Tag Archives: ford

Ditch Witch

From a science fictiony machine about which we know absolutely nothing to real world machine about which we know absolutely nothing. Yay!

This is a Witch Ditch JT520 and we genuinely have no idea at all what it’s for. Luckily the trailer it’s on is being pulled by a Ford F-150 crew cab pick-up, so blogging points are redeemed!

The Ford F-150, twin-axle trailer, and the aforementioned mystery contraption are all the work of Damian Z (aka Theitmaier), each is wonderfully detailed, and there’s more to see of all three models on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look.

One Round Tile

We have another one of your suggestions today, and another excellent set alternative!

This wild-looking Mercedes-Benz AMG GT R Roadster comes from previous bloggee Serge S of Flickr, who has constructed it from only the parts found within the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set. Plus a single black circular tile for the Mercedes-Benz badge, but what’s a single black circular tile between friends?

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see at Serge’s photostream via the link above.

[Hoonitruck]

Ken Block’s wild twin-turbo ‘Hoonitruck’ has appeared on these pages before, but today we bring you a rather smaller recreation of the Gymkhana icon. This one is the work of ianying616, who has captured the aesthetic of the drift-happy movie star brilliantly in Model Team form.  There’s a detailed interior, full roll cage, a realistic* engine, plus opening doors and hood, and there’s more to see of ianying’s build at his photostream via the link.

*Although not the right engine. V8’s are over.

Oldtimey Thursday

OK, there’s no such thing as ‘Oldtimey Thursday’, except perhaps at Shady Oaks nursing home where every day is oldtimey. But today is a Thursday and we do have some oldtimey vehicles!

TLCB Elves of course, do not like oldtimey winga-dinga vehicles one bit. They’re slow, they don’t have racing stripes, and they look silly. But the Elves don’t write these posts, we do (they can’t write at all really. We tried giving them a box of crayons once but they ate them), and on occasion we do quite like oldtimey winga-dinga vehicles.

These excellent oldtimey examples all come from Łukasz Libuszewski of Flickr, and are (from top to bottom); a Ford Model T in convertible and pick-up variants, a lovely 1920s postal truck, and a Cadillac V16.

Each is built and presented beautifully and there’s more to see of these, plus lots more brick-built oldtimers, at Łukasz photostream. Click the link above to make the trip. Winga-dinga…

Clean Coupe

Another day and another Elf returns to TLCB Towers, this time with something rather shiny. Usually this means they’ve stolen someone’s keys, but in this case it is actually a Lego creation. Built by ianying616, this ’32 Ford Coupe hot rod looks superb, helped by some most excellent photography and presentation. There’s more to see at the link above, and you can learn some simple tricks to present your models as professionally as ianying616 has by clicking here.

East Coast Style

You don’t need a million bricks and a friend at (or to work for) The Brothers Brick to be appear on a great Lego blog. OK, you do, but you don’t need those things to appear here! A few well selected pieces, excellent presentation, and talent will be just fine, as proven here by Tim Henderson and his lovely ‘East Coast Style’ ’32 Ford hot rod. Based on a real car built in the late ’50s, Tim’s build captures the look superbly and there’s more to see at his photostreamplus you can see what we look for in the models that we feature via our Submission Guidelines page here.

Circuit of Speed Champions | Picture Special

We’ve all dreamed of building our own racing circuit from LEGO bricks, with tyre barriers, grandstands, food stands, a pit lane, maybe even a Dunlop bridge…

Well SpaceMan Nathan has actually gone and done it, taking fourteen official LEGO Speed Champions sets and creating this wonderful race track diorama, complete with of all the above and more!

Measuring 144 by 112 studs, Nathan’s Circuit of Speed Champions includes everything a race track should, with a crowd of cheering race fans present to watch to the on-track battle.

There’s loads more to see of Nathan’s beautifully presented circuit diorama at his photostream on Flickr – join the action trackside via the link above!

RRRNEEEUUUURRGGGHHHHH!

It’s said that pictures say a thousand words. This picture only says one though, and that word is ‘RRRNEEEUUUURRGGGHHHHH!’

Flickr’s Johnni D is the builder behind it, with a little photographic help from a fellow Flickr-er, and there’s more to see of his ’33 Ford hot rod via the link above.

Orange Juice

Flickr’s Brick Flag has appeared here twice recently, with his excellent American 1960s ‘forward control’ vans, the Dodge A100 and Ford Econoline. We tend not to feature the same builder repeatedly in quick succession, but had we not today there would have been an Elven riot. Plus, – more importantly – we think this is bloody cool too.

The reason for the Elves’ excitement is obvious; Brick Flag‘s latest build is bright orange, features a racing stripe, wheelie-bar, ground-scraping stance, a huge rear wing, oh – and it has ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine directly on its rear axle’, to quote the builder. This has also allowed for a bench seat to be fitted in place of the original two-seat set-up, which sounds safe.

Even Brick Flag admits this ‘makes no sense whatsoever’, but if you’re a TLCB Elf few things do, and that’s the way they like it. There’s more to see of Brick’s wildly modded ‘Pro Street’ ’60s Ford Econoline at his photostream – click the link above to fire up ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine’ and become an orange blur.

Econoline

From one simple, basic workhorse to another now, and possibly the most blandly-named vehicle in American history, the Ford Econoline.

Worried by Volkswagen’s assault on the budget van and pick-up market with the Type 2 Transporter, America’s domestic auto-makers began to build their own ‘forward-control’ pick-ups in the 1960s.

Ford based their design on the Falcon sedan which helped to keep costs low, as did leaf-spring suspension both front and rear, and a manual gearbox with just three speeds.

The Econoline did feature a racing stripe down the side though, and today we think it looks rather good, particularly as the Econoline had become a standard and far less interesting two-box van by the 1970s.

This superb Model Team recreation of the 1960s original comes from Brick Flag of Flickr, who has captured the 1961 Econoline pick-up wonderfully, including an excellent brick-built version of the ‘FORD’ stamped tailgate.

There’s more to see of Brick Flag’s model at his photostream – click the link above jump back to ’61.

My Other Bird is a Horse

Nothing says ‘America’ like voter fraud apparently*. A close second however, is the Ford F-150 pick-up, especially in Raptor specification and with stars-and-stripes FORD lettering across the front.

This fantastic recreation of America’s favourite uprated off-road pick-up comes from Master MOCer and vehicle-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, who has created it entirely from the parts found within the official 10265 Ford Mustang set.

Despite the limitations of its parts-base, Firas’ F-150 Raptor not only looks superb, it features working steering, opening doors, a functioning sunroof, a dropping tailgate, and a detailed engine underneath the opening hood.

There’s much more to see of Firas’ 10265 B-Model at his ‘Ford F150 Raptor’ album on Flickr, where around twenty stunning images are available to view.

You can also find building instructions for the Raptor available at Firas’ excellent new website Bricks Garage, where instructions for over a dozen of Firas’ builds are available for download, including a range of set alternates. Find out more here!

*Yes we are taking the piss.

My Other Car’s a Fiat

LEGO’s brilliant 10265 Ford Mustang set has been turned into all sorts of B-Models by the enterprising online community. So too has the equally marvellous 10271 Fiat 500 set, but this is the first time one set has been used to create the vehicle from the other!

This excellent 1960s Ford Mustang fastback comes from Flickr’s Gerald Cacas, and it’s been built only from the parts found within the 10271 Fiat 500 set. Like the official LEGO version Gerald’s model includes opening doors, trunk and hood, under which there’s the option of fitting a gloriously oversized hood-protruding engine. Combine that with it being both yellow and adorned with racing stripes and you have a car almost made for TLCB Elves.

There’s more of the creation to see of Gerald’s Ford Mustang 10271 Alternate Build album, where you can also enquire about building instructions should you wish to convert your own 10271 Fiat into Ford’s iconic ’60s pony car.

Now if only someone could build a Fiat 500 from the 10265 Ford Mustang set to complete the circularity…

Interceptor Utility

American police cars are cooler than those we have in TLCB’s home nation. Oh sure, we have the occasional fast pursuit car (which include some surprisingly awesome models), but it’s mostly economy hatchbacks. Not so in the USA, where police cars have names like ‘Charger Police Pursuit’ and ‘Interceptor’. It’s the latter we have here, a Ford Explorer with an Ecoboost V6, all-wheel-drive, and a bar on the front for ramming criminals. Ralph Savelsberg is the builder and there’s more to see of his excellent NYPD Ford Interceptor Utility by clicking here.

Airborne Anglia

Harry and Ron are heading back to school, thanks to Ron’s Dad’s 1960s Ford Anglia 105E and a sprinkling of magic. TLCB regular Jonathan Elliott has recreated the flying Ford beautifully and there’s more to see at his photostream. Head to Hogwarts via the link above.

Furry Road

Don’t worry, we’re not referring to one of your Mom’s old movies.

TLCB Elves are grumpy today. Despite a slew of finds they missed this one, which we instead saw on The Brothers Brick. And they love Mad Max. We’re not sure they follow the plot, but stuff explodes quite regularly and that seems to please them.

Anyway, those of you with a keener eye will have noticed that something is amiss with Michael Kanemoto‘s rendition of the ‘V8 Interceptor’ from the movie, what with it being red and yellow and driven by a cartoon dog.

That’s because Michael’s ‘V8 Interceptor’ is part of a wider ‘Fab Max’ collaboration, mixing LEGO’s primary-coloured 1980s Fabuland theme with George Miller’s post-apocalyptic road movie, and in doing so creating a desolate wasteland inhabited by cute (but violent) anthropomorphic critters. Kinda like TLCB Towers.

Complete with officer Max “Bark”-tansky of the Fab Force Patrol there’s more to see of Micheal’s ‘Fab Max V8 Interceptor’ via the link above (plus you can also find the original black version of the car which is frankly boring by comparison), and – if you’re as in to this theme as we are – you can see another ‘Fab Max – Furry Road’ creation blogged at TLCB by clicking here.