe it not only looks absolutely brilliant, it kinda functions too, with a posable crane, steering, and working stabiliser legs too.

There’s more to see of Nikolaus’s fantastic mini-figure Unimog at his photostream via the link above, you can read our review of the huge 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog set via the first link, and you can read some tips on how to create images as stunning as Nikolaus’s by clicking here.

Castles Made of Sand*

Everyone likes building sandcastles at the beach. OK, not everyone – some people are more Sandcastle Destroyers than Sandcastle Makers. Which is probably a microcosm for society or something. Anyway, we like building sandcastles, and today Porsche96, who last appeared here 5 years ago, is here to help.

Pictured at the beach, this is his 1.2m tall Liebherr HS 8040 dragline excavator, a seven motor bluetooth controlled engineering masterpiece. The first two motors drive the tracks, with a Medium motor in between them operating the linear actuators that widen or contract the track spacing. Another Medium motor rotates the superstructure whilst two XL and an L motor lift control the bucket and lift the enormous boom via a series of winches.

It’s a magnificent build and one you can learn more about at the Eurobricks forum, where Porsche96 has detailed the full specification and posted a video of the dragline in operation, plus you can view the full image gallery of the Liebherr HS 8040 on Flickr by clicking here. Head to the beach via the links above.

*Today’s title song.

Laying Pipes

We’re not quite over poo-based titles just yet. Discovered by one of our Elves on Brickshelf, this is gkurkowski‘s Volvo PL4809E pipe layer, a fully remote controlled Model Team replica of Volvo’s real tracked crane.

Phenomenal attention to detail and some seriously intricate pneumatics make gkurkowski’s creation spectacularly accurate, both aesthetically and in its operation.

An array of hidden Power Functions motors drive the tracks, superstructure rotation, boom reach, and the cable winch, enabling the Volvo to lay pipe as efficiently as this TLCB Writer does when he’s rushing to leave for work in the morning.

An extensive gallery of top quality photos is available to view on Brickshelf, where comparison imagery showing gkurkowski’s model alongside the real vehicle and WIP shots can be found, plus plenty more images displaying the completed crane as you see here. Click the link above to head to Brickshelf and lay some pipe.