Tag Archives: ford

Game of Bricks Lighting Kits | Review

The presentation of Lego models has moved on a bit since this particular TLCB Writer started posting creations for the internet to see. Gone are the days when a white sheet and a desk lamp were all that was required to create satisfactory presentation, with high quality cameras, easy photo editing, and a host of custom accessories now available to enhance the visual impact of a model.

One way of making that impact is with custom lighting, both for MOCs and for official LEGO sets, and newcomers Game of Bricks have quickly established a vast range of LED lighting kits to service both official sets and home-built creations. We handed three boxes of their products over to our readers to let you know what they’re like. Over to them!

Light kit for Ford Mustang 10265 | Review by Andrea Lattanzio | Norton74

I must admit I’m not so much into lighting LEGO sets or MOCs, but when TLCB offered me this chance I was curious to test out one of the lighting sets from the Game of Bricks company. I requested the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang kit because it’s one of the few official sets I own and because it’s probably one of my favourite LEGO sets ever. Within a few days I received the pack with the lighting kit and soon I got to work fitted it on the Pony;

    1. Pack.  The Game of Bricks lighting kit comes in a very elegant black box. You probably won’t throw it away after installing the kit, as you can use it to store the smallest LEGO parts from your collection. Inside the black box another surprise, a plastic container (transparent) in which you’ll find the lighting kit neatly stored inside three little bags, a very well-finished pack.
    1. Building process. The Game of Bricks lighting kit for the 10265 set give you two kinds of kit, the ‘standard’ and the ‘advanced”’ I started with the standard version, fitting it to my Mustang set in about half an hour, and something more for the ‘advanced’ version. To install the kit there are video instructions to follow, which consist of a step-by-step video manual. It’s quite easy follow the steps although you do have to stop the video many times because it’s quite fast. To install the entire kit you have to disassemble few parts of the car as well as change a few parts for the new ones which have the Game of Bricks LEDs installed. It surprised me that the kit is all-in-one, the single lights are linked via the same wires, so you have to hide many wires through the bricks. Although the threads are very thin, it is not easy to hide them all completely within the bricks of the set, so in the end some pieces of cable will still be visible. You have to be very precise and patient, but you can do it and it is fun, and the ‘advanced’ kit does ask you to take apart more parts of the car than the ‘standard’ one. 
    1. Instructions. As above, the instructions are basically two step-by-step video manuals, one each for the ‘standard’ and ‘advanced’ versions. The steps are easy to follow and you can stop the video when necessary.
    1. Final result. Even if I personally prefer the 10265 Ford Mustang set as LEGO made it, the Game of Bricks lights are quite fascinating, especially for my kids and wife. I’m sure about this because both my kids and wife said ‘WOW!’ when I shown them the shining Mustang set at night!

Personally, I prefer the ‘standard’ version of LEGO’s 10265 set, both with and without the Game of Bricks kit. However there are two shades of light, warm and bluish and honestly I don’t know why, as I would have preferred everything with the warmer hue. Overall though it’s a good kit and if you are a lighting fan you must get your Game of Bricks set; you won’t be disappointed.

Town Street Lighting Kit (plus a few extras!) | Review by Anonymous via TLCB on Facebook

I bagged myself some Game of Bricks goodies via The Lego Car Blog’s Facebook page, not having heard of the brand before but intrigued to see what they had on offer. Plus who turns down free Lego stuff?!

I requested the Game of Bricks Street Lighting kit, as I don’t own many new Technic sets and I prefer to keep them original. However I do build LEGO City and the working street lights looked like they would make a cool addition to modular buildings.

A small black box arrived a few days later with ‘Game of Bricks’ embossed on the top. It’s pretty high quality packaging and to my surprise it contained not just the street lights I had requested to review, but light sabres and multiple ‘daisy chained’ 1×4 lighting bricks, each with a row of LEDs hidden inside them. Continue reading

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Ford Vs Ferrari

2019’s excellent and surprisingly moving film about the development of the Ford GT40 and the amazing men behind it was a joy to watch last year. Whilst the film did gloss over the fact that car isn’t really American at all, it did pay tribute to the unsung hero of its creation; Englishman Ken Miles, who was tragically killed during testing just a few short months after winning Le Mans.

The GT40 would go on to win the event multiple times and achieved success in numerous endurance races around the world during the 1960s. Built by previous bloggee James Tillson, this particular GT40 finished in second place at the 1967 12 Hours of Sebring, and has been recreated superbly in both digital and Technic-brick forms.

James’ GT40 features all-wheel independent suspension, a working V8 engine hooked up to a four-speed gearbox, functioning steering, and an opening clamshell front and rear. There’s more to see of James’ build in both digital and real-brick forms on Flickr, plus you can join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum by clicking these words, where there are also instructions available.

 

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My Other Car’s a Mustang

LEGO’s awesome new 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is filled with lovely blue and white bricks suitable for all sorts of cool builds. From Firas Abu-Jaber’s 2020 Mustang GT500 to Nathanael Kuipers’ Ford F-100 pick-up truck, the classic Mustang set can be reconfigured into an infinite number of B-Models, such is the joy of LEGO.

Keeping the Ford link, previous bloggee Serge S has taken his 10265 set and turned it into something rather more exotic. This is his superb DeTomaso Pantera GT5, a car which – like the Mustang – used a Ford V8, but which wrapped it in a stunning Italian body.

Serge is no stranger to building brilliant B-Models, his 10252 Volkswagen Beetle alternative appearing here last year, and his latest is every bit as good. Using only the pieces available within the 10265 set, Serge’s Pantera is accurate enough that you’d never know the design was parts-constrained, and it includes an opening hood, opening doors, and a detailed interior too.

There’s more to see of Serge’s amazing alternate at his Flickr photostream, where a link to instructions can also be found if you fancy rebuilding your 10265 Mustang into a DeTomaso Pantera GT5 yourself. Take a look by clicking here.

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[Hoonitruck]

This is the ‘Hoonitruck’, Ken Block’s ridiculously powerful all-wheel-drive, twin-turbo Ecoboost V6-engined classic Ford F-150 pick-up truck, and it’s glorious. You might now be expecting us to say ‘well, this one isn’t obviously, this is Lego…’ but we won’t, because this really is ridiculously powerful, all-wheel-drive, and comes with with a twin-turbo V6.

Previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron is the builder behind it, whose recreation of Block’s ‘Hoonigan’ Ford Mustang was TLCB’s most viewed creation of 2018, and his latest build is every bit as awesome.

A pair of third-party BuWizz bluetooth batteries delivery up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, with each hooked up to its own Technic Buggy Motor, the most powerful motor that LEGO have ever produced.

The result is… well something that a Lego model shouldn’t really be capable of, and thankfully Lachlan has fitted fully independent suspension and all-wheel-drive to try to manage that power.

The model also features a complete (and superbly accurate) exterior wrap courtesy of fellow previous bloggee Jaap Technic, plus a wealth of chromed parts via Bubul, and – to pre-emptively answer the question we’re sure to be asked – Lachlan has a habit of making instructions for his creations available too, so keep an eye out for the arrival a link.

In the meantime there’s much more of Lachlan’s spectacular build to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks, plus you can watch what all-wheel-drive and eight times the power can do via the video below…

YouTube Video

 

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Beating Ferrari

The excellent looking Le Mans ’66 (Ford vs. Ferrari) movie is in theatres now, and tells the story of one of the greatest (and most unlikely) racing rivalries in history. Ford, annoyed at having their offer to purchase Ferrari snubbed, decided to build a car to beat the Italians at their own game. Cue a story of American heroism, engineering brilliance, and underdog victory. Except the Ford GT40 was actually British…

No matter, it is a great story, and this lovely digital Ford GT40 road car captures the legendary American British endurance racer wonderfully. It comes from cshowd of Flickr who is in the midst of building it for real and there’s more to see at his photostream. Head back to 1966 and conquer Ferrari via the link above.

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Big Foot’s Back! (Kinda)

Flickr’s Havoc is having an awesome run blending classic Model Team sets with real-world vehicles. Following in the footsteps (hah!) of his 5541-inspired T-Bucket and his 5510-derived Jeep Renegade comes this, a reworking of the 5561 Big Foot monster truck set from 1997.

The original set wasn’t really a monster truck (or anything like the real Big Foot for that matter) but it was rather cool, and Havoc has chosen to carry over its paint-job onto a vehicle far more in keeping with the real Ford pick-up based car-crushing monster truck.

Havoc’s ‘Big Foot’ uses a Ford F-250 as its base (like the real truck), but switches the famous blue livery for the red-on-white that many Model Team sets have used over the years. Head to Havoc’s photostream to see all the images, plus you can view his past builds and see the official LEGO set that inspired this one via the links in the text above.

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Plus Two

LEGO’s Speed Champions range has recently expanded. Not just in number, like your Mom’s list of past boyfriends, but in girth, just like your Mom. As revealed here last month the new Speed Champions sets have adopted increased dimensions, going from from six studs in width to eight. This brings with it an increased level of realism as well as the ability for two mini-figures to fit side-by-side.

One of LEGO’s previous Speed Champions sets, the 75884 Ford Mustang, now looks a little thin by comparison, so Joao Campos of MOCpages has given it a thorough update to match the new 8-wide Speed Champions scale.

Suggested by a reader, Joao’s classic Ford Mustang Fastback looks every bit as good as LEGO’s latest Speed Champions releases, and whole lot better than the already decent official set (which you can see pictured alongside it in the images above)

With only 230 parts Joao’s Mustang also looks to be an easy recreation for other builders to try, particularly those that own the official 75884 set already. Head to Joao’s Ford Mustang page on MOCpages to see the complete gallery of images.

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T for Two

It’s been a hot rod heavy few days but we’ll sneak in two more before a bit of a gearshift. This neat pair of Town-scale Model T hot rods comes from Tim Henderson who has captured both ends of the hot rodding scale circa 1973. Both the ‘Resto-mod’ and ‘Fad-T’ replicate their respective trends superbly and there’s more to see of his mini-figure models on Flickr via the link.

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5541 Redux

Following his lovely 5510-inspired Jeep Renegade CJ5 featured here over the weekend Flickr’s Havoc is back with another Model Team set redux. This time it’s the 5541 Blue Fury set from 1995 that gets the update, becoming a smooth Ford T-Bucket complete with working steering, opening suicide doors, a trunk and an enormous engine. there’s more to see at Havoc’s photostream – click the link to make the jump!

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Black Knight

No, not that Black Knight. Or that one. This is a Ford ‘Tudor’ hot rod, so called because it had two doors, and not because it has anything to do with the English royal house that was in power for a century from 1485. But the tenuous link does enable us to write a title that lets us include pointless Monty Python clips, so we’re pretty happy.

We have Redfern1950s to thank, and his excellent (and very black indeed) Model Team Ford Tudor hot rod. Head to Flickr via the link to see more.

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Buy One Get One Free

Nope, we haven’t finally relented and decided to jump on the Black Friday bandwagon, but nevertheless if you’re an owner of the excellent looking 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set then you could own this 2020 Mustang GT500 for free (just not at the same time).

TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has created this superb looking GT500 from the parts only found within the 10265 set, and what’s more he’s working on instructions so that you can build it for yourself too.

In the meantime you can check out all of the images of Firas’ 10265 B-Model on Flickr via the link above, you can learn how Firas creates amazing models such as this one via his Master MOCers interview at TLCB, and you can find out why Mustang owners need at least one other back-up car by clicking here…

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Space ‘Stang

This is not a car, but it somehow manages to feature more car references than many cars do. And that doesn’t even make sense. Built for NoVVember (another annual month-long building bandwagon we don’t understand) by Mark B. aka ABS Shipyards, it’s a space-based nod to one of America’s most legendary muscle cars, the Ford Mustang 302 ‘Boss’.

The huge (and excellent) ‘302’ numbering on the sides complete with the tri-colour Mustang stripe running through it is hard to miss, but there’s a wealth of other brilliant references to the ’70s muscle car hidden throughout the build. Head into space via the link above to see how many you can spot, followed by doing whatever the equivalent of a burnout is in zero gravity before crashing into a space station. This is a Mustang after all!

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SEMA

Founded in 1963, the Specialty Equipment Market Association, or SEMA, has become a giant of the automotive landscape. The annual SEMA show in Las Vegas is now one of the largest automotive events non the planet, attended not just be tuning companies but also by mainstream auto manufacturers, who are embracing a culture that can help their brand image.

Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka has decided to build a Lego homage to the upcoming SEMA show, taking the official 10265 Ford Mustang set as a base and reworking it to achieve the awesome looking wide-body Mustang you see here. Such an approach is perfectly in keeping with SEMA, where standard manufacturer products are modified to often wild extremes, these days occasionally by the actual company that made them in the first place.

We think Simon’s modified Mustang looks spectacular and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link above, plus you can take a look at some of the good, weird, and frankly awful vehicles from last year’s SEMA show by clicking here.

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My Other Car’s a Mustang

LEGO’s new 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is a great addition to their officially licensed range. With useful parts, excellent detailing, and being a replica of one of the coolest cars ever made, it’s one of our favourite sets of recent times, and Nathanael Kuipers – a previous set designer for The LEGO Company – has just made it even better.

This excellent 1970’s Ford F100-inspired pick-up truck has been constructed by Nathanael only from the pieces found within the 10265 set, not that you’d know – so un-constrained does it look!

The model features opening doors, a dropping tailgate, and a detailed engine under the opening hood, and best of all if you own a 10265 Ford Mustang set you can build Nathanael’s pick-up truck too, as he’s made building instructions available!

Head to Nathanael’s photostream by clicking here to see more of his superb 10265 B-Model and find out how to build it for yourself.

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Paddy Wagon

Apparently police vans are known as ‘Paddy Wagons’ because cops were often Irish (with ‘paddy’ being slang for Irish nationals). Or the people in the back of them were often Irish, we’re not sure. Whatever the reason, it was the name given to this wild Tom Daniel’s-designed show rod from 1968, which became a huge selling plastic toy kit thanks to Monogram models.

This incredible recreation of the iconic hot rod is the work of previous bloggee, Master MOCer, and TLCB favourite Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74), who has captured Tom Daniel’s design wonderfully in his trademark Model Team style.

Head to Andrea’s ‘Paddy Wagon’ Flickr album via the second link above to see more of the build, and you can read his interview as part of the Master MOCers series here at TLCB by clicking on the first.

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