Tag Archives: ford

Black Horse

The officially-licensed 10265 Ford Mustang set is one of the coolest products to come from LEGO’s burgeoning partnership with real-world auto makers. We think there’s room from a Ford Technic set too (Raptor or GT anyone?!), but until then it’s up to the Lego Community to fill the void.

Cue Bartonius of Eurobricks and his excellent Technic recreation of the first generation Mustang that LEGO chose for their Creator set; arguably the most iconic and famous iteration of Ford’s evergreen pony car.

Bartonius’ Technic version captures the mid-’60s Mustang superbly, and adds in a working (and beautifully detailed) engine, functional steering, and opening doors, hood and trunk.

There’s more to see of Bartonius’ ’64 Ford Mustang at the Eurobricks forum – click the link to see all of the images and tell Bartonius to iron his sheets…

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Fill ‘er Up!

This neat vintage desert gas station and hot rod scene was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. It comes from previous bloggee Faber Madragore and there’s more to see of his ‘Supercharged Model B’ (not to be confused with ‘B-Model‘) at his photostream.

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More Kicks on Route 66

Dornbi’s ace vehicular Americana appeared here earlier in the month, and he’s now published the complete diorama in which his classic metal features. A collaboration with another builder, Dornbi’s brilliant ’40s and ’50s vehicles pass a charming rural desert gas station, complete with pumps, workshop and store, driving of course on the superb brick-built Route 66 itself. There’s more to see of this wonderful build on Flickr – click here to drive Route 66 for yourself!

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Striped Tomato

Undercover detectives need an understated, invisible ride. Something that draws no attention, that can slip by unnoticed. A Dodge minivan for example. Or a Toyota Corolla. Not a bright red Ford Gran Torino with a giant white vector stripe down each side.

Still, maybe things were different in the ’70, and Starksy & Hutch’s wheels still seemed to nab them plenty of crooks. Cue Pasq67‘s 8-wide recreation of one of TV’s most famous vehicles, complete with Starsky & Hutch mini-figures and ‘magnetic’ pot-plant flashing beacon. Oh, and a  giant white vector stripe down each side of course.

Head to Pasq’s Flickr album via the link above for all the imagery and click here for a nearly twenty-minute montage of the real Gran Torino in action!

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Get your Kicks on Route 66*

It’s a bumper haul for an Elf today, with no less than five creations brought back to TLCB Towers. All come from Dornbi, who has – from left to right – created a Ford ’40 Coupe, Mercury Eight, Hudson Hornet, Ford F-100, and Mercury Eight convertible brilliantly in mini-figure(ish) scale. The collection forms part of Dornbi’s ‘Route 66’ diorama and there’s more to see of it and the cars shown here via the link to Flickr above.

*Today’s absolutely marvellous title song.

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Social Distancing

In these times of social distancing, escaping to a campsite seems pretty tempting. Except it would likely be full of vloggers in Volkswagen Campers eating all-natural-ethnically-sourced-peace-crisps and claiming positive energy can cure Coronavirus whilst never being further than five feet from wifi.

Real wanderers forgo Instagram-friendly VW’s and #vanlife for far more practical vehicles, like this magnificent Ford Transit Mk2 camper, something this TLCB writer hasn’t seen in years but recognised immediately from this brilliant mini-figure recreation by Flickr’s November Juliett.

Hardly any Mk2 Transits have survived, because they were used hard, were never on trend, and were therefore pretty much worthless after a few years. Which makes them infinitely cooler than another $25,000 Volkswagen inhabited by people claiming they’ve given up materialism.

Head into the wilderness for some proper social distancing courtesy of November’s superb Ford Transit Camper via the link above.

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Alternative Lifestyle

No, we’re not talking about your cousin James.

Much of the world, including here at The Lego Car Blog, is in lockdown. The COVID-19 epidemic is claiming thousands of lives now, with the potential for millions if it reaches poorer nations. As such many of us have been instructed – by law – to remain inside. If you’re reading this post in the future; yeah this was that thing old people always talk about. And if your world is some kind of nearly-empty post-apocalyptic society; yeah this was that thing where everyone died.

On a less pessimistic note, if we all stay inside we’re probably going to be fine, the world will get back to normal, and we’ll look back and wonder what all the fuss was about. So to help us to do just that, here’s TLCB ‘Alternative Lifestyle’ suggestion, or to give it its working title; ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’.

LEGO’s brilliant 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is one of our very favourite additions to their officially licensed line-up, and – being packed with great parts – it has spawned an entire car dealership of alternate builds. This is the latest, the work of a past LEGO set designer no less, Nathanael Kuipers. Built using only parts found within the 10265 set, this Ford GT40-esque classic supercar features working steering, opening doors and engine cover, and removable V8 engine.

Nathanael has made instructions available too, so if you own a 10265 Ford Mustang set and you’re stuck at home bored you can convert your set into your very own GT40. Find out how via the link above, and if you fancy building a few more vehicles from your 10265 set, take a look below!

Dodge Charger R/T (Firas Abu-Jaber): This 10265 B-Model featured here last month, built by Flickr’s Firas Abu-Jaber this superb Dodge Charger R/T looks so perfect you’d never know it was a set alternate. It’s even modifiable with a huge supercharger like the original set, so if you’re of an Elven persuasion you can build it to your tastes too. Check out the original post here where you can find a link to all the images.

Tesla Cybertruck (Gerald Cacas): Tesla’s yet-to-be released and decidedly odd Cybertruck is not a vehicle we expected to be built from the 10265 Ford Mustang set, yet Gerald Cacas has done just that with this excellent alternate. Gerald promises instructions are on the way so you can build one yourself – take a look at its original appearance here to find the links.

DeTomaso Pantera GTS (Serge S): Powered by a Ford V8 like the Mustang from which it’s built, the DeTomaso Pantera was a genuine alternative to the Ferraris and Lamborghinis of its day. If you own the 10265 set you can build one for yourself, as Serge S has constructed this superb Pantera GTS using parts only found within it. Instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the full gallery of images via this link to Serge’s original appearance here in January, long before someone ate an illegal bat soup and started a worldwide pandemic.

Ford F100 Pick-Up (Nathanael Kuipers): The Ford GT40 at the top of this page isn’t the only 10265 B-Model to come from Nathanael, as back in October last year he published this Ford F100 inspired classic pick-up. There are opening doors, an opening hood, and a dropping tailgate, and most importantly he’s produced building instructions so that you can build it for yourself. Find out more via the original post by clicking here.

Ford Mustang GT500 (Firas Abu-Jaber): Our sixth and final 10265 Ford Mustang alternate is… a Ford Mustang. But it jumps forward about 55 years, bringing Ford’s latest 2020 GT500 into brick form. Best of all, like every other model on this page this incredible GT500 can be built using only the parts found within the 10265 set, giving you two Mustangs for the price of one! Building instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the complete image gallery by clicking here.

Finally, if you don’t wish to dismantle your 10265 Ford Mustang set but you do want something to do with it, try Game Of Brick’s spectacular lighting kit that was reviewed here by a reader at the start of the year.

And so ends our ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’ post, with six brilliant alternative models that can be constructed from just the pieces found within the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set. You can find links to all six in the text above, almost all of which include building instructions. Stay safe, stay indoors, and give alternate building a go! If the current lockdown continues we may even award some loot for your best B-Model builds.

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Classic Hit & Run

The Elves have been relatively peaceful of late. By which we mean none of the creations that they’ve found have been fast enough to smush one-another into the office carpet. That ended today.

This is Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego)’s spectacular Ford F100 hot rod, built as a commissioned piece and featuring full remote control drive, a V8 engine, opening doors and deck-lid, and with some of the most inventive custom decals we’ve seen yet (check out the stitching on the seats!).

The Elf at the controls couldn’t care less about the seat stitching though, because Lachlan’s creation can be driven by XL or Buggy motors and – in this case – is powered by a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery delivering up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own unit.

With all-wheel-drive Lachlan’s creation put that power down very effectively in the halls of TLCB Towers, as the Elf at the controls inevitably used its find to wreak havoc upon its Elven colleagues. Due to the F100’s ground scraping ride height however, no Elves were technically smushed, instead being catapulted over the bonnet, so our smush-free streak is kinda still going. We still have some tidying up to do though.

Whilst we get on with that you can check out more of Lachlan’s stunning F100 hot rod at the Eurobricks forum and at his 70+ photo Flickr album which shows the Ford in a variety of wheel and tyre combinations. Lachlan has also made instructions available via the links above should you wish to build his design for yourself, plus you can check out his interview here at The Lego Car Blog as the newest addition to the Master MOCers series by clicking these words.

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Banana Split

It’s not just the new 10271 Fiat 500 set that looks great in primrose yellow. Previous bloggee 1saac W. has deployed it over white to build this beautiful ’32 Ford hot rod entitled ‘Banana Split’. There’s more to see at his photostream and you can take a bite via the link above.

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Ford V Ford

‘Le Mans ’66’ had a different title in America. Becoming ‘Ford V Ferrari’, in a similar vain to ‘Northern Lights’ becoming ‘The Golden Compass’ (only ‘Le Mans ’66’ was actually a good movie), we can only assume this is because American audiences have different intellect tastes.

Tenuously linking to this today we have Ford V Ford, two astounding creations by Lachlan Cameron (aka loxlego), both of which have featured here previously. Pictured alongside one another for the first time Lachlan’s Ford GT and Ford Mustang ‘Hoonicorn’ signal the arrival of a new builder into The Lego Car Blog’s Master MOCers Hall of Fame.

Yup, the builder behind the most viewed creation of 2019 has joined us here in TLCB Towers to explain his Lego journey, how he joined the online Lego Community, and how he builds incredible creations like the two you see here. Read his full Master MOCers interview via the link below!

Master MOCers Series 2, Episode 7

Lachlan Cameron 

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Mad Collab

The Future Belongs to the Mad. Especially when they collaborate. 2015’s ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ thundered into cinemas to surprising critical acclaim. Directed my George Miller (he of Happy Feet fame!), ‘Fury Road’ followed the terribly-named ‘Mad Max: Beyond the Thunderdome’ film released a full three decades previously, and it was bloody brilliant!

It’s not often that TLCB Staff and TLCB Elves are in agreement, but this is a movie that brought harmony between TLCB’s human overlords and its irritating mythical workforce. Until the little turds started reenacting scenes from the film in the corridors of TLCB Towers at least.

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ starred many incredible vehicles, all of which were build for real, and many of these have been recreated in Lego form over the past five years (you can use the search function to find those that have appeared here). However, despite only appearing briefly in the third Mad Max instalment, it’s the V8 Interceptor that has endured as the franchise’s most iconic car.

Based on a 1970s Ford Falcon XB GT Hardtop, the V8 Interceptor appeared in all three movies, and is arguably more associated with the Mad Max story than the fleshy meatbag/s that drove it. This is the version of the Interceptor from the final (for now) film, and it’s been created through the collaboration of builders Mikhail Biktimirov, FX6000, and photographer Nikolay Gamurar.

With remote control drive and steering, working independent front and solid-axle rear suspension, and opening doors and hood, Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s beautifully presented V8 Interceptor is definitely worth a closer look. FX6000 has also made building instructions available too, should you wish to pretend your kitchen floor is post-apocalyptic wasteland and reenact scenes from the movies.

The Elves will certainly be doing that, so whilst we keep a careful eye on proceedings you can see more of Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s brilliant Mad Max V8 Interceptor collaboration at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here.

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Game of Bricks Lighting Kits | Review

The presentation of Lego models has moved on a bit since this particular TLCB Writer started posting creations for the internet to see. Gone are the days when a white sheet and a desk lamp were all that was required to create satisfactory presentation, with high quality cameras, easy photo editing, and a host of custom accessories now available to enhance the visual impact of a model.

One way of making that impact is with custom lighting, both for MOCs and for official LEGO sets, and newcomers Game of Bricks have quickly established a vast range of LED lighting kits to service both official sets and home-built creations. We handed three boxes of their products over to our readers to let you know what they’re like. Over to them!

Light kit for Ford Mustang 10265 | Review by Andrea Lattanzio | Norton74

I must admit I’m not so much into lighting LEGO sets or MOCs, but when TLCB offered me this chance I was curious to test out one of the lighting sets from the Game of Bricks company. I requested the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang kit because it’s one of the few official sets I own and because it’s probably one of my favourite LEGO sets ever. Within a few days I received the pack with the lighting kit and soon I got to work fitted it on the Pony;

    1. Pack.  The Game of Bricks lighting kit comes in a very elegant black box. You probably won’t throw it away after installing the kit, as you can use it to store the smallest LEGO parts from your collection. Inside the black box another surprise, a plastic container (transparent) in which you’ll find the lighting kit neatly stored inside three little bags, a very well-finished pack.
    1. Building process. The Game of Bricks lighting kit for the 10265 set give you two kinds of kit, the ‘standard’ and the ‘advanced”’ I started with the standard version, fitting it to my Mustang set in about half an hour, and something more for the ‘advanced’ version. To install the kit there are video instructions to follow, which consist of a step-by-step video manual. It’s quite easy follow the steps although you do have to stop the video many times because it’s quite fast. To install the entire kit you have to disassemble few parts of the car as well as change a few parts for the new ones which have the Game of Bricks LEDs installed. It surprised me that the kit is all-in-one, the single lights are linked via the same wires, so you have to hide many wires through the bricks. Although the threads are very thin, it is not easy to hide them all completely within the bricks of the set, so in the end some pieces of cable will still be visible. You have to be very precise and patient, but you can do it and it is fun, and the ‘advanced’ kit does ask you to take apart more parts of the car than the ‘standard’ one. 
    1. Instructions. As above, the instructions are basically two step-by-step video manuals, one each for the ‘standard’ and ‘advanced’ versions. The steps are easy to follow and you can stop the video when necessary.
    1. Final result. Even if I personally prefer the 10265 Ford Mustang set as LEGO made it, the Game of Bricks lights are quite fascinating, especially for my kids and wife. I’m sure about this because both my kids and wife said ‘WOW!’ when I shown them the shining Mustang set at night!

Personally, I prefer the ‘standard’ version of LEGO’s 10265 set, both with and without the Game of Bricks kit. However there are two shades of light, warm and bluish and honestly I don’t know why, as I would have preferred everything with the warmer hue. Overall though it’s a good kit and if you are a lighting fan you must get your Game of Bricks set; you won’t be disappointed.

Town Street Lighting Kit (plus a few extras!) | Review by Anonymous via TLCB on Facebook

I bagged myself some Game of Bricks goodies via The Lego Car Blog’s Facebook page, not having heard of the brand before but intrigued to see what they had on offer. Plus who turns down free Lego stuff?!

I requested the Game of Bricks Street Lighting kit, as I don’t own many new Technic sets and I prefer to keep them original. However I do build LEGO City and the working street lights looked like they would make a cool addition to modular buildings.

A small black box arrived a few days later with ‘Game of Bricks’ embossed on the top. It’s pretty high quality packaging and to my surprise it contained not just the street lights I had requested to review, but light sabres and multiple ‘daisy chained’ 1×4 lighting bricks, each with a row of LEDs hidden inside them. Continue reading

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Ford Vs Ferrari

2019’s excellent and surprisingly moving film about the development of the Ford GT40 and the amazing men behind it was a joy to watch last year. Whilst the film did gloss over the fact that car isn’t really American at all, it did pay tribute to the unsung hero of its creation; Englishman Ken Miles, who was tragically killed during testing just a few short months after winning Le Mans.

The GT40 would go on to win the event multiple times and achieved success in numerous endurance races around the world during the 1960s. Built by previous bloggee James Tillson, this particular GT40 finished in second place at the 1967 12 Hours of Sebring, and has been recreated superbly in both digital and Technic-brick forms.

James’ GT40 features all-wheel independent suspension, a working V8 engine hooked up to a four-speed gearbox, functioning steering, and an opening clamshell front and rear. There’s more to see of James’ build in both digital and real-brick forms on Flickr, plus you can join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum by clicking these words, where there are also instructions available.

 

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My Other Car’s a Mustang

LEGO’s awesome new 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is filled with lovely blue and white bricks suitable for all sorts of cool builds. From Firas Abu-Jaber’s 2020 Mustang GT500 to Nathanael Kuipers’ Ford F-100 pick-up truck, the classic Mustang set can be reconfigured into an infinite number of B-Models, such is the joy of LEGO.

Keeping the Ford link, previous bloggee Serge S has taken his 10265 set and turned it into something rather more exotic. This is his superb DeTomaso Pantera GT5, a car which – like the Mustang – used a Ford V8, but which wrapped it in a stunning Italian body.

Serge is no stranger to building brilliant B-Models, his 10252 Volkswagen Beetle alternative appearing here last year, and his latest is every bit as good. Using only the pieces available within the 10265 set, Serge’s Pantera is accurate enough that you’d never know the design was parts-constrained, and it includes an opening hood, opening doors, and a detailed interior too.

There’s more to see of Serge’s amazing alternate at his Flickr photostream, where a link to instructions can also be found if you fancy rebuilding your 10265 Mustang into a DeTomaso Pantera GT5 yourself. Take a look by clicking here.

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[Hoonitruck]

This is the ‘Hoonitruck’, Ken Block’s ridiculously powerful all-wheel-drive, twin-turbo Ecoboost V6-engined classic Ford F-150 pick-up truck, and it’s glorious. You might now be expecting us to say ‘well, this one isn’t obviously, this is Lego…’ but we won’t, because this really is ridiculously powerful, all-wheel-drive, and comes with with a twin-turbo V6.

Previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron is the builder behind it, whose recreation of Block’s ‘Hoonigan’ Ford Mustang was TLCB’s most viewed creation of 2018, and his latest build is every bit as awesome.

A pair of third-party BuWizz bluetooth batteries delivery up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, with each hooked up to its own Technic Buggy Motor, the most powerful motor that LEGO have ever produced.

The result is… well something that a Lego model shouldn’t really be capable of, and thankfully Lachlan has fitted fully independent suspension and all-wheel-drive to try to manage that power.

The model also features a complete (and superbly accurate) exterior wrap courtesy of fellow previous bloggee Jaap Technic, plus a wealth of chromed parts via Bubul, and – to pre-emptively answer the question we’re sure to be asked – Lachlan has a habit of making instructions for his creations available too, so keep an eye out for the arrival a link.

In the meantime there’s much more of Lachlan’s spectacular build to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks, plus you can watch what all-wheel-drive and eight times the power can do via the video below…

YouTube Video

 

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