Tag Archives: 1930s

In the Bank

Lego Brooklands 1935

It’s time for some history here at TLCB, because we are – at heart – complete nerds.

The world’s first purpose-built racetrack (or what’s left of it) lies not far from TLCB Towers. The Brooklands race circuit opened in 1907, built partly for manufacturers of the newly emerging auto-industry to test their cars, and partly because driving really quickly is bloody good fun.

Measuring just under 3 miles long the Brooklands track was built from uncoated concrete banking, which in places reached 30ft high, and was simply unimaginably steep, far steeper than any modern banked circuit. With no safety barrier at the top and cars routinely getting airborne over the bumpy concrete the spectacle was incredible, and crowds topped a quarter of a million in the circuit’s hay-day.

The outbreak of the First World War saw Brooklands requisitioned by the War Office, as the site also included an aerodrome, becoming the UK’s largest aircraft manufacturing centre by 1918. The end of the war saw motor racing return the the track, alongside the continuation of aircraft manufacturing, but when Hitler decided that Germany hadn’t quite finished with Europe yet motor racing at the track ceased for good.

During the Second World War the Brooklands site became the hub of Hawker fighter and Wellington bomber manufacturing, amongst other aircraft, and the track’s survival as a piece of British heritage sadly, but necessarily, came second to the war effort. Trees were planted on the track to disguise it from German bombers, and whole sections ripped up to expand the runways.

By the end of the war the track was in a poor state, and the site was sold to Vickers-Armstrong to continue operations as an aircraft factory, at one time laying claim to being the largest aircraft hanger in the world. However as the UK’s aircraft manufacturing industry declined the Brooklands site was gradually sold off, becoming a business park, a supermarket, and the Mercedes-Benz World driving instruction track.

Today not much of the original circuit remains, but what does is managed by the Brooklands Museum, who are endeavouring to preserve possibly the most important motor racing, aeronautical and war-time manufacturing site in the world. A recent heritage grant aims to return both the aero-buildings and the famous Finishing Straight to their former glory, and a section of the incredible concrete banking is still standing. You can even take a car on it if you’re feeling brave.

If you’re in the UK and you get the chance to visit the Brooklands Museum we highly recommend it, but for our readers further afield you can get an idea of the insanity of the vintage racing that once took place there courtesy of this lovely scene recreating Brooklands circa-1935 by Flickr’s Redfern. There’s more to see of his 1930s Maserati, its racing counterpart, and his wonderfully recreated Brooklands banking his photostream. Click the link above to step back in time.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jap Rod

Lego 1932 Ford Deuce Coupe Takehito Yamato

Japan’s product design may not have a reputation for originality, but the Japanese can take almost anything pioneered by another part of the world and make it better. See the Mazda MX-5 Miata, the Toyota Land Cruiser, the Nissan GT-R, and pretty much every electronic device ever invented.

We can probably add hot rods to that list now too, thanks to this gorgeous 1932 ‘Takehito Yamato’ Ford Deuce Coupe. This Lego recreation of the real-world car comes from Master MOCer and previous bloggee Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74, and he’s replicated the original vehicle superbly in Lego form, even building a beautiful period-correct workshop in which to house it.

There’s more to see of the Takehito Yamato at Norton74’s photostream – click the link above to head over to somewhere inbetween America and Japan.

Lego 1932 Ford Deuce Coupe Takehito Yamato

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Not Rod

Lego Ford Model A Tudor

Ford’s Model T is undoubtedly the most remarkable car in history. The world’s first mass-produced car, constructed using the world’s first production line*, built in at least 12 countries, and with production spanning eighteen years, the Model T was at one point more popular than all the other cars on sale worldwide put together.

With a 50% global market share, Henry Ford had a quite a daunting task to replace it, so – to use a phrase of the time (probably) – he dilly-dallied for ages, allowing competitors to catch-up and erode his company’s position.

Finally, at the end of 1927, the Model T’s replacement was ready. The new Model A was a huge jump over the old T, with twice the power, a 50% higher top speed, and – more importantly – conventional driver controls.

The Model A went on sale in December 1927, and just over a year later a million had been sold. 6 months after that the figure passed two million, and by the time production ceased in 1932 almost 5 million Model As had been produced across nine different body styles.

This version is one of the most common, the ‘Tudor’ sedan, recreated wonderfully in mini-figure scale by TLCB favourite _Tiler.

Unusually, _Tiler hasn’t hod-rodded his Model A, leaving it instead as Henry Ford intended. A staple of the hod rodding scene, due its popularity and readily available parts supply, the Model A probably exists in greater numbers today as a hot rod than it does in its production form.

However there’s something very cool about seeing an original un-modded A, and you can check out more of _Tyler’s, along with his collection of hot rods, via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Blow Job

Lego Blower Bentley

LegoGallifrey‘s ‘blower’ Bentley is not a new build, but it is superb, and it’s been recently updated to include even more period realism, plus – and most importantly – it allows us to post a smutty title.

Built between 1927 and 1931, the Bentley 4½ litre was designed to take on the European performance cars of the time, and with a supercharger fitted (or ‘blower’ as it was known), power jumped by over 100bhp to 240, allowing Bentley to set several speed records, including a recorded 138mph at Brooklands.

Only 55 of the 720 Bentley 4½ litres built received a supercharger and they command truly astronomical prices today, so if you want one LegoGallifrey’s version is probably as close as you’ll get. Head over to Flickr via the link above to take a closer look.

Lego Bentley 4 1/2 Litre Blower

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Art Lego

Lego 1939 Delahaye 136

France probably lays claim to our least favourite car in the looks department. The first generation Peugeot 308 was built at the very lowest point of French automobile design, being both painfully dull and yet somehow also managing to resemble a deep-sea fish that’s washed up on the shore.

Thankfully those dark days have passed as the French have re-discovered some of their joy de vivre, so we’re holding out hope that French car design can come full circle, and give us something like this again.

The fantastically luxurious 1939 Delahaye 136 was an utterly gorgeous machine, and probably took the art deco school of design further than any other car has ever managed. Sadly production was cut short by Hitler being a dick, and unfortunately post-war France then had no place for a vehicle manufacturer as opulent as Delahaye, with the brand quietly slipping away in the 1950s.

We remember when French design ruled the roads thanks to previous bloggee Lino Martins, who has recreated the Delayhaye 136’s incredible art deco shape beautifully in standard LEGO bricks. There’s more of his spellbinding creation to see at his photostream – click the link above to visit France circa 1939.

Lego Delahaye 136

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Bulldog

Lego Lanz Bulldog

This weird agricultural oddity is a Lanz Bulldog tractor. 220,000 of these were built in Germany from the early 1920s up until 1960, making it one of the most popular European tractors of all time. Many Germans still use the word ‘bulldog’ as a generic name for tractors today.

The Bulldog’s popularity was down to its incredibly crude single cylinder hot bulb engine. Yup, just one cylinder, which came in a capacity of up to 10 litres, but which could run on just about anything – crucial in war-torn and then recovering (and then war-torn again) Europe.

This Town-style recreation of the vintage tractor comes from previous bloggee Peter Schmid on Flickr, and you can see more of his Lanz Bulldog build at his photostream by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Chicken Coop

Lego Hot Rod

We’re not really sure why this ’34 Ford Coupe hot rod is called the Chicken Coupe, but we do know that we love it. TLCB regular _Tiler is the builder, and as always it’s both beautifully built and photographed. See more at the link.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Red Bed

Lego Ford Hot Rod 1932

Now that’s an engine. Visibility may be slightly compromised though. No matter, this ridiculous Ford ’32 hot rod pick-up by Flickr’s Tim Inman is unlikely to be going round many corners. See more at the link above.

Tagged , , , , ,

Stay Classy

Lego Technic Alfa Romeo 1932

Long time readers (and probably even short time readers) will have worked out that this is not a classy blog. However every so often we put on a shirt, leave the decaying ruin that is TLCB Towers, and sit in a real restaurant to eat something that actually came out of the ground. With metal cutlery and everything.*

Anyhoo, this is one of those moments, as this could well be the classiest creation that we’ve published all year. Built by marthart of Brickshelf it’s a 1932 Alfa Romeo Spider, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. It also has a working engine, steering, leaf spring suspension, and opening doors and hood.

There’s more to see at marthart’s Brickshelf account via the link above. Put on a tie and join us there.

Lego Technic 1932 Alfa Romeo

*As opposed to staying in the office eating Sugar Puffs straight from the bag again.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

The Right Profile

profile-01

Red has produced a monster-sized vintage racing car. Loosely based on a 1932 Alfa Romeo, this car has the aerodynamic streamlining that was all the fashion at the time smooth built in bricks. It also features working steering and an engine that uses so many ray-guns as greebles that it could almost be part of sci-fi SHIPtember.

Red has included multiple views in his uploads but we really liked the straight profile shots, which are an unusual way to present a MOC. Click this link to Flickr to more views and under the bonnet or click this link to hear the song that we stole today’s title from. Meanwhile, here’s the left profile:

profile-02

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Back in Black

Lego Technic Ford 5 Window Coupe Hot Rod

This lovely Ford 5-Window Coupe hot rod was discovered on Brickshelf by one of our Elves. It comes from newcomer TeddyMagenta, and besides looking the part it’s got a working piston engine, 4-speed gearbox, functioning steering, front and rear suspension, and opening doors and boot-lid. There’s lots more to see of this excellent build at Teddy’s Brickshelf gallery – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Ford Hot Rod

Tagged , , , , , ,

Not a Car…

Lego German Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern

It is in fact a Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern steam locomotive operated by Deutsche Reichsbahn, and, if we’re being honest, we only know that from the builder’s description. But we are a car blog so European railways of the 1930s are a bit outside of our (admittedly limited) skill set.

This stunning model is the work of previous bloggee, TLCB favourite, and Master MOCer BricksonWheels, and it’s a beautifully thought-out build. With exquisite custom 3D printed wheels and valve train (see the image below), plus two Power Functions XL motors and in-built IR receivers driving it, the Polarstern locomotive demonstrates an incredible attention to detail.

Lego 3D Printed Steam Train Parts

You can read further details of both the build and the real train, and see the full gallery of stunning imagery, at BricksonWheels’ photostream – click here to buy a ticket.

Lego Steam Locomotive BricksonWheels

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Flying Scotsman

Lego The Flying Scotsman

Hitting over 100mph in 1934, the Flying Scotsman steam locomotive is one of the world’s greatest trains. This outstanding Lego replica is the work of Certified LEGO Professional Ryan McNaught (aka TheBrickMan), and it’s built from over 165,000 LEGO bricks, measuring over 10ft in length. There’s more to see at Ryan’s Flickr photostream – click the link above to climb on board.

Tagged , , , , ,

Life and Death on the Track

Lego Ambulance Hot Rod

‘Motorsport Can Be Dangerous’ – so say the triangular signs attached to racetrack fences. It’s true, it can, but TLCB maths states that as the danger involved in something rises, so does the coolness of the thing in question (and therefore the more tempting it is to try it*).

Flickr builders Lino Martins and Tim Inman have built the perfect vehicles to explain this cultural phenomenon with their ’31 Ford ‘Flatline’ ambulance hot rod (above) and ’67 Cadillac ‘Hells Bells’ hearse hot rod (below). They’re a ridiculously cool way to reach the hospital (or exit it in a bag), and you can see more of each build via the links in the text above.

*Apart from The Salmon Mousse.

Lego Cadillac Hot Rod Hearse

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

The Eliminator

Lego ZZ Top Eliminator Hot Rod

ZZ Top’s ‘Eliminator’ hot rod is very nearly as famous as the band themselves. This ace Miniland replica of the iconic ’33 Ford Coupe comes from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg and there’s more to see here.

Lego ZZ Top Eliminator Car Ford Coupe

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: