Tag Archives: 1930s

Cartoon Traction Avant

This wonderfully cartoonish Citroen Traction Avant was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. Constructed by KMbricklab, a wealth of clever techniques have been deployed to accentuate the classic Citroen’s features, and there’s a whole lot more of the model to see on Flickr. Click the link above to forward yourself there.

Cream Cracker


After more than a few posts that definitely weren’t cars at all, we’re back on brief with previous TLCB competition winner 1saac W.’s beautifully presented ‘32 Ford hot rod. Disc wheels, a detailed exposed engine, and an Adventurers windshield create an accurate period aesthetic and there’s more to see on Flickr at the link.

Jurassic Re-Boot

Hollywood loves a reboot. Cue ‘Top Gun, Maverick’, ‘Fast and Furious 10’, anything with ‘Star Wars’ in the title, and ‘Jurassic World’. That said, a genetically-modified dino-weapon running amok in a theme park is a winner in TLCB Office. Because we’re 6.

Also rebooting a dinosaur-based classic is chriselliott.art, whose marvellous vintage half-ton ute inspired by the 5975 ‘T-Rex Transport’ Adventurers set was suggested to us by a reader.

Clever techniques, gorgeous presentation, and a conspicuously absent T-Rex can all be seen at Chris’ photostream. Click the link above to reboot.

Hauling up Hills

This is a BR44, a heavy steam locomotive built from 1926 to 1949 to haul giant loads across Germany’s mountainous regions.

Able pull 1,200 tons through the hills, or 600 tons up steep inclines, the BR44’s were hugely impressive machines. We suspect much of what they hauled from the late-’30s was rather different from that originally intended though, with a simplified versions (ironically given the least simple title of ‘Übergangskriegslokomotives’) designed to speed up production during Germany’s phase of, er…. European ambition.

This brilliant brick-built recreation of the BR44 comes from Bricks_n_Trucks, who has not only replicated the design beautifully, there are two Power Functions L-Motors and a BuWizz 2.0 hidden inside to bring it to life.

There’s more of Bricks’ creation to see on Flickr, and you can travel into the mountains of wartime Germany via the link in the text above.

Anglo-French Relations

The British and French don’t often collaborate. In fact over much of their history it’s been quite the opposite, with the two countries regularly trying to blow one another up.

These days (and post-Brexit) there’s just a simmering dislike that only manifests itself in sport and stealing one another’s scallops, but despite this there have been some notable (and remarkable) collaborations between the two nations.

The longest under-sea tunnel in the world, the world’s first supersonic airliner, and Kristin Scott-Thomas are all worthy partnerships, and back in the 1930s Britain and France worked together on cars too.

This is the Bugatti Type 41 Park Ward, a luxurious grand limousine from the golden era of coach-building.

Park Ward, better known for re-bodying Rolls Royces, created this beautifully opulent vehicle upon Bugatti’s fourth Type 41 (Royale) chassis for Captain Cuthbert W. Foster, a department store heir, in 1933.

Still to this day one of the largest cars ever built, the car now resides in a museum in France, where it’s worth more than all the scallops in the English channel.

Fortunately Flickr’s 1corn has created one that – at 1:25 scale – is rather more attainable, and there’s more to see of his wonderful brick-built Bugatti Type 41 at his photostream; Click the link above to take the Channel Tunnel and fight over some marine molluscs.

Poop-Poop!

Is there any car more worthy of a Toad-of-Toad-Hall-style ‘Poop-Poop!’ exclamation than this one?

The 1928-’32 Mercedes-Benz SSK is the very definition of Gatsby-esque opulence, with this Speed Champions scale recreation by Flickr’s Pixeljunkie capturing its excess brilliantly.

Yellow bodywork, shiny bits, bonnet straps, and an over-sized Mercedes-Benz badge ensure the peasants can’t miss you, and there’s more to see at Pixel’s photostream via the link.

Click the link above for even more Poop-Poopery.

Handled Like It’s on Rails

This post features something on rails, carrying something on rails, craning something on rails. Previous bloggee Pieter Post is the builder behind this railway-based Inception, with his 1930s diorama depicting a Henschel ‘Brauns’ narrow-gauge steam engine being lowered onto its new route by a fully motorised Ardelt 25-ton railway crane. Each is beautifully constructed and there’s more to see on Flickr via the links above.

Tudor Taxi

TLCB’s historical accuracy is pretty flakey, but even we know this isn’t what Henry VIII used to get to whichever beheading event was on that week. This stupendous build is Ford Model A, nicknamed the ‘Tudor’ because it had two doors. Lots of cars probably had two doors at the time, but as 90% of all the cars on the roads were Fords, they got the ‘Tudor’ moniker. This one comes from TLCB favourite _Tiler, who has captured the late ’20s sedan wonderfully, constructing it atop a Fabuland old-timey chassis. Hail a ride in 1930’s New York via the link above!

Ruby Ruby Ruby Ruby*

This splendid 1935 Austin Ruby was found by one of our Elves today, and it features more ingenious (and somewhat sketchy) building techniques than we think we’ve ever seen on one model before.

A stretched rubber band forms the grille, angles are created via the half-attachment of pieces, and the running board/rear wheel arch is attached with string!

Whilst it wouldn’t exactly pass LEGO’s requirements for robustness, the resulting model looks absolutely lovely, and there’s more to see at the photostream of Owen Meschter, who owns the mind behind it.

Click the link above and try not to knock any pieces off…

*Ah-ah-ah-ah-ah-aaah. Today’s title song. Obviously.

Vintage Erection

If the content of TLCB’s spam folder is to be believed, we’re in for a future of certain erectile disfunction. However, not all old things have trouble getting it up, as this unusual GAZ-AA ‘Tower Wagon’ by Kent Kashiwabara proves.

The GAZ-AA was effectively a Ford Model A constructed under license in Russia, long before the two countries hated one another and the Soviet Union began buying everything from Fiat.

This particular GAZ-AA is based on the Model-A pick-up, but features an extending platform tower mounted behind the cab that can whir skywards, in Kent’s model thanks to some cunningly concealed Power Functions motors.

Remote control drive and steering also feature and there’s more to see of Kent’s erection at his ‘GAZ’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to get it up.

The Last Dakota* in Denmark

The Douglas DC-3 ‘Dakota’ revolutionised air travel before the jet age. And after it to some degree. Originating as a 1930s military design the DC-3 could fly 1,500 miles at 200mph, taking off and landing on short runways, and carrying 6,000lbs of cargo.

The Dakota was so versatile and reliable that it is still in service all around the world, although not in Denmark where just one unit remains airworthy. Previous bloggee Henrik Jensen has built this aircraft, as operated by a non-profit preservation, recreating it beautifully in brick form.

Wonderful techniques and authentic decals add to the realism and there’s more to see of Henrik’s Douglas DC-3 on Flickr – click the link above to fly in Denmark’s last Dakota.

*Today’s (excellent) title song.

Blue Bulldog

We round off a busy day here at TLCB Towers with this, TLCB debutant eastpole77‘s charming vintage Lanz Eilbulldog tractor. Inventive parts use, clever building techniques, and excellent presentation are all present and there’s more of eastpole77’s creation to see via the link above.

Vintage Velocity

An Elf wandered into the office this morning. It had tyre tracks down its middle and was jabbering dejectedly. Sigh.

A shuffle out to the corridor revealed several more cartoonishly tyre-tracked Elves and the cause, overturned in the corner, wheels spinning furiously.

With the delighted culprit apprehended we can take a closer look at their weapon of choice, and it’s a rather wonderful thing.

Built by Lego-building legend Sariel, this is a fully remote controlled 1931 Mercedes-Benz SSKL, powered by two LEGO Buggy Motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, delivering up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system.  That explains the tyre tracks then.

A Servo Motor steers the front wheels (and turns the steering wheel), which are suspended via wishbones and torsion bars, whilst the rear is suspended via a live axle.

There’s lots more of Sariel’s creation to see at his ‘Mercedes-Benz SSKL’ album on Flickr, plus you can watch the model in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video

Catalina

This beautiful aircraft is a PBY-6A Catalina, as built by Henrik Jensen of Flickr. Introduced in 1936 over 3,300 Catalina were constructed, making it one of the most widely used flying boats during the second world war. The Catalina saw service in maritime patrol, night bombing, anti-submarine warfare, and search and rescue, with some still in use today as fire fighting water bombers.

The PBY-6A Catalina depicted here was operated by the Royal Dutch Air force, and has been recreated wonderfully by Henrik using a myriad of clever building techniques, with a few stickers enhancing the realism too. There’s more to see of Henrik’s Catalina at his photostream – click the link above to head there and take a look.

Atlantic

The ocean that separates TLCB from the majority of you reading this has been used several times in car naming. This is perhaps the most impressive car to wear the oceanic nameplate, the Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic. Just four Atlantics were built, meaning each is worth roughly a trillion dollars, but fortunately thanks to a reader suggestion this one is rather more attainable. RGB900 is the builder and he’s captured the 1930s masterpiece beautifully in a tiny scale. Head to Flickr to see more.