Tag Archives: V6

Super Stripe

This stunning Technic Supercar comes from previous bloggee Nico Lego (aka Levihathan), and it might just be our favourite of the year. Which may or may not be because of that wicked-cool stripe. There’s more than just the stripe to like though, as Nico’s creation is packed with old-school Supercar functionality, including working steering, suspension, a mid-mounted transverse V6 engine hooked up to a 5+R gearbox, and an opening engine cover, front ‘trunk’, and cockpit canopy. Plus it has a wicked-cool stripe.

There’s more to see of Nico’s stripe and the Technic Supercar attached to it at his Flickr album, where over thirty high quality images are available to view, detailing the exterior, chassis, working functions, and stripe. Click the link above to make the jump to our favourite stripe Technic Supercar of the year so far.

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[Hoonitruck]

This is the ‘Hoonitruck’, Ken Block’s ridiculously powerful all-wheel-drive, twin-turbo Ecoboost V6-engined classic Ford F-150 pick-up truck, and it’s glorious. You might now be expecting us to say ‘well, this one isn’t obviously, this is Lego…’ but we won’t, because this really is ridiculously powerful, all-wheel-drive, and comes with with a twin-turbo V6.

Previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron is the builder behind it, whose recreation of Block’s ‘Hoonigan’ Ford Mustang was TLCB’s most viewed creation of 2018, and his latest build is every bit as awesome.

A pair of third-party BuWizz bluetooth batteries delivery up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, with each hooked up to its own Technic Buggy Motor, the most powerful motor that LEGO have ever produced.

The result is… well something that a Lego model shouldn’t really be capable of, and thankfully Lachlan has fitted fully independent suspension and all-wheel-drive to try to manage that power.

The model also features a complete (and superbly accurate) exterior wrap courtesy of fellow previous bloggee Jaap Technic, plus a wealth of chromed parts via Bubul, and – to pre-emptively answer the question we’re sure to be asked – Lachlan has a habit of making instructions for his creations available too, so keep an eye out for the arrival a link.

In the meantime there’s much more of Lachlan’s spectacular build to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks, plus you can watch what all-wheel-drive and eight times the power can do via the video below…

YouTube Video

 

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Black Mirror

We continue yesterday’s chrome theme with, well… even more chrome. This is ianying616‘s ‘Black Onyx’ hot rod, and it’s really very shiny indeed. It’s also two cylinders short of the engine usually fitted to a hot rod, but ianying has made up for this with a delightfully impractical (and enormous) vision-restricting supercharger. Both it and the V6 engine underneath it turn, plus there’s working steering and suspension too. Head over to Flickr for the full gallery.

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Plan B

Lego Technic Group B Rally Car

Back in the mid-’80s world rally cars were a very different animal to those racing today. With only the loosest affiliation to their road-going counterparts, the racers of Group B took rallying (and then rally-cross, after they were banned from the WRC in 1987) to a whole new level or speed, and – unsurprisingly – risk. Formula 1 had mostly cleaned up its safety record by the mid-’80s, however Group B rallying ensured that professional motorsport continued to send people home in boxes.

A series of fatalities in 1986 prompted the FIA to act, and it was to be Group B’s last WRC season. The cars were not forgotten though, with many transferring to rally-cross, whilst Peugeot updated their monstrous 205 T16 to run in the Paris-Dakar rally, winning in ’87. ’89 and ’90.

Previous bloggee and Technic legend Nico71 hasn’t forgotten either, paying homage to the insanity of Group B with his latest creation, this superb Technic Group B rally car. Based on no particular model Nico’s model looks a bit like an Opel Astra to us (if Opel has created a Group B challenger), and it’s packed with mechanical Technic functions. These include a mid-mounted V6 engine, all-wheel-drive with three differentials, working steering both by the wheel and Hand-of-God, opening doors and rear engine bodywork, and fully independent suspension on all wheels.

As the time of writing Nico’s latest build isn’t on Brickshelf or the other main creation-sharing websites (big points for the Elf that found it!), but you can see all the details, a huge gallery of high quality images, and access instructions to build this model yourself at Nico’s own website. Click the link above to head to a forest in 1985.

Lego Technic Group B WRC Nico71

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Remote Control Raptor

Lego Technic Ford Raptor Remote Control

Ford’s Raptor is arguably the most hardcore production off-road pick-up truck on sale. For 2017 Ford are preparing  a new version, ditching the old V8 and replacing it with their new twin-turbo V6 as found in the Ford GT. No doubt some backwards-thinking rednecks will lament this update, but we’re all for it here at TLCB. Previous bloggee Rage Hobbit of MOCpages seems to be too, and he’s recreated the upcoming Raptor in monster RC Technic form.

With twin buggy motors driving a selectable 4×4 system through a 4-speed sequential gearbox, working steering, independent front and 4-link live axle rear suspension, opening (and locking) doors, hood and tailgate, plus a the 2017 Raptor’s Ecoboost V6 up front, Rage’s Raptor replica is one of the best off-roading Lego creations we’ve seen this year.

There’s lots more to see at Rage Hobbit’s MOCpage, including an extensive image gallery, full technical details and a video of model in action – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Ford SVT Raptor 2017

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Downsizing

Lego Technic New Ford GT Ecoboost

America. Bigger is better. Guns, meals (and waistlines) and – of course – cars. But what if there’s another way?

It was actually America, remarkably, that put the first turbo-charged production car on the market, way back in the 1960s. Turbo-charging was then promptly forgotten about, and the U.S auto makers went back to their tried and tested method of humungous and spectacularly inefficient V8s.

But the world has moved on, and with European and Japanese manufacturers making huge power from small capacity forced-induction engines, and saving weight, fuel and cost too, it’s finally time for America to get with the programme.

All of the Big Three are now championing turbo-power, using technology from their European divisions to bring smaller-capacity engines to the U.S market. Arguably the most successful so far have been Ford, with their excellent Ecoboost engine range. Unfortunately though, there are still customers in America who live in 1974, and they don’t trust this brave new direction one bit, so how does Ford prove to them that smaller equals better? A 600+bhp Ecoboost supercar ought to do it…

Only a handful of people even within Ford knew that the 2017 GT was being developed, so it came as a total surprise to the motoring press when the GT was revealed in concept form at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Powered by the 3.5 litre Ecoboost V6 that Ford would like to see replace the V8 across the range, the GT’s engine is around half the size of its American competitors. And it’s twice as good.

MOCpages’ Rage Hobbit thought so too, and he’s built a stunning Technic replica of the Ford GT before the real car has even gone on sale. Rage’s Lego recreation includes the mid-mounted V6 – hooked up to an eight speed remotely operated gearbox, remote controlled drive and steering, a motorised rear wing, double wishbone independent suspension and opening butterfly doors.

There are more images and full details of the build available at Rage Hobbit’s MOCpages account – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Ford GT Ecoboost V6

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