Tag Archives: power functions

Italian DTM

Italy and Germany have a long rivalry. Two of the best football teams in Europe, they’ve met 35 times, with Italy winning 15 of those encounters to Germany’s 8. They’ve fought on the track since Formula 1’s beginning (and even before that), with Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union battling Alfa Romeo and later Ferrari for dominance. Oh, and they fought against one another in World War 2, but only after Italy overthrew racism and changed sides.

Recently though, all the victories have been German. Mercedes-Benz have annihilated Ferrari in Formula 1, Italy haven’t beaten Germany in their last four soccer matches, and Ducati are now owned by Volkswagen.

However, go back to the mid-’90s and you’ll find a remarkable story of Italian dominance in Germany’s own back yard; the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters (DTM).

In 1993 Alfa Romeo decided to take their new 155 V6 to DTM, building an all-wheel-drive 11,000rpm Class 1 Touring Car to take on the domestic German teams from Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Opel. The car proved unstoppable, with Nicola Larini winning a record eleven of the twenty-two races and teammate Alessandro Nannini another two, taking Alfa Romeo to a dominant manufacturer’s title.

This incredible replica of the ’93 championship-winning Alfa Romeo 155 V6 Ti comes from previous bloggee Zeta Racing of Flickr, who has recreated both the car and its iconic livery in stunning detail.

Underneath that beautifully stickered exterior Zeta has accurately constructed the 155’s drivetrain, including a jaw-dropping V6 engine, all-wheel-drive system, working suspension, gearbox, and a suite of Power Functions motors to control it all remotely.

A spectacularly detailed interior is included behind the four opening doors, with a bucket seat and racing harnesses, a full roll cage, and even the 155’s fire suppression system replicated in bricks.

Zeta Racing’s creation is a work of art (as any Alfa Romeo should be) and there’s a huge gallery of images available to view at his photostream on Flickr. Click the link above to remember a time when the Italians beat the Germans at their own game, and here to see (and hear!) the 155 DTM’s 11,500rpm V6 in action way back in ’93.

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Scorpion King

Notable only for being Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s first lead role, the 2002 fantasy adventure ‘The Scorpion King’ is an appalling turd of a movie. A spin off from ‘The Mummy’ franchise, it took the shonkily CGI-ed character from the second Mummy instalment (itself only worth watching for Rachel Weisz) and dragged it out over ninety stupefying minutes.

However some scorpion spin-offs are worth a look, and the car in this post is one of them.

The Autobianchi A112 was created through collaboration by Fiat, tyre-maker Pirelli, and bicycle manufacturer Bianchi, launching in 1969 and being – as most Italian cars of the time were – rather excellent.

Over a million Autobianchi A112s were produced before the brand was eventually merged into Lancia, with the design also forming the basis of the rather good Fiat 127, the less good Seat 127, the pretty bad Polski-Fiat 127, and the miserable Yugo 45.

Of course being effectively a Fiat, Italian tuners Abarth got their hands on the A112 too, and uprated the tiny 900cc engine to 1,050cc, taking power from around 45bhp to a mighty 70 in the process.

Today’s post is an A112 in Abarth flavour, as built by previous bloggee Zeta Racing in full ‘Technic Supercar’ specification. Capturing the look of the real car brilliantly, Zeta has engineered his Lego replica with a working engine, gearbox, steering, and suspension, along with opening doors, hood, and hatchback. Zeta’s model also includes fully remotely controlled Power Functions drivetrain, with motors powering both the front-wheel-drive and steering, the gearbox, and equipping the car with working brakes.

It’s a fantastic build, presented beautifully, and enhanced with few choice decals (including the famous Abarth scorpion), and there’s much more of Zeta’s Autobianchi A112 Abarth to see at his photostream. Click the link above to check out one Scorpion King worth viewing.

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Land Rover Defender | Picture Special

We love it when builders gets in contact with us here at TLCB. Firstly it means a few people actually read the ‘inane blather’ (to quote a comment by a reader) that streams from the hovel that is TLCB Towers, and secondly because it sometimes unearths incredible creations.

Case in point is Zeta Racing, who recently messaged us on Facebook. We recommended Flickr as a tool for sharing his creations and bam! – We now have no less than five unbelievable builds to blog.

This is the third, Zeta’s magnificent fully RC Land Rover Defender, and it – like the two builds already featured here – is a work of engineering brilliance.

Based on an earlier design by TLCB Master MOCer Sheepo, Zeta has captured the aesthetic of a moderately modified Defender 110 brilliantly, with a lift kit, snorkel, roof cage, tow bar, and more all represented in Lego form. The doors, hood and tailgate all open, and there’s a superbly detailed interior inside too.

It’s what’s underneath that’s most impressive though, with Zeta’s model equipped with a complete Technic Supercar drivetrain (engine, gearbox, suspension, and steering), and full remotely controlled motorisation.

Power Functions motors drive the four-wheel-drive system (which also turns the accurate inline 4-cylinder engine under the hood) and control the working steering, with superbly accurate suspension allowing the power to be used both on and off-road.

Four IR receivers are hidden in the cabin, allowing control of the aforementioned drive and steering, and also – by our guess – a motorised gearbox and front-mounted winch too.

It’s a stunning build, immediately jumping into the Technic off-roader All-Time Greats list, and there’s a whole lot more of the build to see at Zeta Racing’s Flickr photostream by clicking here. And there are still two further incredible creations to come…

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Numero Uno Turbo

It’s the 1980s and literally everything has got ‘Turbo’ written on it. Aftershave, sunglasses, and – as of 1985 – even Fiat shopping cars. The Fiat Uno Turbo i.e. did actually feature a turbo too, with an IHI unit, complete with intercooler, fitted to its 1.3 litre engine.

Power jumped to 105bhp, which may not sound a lot (and isn’t), but ’80s Italian cars had the structural integrity of a paper bag, and thus were almost comically light. This gave the Uno Turbo a 127mph top speed and a 0-60 time of 7 seconds, which was properly quick for the time. We just don’t want to think about crashing one…

Fortunately Fiat had an answer, creating the Uno Turbo i.e. ‘Antiskid’, which was equipped with a rudimentary form of ABS. It’s this version that Zeta Racing has chosen to recreate – beautifully – in Technic form, adding another stunning ’80s Italian hot hatchback to his catalogue, following the incredible Lancia Delta HF Integrale’s published here yesterday.

Like the Lancias, Zeta’s Uno Turbo replicates the real car with jaw-dropping authenticity, including a full ‘Technic Supercar’ driveline consisting of a transverse 4-cylinder engine, suspension, steering, and gearbox, all motorised via LEGO Power Functions components.

The model also includes a fantastically realistic interior, with folding seats, a tilting sunroof, and some rather ingenious seatbelts that we suspect we’ll see on a lot more Technic creations after this is published. Opening doors, hood and hatchback complete the model, and there’s loads more to see at Zeta Racing’s photostream.

Click the link above to make the jump to Flickr for all the photos, whilst we squash down our hankering to buy one of these tiny tinny Italian deathtraps*…

*It seems that improbably thin Italian steel didn’t survive UK winters very well. Just a dozen Fiat Uno Turbo’s are left on UK roads, and only two ‘Antiskid’ versions. They may have crashed less, but they rusted just us much…

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Talking Crap

Some commenters have written in to tell us that we are – basically – manure spreaders here at TLCB. Which is true, although they do seem to only state this when we highlight Russia or America‘s shortcomings. We’re pretty sure the rest of the time we spout just as much crap too…

Anyhoo, this post is for them, being an actual manure spreader! It’s a Bunning Lowlander 105 Mk4 to be precise, as built (brilliantly) by Michal Skorupka (aka Eric Trax).

Impressive as the poo-thrower is though, we’re sure most of you are more interested in what’s pulling it, which is a fully remote controlled Case 1455 XL tractor complete with four Power Functions motors.

Drive comes from an L Motor, a Servo controls the steering, and two further M Motors power both the rear PTO (that here is used to spin the Bunning Lowlander’s muck-spreading shafts and conveyor belt) and the tractor’s three-point hitch mechanism.

The model features beautiful attention to detail too, enhanced by superbly accurate custom decals, and there’s a whole lot more to see at Michal’s ‘CASE 1455 XL & Bunning Lowlander 105 Mk4 album‘ on Flickr, and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, both of which include links to a video showing the model in action and to building instructions, so you can spread some crap at home!

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The World’s Most Expensive Recovery Truck

This astonishing creation is a fully working replica of the U.S Glomar Explorer, constructed by Master MOCer and world-renowned builder Paweł ‘Sariel’ Kmieć, and you’re in for a truly remarkable story…

It’s 1968, and the Soviet ballistic missile submarine K-129 has been lost with all 98 crew, plummeting over 16,000ft to the ocean floor. It’s just a few years after the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Cold War is very real indeed. The Soviet Union is looking for its lost submarine, but 150 miles in the wrong place. The U.S. however, knows where it is…

And so begins one the strangest and most expensive recovery efforts in history, as the CIA commission the building of a ship designed solely to pluck the wreck of K-129 from the seabed to learn its secrets, without the Soviet Union knowing.

Costing $1.4billion, it was one seriously expensive recovery truck, although of course its true purpose was hidden behind a ‘drilling for magenese’ cover story, fronted by millionaire aviator and film-maker Howard Hughes.

Six years later and the 50,000 ton 600ft long ship was ready. Named the Transocean Glomar Explorer, it was positioned above the wreck using radio beacons (GPS being some way off) and the CIA began the enormous recovery of the 330ft, 2,700 long ton (before it was filled with water) nuclear-armed submarine.

A giant claw dropped through a moon pool in the centre of the ship, gripping the wreck of K-129 and winching it to the surface. However during the 16,500ft ascent a mechanical failure occurred, and two thirds of the submarine broke loose and sunk back to the ocean floor, taking with it the sought-after nuclear missiles and code book. However, two nuclear-tipped torpedoes and cryptographic machines were recovered, along with the bodes of six crew members, which were not returned to the Soviet Union, but back to the sea.

The Glomar Explorer was purposeless after the mission was (partly) completed, and in 1976 it transferred to the U.S Navy for storage in a dry-dock. In 1978 however, the ship was leased to test prototype deep sea mining equipment, before being converted to a drilling ship in the 1990s. It was finally scrapped in 2015.

Recreating this incredible feat of engineering is Sariel, whose floating brick-built replica of the Glomar Explorer measures over 3 metres in length, uses 60kg of LEGO pieces, and can really (partly) recover a lost Soviet submarine, thanks to a fully working recreation of the monumental grapple crane fitted to the real ship.

We won’t write too much more here as there’s really only one way to appreciate this spectacular build – take a look at the video above (or click here to find it in the Eurobricks discussion), and watch how one of the most impressive Lego creations of all time was built, and how it can recover nearly all of a brick-built submarine from the bottom of a swimming pool…

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Evolution of the Camel

The camel – our favourite humped, even-toed ungulate – did not start out as a large desert-dwelling domesticated animal. The camel’s beginnings, around 50 million years ago, are more rabbity. Later it had grown to around the size of a goat before, c5 million years ago, evolving into a nine-foot tall arctic-living creature, whose hump may have existing to help it survive the cold.

The Camel is an animal that’s gone through a bit of change, and so too has newcomer Fabiomaster‘s Land Rover Defender in Camel Trophy spec. Which is as seamless a link between two barely related things as you’re likely to find.

Beginning as an off-road chassis by TLCB Master MOCer Sheepo, the design evolved into a Land Rover Defender Camel Trophy in the hands of RM8, whose Sheepo-based creation appeared here four years ago.

Fast-forward to 2020 and the design has subtly evolved again, with Fabiomaster updating the Defender with the latest parts and unique off-road accessories, presenting it beautifully as you can see here. So it’s not really Fabiomaster’s creation, but rather the work of three builders over the course of several years, and it looks properly good as a result.

There’s more to see of Fabiomaster’s Land Rover Defender Camel Trophy on Eurobricks via the link above, and you can follow the evolutionary tree back through RM8’s version to Sheepo’s original chassis via the links in the blog text.

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Constructive Air

Large, potentially dangerous, and full of air. No, not the 2020 U.S Presidential Candidates, but this excellent Technic backhoe loader from Shimon Bogomolov. Unlike the aforementioned angry old men, Shimon’s impressive creation uses the air within it for constructive purposes, with a working pneumatic front bucket and rear excavating arm. Air pressure can be generated manually or via a motorised compressor, plus there are working pneumatic stabiliser legs, steering, all-wheel-drive, and a 4-cylinder piston engine too. A complete gallery of images is available to view at Shimon’s ‘Pneumatic Backhoe’ album on Flickr, plus you can join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here.

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Pick-Up Electric

America really likes pick-up trucks. The best selling vehicles in the U.S. are the Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado, and Dodge Ram, followed by a pair of SUVs (the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V respectively). In fact only two vehicles in the top eight are cars. Tump is (rightly) called out on his total disregard for CO2 emissions legislation, but it’s not like he’s going against the wishes of the American people, who – based on their vehicular choices – must all be lumberjacks during the week and tow boats at the weekend.

Of course the electric revolution will reach pick-up trucks one day, and until then Ford at least have taken a small step in the right direction by replacing most of their old V8s with smaller, marginally less environmentally catastrophic, turbocharged units.

Back to electricity though, and pick-ups are perfect for electrification, having loads of chassis space for batteries, and supposedly often doing tasks that would benefit from electric motor torque, like lumberjacking and towing boats…

The electrification of Lego pick-ups is the opposite however, seeing as there is no covered body to hide the battery box, and both it and the motors have to be squeezed inside a cabin full of cabiny things. That hasn’t stopped mktechniccreations though, who has built this superbly accurate Model Team/Creator Ford F-150 that would be bloggable on looks alone, and yet – by witchcraft and magic – has equipped his model with a perfectly-concealed full remote control drive system with Power Functions motors and a BuWizz bluetooth battery.

It’s quite a feat of engineering and if you’d like to have a go yourself MK has released building instructions so you can learn how he’s done it! There’s more to see of this remarkably packaged Ford F-150 at both MK’s Bricksafe gallery and at the Eurobricks forum, where you can see images showing how the motors are fitted and find a link to building instructions – take a look via links!

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The Boss

The muscle car market has gone mad in recent years. Upwards of 700bhp is now available from stock, and whilst many modern muscles cars have now added revolutionary new technologies such as ‘steering’ and ‘suspension’, we suspect actually using all that power is a difficult thing to do. Resulting in happenings like this. And this. And this. And this.

Things were little different back in the late ’60s, when the first power race between muscle car makers began. This was one of Ford’s efforts from the time; the Mustang Boss 429. The ‘429’ moniker stood for the V8 engine’s cubic inch capacity, which translates to seven litres. Seven. Most European cars at the time made do with just over one.

Of course the Boss’s steering, braking and suspension were – in true muscle car tradition – woefully inadequate, meaning that morons-with-daddy’s-money in 1969 could plow their new car into a street light in much the same way as they do today, only without the event being captured on YouTube.

Today though, we’re joining the muscle car crashing fraternity too, thanks to Hogwartus, and this superb SBrick-powered remote control Technic Boss 429.

Driven by two L Motors, with a Medium Motor turning the steering and another controlling the four-speed sequential gearbox, Hogwartus’s creation is a riot to drive. That is until we spun it into a kitchen cabinet. We’ll blame the Mustang-accurate torsion bar rear suspension for that faux-par. The front suspension is independent though, and the model also includes opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, a replica 7-litre V8 engine (that turns via the drive motors), sliding seats, and LED headlights.

There’s more to see of Hogwartus’s stunning Technic ’69 Mustang Boss 429 at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, plus via the truly excellent video below, which must be one of the few Mustang videos on YouTube that don’t end like this.

YouTube Video

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Skip This

Trucks such as this one always seem to have fancy names when LEGO produce them. Not at this blog though, where they are simply known as a ‘skip lorry’, seeing as they’re a lorry with an, er… skip. Said skip is usually full of an old bathroom, ripped out of an old lady’s bungalow when the new owners moved in, and all the junk from the neighbourhood lobbed into it by every house within walking distance whilst it was on the road.

Previous bloggee Damjan97PL/damianPLE’s fully RC Technic skip lorry is so realistic we’re surprised it doesn’t come with an old lady’s bathroom in the skip on the back to be honest, but besides that rather glaring omission he’s nailed it.

An SBrick provides bluetooth control for the motorised drive, four-wheel steering, raising/lowering rear axle (with automatic steering detachment when raised), and the skip loading arm, whilst there’s also a working six-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cabin, manually operated stabiliser legs and functioning suspension too.

There’s more of Damain’s remote control skip lorry to see at both the Eurobricks forum and at his Bricksafe gallery – click the links to chuck your rubbish on top of an old lady’s bathroom.

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Big Red

The halls of TLCB Towers were a bustling place today. Several Elves have recently returned with finds, TLCB staff were pretending to be busy to avoid sweeping up the cage room, and the Le Mans 2020 livestream was ticking over in the corner. All of which meant we were thoroughly distracted from the Elf proudly riding atop this rather brilliant remote control Caterpillar D10 bulldozer until it was too late.

‘Too late’ in this case means we now have a bit more than sweeping up to do, as several Elves have been smeared across the corridor (and over the front of the bulldozer) thanks to builder keymaker‘s inclusion of four Power Functions motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, controlling the drive, steering, and ripper and blade mechanisms.

Individual suspension on the tracks’ jockey wheels plus track tensioners meant the blade stayed at Elf-smearing height even if one of them went under the tracks, whilst a working V8 engine, detailed cabin and engine bay, and opening doors and tool compartment add to the realism, if not the Elf-smushing capabilities.

We now have some considerable floor cleaning to do, as a number of our smelly little workers were caught off guard and fell victim the the D10’s blade, then tracks, then ripper, which doesn’t sound fun at all. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of keyworker’s most excellent creation at both the Eurobricks forum via the link above, or on Bricksafe, where over forty high quality images are available to view.

Lastly, if you’re wondering how mechanisms such as those found on keyworker’s ‘dozer work then come back to The Lego Car Blog later today where we’ll be sharing an awesome new tool that does just that!

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Chocolatey Contraband


The humble Kinder Suprise egg – one part tasty Italian chocolate, one part crappy plastic toy – is illegal in the United States. Appalling animal welfare and firearms are fine though.

Fortunately for our American readers, the Kinder contained in the back of this superb Scania 1-Series truck and trailer by Vladimir Drozd is all tasty Italian chocolate and no crappy plastic toy (which is the way we prefer it), so you can have munch too.

Recreated in 1:22 scale, Vladimir’s beautifully detailed Scania includes Power Functions remote control drive and steering, suspension on all wheels, and an automatic trailer hitch.

There are more top quality images of Vladimir’s Kinder delivery truck available to view at his Flickr album, and you can find full build details and a link to building instructions at the Eurobricks forum here.

Take look via the links above whilst we work on our elaborate plan to smuggle deadly Kinder Suprise eggs into the U.S inside some harmless assault rifles.

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Liebherr Again

With over four thousand pieces, seven electric motors, and the new Control+ bluetooth receiver, LEGO’s enormous 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 Control set is a great place to start if you want to build a B-Model. So much so that previous bloggee Eric Trax has actually built two. Following his Bobcat skid-steer loader that appeared here earlier in the year, Eric has constructed another alternate from only the pieces found within the 42100 set; this spectacular Liebherr PR776 bulldozer.

Packed full of working functionality including remote control drive, steering, accurate blade and ripper mechanisms and a highly detailed exterior you’d be hard-pressed to know that Eric’s ‘dozer is a B-Model. Best of all Eric has made his design ridiculously accessible if you own a 42100 set and you’d like to build it for yourself, with downloadable instructions, sticker sheet, and even a BuWizz profile that you can add straight to your own third-party BuWizz app to control it. There’s lots more to see of Eric’s incredible B-Model build at his ‘Liebherr PR776’ album on Flickr and the Eurobricks forum, where links to all of the above can be found – click the links in the text to take a look!

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Frieghtliner

This slab of white enormity is a Frieghtliner FLA 9664, and it comes from Michael217, who has managed to combine the best of Model Team and Technic building styles into one superb creation.

The chassis is constructed from modern studless Technic, with a complete remote control drivetrain consisting of two XL Motors for drive, an L Motor for steering, and a Medium Motor to power the tilting cab hidden within it.

The lifelike Model Team exterior is matched by an accurate engine and a brilliantly detailed interior behind open doors, with all hatches inside opening too, and there’s more to see of all of that at Michael’s expansive Frieghtliner FLA Bricksafe gallery and at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here.

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