Tag Archives: power functions

Tracked Lunch Box

Lego Technic Hägglunds BV 206 ATV

OK, after today’s earlier dalliance, we’re back in the room. This is a Hägglunds Bv 206, and it’s one of the mot unusual vehicles ever made. Built for the Swedish military in 1980 the Bv 206 consists of two linked tracked units, with all four tracks powered, and a payload of over two tons, even on snow. Plus you can add another two tons behind the second unit on a trailer, creating a wonderfully weird train-like arrangement.

Despite looking like a pair of lunch boxes the Bv 206 has been a huge success, and is now in use with various militaries, Antarctic research organisations, the British, Icelandic and Canadian Search & Rescue services, and even the Singapore fire department.

This excellent Technic recreation of the Hägglunds Bv 206 comes from Technic BOOM of Eurobricks, and it features an authentically articulated tracked chassis powered by three Power Functions L motors (plus a Technic V6 piston engine), suspended tracks and a fully detailed cabin, er… we mean cabins.

There’s more to see of this delightfully odd creation at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can also watch a video of the vehicle in action and find a military version too. We’re wondering whether we could even fit our lunch inside it…

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Bronco-ish

Lego Trial Truck 4x4

Today’s creation comes from serial bloggee paave, who has inadvertently built a Ford Bronco. His generic truck trial 4×4 has ended up very Bronco-ish, which is not bad thing, and it features a wealth of off-road goodies to help it navigate the devious obstacles of the recent St. Petersburg Lego truck trial competition.

All-wheel-drive and leaf-sprung front / coil-sprung rear suspension each with panhard rods are teamed with remote control drive and steering via LEGO’s own Power Functions infrared system. It’s a simple set-up that works remarkably well, just like the best real-world off-roaders.

There’s more to see of paave’s Bronco-ish 4×4 trial truck on Brickshelf and you can watch the model in action in the St. Petersburg trial courtesy of Eurobricks – click the links to take a look.

Lego Trial Truck 4x4

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Spray Pattern

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

It’s weird animal-related vehicle day here at The Lego Car Blog. First we post a flying crab, and now we’ve got some sort of tracked locust. Ironically, considering its resemblance to the winged eater of crops, this Goldacres G8CT is employed to protect the bounty of the fields.

Built by BrickbyBrickTechnic this impressive Technic crop sprayer is one of the most intricately engineered creations we’ve found in a while, with independently suspended all-track-drive linked to a four-cylinder piston engine, Hand-of-God steering, and a pair of huge motorised spraying arms that can both unfold and lower electrically.

There’s much more to see of BrickbyBrick’s Goldacres G8CT at both Eurobricks (where there is a video showing the 1 metre wide arms in action) and Flickr – take a closer look via the links.

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

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The Power of Four

Lego Technic RC Buggy

We are very thankful to reader and previous bloggee Lipko today, as he a) found us this awesome Technic RC buggy, and b) most importantly, he found it before one of the Elves did. That’s because this monstrous creation by Didumos69 features four L Motors, all-wheel-drive, and two BuWizz LiPo battery bluetooth controllers, making it very probably the most capable Elf-smushing creation built yet.

Thankfully there will be no Elven smushing today and you can see more of Didumos69’s riotous build, which also includes a V8 piston engine, superb suspension complete with caster angle and Ackerman geometry steering at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where there’s also a video showing what two BuWizzes can achieve when hooked up to four L Motors and all-wheel-drive…

Lego Technic RC Buggy

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Superfront

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This is Marion 204-M Superfront cable-operated mining shovel, and it’s massive. First built in 1974 by the Marion Power Shovel Company (who also built NASA’s enormous crawler transporters), the 204-M Superfront used electrically driven cables to drive its huge bucket arm and had a working weight in excess of 700 tons. Built for around twelve years the 204-M worked in open mines all over the world, with the last still operating in Asia decades later.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This incredible fully functioning Lego replica of the Marion 204-M Superfront was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr and it comes from Beat Felber who has recreated the machine in astonishing detail. Powered by eight Power Functions motors and controlled via bluetooth thanks to three third-party SBricks, Beat’s 204-M Superfront uses an XL Motor to drive each track whilst two L Motors can slew the entire superstructure independently. A pair of XL Motors power each of the cable drums and the bucket angle and bucket door are electorally powered by another two motors, giving Beat’s model as much articulation as the real Marion 204-M.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

There’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular model at Beat Felber’s Marion 204-M Superfront Flickr album, plus you can read our 5 star review of the SBrick bluetooth controller that makes creations like this possible by clicking here.

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BuWizz | Bluetooth Control Battery | Review

Lego BuWizz Review

The Lego Car Blog Elves love remote control Lego creations. Well, they love them if they are at the controls. As regular readers will know there have been a number of remote control related incidents here at TLCB Towers, resulting in much Elven hospitalisation. Well things are about to get taken up a notch…

Revealed here as a Kickstarter project back in June 2016 the BuWizz bluetooth control battery brick has become a regular third-party accessory within the Lego Community. With claims of up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery set-up, now expanded to twelve times with the release of BuWizz 2.0, the potential to transform the way Lego models move is huge. But does the BuWizz live up to the hype? We’ve been sent a copy to find out…

Lego BuWizz Review

The Brick

Our BuWizz arrived a simple cardboard box, packaged only with a little piece of paper denoting the required warnings and LED indicator meanings. The BuWizz brick is a clever thing, incorporating both a rechargeable li-ion battery and a bluetooth control into one 8×4 stud box, reminiscent of LEGO’s own battery boxes from the 1980s. There are studs on top, tubes on the bottom, and four Technic pin holes with which the BuWizz can be attached to genuine LEGO pieces.

Our BuWizz came in a dark grey hue that we don’t think matches any of LEGO’s colours, but seeing as it can be mounted internally within a creation an exact match isn’t required. The moulding quality is OK, perfectly adequate for the job in hand, but certainly not as good as an official LEGO piece (or the rival SBrick reviewed here previously). On top of the BuWizz are two connection ports, a status LED, and four LEGO Power Functions compatible power outlets.

You must charge your BuWizz upon arrival via a micro USB, which the pack does not contain. This is a bit of a shame as it means the device is not truly plug-and-play, requiring a lead from something else in order to charge. We found a lead, plugged in the BuWizz, which let us know it was charging via the LED on top, and busied ourselves for a few hours.

Lego BuWizz Review

Set Up

Upon returning to our BuWizz a green light indicated we were ready to go. Like the aforementioned SBrick, the Buwizz brick uses an app to connect your phone or tablet to itself. The app is an easy download and connects the device seamlessly. Within it are six pre-programmed control interfaces available to operate your model. Each requires a small amount of set-up so that the app knows which of your motors is connected to which port which is simple enough, although there is no ‘test’ function as per the SBrick, which would be useful.

We connected four XL motors mounted within a direct-drive skid-steer test rig to the BuWizz battery and hit the controls. Weirdly one motor (and only one) span the wrong way, but the BuWizz’s simple ‘reverse’ option soon cured that. Then, because we have the mental age of five, we engaged ‘Ludicrous Mode’…

Inspired by Tesla, BuWizz’s ‘Ludicrous Mode’ turns up the power to the motors by a factor of three. Multiply that by the four motors you can drive at once and you get twelve times the power! And boy, does it show… Continue reading

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That Stance Tho

Lego Technic Remote Control Stanced Car

Let’s be clear about this. ‘Stancing’ cars ruins them. It ruins the way they ride, the way they corner, tyre wear, fuel consumption…

The Elves however, having tiny brains similar to that of your average bro, love stanced cars, and thus there’d have been a mass Elven sulk if we didn’t feature this one. Fortunately we can, as whilst the subject matter is questionable the build itself is most excellent, and the builder is something of a legend too.

Lego Technic RC Car Stanced

Powered by LEGO’s Power Functions system and controlled via bluetooth via the 5-star-rated SBrick, Mahjqa’s ‘SUP BRO’ stanced tuner runs a 22.5 degree camber on its remote control chassis. Despite this obvious handicap it still looks proper fun to pilot around an empty car park – take a look via the video below!

 YouTube Video

There’s more to see of Mahjqa’s latest build via both Flickr and the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus we’re delighted to reveal that Mahjqa has become the latest builder to be awarded Master MOCer status here at The Lego Car Blog!

Joining fourteen other of the world’s very best Lego builders, Mahjqa tells us his inspiration, reveals what sort of LEGO brick he would be, and explains how he creates his amazing models. Read his Master MOCers interview below!

Master MOCers Season 2, Episode 4

Mahjqa

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Technic Bugatti Chiron | Picture Special

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron

A very special supercar requires a very special Lego model…

LEGO’s own Bugatti Chiron set, previewed here at The Lego Car Blog earlier in the year, is due later in 2018. However one builder has beaten LEGO to it, and in doing so may have set the bar not just higher than LEGO themselves could hope to achieve, but possibly higher than any Technic supercar has done to date. This is Leviathan‘s 4,000-piece, 3.7KG, two year in the making 1:8 Technic Bugatti Chiron supercar.

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron RC

Designed as a modular construction, as per a real car, Leviathan’s Bugatti Chiron features Power Functions remote control operated via a third-party BuWizz bluetooth brick, a seven speed dual-clutch gearbox, all-wheel-drive, working steering with Ackermann geometry, electronically height adjustable independent suspension, a replicated W16 engine, and even active aerodynamics.

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron Remote Control

Five Power Functions motors are controlled by the BuWizz bluetooth brick, with two RC motors driving all four wheels, an XL motor powering the seven-speed dual clutch gearbox, and a fourth motor powering the steering. The fifth motor uses a gearbox to switch between two functions; raising/lowering the suspension, and controlling the three-position rear spoiler/air-brake (shown in the picture above in air-brake mode and in the image below fully retracted).

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron Supercar

Leviathan’s Bugatti Chiron is very probably the most advanced Lego model we’ll see all year, and if LEGO’s own 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set is half as good when it arrives later on this year it’ll definitely be a set worth having. In the meantime you can read full details of Leviathan’s unbelievable creation at the Eurobricks forum, where there are also images showing the amazing engineering within, you can see the full gallery of images on Flickr, and you can watch a video demonstrating all of the model’s incredible functions by clicking here.

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Ugly but Effective

Lego BuWizz RC Trophy Truck

The best off-roaders are never the prettiest things. Sensual curves and wind-cheating aerodynamics come a very distant second to approach/departure angles and suspension articulation.

Eurobricks’ rm8 has employed a similar tactic with his BuWizz-controlled trophy truck. Despite claims that it’s inspired by the Ferrari GTC4 Lusso it has about as much in common with that car as your Mom does with Charlize Theron. They’re the same species, and everything is kinda in the same place, but that’s about it.

Lego Technic Trophy Truck Remote Control

What rm8’s trophy truck lacks in aesthetic appeal however, it more that compensates for with off-road ability. Powered by a LEGO Buggy Motor, with servo steering and BuWizz control, plus bouncy independent front and live-axle rear suspension, it’s absolutely mega off-road, which should help it in the BuWizz Fast Car Competition in which it’s been entered.

There’s lots more to see at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, and you can watch the model in action via the ace video below.

YouTube Video

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The Other Challenger

Lego Challenger MT-865 Tractor

The Dodge Challenger has appeared here numerous times over the years. This isn’t that Challenger. Nope, this one is made by Caterpillar, and it comes from a series of tractors that were the first to be specifically designed to run on tracks.

This brilliant Model Team recreation of the latest Challenger MT865C comes from the appropriately-named Eric Trax, who has done a simply astonishing job replicating the Caterpillar in Lego form. And Eric’s creation is far from a static model…

Lego Challenger MT-865 Tractor

Inside the beautifully constructed exterior are a wealth of electronic and pneumatic components, allowing Eric’s Challenger to drive, skid-steer, and power both an on-board compressor and power-take-off.

Hooked up to the back of the MT865 is a Kinze 1050 grain trailer, complete with its own Medium motor and pneumatics to control the unloading auger.

Lego Challenger MT-865 RC

All of these functions can be controlled remotely via bluetooth, thanks to the third-party SBrick concealed within the build. This enables the models to be controlled by a phone or, as Eric has done, by a Playstation 4 controller!

There’s much more to see of this amazing Caterpillar Challenger MT865C tractor and Kinze 1050 grain trailer at both Brickshelf and the Eurobricks forum – click the link to see all of the images and to read complete build details.

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Diggin’ Double

Lego Technic Remote Control Excavator

LEGO’s excellent Power Functions components have brought a new ease to motorising Technic models. Small, simple to install and reasonably powerful, the wide range of motors, infrared receivers and battery boxes have found their way into countless Lego creations featured here over the years.

It didn’t take long however, for the clever boffins in the Lego Community to think ‘Great… but what if Power Functions was really powerful?…’

The result is the BuWizz brick, an integrated rechargeable battery and bluetooth receiver that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system. To which Anto of Eurobricks thought ‘Great… but what if I had two…’

This is the fruit of Anto’s endeavour; a neat if unspectacular looking Technic excavator, with two BuWizz third-party bricks. The first controls the independently driven tracks (each powered by a Medium motor), the front-mounted blade (also powered a Medium motor) and the arm-mounted LEDs.

The second BuWizz device controls the superstructure rotation (via a Large motor), the two-stage arm (via an XL motor and Large motor respectively), and finally the bucket (powered by a Medium motor).

That’s a lot of motors and, thanks to those two BuWizz bricks, a lot of power too. So much so that Anto’s Technic excavator really can, well… excavate. Full details can be found at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you watch Anto’s excavator in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

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Deutschland Duel

Lego Technic Großer Mercedes 770

Iiiin the red corner, representing West Germany, driven by Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler, Hermann Göring and Pope Pius XI, and powered through the 1930s by eight cylinders and a supercharger, it’s the Großer Mercedes 770!

Aaaand in the beige corner, representing East Germany, driven by peasants, and powered through the 1950s… and 60s… and 70s… and 80s… and 90s… by two cylinders and hope, it’s the Trabant Combi!

Two very different yet very German cars today, represented by two very different but very excellent Lego creations.

Above we have the Großer Mercedes 770, built by Aleh of Eurobricks in Technic form and absolutely packed with amazing technology. Aleh’s recreation of one of Mercedes-Benz’s most opulent vehicles includes Power Functions drive and steering, an inline-8 engine hooked up to a three-speed+R gearbox, working all-wheel mechanical brakes powered by a Medium motor, all-wheel suspension, LED lights, and SBrick bluetooth control.

At the other end of the automotive scale we have this wonderfully replicated Model Team style Trabant Combi, resplendent in an authentic hearing-aid beige and built by fellow TLCB debutant Dan Falussy. With opening doors, hood and hatchback plus folding seats, Dan’s homage to the world’s finest cotton car (yes really) is about as well equipped as the real thing, and very probably better built.

There’s more to see of each model on Eurobricks (as well as Flickr in the Trabant’s case) via the links above. Take a look and choose your winner!

Lego Trabant

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Optimus Primary

Lego Mack Superliner 6x6 RC

Lego models aren’t often constructed in primary colours these days. However a quick look back through our Review Library reveals that once-upon-a-time primary colours were very much in vogue. Due mostly to the fact that other hues were not available, but still.

Today’s find takes us back to the era of crayon-coloured Lego models, being this glorious primary-coloured Mack Superliner 6×6 RC by Flickr’s spongebrickpl, and it makes us think that basic colouring is due a resurgence!

There’s more to see of spongerbrick’s blue, yellow and red Mack Superliner complete with Power Functions six-wheel-drive, pendular suspension and remote control steering via the link above, and if like the Elves you’re still learning your colours, this scientific explanation may help…

Lego Mack Superliner 6x6 RC

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Bucket o’Beatings

Lego Technic Volvo L120H Wheel Loader

Much like its real-world counterpart, this rather wonderful remote controlled Volvo L120H by Eurobricks’ mpj is not a fast machine. A smaller version of Volvo’s wheel-loader in the 42030 Volvo L350F set, mpj’s L120H can do everything the official set can, including drive via an XL Motor, articulated steering via two Medium Motor-Powered linear actuators, arm raising/lowing via another two linear actuators driven by a Large Motor, and lastly the tipping of the bucket by a  final Medium Motor.

An impressive roster of remote control functions then, which today’s discovering Elf deployed with moderate success. Unable to run over any of its colleagues thanks to the L120H’s slow speed, it drove its find into the Cage Room, up to a cage containing a sleeping Elf, and promptly tipped it out. Understandably unamused the awoken Elf remonstrated forcibly with its aggressor, who responded by simply stabbing it with the bucket, and then (very slowly) running it over. Job done.

We’ve taken the controls away now so there’ll be no more Elven violence (at least at the hands of the Volvo), and you can see more of mpj’s impressive machine at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to take a look.

Lego Technic Volvo L120H Wheel Loader

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BuWizz Buggy

Lego Technic Remote Control Buggy

[Whiiiir] [Elven Screaming] [Thump] [Whiiiir]…

An all too familiar pattern of noises floated into TLCB Office from the corridor today. Said pattern has been heard here at TLCB Towers on numerous occasions and it always means tidying up for us. Sigh.

A glance into the corridor revealed the scene of expected carnage, with an Elf – high on power – repeatedly driving a nimble off-road buggy over a group of already squashed Elves.

The controls have now been taken away, the victims patched up, and we can take a look at the vehicular weapon in question. Built by Anto of Eurobricks it’s an entry into the current BuWizz Fast Car Competition, in which the third-party bluetooth brick specialists have challenged builders to make, well… a BuWizz powered fast car.

Lego Technic RC Buggy

With up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery/receiver system a BuWizz powered creation is certainly able to outrun a fleeing TLCB Elf, and with competition entrants having to complete the longest jump possible Anto’s RC buggy had the suspension to bounce over victims without any problems at all.

There’s more to see of Anto’s brilliant remote control buggy at the Eurobricks forum, plus you can watch it in action via the video below.

We’ve also got our hands on our own BuWizz brick, courtesy of the BuWizz team, and will be conducting our own tests shortly [maniacal laugh!] in order to bring you a full review. Whilst we find out whether eight times the power really is possible you can find all of the BuWizz powered creations previously featured here via this archives search, and you can read our five-star review of BuWizz’s rival SBrick by clicking here.

YouTube Video

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