Tag Archives: dodge

Horse Truck

Surprisingly we don’t think we’ve ever blogged a horse truck here at TLCB (and we’re reluctant to go into the Archives to check properly as there are rumours of a feral band of TLCB Elves inhabiting them).

Today doesn’t change that though, despite the title, as this lovely Dodge M-37 truck is not a horse truck per say, rather it’s here as ground support for [Maks] previously blogged UH-34D Seahorse U.S Navy helicopter.

That means no attractive horsey girls called Arabella, but still an ace scene that would have been commonplace in the 1960s U.S Navy. There’s more to see of [Maks] Dodge M-37 truck and superb Sikorsky Seahorse on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

Carryall

The title of this post could well apply to this TLCB Writer at the airport, when Mrs TLCB Writer fills a suitcase with things she’s then unable to carry. He’s basically a donkey.

So too though is the Dodge Power Wagon, which a) has one of the best names of any vehicle ever, and b) was used to carry all sorts of things over some pretty unforgiving ground back in the 1950s.

It was particularly favoured by middle eastern oil extractors, where this superb cartoonish recreation of the Power Wagon ‘Carryall’ would fit in beautifully thanks to its sandy hue.

Flickr’s Redfern1950s is the builder behind it, whose earlier covered pick-up version appeared here last year, and there are lots more superb images of his Dodge Power Wagon ‘Carryall’ available to see at his photostream via the link above.

Dodgy Drag

This Elves are very excited today. Not only does this excellent 1970 Dodge Challenger feature a hood scoop (Elf points), many drag racing modifications (more Elf points), and a brick built nitrous kit (even more Elf points), it’s fully remote controlled too, with LEGO’s monstrous Buggy Motor driving the rear wheels.

A Servo powers the steering, not that you’ll really need that at the drag strip (in this case TLCB office corridor), there’s working suspension (independent front and live-axle rear), plus opening doors, hood, and trunk.

It’s a mega bit of kit and one we fully intend to drive up and down the corridor to much Elven whooping until the battery is flat. Whilst we get on with that arduous testing you can check out more of Michael217’s awesome creation at both Eurobricks and Bricksafe – click the links to take a look!

Green Mean Machine

Being green is very fashionable these days, so here at TLCB we’re jumping on the green bandwagon with a V8-powered hot rod.

Built by TLCB regular SP_LINEUP, this ’41 Dodge hot rod pick-up is based on a real vehicle, in fact being constructed for the builder behind the full size version

There’s more of the model to see at SP’s photostream along with a host of other superb Speed Champions creations – click the link above to go green.

Dodgy Restomod

Despite the title this is not a badly-restored classic, ‘repaired’ in Billy-Bob’s garage in the hope of making a quick buck. No, restomods, when done well, are rather excellent, bringing modern tech (cooling systems, brakes, suspension etc.) to cars from a very different era of performance. Flickr’s Brick Flag has turned his very capable hand to restomoding his own ’60s Dodge A100 model, in the final of his five ‘forward-control’ classic vans. There’s more to see of Brick’s excellent creation on Flickr via the link above, and you can see all five brilliant classic vans side-by-side by clicking here.

Little Red Wagon | Picture Special

It’s 1965, and drag-racers Jim Schaeffer and John Collier have got their hands on a Dodge A100 ‘forward-control’ truck. The pair decided to install a 426 Hemi in the bed, and any non-essential items were removed. The resulting ‘Little Red Wagon’ was the world’s fastest 1/4 mile truck, setting an eleven second time at the first attempt. However, the modifications also tilted the weight bias rearward a bit…

The unintended consequences of this rear-biased weight distribution were a vehicle that proffered to drive only on its back wheels, and in fact the ‘Little Red Wagon’ could complete an entire 1/4 mile race without the front wheels ever touching the ground.

Such crowd-pleasing shenanigans caught the attention of Dodge, who not only used the ‘Little Red Wagon’ in commercials, they all arranged for its purchase by Super Stock Champion Bill Golden to use as the first ‘competition wheelstander’, a class it created single handedly.

Of course having your front wheels in the air limited steering somewhat, and the ‘Little Red Wagon’ crashed in 1969. And 1971. And 1975. That last wreck took the truck out of service, and Golden converted a new truck to continue his wheel standing antics, setting the Guinness World Record for the longest (at nearly 3/4 of a mile!) in 1977 and racing it until his retirement in 2003.

Today a recreation of the ‘Little Red Wagon’ tours alongside the wrecked original, whilst Golden’s own replacement wheel standing truck sold for over $500,000 in 2009.

Flickr’s Brick Flag, who is fast becoming one of our favourite builders here at TLCB, has converted his own Dodge A100 model into a ‘Little Red Wagon’ wheelstander, with his spectacular Model Team version amalgamating the different versions of the real truck that were built over the years.

Superb design, detailing, and decals are evident in abundance and there’s heaps more to see at Brick’s ’60s Dodge Little Red Wagon’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to head down the drag strip on just your back wheels, and here to see the real ‘Little Red Wagon’ in action courtesy of a glorious period video!

Pink Bits

If you’re new to this site and were expecting to see something else based on the title, sorry; here’s a Lego van instead. But it is built from pink bits.

Two shades of pink in fact, which recent previous bloggee Brick Flag has used in the creation of this rather excellent 1960s Dodge A100 van.

The Dodge A100’s story is a similar one to the Ford Econoline that appeared here earlier in the week, being designed to combat the influx of imported Volkswagen Type 2s. Like the Ford, the Dodge was available in pick-up and van body styles, featured a three speed gearbox (three!), and an inline 6-cylinder engine. A V8 was also available, although we have no idea why.

Brick Flag has taken the hot rod route with his superb A100 van, fitting his creation with lowrider suspension and a custom pink paint job, and there are further images available to view on Flickr. Click this link to see more pink bits.

Game of Bricks – Light Kit (42111 Dom’s Dodge Charger) | Review

Here at TLCB we’ve taken a fairly backwards approach to employee payment. As in, no one gets paid anything. But why should we have all the fun when we could not pay you guys for doing work too! Cue Francesco Frangioja, who joins us here at TLCB to review one of Game of Bricks’ new lighting kits. For free. Because he’s great. Over to Francesco!

TLCB kindly offered me the chance to pick two Game of Bricks light kits for 2020 vehicle sets, and my first choice was the light kit for the LEGO Technic 42111 Dom’s Dodge Charger set. After a couple of weeks (due to the shipment), I finally had time to install the kit in the set for which it was intended.

The lighting kit comes in a cardboard box, black and premium quality, with only the logo of the manufacturer on it.

Inside the box I found: 

  • Seven numbered plastic bags with tiny LEDs stripes and the thin, very thin cables
  • Three un-numbered plastic bags with the battery box, some “junction” cable plus the control unit and the USB connector to connect the LEDs “circuit” to the battery box
  • One booklet with the explanation of what each component is and its use/purpose
  • A remote (because I got the remote/RC version of the kit)

The actual building instructions are found on the Game of Bricks’ website; a series of “photographic” steps that show where to place the individual “light points” and how to organize (where they have to pass) the various wiring. 

I’m already familiar with the installation of this kind of product (light kits from other manufacturers) and the instructions were very similar, so I was able to follow the steps for this set very easily. Installing all the front lights is pretty simple: you have to “squeeze” the various LED element between the respective/relative transparent piece and the underneath on which the transparent one is originally fixed.

After that, you have to place the “array stripes” in the position/as shown in the photo-instructions.

Because normally there is exactly zero space between a transparent piece and the stud below it, you need to push it in place carefully even with this super thin wire. In fact, compared to the kits of other manufacturers, the peculiarity of the kit from Game of Bricks is that only a few of the “light points” are glued into LEGO brick. In practice, only the bricks of set 42111 which have to be physically replaced with counterparts with the LED already wired and glued inside, have been inserted in the light kit. All other “light points” are realised by fixing the LED element between the transparent and to be illuminated LEGO element, and the stud of the underlying piece.

The rear section was just as easy to manage; once the wiring steps are completed, you need to attach the tiny connector to a “splitter piece”, also equipped with adhesive tape to fix it in the position indicated by the photographic instructions. The connectors are very thin, so the use of a modeling plier can make the job easier. The cables, although very thin, are very resistant to traction and torsion. You just have to pay attention to the “scissors effect”: if you “staple” them too hard between brick and stud, you risk that they get cut. Therefore, you must always pay a lot of attention and procedures gently and carefully. 

The battery box requires 3 AA-LR6 batteries and includes a female USB connector. It’s up to you to choice to fit it into the model (i.e. into the trunk) or to keep it outside the model. Just remember that you will need to be able to access the on/off button.

Once the installation is finished and all the LEDs are connected, the final result is really great. 

Keep in mind that the kit in my possession is the top version, the one with the highest number of lighting points and including remote control to manage the on/off of each group and some “lightshows”.

Unlike the light kits I have tried before previously, the solutions of modular wiring and the interlocking of the lighting elements between the transparent bricks and the stud below implemented by Game of Bricks are perhaps the two most significant plus: not having bricks with pre-glued LEDs inside, you do not have to do too many replacements of parts of the official set to be illuminated, as well as the modularity of the wiring, allow you to decide from time to time if and which lighting elements to insert and which not. 

You can find the Game of Bricks lighting kit for the 42111 Dom’s Dodge Charger set, alongside a wide range of other kits designed to fit official LEGO sets, by clicking here!

Power Wagon

Is there a cooler name for a truck than ‘Power Wagon’? Nope. Dodge’s naming department nailed it back in 1945, with the nameplate lasting right up until 1980. This is a ’50s Power Wagon, with a few modifications, as built by TLCB Master MOCer Redfern1950s, and it’s magnificent.

Red’s cartoon-ised Dodge sits proudly atop monster wheels and suspension, features a brick-built removable ‘canvas’ load cover, plus a detailed engine and interior behind a removable hood and opening doors.

A multitude of top-notch imagery is available to view at Red’s Flickr photostream by clicking here, and you can read his interview as part of the Master MOCers series here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking the link in the text above to discover how he builds models like this one!

The Lawmen are Crooks, the Good Guys are Outlaws and Ever’body’s In-Laws!

We didn’t get ‘The Dukes of Hazzard’ here in TLCB’s home nation, but we wish we had. After all, what’s not to like about a Dodge Charger jumping over  a river, a tractor, a train, a barn, a truck full of outhouses, a truck full of barrels… you get the idea.

Unfortunately this meant hundreds of ’69 Dodge Chargers – now incredibly valuable cars – were sacrificed in the name of entertainment, but they were a bit less valuable in the ’70s and ’80s.

Flickr’s Chris Radbone has put one back though, with his enormous Model Team recreation of the Duke Boys’ ’69 Dodge Charger ‘General Lee’, complete with working steering, a V8 engine, a 5-speed gearbox, and authentic ’01’ decals and flag-with-slightly-racist-connotations on the roof.

His near 8kg model also includes working suspension, so presumably he can jump it over various household obstacles in proper ‘Dukes of Hazzard’ fashion. Head to Chris’ photostream to join the good ‘ol boys!

42111 Technic Fast & Furious Dom’s Dodge Charger | Set Preview

If you’re ten, you gonna want to keep reading this!…

This is the brand new for 2020 Technic ‘Fast & Furious’ Dom’s Dodge Charger set, a 1,077-piece recreation of the iconic drag racer from the very first ‘Fast & Furious’ movie.

Officially licensed by both Universal’s ‘Fast & Furious’ franchise and Dodge, LEGO’s new 42111 set continues Technic’s increase in visual realism with almost Model Team levels of detail. Fear not though Technic fans, because it’s loaded with mechanical functionality too…

A working V8 engine complete with a spinning supercharger belt, functioning steering, double-wishbone suspension, plus opening hood, doors and trunk (with NO2 bottles inside) all feature, as does a wheelie stand so you can recreate the Dodge Charger R/T’s most famous movie scene.

The new 42111 set is expected to cost around $99 when it goes on sale at the end of April, around a year ahead of the release of next (and ninth) ‘Fast & Furious’ movie. Not counting the spin-offs.

Whatever we feel about that state of cinema that the ‘Fast & Furious’ movies are now the highest grossing films ever, we have to admit that they do inspire a properly cool LEGO set. And we’re not even ten.

Alternative Lifestyle

No, we’re not talking about your cousin James.

Much of the world, including here at The Lego Car Blog, is in lockdown. The COVID-19 epidemic is claiming thousands of lives now, with the potential for millions if it reaches poorer nations. As such many of us have been instructed – by law – to remain inside. If you’re reading this post in the future; yeah this was that thing old people always talk about. And if your world is some kind of nearly-empty post-apocalyptic society; yeah this was that thing where everyone died.

On a less pessimistic note, if we all stay inside we’re probably going to be fine, the world will get back to normal, and we’ll look back and wonder what all the fuss was about. So to help us to do just that, here’s TLCB ‘Alternative Lifestyle’ suggestion, or to give it its working title; ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’.

LEGO’s brilliant 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is one of our very favourite additions to their officially licensed line-up, and – being packed with great parts – it has spawned an entire car dealership of alternate builds. This is the latest, the work of a past LEGO set designer no less, Nathanael Kuipers. Built using only parts found within the 10265 set, this Ford GT40-esque classic supercar features working steering, opening doors and engine cover, and removable V8 engine.

Nathanael has made instructions available too, so if you own a 10265 Ford Mustang set and you’re stuck at home bored you can convert your set into your very own GT40. Find out how via the link above, and if you fancy building a few more vehicles from your 10265 set, take a look below!

Dodge Charger R/T (Firas Abu-Jaber): This 10265 B-Model featured here last month, built by Flickr’s Firas Abu-Jaber this superb Dodge Charger R/T looks so perfect you’d never know it was a set alternate. It’s even modifiable with a huge supercharger like the original set, so if you’re of an Elven persuasion you can build it to your tastes too. Check out the original post here where you can find a link to all the images.

Tesla Cybertruck (Gerald Cacas): Tesla’s yet-to-be released and decidedly odd Cybertruck is not a vehicle we expected to be built from the 10265 Ford Mustang set, yet Gerald Cacas has done just that with this excellent alternate. Gerald promises instructions are on the way so you can build one yourself – take a look at its original appearance here to find the links.

DeTomaso Pantera GTS (Serge S): Powered by a Ford V8 like the Mustang from which it’s built, the DeTomaso Pantera was a genuine alternative to the Ferraris and Lamborghinis of its day. If you own the 10265 set you can build one for yourself, as Serge S has constructed this superb Pantera GTS using parts only found within it. Instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the full gallery of images via this link to Serge’s original appearance here in January, long before someone ate an illegal bat soup and started a worldwide pandemic.

Ford F100 Pick-Up (Nathanael Kuipers): The Ford GT40 at the top of this page isn’t the only 10265 B-Model to come from Nathanael, as back in October last year he published this Ford F100 inspired classic pick-up. There are opening doors, an opening hood, and a dropping tailgate, and most importantly he’s produced building instructions so that you can build it for yourself. Find out more via the original post by clicking here.

Ford Mustang GT500 (Firas Abu-Jaber): Our sixth and final 10265 Ford Mustang alternate is… a Ford Mustang. But it jumps forward about 55 years, bringing Ford’s latest 2020 GT500 into brick form. Best of all, like every other model on this page this incredible GT500 can be built using only the parts found within the 10265 set, giving you two Mustangs for the price of one! Building instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the complete image gallery by clicking here.

Finally, if you don’t wish to dismantle your 10265 Ford Mustang set but you do want something to do with it, try Game Of Brick’s spectacular lighting kit that was reviewed here by a reader at the start of the year.

And so ends our ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’ post, with six brilliant alternative models that can be constructed from just the pieces found within the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set. You can find links to all six in the text above, almost all of which include building instructions. Stay safe, stay indoors, and give alternate building a go! If the current lockdown continues we may even award some loot for your best B-Model builds.

My Other (Muscle) Car’s a Mustang

LEGO’s awesome 10265 Ford Mustang set is generating an array of equally awesome B-Model machinery. Hot on the heels of his Mustang GT500, TLCB favourite Firas Abu-Jaber has constructed another alternative from the parts found within the Creator set, and this time it isn’t a Ford. It is another classic muscle car though, and the Mustang’s arch rival; the Dodge Charger R/T.

It’s a superb looking creation too, every bit as playable as the set that donated its parts and you’d never know it was constrained by virtue of being a B-Model. Plus, just like the original 10265 Creator set, Firas’ Dodge Charger can also be built in modified form too, with the option of a huge supercharger protruding from the hood to satisfy your inner seven year old / Elf, as shown below.

You might notice that two of the three images here show Firas’ design constructed from black parts not available in the 10265 Ford Mustang set, but fear not – it can be built in blue as a genuine B-Model. Black is the colour the Charger is most famous for though, so it’d be rude not to publish these images alongside the 10265 alternate version.

There’s much more to see of Firas’ incredible ’68 Dodge Charger R/T B-Model at his Flickr album, you can read his interview here at The Lego Car Blog as part of the Master MOCers Series by clicking these words, and you see the other alternative models built from the pieces found within the 10265 Ford Mustang set via the search box that can be found on every page.

Summer of ’69*

LEGO’s new 10265 Ford Mustang set has us yearning for more officially-licensed muscle cars. There’s hope too, as this particular Detroit classic has already been released as a Speed Champions set. It is of course the stupendous ’69 Dodge Charger R/T, the wildest muscle car of the era, and one that’s become famous to whole new generation of fans thanks to the Fast and Furious movie franchise.

This brilliant recreation of Dodge’s over-powered, under-suspended icon is the work of previous bloggee Tony Bovkoon, who has built his Charger R/T to match the scale and detail of the official Ford Mustang set. Working steering, opening doors, hood, trunk, and a detailed interior all feature, and there’s more to see of this superb creation at Tony’s ’69 Dodge Charger R/T album on Flickr via the link above.

*Nope, we’re not doing a link to today’s title song, because any DJ** that ends the night by playing it needs to go have a quiet think about how they can do better.

**For our younger readers; a DJ is sort of like if your Spotify playlist were a person.

Santa-Charged

We already know Father Christmas is a pretty cool dude. He owns an array of machinery (according to you lot), from hot rods to hover cars, and Supras to snowmobiles, and now it’s the turn of Santa’s sleigh to get an upgrade. Flickr’s tony bovkoon has given Saint Nick’s flying present distribution system a lot more attitude, courtesy of a side-piped Dodge Challenger! We’re not sure what the V8 behind those side pipes is for, seeing as there is no way for any of its power to get to the snow, but it sure looks cool. Head to Tony’s album on Flickr to take a look!