Tag Archives: ford

Ford F100

As mentioned in today’s other post, the world has seemingly jumped backwards 50 years to the 1970s. There’s record inflation, war, nothing works, and everyone’s on strike. Having missed the misery of ’70s first time round, this TLCB Writer is wallowing in the resurgence of the aforementioned afflictions via another ’70s vehicle, the humble Ford F100 pick-up truck.

This fantastic 1972 Ford F100 is the work of Jakub Marcisz, who has recreated the classic pick-up beautifully in Model Team scale. A wonderfully detailed working V8 engine, life-like interior, opening doors, hood and tailgate, functioning steering, and some of the best brick-built ‘chromework’ ever ever seen all feature, and there’s lots more to see at Jakub’s photostream.

Join the queue for over-priced petrol next to the picket-line at the link above!

LEGO Technic 42154 Ford GT | Set Preview

Just before Christmas we posted here stating that TLCB Elves had been locked back in their cages for the festive break. Well that wasn’t entirely true…

Most of our workers were indeed locked back up of course. However, a few ‘lucky’ Elves were ‘asked’ to join a crack team of ‘volunteers’, selected for their guile, cunning, and ability to fit through The LEGO Company’s air-conditioning ducts, and sent on a special mission.

Today we can share the result of the aforementioned adventure, and what a result it is. This is the brand new for 2023 LEGO Technic 42154 Ford GT.

Marketed within LEGO’s ‘adult’ range of 18+ sets (which has everything to do with product positioning rather than building complexity), 42154 brings one of the most iconic recent real-world supercars to the Technic range, and it looks terrific!

Constructed from 1,466 pieces, 42154 captures the real Ford GT brilliantly, with a slew of panels available in this beautiful dark blue for the first time. Interestingly this is because LEGO have chosen to release 42154 as a road car, as opposed to the endurance racer specification chosen for the 42125 Ferrari 488 GTE AF Corse set. No doubt that 42154 looks superb as a road car, but we think it might have been nice to have the two sets as rival racers.

Like the 42125 Ferrari 488 GTE set, the 42154 Ford GT is packed with Technic functionality, including a working mid-mounted V6 engine, all-wheel suspension, functioning steering, opening doors, and a deployable rear wing, with the aesthetics enhanced via authentic decals and a pair of excellent racing stripes.

The new Technic 42154 Ford GT set will reach stores early this year, and will probably cost a bit too much, but nevertheless it looks to be a glorious addition to LEGO’s superb officially-licensed Technic line-up.

Our Elves’ mission has revealed the 2023 Technic range will include a few other officially-licensed sets too; stay tuned for the reveal of the rest of the H1 Technic line-up shortly!

Eruptin’ Bronco

We kick-off 2023 with this; the brand new Ford Bronco, the latest addition to the burgeoning factory hardcore off-road market. In four-door flavour, with removable door panels and a removable roof, there’s little cooler, especially with colours such as ‘Race Red’, ‘Cactus’, ‘Hot Pepper’ and – as pictured here – “Eruption Green’.

We’re not sure which eruptions are green, beyond the child in ‘The Exorcist‘ and this rather spectacular event, but that’s why we’re not in vehicle marketing.

This excellent Model Team / Creator style recreation of the 2022 Ford Bronco in ‘Eruption Green’ comes from Peter Blackert (aka Lego911) – a TLCB LEGO Professional no less – and includes those removable panels, a highly detailed interior, plus an opening hood, tailgate and doors (when they’re attached).

Built as a commissioned model there’s lots more to see at Peter’s photostream. Trigger an eruption via the link above!

My Other (Muscle) Car is a Camaro

What’s better than a ’69? Two ’69s obviously. Cue Brian Michal, who has taken LEGO’s excellent 10304 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 set and created another ’69 icon, the Ford Mustang Mach 1.

A performance package available on the first generation Mustang, Mach 1s were powered by V8s engines of 5.8, 6.4, or 7.0 litres, were fitted with upgraded suspension (although – we suspect – not nearly upgraded enough), and a 3-speed automatic or 4-speed manual gearbox.

A host of other options were available too, including Ram-Air, a Drag Pack, a ‘Traction Lok’ rear axle, and – as pictured here – a ‘Shaker’ hood. All of which sound marvellous.

Brian’s 10304 alternate captures the ’69 Ford Mustang Mach 1 superbly, with more to see at his Flickr album, where a link to building instructions can also be found should you wish to switch your own ’69 muscle car for another.

And if a ’69 isn’t really your thing, here are a few bonus links to a rather more modern Mustang, a Porsche 911, and a Chevrolet C10 pick-up, also built solely from the 10304 Camaro Z28 set.

Built Like an Outhouse

This time the phrase is more than metaphorical! Built by previous bloggee Andrea Lattanzio, this is the ‘Outhouse’, a Ford V8-powered toilet-in-a-shed based on a 1924 Ford truck, as constructed by hot rodder Bob Reisner during the bizarre novelty hot rod scene. Wooden handling and the aerodynamics of, well… an outhouse aside, this TLCB Writer is rather enamoured by the practicalities of Bob’s creation – you’d never need to use a highway services restroom again! Take a dump on the interstate via the link above!

Highway Patrol

It’s the early-’80s, and if you’re in the back of a Ford LTD Crown Victoria it means one of two things; you’re either paying a fare to cross a city, or you’ve been busted.

Cue Jakub Marcisz‘s wonderful 1983 Ford LTD Crown Victoria police car, resplendent in a black-on-white highway patrol livery with a red/blue light-bar, rear-facing red lights in the rear window, a detailed V8 engine, and the optional ‘push bar’, so law-enforcement officers can ram you before shooting.

There’s lots more to see at Jakub’s superb ‘Ford LTD 1983’ album on Flickr; click the link above to bust on over, or here to see another LTD Crown Victoria with a few modifications that even the cops don’t get…

Protecting the Earth from the Scum of the Universe

It’s 1997, the year the Kyoto Protocol ensured that CO2 emissions were reduced to avert climate change, a small ethical start-up called Google registered their domain name, and Will Smith cemented his legacy as a forever wholesome family rapper.

It was also the year that said wholesome family rapper starred in one of the biggest movies of the decade; ‘Men in Black’, wherein an organisation ‘more secretive than the C.I.A. and more powerful than the F.B.I.’ went on a recruitment drive to help protect Earth from the scum of the universe.

Will Smith’s character of course got the gig, entering him into a top secret world of memory-erasing pen thingies and carboniser fission guns, plus the rather unique vehicles that the ‘Men in Black’ had at their disposal, including a fleet of 1987 Ford LTD Crown Victorias.

In standard form the ’87 Crown Vic could have been an entry into TLCB’s Festival of Mundanity competition, so deep was its nondescriptness. However, the Men in Black version came equipped with a few… optional extras, most notably a little red button that initiated a sequence of the finest CGI that 1997 could muster.

Previous bloggee Peter Zieske has captured the effects of pushing the aforementioned button beautifully in brick form, with the result perhaps even more visually believable than its movie counterpart.

Further images of Peter’s brilliant transforming ‘Men in Black’ Ford LTD Crown Vic can be found at his Flickr album, and you can click here to take a look, whilst we ponder the fact that the entire world seems to have been on the receiving end of the ‘Men in Black’s memory-erasing pen thingy since 1997…

Reformed Ford

‘Restomods’ are big business these days, where classic cars, pick-ups and 4x4s, are brought up to date with the addition of modern engines, suspension, electrics, and brakes, whilst mostly keeping the looks that make classic vehicles so appealing.

This is Tony Bovkoon’s brick-built restomod, a 1956 Ford F-100 pick-up featuring a subtly modified exterior that includes opening doors, hood and tailgate, with a beautifully detailed interior and engine bay inside the first two.

Very un-’56 wheels hint at the powertrain upgrades that would lurk within, and there are over a dozen superbly presented images available to view at Tony’s ‘Ford F-100’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to upgrade a ’56 Ford.

Building Broncos

This is a classic 1960s Ford Bronco. And so is this. Yup, we have two brilliant brick-built Broncos today, each of which looks stunningly accurate, and yet the two are constructed entirely differently, such are the infinite possibilities of the LEGO brick.

The blue ’68 Bronco is the work of Michael217, whose Model Team style creation deploys a raft of ‘Studs Not on Top’ techniques to recreate the iconic shape. There are opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Built in exactly the same scale, but using traditional studs-up techniques, is FanisLego’s red ’65 Bronco, which also includes opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, again behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Fanis’ Bronco also deploys a few more ‘Creator’ style techniques, including ‘glass’ for the windows, and the smoothing of nearly every visible stud.

Michael217 has chosen to omit the glass in his windows, but there’s rather more hidden underneath the chassis of his blue ’68, where a complete remote control drivetrain has been packed in. All-wheel-drive courtesy of two L Motors, Servo steering, and all-wheel-suspension all feature, without a hint of the clever engineering within being revealing visibly.

Each Bronco is fantastic example of the versatility of our favourite plastic bricks, using two completely different compositions to deliver an identically scaled highly realistic creation packed with with features.

Both Broncos are presented beautifully on Bricksafe, with Michael’s blue ’68 available to view here (and on Eurobricks too), whilst FanisLego’s red ’65 available to view here. Check out each superb model via the links!

My Other Car is a Camaro

Ford and Chevy people seem – as is so often the way – so be very separate communities. Which is a shame, because without the unnecessary tribalism, both products can be appreciated together.

Cue TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber, who has constructed this excellent Ford Mustang Shleby GT500 from only the parts found within the official LEGO 10304 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 set. Plus a set of more appropriate wheels in the image above.

Converting a Camaro into a Mustang may be considered sacrilege by certain quarters of the Chevrolet community, but fear not, Firas turned the 10265 Ford Mustang set into a Dodge Charger in the past too. See, there’s no bias here!

There’s more to see of Firas’ Camaro-based-Mustang B-Model at his ‘10304 Shelby GT500’ album on Flickr, and you can check out his previously-blogged Mustang-turned-Charger via the link in the text above if you’d rather see a Mustang taken apart than put together.

Where’s Harry?

Whilst 1960s America got the Ford Mustang, we got this; the 997cc Ford Anglia 105E. Like the Mustang though, the fourth generation Anglia was phenomenally successful, selling over a million units in an eight year production run. It was just – with a top speed of 73mph and 0-60mph in 27 seconds – a little slower than its American cousin.

One of those million-plus owners was of course Arthur Weasley from the Harry Potter series, who outfitted his light blue Anglia 105E with the ability for magical flight, and cued the creation of a thousand blue brick-built Anglias.

But not today, because regular bloggee 1saac W. has not built the Harry Potter Anglia, rather a normal non-magical one, and we’re all in favour of that.

That’s because unlike say, a DeLorean DMC-12, which was total garbage as a car and only survives thanks to some time-travelling movie modifications, the Anglia was an excellent and widely celebrated little British car long before its starring role in the movie scene where it crashed into the Buggering Birch.

Which means we love this humble white Ford Anglia 105E, devoid of wizards, enchanted flight, and a tree with a lust for violence, and there’s more to see at 1saac’s photostream, where Harry Potter is nowhere to be found.

Aaoogha!

We love vintage cars here at The Lego Car Blog. Particularly ones that go ‘aaoogha!‘ Because we’re idiots.

This marvellous Ford Model T would certainly go ‘aaoogha!’ if it were real, and there’s more to see of this beautifully presented vintage motoring icon courtesy of _Tiler. Check it out at his photostream via the link.

Oh go on, one more…

Application Accepted

From one of Ford’s most boring ever vehicles to one of their most exciting, the Ford GT wowed even Ford employees when was unveiled in 2015, having been developed in secret within the company by just twelve individuals.

Such was the the hype surrounding the car that customers had to be selected to buy it (TLCB’s application was rejected for some reason…), which means only a very few will ever get behind the wheel.

But no matter, because this brilliant Lego recreation of the Ford supercar by Flickr’s Leo 1 is thoroughly attainable, as Leo has made building instructions available. You’ll need to be skilled though, as there look to be some properly trick techniques used to replicate the GT’s wild shape.

There’s more of the GT to see at Leo’s photostream via the link above, where a link to purchase building instructions can also be found – no application necessary.

Guardians of the Galaxie

Like animals, space has proven a popular them for car names. Particularly at Ford, who have used Orion, Zodiac, Starliner, Comet, and Meteor, along with this; the Galaxie. Which is spelt wrong.

Although Ford corrected the spelling in 1995, we rather prefer the mis-spelt original, which IBrickedItUp has recreated beautifully in brick form. IBrickedIt’s Galaxie Hardtop captures Ford’s early-’60s full-size sedan wonderfully, building instructions are available, and there’s more to see at his photostream. Click the link above to baldly goo.

Gascort

A beige 1970s economy estate car might not be the most exciting genre of vehicle, but we do like the mundane here at The Lego Car Blog. TLCB Elves however, are more… er, ‘basic’ in what they like. Think ‘six year old’. Or the ‘Fast & Furious franchise’.

Cue Sergio Batista‘s Ford Escort Mk1 estate, somewhat repurposed as a ‘gasser’ style hot rod. Sergio has built an unmodified Escort estate too, in delightful ’70s tedium, but for some reason the Elves seem to prefer this one…

There’s more to see at his photostream, where you can find both the Elves’ preferred variant (this one) and ours (standard ’70s monotony). Click the link above to make the jump!