Tag Archives: power functions

Big Tow

Mining trucks are slow. But even slower are the tracked vehicles that fill them, designed as they are to move very heavy things very short distances.

Which means if you need to relocate an enormous bulldozer or tracked excavator to the other end of the mine, you’d better clear your schedule for the next few weeks.

Which is where this curious machine comes in. Effectively a Komatsu mining truck with a gooseneck hitch in place of the dump body, it can tow the aforementioned mining machines to their new location aboard a specially-designed single-axle TowHaul Lowboy trailer, capable of transporting 250 tons. We bet parking isn’t fun.

This spectacular fully remote controlled recreation of the world’s biggest vehicular trailer comes from previous bloggee Beat Felber, whose converted Komatsu HD785-5 mining truck features motorised drive, steering, and gooseneck hitch, enabling the model to load and tow a huge TowHaul Lowboy trailer and its Komatsu D575A-3 ‘Super Dozer’ load.

There’s loads more to see of the both the Komatsu HD785-5 truck and the TowHaul Lowboy 250 ton trailer behind it at Beat’s Flickr album, and you can watch the whole rig in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video

Six in the Sand

Much like sandwiches and body crevices, LEGO Technic gears do not like sand. Sand however, as per the aforementioned lucheon staple and your belly button, loves to get all up in there, first causing horrible noises, then a jamming drivetrain, and finally broken pieces. But not today, as this simple yet superbly engineered 6×6 trial truck can withstand not just sand, but snow, mud, and 8cm of water!

Built by Eurobricks’ keymaker there’s 6×6 drive via three Power Functions L Motors, Servo steering, all-wheel suspension, and – crucially – complete underbody protection thanks to some strategically placed curved Technic panels.

It’s such a simple solution we’re amazed it a) hasn’t been done before and b) expect it will soon be fitted to every remotely controlled off-road Lego creation, particularly as keymaker has published instructions for his creation that are available for free. We don’t normally link directly to instructions but if you release them free of charge we will!

There’s more to see of keymaker’s sand-proof truck at the Eurobricks forum, and you can take your truck trial to the beach via the link above.

YouTube Video

Tank Hunter

Does anyone else remember that fiendishly addictive early computer game in which the player was tasked with manoeuvring around a seeming infinite plain populated by the outlines of various 3D shapes, hunting and destroying enemy tanks? Just us? OK.

Anyway, perfect cubes and prisms aside, the concept of hunting tanks was based on reality, with specific machines (themselves looking rather like tanks) designed for their destroy enemy counterparts.

This is one such device, the Sturmgeschütz III tank-hunting assault gun, as deployed by Germany during the Second World War (and Syria until 1973).

Handily known as the STuG III, it saw service on almost every front, from Russia to Europe to Africa, and proved very successful at destroying Allied armour.

This excellent fully remote controlled Lego version of the STuG III comes from TLCB favourite Sariel, who – despite the model measuring just 32cm in length and weighing under 1kg – has packed in drive and steering, fully suspended tracks, and an oscillating and slewing gun barrel, all powered by a LEGO battery and controlled via bluetooth courtesy of a third-party SBrick.

There’s more to see of Sariel’s STuG III at his Flickr album of the same name, plus you can watch the model in action via the video below. Go tank hunting across a plain of cubes via the links!

YouTube Video

Weekend in Drag

This a dragline crawler crane, used in open-cast mining for digging really big holes. Built by previous bloggee Beat Felber, this incredible creation is a fully-working replica of one the world’s largest; the 700-ton P&H 2355 diesel-electric dragline that worked the Rix Creek Mine in Australia.

Remotely controlled by three SBricks, Beat’s creation can hoist and drag the bucket, rotate the superstructure, raise the boom, drive and skid-steer, and even raise the two access ladders thanks to seven Power Functions and two Micro Motors.

Four pairs of LEGO LEDs illuminate the floodlights and interior, whilst removable panels give access to the motors and winches within.

It’s a spectacular build, with a fully detailed machine room and interior to match the astonishing working mechanisms, and you can head to the mine via Beat’s ‘P&H 2355’ album to get in drag.

Big Reach

Reach. It’s a word we hear a lot in the running of a world-famous top-quality Lego site. OK, a mildly-known bottom-of-the-barrel Lego site. But nevertheless, we still hear it a lot. Countless messages offering great value reach improvement services are deleted with alarming frequency.

Anyway, today we have great reach, courtesy of TLCB favourite and Lego-building legend Sariel, and this incredible fully remote controlled Liebherr LTC 1045-3.1 mobile crane.

Powered by fourteen motors and three SBricks, Sariel’s crane can extend its reach to well over a meter, with a further half-meter boom extension possible on top of that.

Four Power Functions motors drive the boom’s elevation, extension and winch, another three the cabin boom elevation, extension and tilt, one rotates the superstructure, another folds the mirrors, two more the outriggers, and finally three power the drive and steering.

Over five meters of wires are hidden inside to link the motors, LED lights, LEGO battery, and SBricks, with the total model weighing almost 5kgs and able to lift ¾ kg.

There’s much more of Sariel’s superbly presented creation to see at his Liebherr LTM 1045-3.1 album, you can read how Sariel turned his hobby into revenue via our ‘Become a Lego Professional‘ series, and you can watch this amazing model in action in the video below. Click the links to reach the full content.

YouTube Video

Power(ed-Up) is Nothing Without Control(+)

Yes, we have nerdily butchered the marketing tagline for tyres for today’s title.

Because these are the ‘Universal Vehicle Controls’; part mechanical, part electronic twin joysticks with four degrees of movement, twin triggers, and a dashboard with a working needle, that allow Control+ LEGO sets and creations to be, er… controlled, with real feedback, all built solely from off-the-shelf LEGO pieces. It’s like the Control+ app, BuWizz, or SBrick we’re familiar with on our phone screen, but made physical.

Tobi WanKenobi owns the brain behind this rather interesting idea, and if you think it’s interesting too you can find out more on LEGO Ideas, at the Eurobricks forum here, or take a look at the ‘Universal Vehicle Controls’ in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

It’s ChristMAN!

It’s Christmas! The season of hope, goodwill, and tenuous TLCB titles. Today’s enabler is previous bloggee Vladimir Drozd, with this epic MAN F2000 8×4 heavy haulage truck.

Powered by an XL Motor, with Servo steering, all-wheel suspension, a lifting second axle, custom decals, and some non-LEGO (but superb looking) front wheel trims and coiled cables, Vladimir’s creation is one of the most realistic trucks of 2022, and there’s much more to see at both his ‘MAN F2000 8×4’ Flickr album and via the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Click the links for a Merry ChristMAN!

Smokin’

This is a Baureihe 57 / Prussian G10, a German steam locomotive built in the 1910s-’20s for heavy goods transport. Around 2,600 Prussian G10s were produced, with an extra one – pictured here – arriving courtesy of Pieter Post, who has recreated the steam train in beautiful detail. Powered by a hidden Power Functions L Motor and BuWizz bluetooth battery, Pieter’s Prussian G10 is depicted navigating a wonderfully constructed forest track, complete with a transformer building and the best pine trees we’ve ever seen. Top of the billing however, is the smoke – which looks as real as anything made from plastic bricks could possibly be. Click the link above to smoke your way through a German forest in the 1920s.

Tsar Tank

Russia, currently undertaking a humiliating withdrawal from occupied Kherson in Ukraine following their illegal invasion, haven’t always been the scumbags of Europe. In fact, the Russian T34-85 Tank made one of the greatest contributions to saving Europe from the last set of scumbags intent on invading their neighbours.

Prior to the success of the T34-85 however, Russia’s tanks were a little more… experimental. Looking like a cross between something from Battle Bots and a child’s tricycle, this is the Netopyr or ‘Tsar Tank’, a 60ft long 1914 prototype armoured vehicle, crewed by ten personnel and powered by two 240bhp Maybach engines taken from a captured German airship, one for each enormous front wheel.

Those wheels measured almost 30ft in diameter, and were followed by a 5ft rear wheel, in-between which was a 26ft hull festooned with cannons. The idea was that the Tsar Tank could traverse large obstacles thanks to the massive front wheels, although little thought seemed to be given to the much smaller rear one.

This promptly got stuck in soft ground during the tank’s first test run, and even the most powerful engines of the time couldn’t get it out. Various extractions failed too, and thus the tank was left in-situ for a further 8 years before it was finally removed and scrapped.

Still, it looked bloody awesome, and so too does TLCB favourite Sariel’s spectacular recreation of Russia’s 1914 engineering failure. Propelled by two Power Functions motors, with a further three operating the various cannons, Sariel’s replica looks every bit as mad as its 60-ton counterpart, and there’s lots more to see at his ‘Tsar Tank’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look at easily the weirdest vehicle you’ll see today, and here to watch it in action, where it is – frankly – every bit as rubbish as the real thing was over a century ago.

Building Broncos

This is a classic 1960s Ford Bronco. And so is this. Yup, we have two brilliant brick-built Broncos today, each of which looks stunningly accurate, and yet the two are constructed entirely differently, such are the infinite possibilities of the LEGO brick.

The blue ’68 Bronco is the work of Michael217, whose Model Team style creation deploys a raft of ‘Studs Not on Top’ techniques to recreate the iconic shape. There are opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Built in exactly the same scale, but using traditional studs-up techniques, is FanisLego’s red ’65 Bronco, which also includes opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, again behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Fanis’ Bronco also deploys a few more ‘Creator’ style techniques, including ‘glass’ for the windows, and the smoothing of nearly every visible stud.

Michael217 has chosen to omit the glass in his windows, but there’s rather more hidden underneath the chassis of his blue ’68, where a complete remote control drivetrain has been packed in. All-wheel-drive courtesy of two L Motors, Servo steering, and all-wheel-suspension all feature, without a hint of the clever engineering within being revealing visibly.

Each Bronco is fantastic example of the versatility of our favourite plastic bricks, using two completely different compositions to deliver an identically scaled highly realistic creation packed with with features.

Both Broncos are presented beautifully on Bricksafe, with Michael’s blue ’68 available to view here (and on Eurobricks too), whilst FanisLego’s red ’65 available to view here. Check out each superb model via the links!

Mind Bending

This is an MAN Lion articulated bus, created in Technic by Fosapifi of Eurobricks, and in place of the usual nonsense we write on these pages, this post is mostly an almost unfathomably long list. Because Fosapifi’s model is as complicated – and has as much hidden from view – as Trump’s tax returns.

Firstly the bus is remotely driven, with four Power Functions XL Motors driving the third axle. A Servo steers the front axle, and there are eight sets of LEDs illuminating the lights.

Two separate pneumatic systems, each self-compressed by individual Power Functions L Motors, power the doors and air-suspension, allowing the bus to ‘kneel’ at the kerb for passenger embark/disembarkation. A total of twenty-two pneumatic cylinders (plus ten shock absorbers) are built into the suspension, controlled via Servo, whilst another Servo and six further cylinders operates the doors, the second and third of which can be deactivated via a switch in the cab.

Finally, a Micro-Motor unfolds the wheelchair ramp, with all the above controlled remotely via four SBricks and a BuWizz Bluetooth battery, with all of it hidden away to allow for a complete bus interior.

No we don’t know how it’s possible either, but you can join us having our minds bent at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where a video and a link to building instructions can also be found.

Technic Tipping

This neat Technic tipper truck was discovered by one of our Elves today, and they’ve all had great fun sliding down the raising tipping load bed. Flickr’s JLiu15 is the builder, and has included Power Functions motors, LED lights, a working miniature piston engine under an opening hood, and the aforementioned linear-actuator powered slide tipping bucket. See more at JLiu15’s ‘Classic Dump Truck’ album via the link.

Knuckle Dragger

This astounding creation is a Volvo FH16 750, and it’s one of the finest Technic creations of the year so far.

Packed with working functions, it took builder blaz62 over two years to complete, with a remote control 8×6 drivetrain linked to an inline-6 engine that resides under a fully suspended cab, all-wheel suspension, LED lights, working front, middle and rear outriggers, and an incredible three-stage folding ‘knuckle boom’ crane.

Based on the Palfinger PK 165.002 TEC 7 crane (ah yes, that one. Ed.), blaz62’s amazing feat of engineering can unfurl (via much knob twiddling) to reveal a three-stage first boom, with a further second two-stage jib and third single-stage jib thereafter. It offers 360° of rotation, a 400g payload, and a reach longer than a 1983 Monty Python sketch.

Building instructions are available and there’s much more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum and Blaz62’s ‘Volvo FH16’ Bricksafe album.

Bricky E-ish

The future of racing is electric. Because the future of everything is electric, unless we can sort hydrogen out.

Formula E is the FIA’s flagship electric racing series, in which unsuccessful Formula 1 departees drive, um… not particularly quickly around giant carparks. Oh. At least the cars look cool.

Cue R. Skittle‘s ‘Formula e Concept’ – suggested to us by a reader – which looks a lot more like a traditional racing car than the wild current Formula E car. However with twin BuWizz batteries and motors, it might also have performance more in line with a traditional racing car than a Formula E car too.

A Power Functions servo motor provides the steering, there’s clever independent pushrod suspension, and – apparently – torque vectoring for a drift mode! If this is the future of electric racing sign us up!

Join the electric revolution at R. Skittle’s Flickr album via the link above.

Racing Point(less)

Racing trucks are a bit like starting a removal company with a Mazda Miata. There are vehicles considerably more suited to the task.

But, much like moving house in a Miata, a racing truck is a somewhat impressive sight. This one is a Scania R730, as constructed by previous bloggee Vladimir Drozd (aka LegoV94), and it comes complete with remote control drive and steering via an SBrick, a two-speed gearbox, a working piston engine, and sponsorship by every company ever.

There’s more of Vladimir’s remote control Scania R730 racing truck to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks, or alternatively you can move house in a Miata here.