Tag Archives: power functions

She’s Electric

Lego Technic Tesla Model S Remote Control

The future of transport is electric, and no manufacturer has done more to advance the technology than electric car start-up Tesla.

Founded from the proceeds of Paypal, Elon Musk’s ludicrously ambitious venture has gone from producing a humble modified Lotus Elise in tiny numbers to become the largest manufacturer of li-ion batteries in the world, completely changing the automotive landscape in the process.

This is the car that made the company, the Model S sedan, which proved that electric cars didn’t have to be slow, ugly econo-boxes, and that they could be produced at a price comparable to an internal-combustion-engined rival.

This huge Technic recreation of one of the most important cars ever built comes from Fosapifi of Eurobricks, and it’s very nearly as technology-packed as the real car.

Opening doors, hood, tailgate, jump-seats, and independent suspension all feature, and the model is controlled by two third-party power-boosting BuWizz bricks, allowing Fosapifi’s Model S to be driven by eight (yes eight!) Large Power Functions motors, plus a Servo for steering. The result is, much like the real car, a vehicle that makes way more power than you’d expect.

How much power? Click the link above to visit the Eurobricks forum for full details, you watch the Tesla in action courtesy of the video below, and you can hear today’s title track by clicking here.

YouTube Video:

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Thermidor

Lego Scania R580 PWT

This absolutely stunning Scania R580 in PWT Thermo livery is the latest model to come from truck building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker aka Bricksonwheels. Constructed from over 4,200 pieces Dennis’ incredible creation features full bluetooth remote control (courtesy of a third-party SBrick device), a long-lasting RC battery pack, and twin XL motors.

Dennis’ Scania R580 will be available to view in person at the upcoming Legoworld exhibition 2017 in Utrecht, the Netherlands, but for those not local to Utrecht you can check out the image in high quality at Dennis’ photostream – click the link above to make the trip.

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Argy Bargy

Lego Technic Argo 6x6

This intriguing looking vehicle is an ARGO 6×6 XTV and, just like your Mom at a free buffet, it’ll climb over almost anything to get where it wants to go. The real ARGO is a fully amphibious vehicle, floating with its body above the water and propelled by its six wheels that sit below the waterline. Those six wheels are all driven and are skid-steered thanks to a set of brakes on each side, allowing the ARGO to turn in its own length.

This brilliant little Technic recreation of the ARGO XTV is the work of newcomer Andrew Millson, and whilst his version might not float it steers in exactly the same way as the real thing. In Lego form it would have been far far easier to skid-steer via the use of two motors, one driving the three left wheels and another the three right, but just like the real ARGO Andrew’s model uses a single motor and an ingenious left/right braking system that activates when the handlebars are turned. It’s seriously clever stuff and one of the neatest Technic tricks we’ve seen his year.

There’s more to see of Andrew’s ARGO and the brilliant braking system within it at both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum, and if you’d like to see what Jeremy Clarkson thought of the 8×8 version click here!

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Big White Box

Lego Mercedes-Benz Actros 4163 Truck

This enormous and brilliantly detailed Mercedes-Benz Actros 4163 comes from recent bloggee Shineyu, and whilst it may appear to be a Model Team creation outwardly, it’s also a fully functional remotely controlled model too. With working LED lights, twin steering axles and powered drive, the Actros is packed with Power Functions goodness. The features don’t stop there though as the huge trailer also features a neat party piece, as the powered sides lift upwards to enable loading. It’s a difficult trick to explain here, but fortunately Shineyu has uploaded a video to the internet revealing his box opening up (just like your Mom). Head over to the Eurobricks forum to check it out and to see the full gallery of images.

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Halo Warthog – Picture Special

Lego Halo Warthog Remote Control

Halo. It’s one of the most successful video game franchises of all time, with over 65 million sales worldwide and grossing almost $3.5billion to date. And it’s also the cause of more awful Lego creations than probably any other genre in history. Besides Bionicle of course.

A Halo Warthog is therefore not an unusual creation. The online Lego community is plagued with them. But today’s find is an unusual creation. Because it’s a Halo Warthog… that’s really bloody good.

Lego Halo Warthog Remote Control

Built by previous bloggee and TLCB favourite Nico71 this fully remote controlled Technic Halo Warthog is a spectacularly well-engineered creation. Featuring remote control all-wheel-drive complete with diff locks, all-wheel-steering, all-wheel suspension, and a remotely operable gun turret, it’s very probably the Elves’ favourite creation of the year so far. Until it squashed them of course, but they’re used to that by now.

There’s lot’s more to see of this incredible Technic Halo Warthog at Nico71’s Brickshelf gallery – click the link to join the fight.

Lego Technic Halo Warthog RC

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Whitetip

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Arocs 4463

The Lego Car Blog Elves have a long and bloody history with remotely controlled vehicles. Fortunately whilst the Elves are slow learners most remotely controlled Lego vehicles are slower still, and thus today’s find failed to bring about the wanton destruction so desired by the Elf that found it. Instead it’s actually delivering some Elven cheer, as several of our smelly little workers happily ride in it around the office. So what is this unusual Elven chariot?…

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Arocs 4463 Remote Control

Built by previous bloggee Shineyu, it’s a Mercedes-Benz Arocs 4463 8×4 tipper truck, and whilst its external realism marks it out as a Model Team creation, underneath it’s packed with proper Technic functionality. Twin Large Power Functions motors drive the two rearmost axles, another motor powers the steering for the front two, whilst a third motor drives the model’s party-peice; a huge tipping bucket. The Elf at the controls will probably discover that soon, but until then we’re content to let the Elves enjoy their ride. See more of Shineyu’s build at Eurobricks.

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Arocs 4463 Remote Control

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Harvest Time

Lego Technic Deutz-Fahr 6040 Combine Harvester RC

This is a Deutz-Fahr 6040 combine harvester (no, us neither), but vehicles such as this are vital for the continual feeding of the Earth’s 7.4 billion human mouths. This incredible fully remote controlled Technic version comes from Flickr’s Krešo Krejča and it’s absolutely packed with mechanical wizardry. The drive, steering, and the rotating, raising and lowering cutting bar are all powered via LEGO Power Functions motors, plus there’s a trailer to tow the cutting bar for road use, a detailed cabin, and opening hatches galore. There’s lots more to see of the Deutz-Fahr at Krejca’s photostream – click the link above to bring in the harvest.

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Land Cruiser

Lego Remote Control Land Carrier

But not the usual kind. This is a Khagaan Land Carrier, a vehicle from deep within the mind of Lego-engineering genius Mahjqa, and it is, just like your Mom, ludicrously massive. Constructed from an estimated 25,000 parts, measuring well over a meter long, and weighing 9kg, Mahjqa’s creation was a truly huge undertaking, requiring three months to reach completion and a further two for each of the remote controlled vehicles on the deck.

The whole rig is itself remote controlled, driven by four powered caterpillar tracks mounted on rotating bogies, and is also fitted with a remotely operable crane, full LED lighting, plus a powered lift to enable the vehicles carried by the Khagaan to ascend and descend between the carrier deck and the ground beneath it.

Lego Remote Control Land Carrier

There’s a whole lot more to see of Mahjqa’s incredible build at both Flickr and the Eurobricks discussion forum, but the only way to really appreciate the scale and engineering complexity of this remarkable machine is to watch in action.

Fortunately Mahjqa is one of the most talented Lego movie-makers in the business, and he’s produced a genuinely exceptional video showcasing the Khagaan and its support vehicles, plus some behind-the-scenes footage of how the amazing shoot was put together.

Click the links above to join the discussion on Eurobricks and to see the Khagaan’s full image gallery on Flickr, but don’t leave this page without watching the video below first…

YouTube Video

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Supercharged Smushing

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

The Lego Car Blog Elves have a long and chequered history with remote control vehicles. Regularly chased, squashed, and manhandled by one of their number at the controls of an RC creation, they only have themselves to blame. Unless we do it of course.

However if they’re going to be run over by a remotely controlled Lego model it may as well be by a vehicle they like, and we expect this brutal-looking Charger-esque supercharged muscle car is the Elves’ very favourite of all the creations that have  mowed them down.

Built by previous bloggee Paave this RC masterpiece not only looks the part, it’s packed with cool functions too. Remote control drive (by two L Motors) and steering (via a Medium Motor) of course feature, plus rather cleverly the supercharger belt also spins. There’s working suspension front and rear, positive caster angle, opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, and the bodywork is completely removable from the chassis.

There’s lots more to see of Paave’s superb Technic muscle car via MOCpages, Brickshelf and Eurobricks where you can also watch a video of the model’s features in action – click the links to check it out.

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

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Ford GT – Picture Special

Lego Technic Ford GT Supercar

Ford’s sold-out GT has got everyone talking. By everyone, mostly we mean America, where not having a V8 is still seen as bit of a novelty. Nevertheless, the new GT doesn’t have a V8, instead being fitted with a seriously tuned version of Ford’s 3.5 litre ‘Ecoboost’ V6 engine producing over 600bhp.

Ford designed the GT first and foremost as a racing car, maximising performance within GT-class rules, and then adapting the design for the road. This makes the GT a magnificently impractical car for road use, but at a track… that’s a different story.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

This stunning Technic recreation of Ford’s newest supercar has been built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron and it’s very nearly as impressive as the real car. Underneath the beautifully sculpted body work is a V6 engine, inboard pushrod suspension complete with the GT’s trick ‘track mode’ setting which drops the car to the tarmac, a raising rear spoiler, and Power Functions remote control drive and steering.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Lachlan’s incredible Ford GT Technic Supercar on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the links above for the full gallery, build details, and a video of the GT in action.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

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Agent Orange

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

Here’s a car that we’d like to own for real. Toyota’s first generation Celica produced between 1970 and 1977 has become a seriously cool ride, even more so when painted bright orange and lightly modified. This awesome remote controlled Lego version of the 1970 TA22-type Celica comes from LegoMarat of Flickr, and he’s lightly modified his creation too.

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

With a third-party BuWizz brick installed LegoMarat’s Celica produces up to eight times the power of a model powered by a standard LEGO battery, making his model a seriously quick bit of kit.

There are more images to view on Flickr via the link above, and you can see the real-life Celica TA22 that inspired LegoMarat’s build by clicking here.

Lego Toyota Celica Remote Control

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Technic Toyota

Lego Technic Toyota FJ Cruiser

Modern Toyota 4×4 vehicles are renowned the world over for their reliability, toughness, and go-anywhere ability. But not so much for their soul. Apart from this one that is – the wonderful Toyota FJ Cruiser.

Launched in 2006 and lasting until 2014 the FJ Cruiser brought a bit of style to Toyota’s 4×4 range, whilst maintaining the legendary durability and off-road ability that the brand was famous for. So why wasn’t it sold in TLCB’s home nation Toyota?!

We’ll have to make do with this then, which is no bad thing. Built by Flickr’s _spacehopper_ this Technic recreation of the FJ Cruiser not only looks brilliant (especially for a Technic model), but it’s also packed with working functions, including remote control drive and steering, working suspension, opening doors and a front-mounted winch.

There’s more of the FJ to see at _spacehopper_’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump to Flickr.

Lego Technic Toyota FJ Cruiser

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Mighty Metro

Lego MG Metro 6R4 Group B

The Austin/Rover/MG Metro does not have a good reputation here in TLCB’s home nation. Now almost extinct, most observers would say that’s a good thing. But this staff writer is feeling brave, and he’s going to make a case for the humble British city car…

Launched in 1980 the Austin – and then Rover/MG – Metro was designed to compliment (but eventually replace) the beloved but ageing Mini. Neat packaging, clever hydro-gas suspension, and modern looks earned British Leyland’s new product the What Car? Car of The Year accolade and buyers bought it in their thousands.

However the Metro was born at a tumultuous time for the British car industry, and the reputation of industrial action, striking workers and piss-poor quality still lingered around almost anything that British Leyland made.

This meant that the Metro was a rare success story, but whilst other good products would arrive in the 1990s cash would become increasingly tight, and the Metro would be forced to carry on for eighteen years. Over that time of course, a good car designed in the late 1970s became no longer a good car at all.

That meant the end of the Metro and – ultimately – the end of Rover too, and the Metro is now almost completely gone from European roads, despite over 2 million being sold.

Lego Remote Control Metro 6R4

However, one variant of British Leyland’s little hatchback can still be found. A version from a time when the company was optimistic about its future, and adventurous in its marketing too. The amazing MG Metro 6R4.

Built for the monstrous Group B rally era, and then becoming a dominant force in rallycross, the Metro 6R4 squeezed a 400+bhp Cosworth-derived V6 and a permanent all-wheel drive system into a space-framed version of the Metro shell, and the engine later went on to be developed for the Jaguar XJ200 supercar – which became the fastest production car in the world.

This wonderful fully remote controlled recreation of British Leyland’s most spectacular car comes from newcomer All_About_Lego, and it’s packed with working functions. Alongside the remote control all-wheel drive and steering are working front and rear lights, all-wheel suspension, and opening doors and rear clamshell. The exterior is accurately stickered in the 6R4’s period mid-80s livery, whilst the inside contains a fully detailed (and roll-caged) interior too.

A full gallery of images is available to view on Flickr, you can read more about the build and watch a video of the model in action via the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, and if you’re wondering quite why this writer thinks the MG Metro 6R4 is so cool, click this link…

Lego MG Metro 6R4 Group B

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To Supercar or Not to Supercar?

Lego Technic Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Remote Control

Is the Chevrolet Corvette a supercar? If this were YouTube there would now be a heated discussion, someone would call someone else something rude, and Hitler would probably eventually be mentioned.

This is The Lego Car Blog though, and our readers are (generally) more civilised than the baying mob found within the YouTube comments section. However, we’ll throw our thoughts into the Corvette Supercar argument because, well… we can: We don’t know.

Yup, we’ve wussed out and sat on the fence, because the area the Corvette occupies between Sports and Super Car is greyer than ever. Once ridiculed by us here in Europe, the Chevrolet Corvette is now actually quite good, and in Z06 form it’s certainly quick enough to enter the supercar league. But ‘quick’ doesn’t necessarily mean ‘supercar’.

It seems that Chevrolet themselves have had enough of the argument and rumour has it they’re readying a mid-engined version of the Corvette to silence the debate. Whether that happens or not what we are confident in is that this stunning C7 series Corvette Z06 by newcomer Dylan Sebastian is a bona-fide Technic Supercar.

With a working V8 engine, independent suspension on all four wheels, plus steering and drive via remote control, Dylan’s Corvette has all the Technic Supercar boxes ticked, plus opening doors and hood, and LED lights.

What’s that? Technic Supercars need to have a gearbox? Damn…

Well it seems Dylan’s Z06 is even more true to the real Corvette than we thought, itself being as supercar debatable as the real thing. Whatever it is though, it’s a model that’s definitely worth a closer look, and you can check out all of the photos at Dylan’s Flickr album and you can read more about the build and watch a video of the model in action at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Lego Technic Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Remote Control

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Mark V Tank – Picture Special

Lego Mark V Tank Sariel

This remarkable looking thing is a 1918 British Mark V tank that saw duty in the final months of the First World War. With an engine (built by Ricardo, who now make the twin-turbo V8 engine fitted to McLaren supercars) mounted in the centre of the crew’s cabin the Mark V was a miserable place to spend any time in. Ponderous, painfully slow, and unreliable, these early tanks were no fun at all, but they would change the course of warfare for ever.

Lego Mark V Tank RC

This beautiful Model Team style recreation of the 100 year old Mark V comes from Master MOCer and TLCB regular Sariel and it’s packed with brilliant engineering. With an XL motor driving each track Sariel’s Mark V can cross 22cm wide gaps, climb 9cm vertically, and ascend a 60% slope thanks to the 176 rubber feet mounted to the tracks for traction. This means that just like your Mom at a free buffet, nothing will get in its way.

Lego Remote Control Tank

Sariel’s Mark V also features a working 6-cylinder piston engine inside a realistically replicated cabin, a functional un-ditching beam, and two remote controlled side mounted guns that can rotate and elevate. Twin SBrick bluetooth bricks take care of the control signal, and mean that the Mark V can be controlled by a mobile phone and – more coolly – by a Playstation controller!

Lego Remote Control Mark V Tank

There’s lots more of Sariel’s Mark V tank to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you join in the discussion and watch a video of the model in action at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here.

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