Tag Archives: LED Lights

Rapid Bus

The Speed Champions line-up may be filled with fast and exotic vehicles, but none of them can carry twenty-five mini-figures at once. The Eleventh Bricks‘ ‘Rapid Bus KL’ can though, being a neat Speed Champions scale replica of one of Kuala Lumpur’s city buses. Accurate decals and LED lighting adds to the already impressive realism and you can hop on board yourself via the link above.

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Massive Minecraft

Built in 1973, massive to world record proportions, and able to service an entire mine at once, your Mom and the Terex 33-19 Titan have a lot in common.

Just one Terex Titan was constructed and – until 1998 – it was the largest mining truck in the world, at a staggering 350 tons. This incredible recreation of the mighty mining machine comes from Beat Felber of Flickr, who has rebuilt the Terex superbly in a huge 1:28.5 scale.

Beat’s model is so large in fact that LEGO don’t make tyres big enough, hence the non-LEGO 120mm tyres fitted – the only non-LEGO pieces used. There’s something authentic about this too, as the real Terex required six axles rather than the usual four as there were no tyres large enough available for a four-axle truck to take the Titan’s immense weight.

Beat’s astonishing replica of the 33-19 Titan not only looks spectacular, it functions too, with two very brave XL Motors driving the tandem rear axle and pair of Servo Motors powering the all-wheel steering. A further L Motor drives the two XL linear actuators that allow the enormous bucket to tip and two sets of LEDs illuminate the Terex’s head and tail lights, with all of that controlled by a third party SBrick programmable bluetooth battery.

Top quality custom decals and excellent presentation make Beat’s build a must-see, and you can do just that at his Terex 33-19 Mining Truck album on Flickr. Click the link and join us there, where it’s making our own Lego creations feel very small indeed.

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Powered-Up Porsche (II)

Porsche 911s are everywhere in the car scene, so it’s apt that it’s the car of choice for Lego builders too. Having published our first ‘Powered-Up’ creation utilising LEGO’s new bluetooth components yesterday – a classic Porsche 911 – here’s another ‘Powered-Up’ equipped model, a… er, classic Porsche 911.

Flukey similarities aside, it’s a mega build by previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Mahjqa, who has deployed LEGO’s new components to great effect in his ’80s ‘whale tail’ Porsche.

LED lights feature alongside the bluetooth-controlled drive and steering and there’s more to see of Mahjqa’s build at both his Flickr photostream and the Eurobricks forum.

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Game of Bricks Lighting Kits | Review

The presentation of Lego models has moved on a bit since this particular TLCB Writer started posting creations for the internet to see. Gone are the days when a white sheet and a desk lamp were all that was required to create satisfactory presentation, with high quality cameras, easy photo editing, and a host of custom accessories now available to enhance the visual impact of a model.

One way of making that impact is with custom lighting, both for MOCs and for official LEGO sets, and newcomers Game of Bricks have quickly established a vast range of LED lighting kits to service both official sets and home-built creations. We handed three boxes of their products over to our readers to let you know what they’re like. Over to them!

Light kit for Ford Mustang 10265 | Review by Andrea Lattanzio | Norton74

I must admit I’m not so much into lighting LEGO sets or MOCs, but when TLCB offered me this chance I was curious to test out one of the lighting sets from the Game of Bricks company. I requested the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang kit because it’s one of the few official sets I own and because it’s probably one of my favourite LEGO sets ever. Within a few days I received the pack with the lighting kit and soon I got to work fitted it on the Pony;

    1. Pack.  The Game of Bricks lighting kit comes in a very elegant black box. You probably won’t throw it away after installing the kit, as you can use it to store the smallest LEGO parts from your collection. Inside the black box another surprise, a plastic container (transparent) in which you’ll find the lighting kit neatly stored inside three little bags, a very well-finished pack.
    1. Building process. The Game of Bricks lighting kit for the 10265 set give you two kinds of kit, the ‘standard’ and the ‘advanced”’ I started with the standard version, fitting it to my Mustang set in about half an hour, and something more for the ‘advanced’ version. To install the kit there are video instructions to follow, which consist of a step-by-step video manual. It’s quite easy follow the steps although you do have to stop the video many times because it’s quite fast. To install the entire kit you have to disassemble few parts of the car as well as change a few parts for the new ones which have the Game of Bricks LEDs installed. It surprised me that the kit is all-in-one, the single lights are linked via the same wires, so you have to hide many wires through the bricks. Although the threads are very thin, it is not easy to hide them all completely within the bricks of the set, so in the end some pieces of cable will still be visible. You have to be very precise and patient, but you can do it and it is fun, and the ‘advanced’ kit does ask you to take apart more parts of the car than the ‘standard’ one. 
    1. Instructions. As above, the instructions are basically two step-by-step video manuals, one each for the ‘standard’ and ‘advanced’ versions. The steps are easy to follow and you can stop the video when necessary.
    1. Final result. Even if I personally prefer the 10265 Ford Mustang set as LEGO made it, the Game of Bricks lights are quite fascinating, especially for my kids and wife. I’m sure about this because both my kids and wife said ‘WOW!’ when I shown them the shining Mustang set at night!

Personally, I prefer the ‘standard’ version of LEGO’s 10265 set, both with and without the Game of Bricks kit. However there are two shades of light, warm and bluish and honestly I don’t know why, as I would have preferred everything with the warmer hue. Overall though it’s a good kit and if you are a lighting fan you must get your Game of Bricks set; you won’t be disappointed.

Town Street Lighting Kit (plus a few extras!) | Review by Anonymous via TLCB on Facebook

I bagged myself some Game of Bricks goodies via The Lego Car Blog’s Facebook page, not having heard of the brand before but intrigued to see what they had on offer. Plus who turns down free Lego stuff?!

I requested the Game of Bricks Street Lighting kit, as I don’t own many new Technic sets and I prefer to keep them original. However I do build LEGO City and the working street lights looked like they would make a cool addition to modular buildings.

A small black box arrived a few days later with ‘Game of Bricks’ embossed on the top. It’s pretty high quality packaging and to my surprise it contained not just the street lights I had requested to review, but light sabres and multiple ‘daisy chained’ 1×4 lighting bricks, each with a row of LEDs hidden inside them. Continue reading

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Ageing Orange

Nope, not a play on words for this abomination in America’s history, nor the current President of the United States (we’ve done him already today), but this spectacular classic DAF N2800 truck from previous bloggee and truck-building legend Nanko Klein Paste. Nanko’s creation replicates the 1980s DAF heavy-hauler beautifully, using the livery of a Belgian sand and gravel company ‘Fa. Maes’.

The truck also includes Power Functions motors, allowing it to drive, steer, and tip the chunky container (with its load of c2,500 ‘rocks!) thanks to a motor-driven linear-actuator, plus it includes LED lights, custom decals, and a wonderfully detailed interior too. There’s much more to see of Nanko’s superb classic DAF at his photostream – take a look via the link in the text above.

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Technical Titan

There’s just time to squeeze in one more creation of 2019 before our customary year-end roundup, and with a delightful circularity it has a whole lot squeezed into it. Suggested to us by a reader, this is Zbiczasty‘s awesome Mercedes-Benz Actros Titan 8×8 with Palfinger PK 150002 HDS crane, and it’s every bit as good as that impressive title suggests.

Firstly, it is indeed 8×8, with all eight wheels driven, all eight suspended, and the front four steering, all operable remotely via LEGO’s Power Functions IR system. That amazing drivetrain is just the start though, as this phenomenal truck features sixteen Power Functions motors, controlled by seven switches, four IR receivers and with three sets of LEDs thrown in too.

The motors drive everything from the stabilising legs to the incredible Palfinger PK 150002 crane mounted on the load bed, which unfurls like a coiled snake thanks to nineteen pneumatic cylinders and over ten metres of pneumatic hosing. We said it had a lot squeezed in…

Watching the crane in action is quite a thing to behold and you can do just that via this link to the YouTube video where you can also see the drivetrain, crane winch, and the stabilising legs doing their respective things. Take a look via the link above, plus you can see all of the images at Zbiczasty’s album on Brickshelf by clicking here.

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On The Buses

TLCB Elves don’t usually get excited about buses. They have no racing stripes, lasers, or supercharging, and such things are important to an Elf. TLCB Team do sometimes get excited about buses – because we’re a bit sad – but not bendy buses, which were introduced to the streets of our capital a decade or so ago whereupon they proceeded to run over cyclists and then get stuck on every tight corner.

Now removed, we’re back to double deckers, but that doesn’t mean the bendy-bus isn’t a good solution for more modern cities. It’s also a design, in the case of today’s creation anyway, that’s really cool. And yes we did just write that about a bus.

This is Sariel‘s Solaris Urbino 18, a remote controlled, five-motor engineering triumph. Looking almost exactly like the real deal, Sariel has managed to squeeze a spectacular array of working functions inside the Urbino’s shell. Firstly the bus drives and steers remotely, thanks to LEGO Power Functions motors and a third-part SBrick programmable bluetooth receiver. This SBrick also allows the bus’s head, tail, brake and indicator lights to be controlled, plus the ingenious motorised door opening mechanism with all doors powered by a single Medium motor.

Most cleverly of all there is a working ‘kneel’ system, where – just like the real bus – the ride height drops as the doors open to allow easier access for passengers to embark/disembark.

Lastly the model features accurate custom decals to replicate those of the real vehicle, illuminated numbers, and some seriously impressive working dot matrix displays thanks to a custom design by third-party specialists Brickstuff.

Sariel’s amazing creation is a great way to round out the year and you can see more of his Solaris Urbino 18 at both his Flickr album and via the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also find a video demonstrating the model’s incredible working features.

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Back in the USSR*

This is a BRDM-2, which might sound like something from your Mom’s internet browser history, but is in fact an amphibious armoured car built by the USSR between 1962 and 1989, and which is still in production in Poland today. Powered by a 140bhp GAZ V8 the BRDM-2 is capable of around 60mph on roads and a heady 6mph on water, when the engine drives a water-jet.

Like the MiG-29 we featured here earlier in the week the BRDM-2 was exported extensively, and is now in use on both sides of some conflicts, most recently between Russia and Ukraine.

This marvellous Technic recreation of one the Soviet Union’s most interesting vehicles was discovered by one of our Elves on Eurorbricks. Built by newcomer Danifill it packs in all the working functions of the real BRDM-2, besides the ability to float.

Two Power Functions XL motors deliver power to the four-wheel-drive system whilst an L motor drives the steering. All wheels are suspended, there are LED lights front and rear, and turret rotation is motorised too, with a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery delivering eight times the power of LEGO’s own system plus bluetooth remote control.

There’s more to see of Danifill’s brilliant BRDM-2 build at the Eurobricks forum where you can also find a link to a video of the model in action. Click the link above to head back to the USSR.

*Today’s excellent title song.

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Super Dozer

This is a Komatsu D575A-3 ‘Super Dozer’, and it weighs 150 tons. Well, this one doesn’t, being rather smaller and slightly more plastic, but it’s still really impressive.

Built by Beat Felber of Flickr, this incredible creation shrinks the giant Komatsu down to 1:28.5 scale, yet retains much of the super dozers awesome functionality.

Powered by two SBricks, Beat’s model can be controlled and programmed via bluetooth, with adder/subtractor crawler drive allowing the model to drive and steer courtesy of an XL Motor providing forwarded propulsion and an L Motor powering the steering mechanism.

Pneumatics also feature, with air pressure built on-board by an L Motor with an automatic cut-off, and two pneumatic valves – each controlled by a Servo Motor – controlling both the lifting and tilting of the blade. Lastly lighting is taken care of via four pairs of Power Functions LEDs.

It’s a brilliantly engineered creation and you can see more – including a link to a video of the model in action – at Beat’s Komatsu D575A-3 Super Dozer album on Flickr. Take a look via the link!

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Volvo FMX & Palfinger PK78002 | Picture Special

This is a Volvo FMX with Palfinger PK78002 SH crane, which is a very long nome. But then it is a very impressive model. Taking builder Dirk Klijn four years to complete, this FMX takes Lego model making to the extreme, with a level of detail and functional realism that is second to none.

Controlled by three third-party SBricks, Dirk’s creation includes Power Functions motors, pneumatics, custom LED lighting and some off-the-charts engineering brilliance.

Firstly the truck is of course remote controlled, with steering on the front axles and drive at the rear. All are suspended, as is the cab, which also tilts to reveal a highly detailed engine underneath.

Stowed compactly between the cab and the flatbed is the Palfinger crane. A trio of Technic pneumatic cylinder unfurl it beautifully, with air pressure provided by an on-board motorised compressor. Further Power Functions motors allow it to rotate, extend and winch, to pluck the assortment of buildery equipment from the truck and lower it to the ground.

Four motorised outriggers keep the truck stable when the crane is in operation, whirring outwards in unison via remote control. It’s a seriously impressive build, and one that certainly goes to the top of the creations featured here in 2019.

There’s much more to see of Dirk’s amazing remote controlled Volvo FMX with Palfinger PK78002 at his Flickr album by clicking here, where you can also find a link to watch a video showing this magnificent model in action.

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Cigarettes on Safari

Nothing says adventure like lung cancer and breathing difficulties! At least that what was thought back when cigarette brand Camel sponsored the amazing Land Rover rally named after them from 1980 to 2000. Still, with Red Bull and Monster energy drinks sponsoring pretty much every extreme sport these days perhaps we’ve not moved on as much as we’d like to think…

This phenomenal Land Rover Defender 110 in stunning Camel Trophy spec is the work of Manuel Nascimento of Flickr, and it is very probably the finest 4×4 that The Lego Car Blog has featured this year. The iconic off-roader’s exterior has been recreated to perfection, including all the adventuring paraphernalia that accompanied these vehicles through jungles, mountain and deserts, and with accurate branding – including the infamous cigarette advertising – courtesy of superb custom decals.

Underneath the incredible exterior the engineering excellent continues, with working lights operated via a third-party SBrick, Power Functions remotely controlled steering, winch, and four-wheel-drive, working suspension, and a four-speed gearbox. Opening doors, a beautifully detailed interior and a roof-mounted tent also feature, plus Manuel has constructed a lovely desert base to accompany his model.

There’s loads more of this spectacularly built and presented creation to see at Manuel’s Land Rover Defender 110 Flickr album, where you can also find a link to a video demonstrating the model’s features. Light up a cigarette via the link above (no, don’t – but do click the link!).

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Retro Rampage

Whiiiir! Crunch. Whiiiir! Crunch. Elven Screaming. Whiiiir! Crunch.

Sigh. These are sounds we’ve heard too often here at The Lego Car Blog Towers before, and they usually mean we’re going to have to get the carpets cleaned again.

A weary trudge to the corridor outside the office revealed the cause, and to our surprise there wan’t just one, but three. Three Elves were each controlling three separate (and rather impressive) Technic Monster Trucks, bashing them into one another and occasionally adding variety to the proceedings by driving them at and over the Elves who had come to watch the spectacle.

It admittedly looked like great fun, so Mr. Airhorn was deployed to break up the ruckus, the injured were patched up with Pritt-Stick and plasters, and we’ve taken control of the trio of Technic trucks for ourselves.

Each truck comes from Technic building legend Madoca77 and wears a gloriously retro livery, including the famous Ford ‘Big Foot’ colours and Toyota’s wonderful ’80s ‘pick-up’ stripe, and the three models are all remotely operable via bluetooth thanks to two SBricks.

These control the four XL motors (one per wheel), the two Servo motors that steer both the front and rear axles, the Medium motor that switches between crab steering and normal steering modes (just like LEGO’s excellent 40254 Claas Xerion 5000 set), and the Medium motor that operates the clamshell bodywork lift.

Madoca’s builds also include LED headlights, opening doors and dropping tailgates, plus – most importantly – a mega suspension setup which includes portal axles. They easily make it into our favourite creations list of 2019, and if you like them as much as we do then head to the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above to read more about the builds and to watch a video of Madoca’s vintage monster truck design in action!

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Mazzive

This is a MAZ-535; massive, a little aesthetically challenging, and able to get really dirty. Just like your Mom. It comes from Lego-building legend Sariel (whose Build a LEGO Mustang book we reviewed here last week) and it’s a triumph of Technic engineering.

Underneath the wonderfully accurate Model Team exterior, complete with opening doors, engine hatches and LED head and tail lights, is a fully working replica of the MAZ’s incredible 8×8 drivetrain.

Four Power functions XL motors drive all eight wheels, the front four of which turn on separate radiuses. All eight wheels feature planetary hubs and are suspended via pendular axles, allowing Sariel’s model to go anywhere it is possible for a Lego creation to go, or to pull a chair across a wooden floor according to the accompanying video.

A working V12 piston engine is mounted inside, along with a pneumatically operated high/low gearbox providing the model with two speeds (slow, and really slow), and the motorised drive, steering, lighting and gearbox can all be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth control.

There’s much more to see of this amazing creation at Sariel’s MAZ-535 Flickr album, on the Eurobricks forum, or via the video below. Click the links to take a look, plus you can read Sariel’s interview here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking here.

YouTube Video

 

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Pick-Me-Up

After this week’s earlier incident we’re a bit light on Elves at the moment, and thus when another ridiculously capable remote controlled creation was found by one of our smelly little workers we feared another violent event.

Fortunately the creation in question was much too slow to meet out any vengeance (much to the Elf at the controls’ annoyance), but it is no less excellent for that, which has cheered TLCB office immensely.

Built by Attika of Eurobricks it’s entitled ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’, which is a bold claim, but a potentially accurate one.

A raft of Power Functions motors provide all-wheel-drive through planetary hubs, whilst a high/low range gearbox allows Attika’s truck to climb gradients in excess of 50 degrees.

A full compliment of LEDs light the head and tail lamps whilst a third-party SBrick enables all of that to be controlled via Bluetooth, plus there are opening and locking doors, hood and tailgate and adjustable seats.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Attika’s ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’ at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find photos showing the chassis and driveline construction and a video of the truck in action. Click the link above to take a look.

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Cowdi

We shouldn’t like the Audi RS7. Driven by douchebags and often poorly modified, they’re usually found an inch from the rear bumper of the car in front wearing stupid blacked-out lights and a blackboard wrap. But, as Audi RS models go, the RS7 is actually quite subtle. OK, not subtle, but it’s not the bloody SQ7 and for that it should be celebrated.

This Technic example wearing RS7-appropriate mods has been built by terryli of Eurobricks and comes wrapped in a cow-esque paint job with chrome-red rims. Whilst not exactly to our tastes (although the Elves love it…), terryli’s RS7 is superbly accurate underneath, with the Audi’s swooping outline very well replicated in Technic form.

There’s a lot going under under that cowhide too, as the model is equipped with remote control drive and steering, LED lights, opening doors, hood and tailgate, independent and remotely adjustable suspension, and a brilliant motorised deployable rear spoiler.

There’s more to see of terryli’s Cowdi RS7 at the Eurobricks forum – click the link above to take a closer look.

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