Tag Archives: ford

Furry Road

Don’t worry, we’re not referring to one of your Mom’s old movies.

TLCB Elves are grumpy today. Despite a slew of finds they missed this one, which we instead saw on The Brothers Brick. And they love Mad Max. We’re not sure they follow the plot, but stuff explodes quite regularly and that seems to please them.

Anyway, those of you with a keener eye will have noticed that something is amiss with Michael Kanemoto‘s rendition of the ‘V8 Interceptor’ from the movie, what with it being red and yellow and driven by a cartoon dog.

That’s because Michael’s ‘V8 Interceptor’ is part of a wider ‘Fab Max’ collaboration, mixing LEGO’s primary-coloured 1980s Fabuland theme with George Miller’s post-apocalyptic road movie, and in doing so creating a desolate wasteland inhabited by cute (but violent) anthropomorphic critters. Kinda like TLCB Towers.

Complete with officer Max “Bark”-tansky of the Fab Force Patrol there’s more to see of Micheal’s ‘Fab Max V8 Interceptor’ via the link above (plus you can also find the original black version of the car which is frankly boring by comparison), and – if you’re as in to this theme as we are – you can see another ‘Fab Max – Furry Road’ creation blogged at TLCB by clicking here.

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Jam Van

British police vehicles don’t wear the myriad of different liveries that feature across the United States. All feature the ‘battenberg’ chequered design, named after the famous Victorian cake that shares the same pattern, and it does look quite cool. Even on an embarrassingly unthreatening 1.6L Astra or Focus.

However until recently The Metropolitan Police (who look after the thirty-two London boroughs, counter-terrorism, and the Royal family) did have a distinct colour scheme, wearing a livery based upon a simple lunchtime snack rather than an English cake. We’re not sure why British police forces design their vehicles after party food, but we’re all for it.

Anyway, this previous-generation Metropolitan Police Ford Transit does wear the now-replaced Met Police ‘jam sandwich’ livery, which has been recreated rather wonderfully by regular bloggee Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist, complete with a British police officer (aka ‘Bobby’). Said officer is a little out of date now as British police don’t wear their ‘custodian helmets’ when driving, but they do still put them on to beat you with their baton, what with that being a special occasion.

There’s more to see of Ralph’s Metropolitan Police ‘jam sandwich’ Ford Transit on Flickr, and you can take a bite via the link above!

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Pick-Up Electric

America really likes pick-up trucks. The best selling vehicles in the U.S. are the Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado, and Dodge Ram, followed by a pair of SUVs (the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V respectively). In fact only two vehicles in the top eight are cars. Tump is (rightly) called out on his total disregard for CO2 emissions legislation, but it’s not like he’s going against the wishes of the American people, who – based on their vehicular choices – must all be lumberjacks during the week and tow boats at the weekend.

Of course the electric revolution will reach pick-up trucks one day, and until then Ford at least have taken a small step in the right direction by replacing most of their old V8s with smaller, marginally less environmentally catastrophic, turbocharged units.

Back to electricity though, and pick-ups are perfect for electrification, having loads of chassis space for batteries, and supposedly often doing tasks that would benefit from electric motor torque, like lumberjacking and towing boats…

The electrification of Lego pick-ups is the opposite however, seeing as there is no covered body to hide the battery box, and both it and the motors have to be squeezed inside a cabin full of cabiny things. That hasn’t stopped mktechniccreations though, who has built this superbly accurate Model Team/Creator Ford F-150 that would be bloggable on looks alone, and yet – by witchcraft and magic – has equipped his model with a perfectly-concealed full remote control drive system with Power Functions motors and a BuWizz bluetooth battery.

It’s quite a feat of engineering and if you’d like to have a go yourself MK has released building instructions so you can learn how he’s done it! There’s more to see of this remarkably packaged Ford F-150 at both MK’s Bricksafe gallery and at the Eurobricks forum, where you can see images showing how the motors are fitted and find a link to building instructions – take a look via links!

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The Boss

The muscle car market has gone mad in recent years. Upwards of 700bhp is now available from stock, and whilst many modern muscles cars have now added revolutionary new technologies such as ‘steering’ and ‘suspension’, we suspect actually using all that power is a difficult thing to do. Resulting in happenings like this. And this. And this. And this.

Things were little different back in the late ’60s, when the first power race between muscle car makers began. This was one of Ford’s efforts from the time; the Mustang Boss 429. The ‘429’ moniker stood for the V8 engine’s cubic inch capacity, which translates to seven litres. Seven. Most European cars at the time made do with just over one.

Of course the Boss’s steering, braking and suspension were – in true muscle car tradition – woefully inadequate, meaning that morons-with-daddy’s-money in 1969 could plow their new car into a street light in much the same way as they do today, only without the event being captured on YouTube.

Today though, we’re joining the muscle car crashing fraternity too, thanks to Hogwartus, and this superb SBrick-powered remote control Technic Boss 429.

Driven by two L Motors, with a Medium Motor turning the steering and another controlling the four-speed sequential gearbox, Hogwartus’s creation is a riot to drive. That is until we spun it into a kitchen cabinet. We’ll blame the Mustang-accurate torsion bar rear suspension for that faux-par. The front suspension is independent though, and the model also includes opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, a replica 7-litre V8 engine (that turns via the drive motors), sliding seats, and LED headlights.

There’s more to see of Hogwartus’s stunning Technic ’69 Mustang Boss 429 at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, plus via the truly excellent video below, which must be one of the few Mustang videos on YouTube that don’t end like this.

YouTube Video

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Le Mans 2018

This spectacular array of racing cars is the entire Le Mans 2018 GTE Pro grid, just one of the four categories that compete side-by-side at the world’s greatest motor race.

Built over two years by Lasse Deleuran, all teams and driver combinations from the GTE Pro class of 2018 are present, with Ferrari, BMW, Aston Martin, Chevrolet, Ford, and the race-winning Porsche squad recreated brilliantly in Miniland scale, many of which have featured here individually over the last two years.

Instructions for every single GTE Pro car are available for free, and you can see more of each racer and find the link to recreate your very own Le Mans 2018 GTE Pro grid via Lasse’s photostream by clicking here.

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Dog Years*

This is an M8 Greyhound 6×6 Light Armoured Vehicle (or something close to it, as builder Robson M doesn’t specify!), built by Ford in the 1940s for Allied troops during World War 2.

The British, who like naming their military hardware after animals and the weather, gave it the ‘greyhound’ name, as it could sustain 55mph on reasonable roads, which was very quick for the time. And – at least in this one’s case – it was grey.

Much like a real greyhound though, the M8 wasn’t particularly well armoured, especially underneath, and nor was it very good off-road, despite being a 6×6. However it was useful enough that 8,500 were made, and – again like its namesake dog – many found new homes after being retired from their first military owner, with some M8s still in service around the world as late as the 2000s!

This neat Town scale version captures the M8 Greyhound rather well, with Robson using a few custom decals and a custom machine gun mounted on top to add to the model’s realism. There’s more of Robson’s build to see at his photostream – click the link to make a visit to the dog track.


*Today’s lovely title song.

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Build-A-Bronco

Ford’s new 2020 Bronco looks right in a way that Land Rover’s new Defender just doesn’t. Who’d have thought that, after Ford mis-managed Land Rover (and Jaguar, Volvo, and Aston Martin…) into the ground only a decade or so ago, before bailing on all of them.

Anyway, Ford seems to have nailed it with their homage to their own classic nameplate, and fittingly today’s bloggee LoMaC has nailed his homage to Ford’s, er… homage.

Capturing the 2020 Bronco in Technic form, LoMaC’s recreation features working steering (by both the wheel and HoG), independent front and three-link rear suspension, a working engine, opening doors, hood and trunk, plus a detailed interior with adjustable seats.

We think the new Ford Bronco would make a fine official LEGO set (which maybe is on the cards with Ford and LEGO’s fruitful partnership), but until then you can build LoMaC’s brilliant Bronco for yourself, as building instructions are available!

Head to LoMaC’s Ford Bronco Bricksafe gallery to see all the images and to the Eurobricks forum for full build details and that link to building instructions.

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Speed Week

Bonneville’s Speed Week is approaching, assuming Coronavirus doesn’t put the brakes on, where vehicles of all shapes and sizes will take the famous salt flats in pursuit of speed.

Flickr’s 1saac W. pays homage to one of the automotive world’s greatest spectacles with his marvellous ’32 Ford. Neat building techniques and excellent photography are obvious to see and there’s more of the model available at 1saac’s photostream via the link above.

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The Van


Almost every car manufacturer makes vans these days, however in Europe there was a time when there was pretty much just one; the Ford Transit.

So ubiquitous was Ford of Europe’s product that for decades the words ‘van’ and ‘Transit’ were interchangeable, like ‘vacuum cleaner’ and ‘Hoover’, or ‘hot tub’ and ‘Jacuzzi’.

Those days are long gone with the Transit now one of many, but Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott remembers a time when the Blue Oval had van market domination with his wonderfully pretty 6-wide Mk1 Transit.

Jonathan has captured the original Transit beautifully and there’s more to see at his photostream here.

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Do Your (Super) Duty*

The emergency services are the everyday heroes that have been thrown into the spotlight both during the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, and in the subsequent protests, riots, and social disorder that seems to be infecting Western society as much as the disease the proceeded it.

It’s a hard enough job to do without having bottles thrown at you, but sadly that’s what’s happening, despite the fact that the emergency services will work just as hard to save the bottle thrower as the innocent bystander in the event they’re needed.

This superb FDNY ambulance comes from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg in his trademark Miniland style. Based on a Ford Super Duty extra cab, Ralph’s model replicates the livery and details of the real ambulance beautifully, and he’s included a neat paramedic figure too. There’s more of the build to see at Ralph’s photostream – click the link above to dial 9-1-1.

*Today’s excellent title song

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Black Horse

The officially-licensed 10265 Ford Mustang set is one of the coolest products to come from LEGO’s burgeoning partnership with real-world auto makers. We think there’s room from a Ford Technic set too (Raptor or GT anyone?!), but until then it’s up to the Lego Community to fill the void.

Cue Bartonius of Eurobricks and his excellent Technic recreation of the first generation Mustang that LEGO chose for their Creator set; arguably the most iconic and famous iteration of Ford’s evergreen pony car.

Bartonius’ Technic version captures the mid-’60s Mustang superbly, and adds in a working (and beautifully detailed) engine, functional steering, and opening doors, hood and trunk.

There’s more to see of Bartonius’ ’64 Ford Mustang at the Eurobricks forum – click the link to see all of the images and tell Bartonius to iron his sheets…

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Fill ‘er Up!

This neat vintage desert gas station and hot rod scene was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. It comes from previous bloggee Faber Madragore and there’s more to see of his ‘Supercharged Model B’ (not to be confused with ‘B-Model‘) at his photostream.

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More Kicks on Route 66

Dornbi’s ace vehicular Americana appeared here earlier in the month, and he’s now published the complete diorama in which his classic metal features. A collaboration with another builder, Dornbi’s brilliant ’40s and ’50s vehicles pass a charming rural desert gas station, complete with pumps, workshop and store, driving of course on the superb brick-built Route 66 itself. There’s more to see of this wonderful build on Flickr – click here to drive Route 66 for yourself!

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Striped Tomato

Undercover detectives need an understated, invisible ride. Something that draws no attention, that can slip by unnoticed. A Dodge minivan for example. Or a Toyota Corolla. Not a bright red Ford Gran Torino with a giant white vector stripe down each side.

Still, maybe things were different in the ’70, and Starksy & Hutch’s wheels still seemed to nab them plenty of crooks. Cue Pasq67‘s 8-wide recreation of one of TV’s most famous vehicles, complete with Starsky & Hutch mini-figures and ‘magnetic’ pot-plant flashing beacon. Oh, and a  giant white vector stripe down each side of course.

Head to Pasq’s Flickr album via the link above for all the imagery and click here for a nearly twenty-minute montage of the real Gran Torino in action!

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Get your Kicks on Route 66*

It’s a bumper haul for an Elf today, with no less than five creations brought back to TLCB Towers. All come from Dornbi, who has – from left to right – created a Ford ’40 Coupe, Mercury Eight, Hudson Hornet, Ford F-100, and Mercury Eight convertible brilliantly in mini-figure(ish) scale. The collection forms part of Dornbi’s ‘Route 66’ diorama and there’s more to see of it and the cars shown here via the link to Flickr above.

*Today’s absolutely marvellous title song.

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