Tag Archives: LED Lights

Pick-Me-Up

After this week’s earlier incident we’re a bit light on Elves at the moment, and thus when another ridiculously capable remote controlled creation was found by one of our smelly little workers we feared another violent event.

Fortunately the creation in question was much too slow to meet out any vengeance (much to the Elf at the controls’ annoyance), but it is no less excellent for that, which has cheered TLCB office immensely.

Built by Attika of Eurobricks it’s entitled ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’, which is a bold claim, but a potentially accurate one.

A raft of Power Functions motors provide all-wheel-drive through planetary hubs, whilst a high/low range gearbox allows Attika’s truck to climb gradients in excess of 50 degrees.

A full compliment of LEDs light the head and tail lamps whilst a third-party SBrick enables all of that to be controlled via Bluetooth, plus there are opening and locking doors, hood and tailgate and adjustable seats.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Attika’s ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’ at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find photos showing the chassis and driveline construction and a video of the truck in action. Click the link above to take a look.

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Cowdi

We shouldn’t like the Audi RS7. Driven by douchebags and often poorly modified, they’re usually found an inch from the rear bumper of the car in front wearing stupid blacked-out lights and a blackboard wrap. But, as Audi RS models go, the RS7 is actually quite subtle. OK, not subtle, but it’s not the bloody SQ7 and for that it should be celebrated.

This Technic example wearing RS7-appropriate mods has been built by terryli of Eurobricks and comes wrapped in a cow-esque paint job with chrome-red rims. Whilst not exactly to our tastes (although the Elves love it…), terryli’s RS7 is superbly accurate underneath, with the Audi’s swooping outline very well replicated in Technic form.

There’s a lot going under under that cowhide too, as the model is equipped with remote control drive and steering, LED lights, opening doors, hood and tailgate, independent and remotely adjustable suspension, and a brilliant motorised deployable rear spoiler.

There’s more to see of terryli’s Cowdi RS7 at the Eurobricks forum – click the link above to take a closer look.

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Game of Bricks – Light Kit (42078 Mack Anthem) | Review

The Lego Fan Community is a marvellous thing. Like all the best products, LEGO has the scope – and the adaptability – to allow for improvement, with bluetooth remote control, custom decals, and even bespoke mini-figures available through third party providers to help builders to personalise their own creations and official sets.

One area that LEGO themselves dabble in is LED lights, with a pair available through their Power Functions range. But what if you want more? Like, lots more?

That’s where Game of Bricks come in, a new start-up offering tailored lighting kits for existing LEGO sets. The guys at GoB contacted us to see if we’d like an early test of a one of their kits, and a box for the huge 42078 LEGO Technic Mack Anthem set duly arrived here at TLCB Towers. So how did it fair? Read on to find out!

Packaging & Product

First impressions were excellent, with the Game of Bricks Mack Anthem kit arriving in a secure and rather nice box, with a mass of wires and lights neatly packaged within it. Unpackaging it undoes much of that neatness unfortunately, as a lot of lights means a lot of wires, but more on that in a bit.

The wires themselves are extraordinarily thin, so much so we feared breaking them, but it turns out they’re remarkably robust, and their slim profile allows them to (mostly) fit between bricks without issue. Attached to these are the lights themselves, each glued inside a non-Lego brick that replaces the non-functional light pieces on the model. These non-LEGO replacements are a good match, although their clutch power is slightly variable, and each has a hole drilled through it to allow the ultra-thin wires to pass through.

Power comes from a battery box (or two in the case of our kit) that takes AAA batteries and plugs into the wires via a USB connection. This makes disconnecting the battery boxes to change them an easy process, plus you can plug your lights into a USB port should you wish. So far, so good.

And then we got to the instructions… Continue reading

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Marion 5760 ‘The Mountaineer’ | Picture Special

This might just be the most impressive thing you’ll see today. Yes, even more so than whichever bottle cap challenge video has gone viral. This is the Marion 5760 mining shovel known as ‘The Mountaineer’, the first giant stripping shovel ever built and still the eighth largest to be constructed.

Completed by the Marion Power Shovel Company in 1956 The Mountaineer had an operating wight of 2,750 tons, working until 1979 before its scrapping a decade later. This spectacular fully functional 1:28.5 scale Lego replica of the 5760 is the work of Beat Felber of Flickr, powered by nearly twenty electric motors, with twenty-two pairs of LED lights, and controlled by several SBrick bluetooth bricks.

Weighing an estimated 35kgs (over 5kgs of which is steel ballast), Beat’s incredible machine can move and work just like the real thing. Each of the four crawling bogies is powered by a separate Medium Motor, with eight tracks being driven in total. These are steered by four linear actuators driven by another pair of motors, whilst another seven power the huge digging arm’s ‘crowd motion’, ‘swing gear’ and bucket. The drum hoist requires a further four XL Motors on it’s own, whilst a final micro motor powers a little passenger elevator that moves between The Mountaineer’s three floors.

Beat hasn’t just stopped with working functionality though, giving his creation a wonderfully detailed appearance afforded by its immense size, with hundreds of tiles and plates covering every surface to smooth the aesthetics, accurate railings, stairways, machine rooms, control rooms and cabins, plus authentically recreated decals to replicate the shovel’s original livery.

The’s much more to see of Beat Felber’s astonishing Lego recreation of the Marion 5760 on Flickr, where almost twenty superb images are available to view, each of which contains an in-depth description of the build. Head to Beat’s Marion 5760 ‘The Mountaineer’ album by clicking this link to Flickr, and see just how brilliant a LEGO creation can be!

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Chevrolet Silverado K30 Crew Cab | Picture Special

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re not usually fans of American pick-up trucks. This is because they are, by and large, complete crap. However – and we appreciate there is little logic to this whatsoever – old American pick-up trucks, even though they’re still complete crap, are somehow becoming rather cool. This is one such ageing pick-up, the Chevrolet Silverado K30, in dually crew cab specification.

Perhaps it’s because as vehicles get older we’re willing to overlook their shortcomings, but we really want this truck. The Elves do too, seeing as it’s a giant tasteless 4×4. Fortunately for one of them, it did get its grubby little claws on this, as it found this rather impressive Technic recreation of the classic(?) Silverado K30 crew cab by previous bloggee filswagood on Flickr.

A few of the other Elves in TLCB Towers soon got to experience it too, but not in the way they hoped, as it ran them down in the corridor. Power Functions remote control drive and steering combined with bouncy suspension enabled filsawgood’s Chevy to comfortably squash a couple of our little workers before we took the controls away to take a look for ourselves.

And look we did, because filsawgood’s Silverado is a brilliantly-engineered build, not only featuring the aforementioned (and excellent) remote control drivetrain, but also opening doors, hood (under which is a detailed engine), tailgate, and toolbox (battery compartment), plus the model includes LED lights and a detailed interior too.

There’s much more of filsawgood’s superb Chevrolet Silverado K30 crew cab to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you can check out filsawgood’s other Technic 4x4s to appear here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking this bonus link.

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MAN With a Semi

Hah! Penis jokes… Anyway, enough of that, on to the model.

This is a Technic MAN TGA truck by ArsMan064 of Eurobricks, and it’s a rather clever fully remote controlled replica of the real thing. Built from Technic parts ArsMan’s truck is a good match for its life-size counterpart and is packed with Power Functions features, including remote control drive, steering, fifth wheel and a high/low range gearbox, plus LED lights, all controlled by a third-party Bluetooth SBrick.

ArsMan’s MAN also includes a host of mechanical functions, including pendular suspension, opening doors, and a huge semi-trailer with a manually operated tipper. There’s more to see of both truck and trailer at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, and you can watch the rig in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video

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Pick-Up Bricks

Today’s blog-worthy creation comes in two colours (earning the Elf responsible two Smarties as we’re feeling generous), each built by well-regarded Technic builder Madoca 1977 and filled with functional goodness.

Madoca’s ‘Dacoma 4×4’ pick-up truck looks most excellent in either colour, with a wealth of clever Technic engineering concealed inside. This includes remote control 4×4 drive via two L Motors, Servo steering, a high/low gearbox powered by a Medium Motor, LED headlights, working differential locks and suspension, plus opening doors, hood and tailgate.

There’s more to see on Eurobricks, including a video of the truck’s features and a link to building instructions. Click the link above to make the jump.

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No Such Thing as a Free Ride

‘Why is there an Elf looking at me?’ thought this writer upon his entrance to TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna for his mid-day ‘quiet time’. A forlorn Elf looked up at him from the toilet bowl, unable to answer beyond incomprehensible Elven gibberish.

Sigh. A toilet brush was held out, onto which the soggy Elf climbed, and it was sent back to the cage room from where it had presumably originated.

Not really feeling like quiet time any more this writer trudged back to the office, only to find another Elf looking up at him from within the recycling bin. Hmm. Something odd was going on.

A brief investigation unearthed the cause. A bright orange Technic truck, cheerily controlled by the Elf that discovered it, was offering ‘rides’ to any Elf stupid enough to fall for it. Which probably would have been all of them, had we not intervened.

With remote control drive and steering, a tipping load bed, and surprisingly large folding crane mounted behind the cab, Elven passengers were being plucked out of the bed and deposited in various unpleasant places around TLCB Towers. The Elf at the controls had even figured out the stabilising legs so as not to topple the truck whilst manoeuvring its Elven cargo.

With the controls removed and order restored we could assess the engineering brilliance of the creation in question, and it really is brilliant. Flickr’s Blaž Dlopst is the builder behind it, and has packed multiple Technic motors, gearboxes and control bricks inside the Scania’s ingeniously constructed chassis. The realistic cab, linear-actuator crane and tipping load bed attach in modular fashion, and the truck’s multiple motorised functions can be controlled via bluetooth.

It’s a seriously clever piece of engineering and there’s much more of the Scania XT to see, including photos showing the crane deployed and images such as the one above revealing the modular components, at Blaž Dlopst’s photostream and on Eurobricks. Click the links above to take a closer look, whilst this writer attempts another trip to the toilet…

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Beast Mode

Lego Technic Rezvani Beast Alpha

Here at TLCB we’re yet to be convinced by any of the multitude of supercar start-ups founded upon the dreams (and little else) of millionaires.

Routinely released in ‘digital concept form’ (i.e. they don’t exist), these affronts to engineering are invariably touted to have somewhere near a zillion horsepower and a 300mph top speed, despite being based upon bits of old Lotus and someone else’s engine, and are usually named by someone with a mental age of four.

Today’s start-up supercar manages a clean sweep of the above, being based on the Lotus Elise or Ariel Atom, using a Honda or Cosworth engine, and bearing the name ‘Rezvani Beast Alpha’. TLCB’s scepticism remains undimmed…

Still, this Technic recreation of the $200K re-bodied Ariel Atom is something to behold. Built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron (who also built the cars found in the two links above) this Lego Rezvani Beast Alpha is a properly fine Technic Supercar, featuring remotely controlled steering and drive, working suspension, opening doors, and front and rear LED lights, amongst a host of other functions.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s Rezvani Beast via both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum – click the links to jump to the complete gallery of images and build specs.

Lego Technic Rezvani Beast Alpha

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Wrong Side of the Tracks

Lego Technic Soviet Truck

Even for Soviet Russia, this vehicle is weird. This is a BWSM 80, which sounds perilously close to something your Mom would be into, but was in fact a prototype Soviet design that fused a GAZ 53 truck with a DT 75 bulldozer to create… whatever the hell this is.

In normal use the BWSM 80 operated as per a regular truck, albeit one with a track system suspended between the wheels. However in extreme conditions the BWSM could lower the track system thus raising its wheels off the ground, and thereby becoming a skid-steer tracked vehicle in the process. If, as we were, you’re struggling to figure that out, take a look at the video below!

That video, and the creation within it, comes from previous bloggee (and apparent Technic wizard) Samolot of Eurobricks, who has recreated the Russian prototype in brilliantly-functional remote control Technic form.

Two Power Functions L Motors drive both the wheels and the tracks, with some ingenious decoupling mechanism we’re struggling to fathom dividing the power appropriately between the two. A Medium Motor drives the lifting mechanism to deploy the tracks, which also feature suspension, and there are LED headlights up front too.

There’s much more of Samolot’s wonderfully odd creation to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, or you could just watch that amazing video again!

Lego Technic GAZ 53 Truck

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Expedition Zetros II

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Having already posted one awesome Mercedes-Benz Zetros expedition truck earlier in the year we didn’t expect to find another. But like feet, Noah’s animals, and your Mom’s chin, Zetroses it seems, come in twos.

This spectacularly well-engineered Zetros expedition truck comes from previous bloggee jrx and it’s packed with brilliant Technic functionally, with seven Power Functions motors fitted inside, controlled via two SBricks and a LEGO IR Receiver.

Each wheel is driven by an XL motor, a Servo controls the steering, and two further Medium motors power the winch and a retractable awning.

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Fourteen sets of LEDs give jrx’s Zetros working head and tail lights, flashing turn signals, roof-mounted floodlights, and even interior lighting. The model also includes functioning suspension on all four wheels, a fully fitted interior, and an ATV stored on-board.

There’s much more to see of jrx’s excellent expedition Zetros at both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum – click on the links to join the journey, and you can watch the truck in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

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Got a Light?

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

A question we’ve all been asked by those who always seem to be just a little shiftier than ourselves. Flickr’s Dennis Glaasker, aka Brickonwheels, does have a light though. In fact he’s got fifty-two of them!

Thanks to third-party custom lighting specialists Brickstuff, Dennis’s beautiful 1:16 scale Peterbilt 379 features a spectacularly realistic lighting set-up to match the brilliance of the build. Fifty-two LEDs are placed throughout the model with power coming from a battery box hidden within the sleeper portion of the cab.

Dennis hasn’t stopped there either, as whilst the bricks are 100% LEGO many have been chromed for added realism, whilst a third-party SBrick brings programmable bluetooth control to the three Power Functions motors that power the truck.

Built for the Legoworld 2018 event in the Netherlands there’s more to see of Dennis’s 3,000-piece masterpiece at his photostream – Click this link to light up.

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

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McLaren P1 | Picture Special

Lego Technic McLaren P1

This is a near perfect working replica of the McLaren P1, it’s really orange, and it might be the finest Technic Supercar of 2018…

Built by brunojj1 of Eurobricks, this incredible 1:8 model of McLaren’s flagship hybrid hypercar measures over 70 studs / almost 60cm in length and is constructed from over 3,000 LEGO pieces.

Lego Technic McLaren P1

Bruno has designed two different versions of the model, one manual and the other remote controlled, and he’s made instructions available too. Both variants have adjustable front and rear suspension, opening butterfly doors, hood and engine cover, a working V8 engine, and a deployable airbrake/active rear spoiler.

The remote control version adds a suite of Power Functions motors to electronically operate the suspension, airbrake/spoiler and doors, plus drive and steer the model remotely. Two on-board LiPo batteries or third-party BuWizz bricks provide the power, whilst twin SBricks allow the McLaren’s working functions to be controlled via a mobile device.

Lego Technic McLaren P1

A huge gallery of images is available to view through the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also find a link to Bruno’s McLaren P1 building instructions and watch a video of the remote control version of the model in action.

Find out more by clicking here, and you can read our reviews of the third-party BuWizz and SBrick parts used in the McLaren via the links in the text above.

Lego Technic McLaren P1 Remote Control

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A-MAZ-ing

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

Last time we mentioned something about a vehicle belonging to Russia’s government forces we got in trouble (despite having been positive in the past too) so today there’ll be no backstory. However none is needed, because this MAZ537 8×8 soviet military truck is incredible.

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

Built by gkurkowski of Brickshelf this 3.3kg behemoth is one of the most beautifully recreated replica trucks that we’ve ever featured. With superb detailing both externally and inside, gkurkowski’s MAZ is certainly befitting of the ‘Model Team’ category here at TLCB. However, this creation is much more than a static display piece…

Inside that brilliant body is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain with power going to all eight wheels shod in LEGO’s huge 42054 Claas Xerion tyres. Each of the four axles is suspended and the first two offer four-wheel-steering powered by a Medium Motor. There’s also a V12 piston engine, LED headlights, a suspended fifth wheel/trailer hitch and opening everything.

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

It’s an incredible build and one that definitely deserves a closer look. A full gallery of over thirty images is available to view on Brickshelf, including CAD drawings of the drivetrain and WIP shots, plus you watch gkurkowski’s amazing MAZ537 8×8 in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video:

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Strength in Numbers

Lego RC Pick-Up Truck

As any builder of remote control Technic creations will know, LEGO drivetrain components – especially u-joints, axle connections and gears – are often not up to the job of delivering the torque from LEGO’s excellent Power Functions motors to where it needs to go.

Gears shearing in half and u-joints snapping are problems that regularly occur, particularly if third-party battery and software products such as SBrick or BuWizz have been used to increase power far beyond what LEGO envisaged. We’ve even experienced this here at TLCB Towers, as an ‘accidental’ collision between an RC creation and a TLCB Elf can push a part past its breaking-point.

Lego Technic RC Pick-Up Truck

However Eurobricks’ Kevin Moo has designed a cunning solution to the problem, with his Toyota Tundra-esque 4×4 pick-up truck utilising two driveshafts for each of the live-axle suspended differentials.

Power is sent down both sets of components, effectively halving the load on each gear, u-joint and axle connection, and therefore the likelihood of a part failure. It’s an ingenious yet simple solution and one that enables Lego models to take more power, more reliably – watch truck trial builders use this design and then double the number of motors to end up right back where they started!

Lego Technic RC Pick-Up Truck

Kevin’s dual-driveshaft pick-up is also a thoroughly excellent model in addition to its clever driveline. Power to all four wheels comes from a single XL Motor with a Servo for steering, there’s superb live-axle suspension front and rear, opening doors, hood, tailgate and load cover, LED lights, and a realistically detailed body too.

There’s much more to see of Kevin’s brilliant build on Eurobricks via the link above, and you watch how the dual-driveshafts work via the top-quality video below. Take a look whilst we see whether breaking parts in ‘accidental’ collisions with TLCB Elves is a thing of the past (it’s all for science).

YouTube Video

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