Tag Archives: 4×4

Cigarettes on Safari

Nothing says adventure like lung cancer and breathing difficulties! At least that what was thought back when cigarette brand Camel sponsored the amazing Land Rover rally named after them from 1980 to 2000. Still, with Red Bull and Monster energy drinks sponsoring pretty much every extreme sport these days perhaps we’ve not moved on as much as we’d like to think…

This phenomenal Land Rover Defender 110 in stunning Camel Trophy spec is the work of Manuel Nascimento of Flickr, and it is very probably the finest 4×4 that The Lego Car Blog has featured this year. The iconic off-roader’s exterior has been recreated to perfection, including all the adventuring paraphernalia that accompanied these vehicles through jungles, mountain and deserts, and with accurate branding – including the infamous cigarette advertising – courtesy of superb custom decals.

Underneath the incredible exterior the engineering excellent continues, with working lights operated via a third-party SBrick, Power Functions remotely controlled steering, winch, and four-wheel-drive, working suspension, and a four-speed gearbox. Opening doors, a beautifully detailed interior and a roof-mounted tent also feature, plus Manuel has constructed a lovely desert base to accompany his model.

There’s loads more of this spectacularly built and presented creation to see at Manuel’s Land Rover Defender 110 Flickr album, where you can also find a link to a video demonstrating the model’s features. Light up a cigarette via the link above (no, don’t – but do click the link!).

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Retro Rampage

Whiiiir! Crunch. Whiiiir! Crunch. Elven Screaming. Whiiiir! Crunch.

Sigh. These are sounds we’ve heard too often here at The Lego Car Blog Towers before, and they usually mean we’re going to have to get the carpets cleaned again.

A weary trudge to the corridor outside the office revealed the cause, and to our surprise there wan’t just one, but three. Three Elves were each controlling three separate (and rather impressive) Technic Monster Trucks, bashing them into one another and occasionally adding variety to the proceedings by driving them at and over the Elves who had come to watch the spectacle.

It admittedly looked like great fun, so Mr. Airhorn was deployed to break up the ruckus, the injured were patched up with Pritt-Stick and plasters, and we’ve taken control of the trio of Technic trucks for ourselves.

Each truck comes from Technic building legend Madoca77 and wears a gloriously retro livery, including the famous Ford ‘Big Foot’ colours and Toyota’s wonderful ’80s ‘pick-up’ stripe, and the three models are all remotely operable via bluetooth thanks to two SBricks.

These control the four XL motors (one per wheel), the two Servo motors that steer both the front and rear axles, the Medium motor that switches between crab steering and normal steering modes (just like LEGO’s excellent 40254 Claas Xerion 5000 set), and the Medium motor that operates the clamshell bodywork lift.

Madoca’s builds also include LED headlights, opening doors and dropping tailgates, plus – most importantly – a mega suspension setup which includes portal axles. They easily make it into our favourite creations list of 2019, and if you like them as much as we do then head to the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above to read more about the builds and to watch a video of Madoca’s vintage monster truck design in action!

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Battle at the School Gates

Iiiiin the red corner, weighing in at 21,780 lbs, all the way from South Africa, it’s Kate, in the Paramount Maraaaaauder! Aaaaand in the green corner, from Russia, it floats like a… I dunno – but it really does float folks – it’s Julia in the amphibious Sheeeerp ATV!

These two slabs of off-road equipment come from Pixel Fox of Flickr, who has added them to his ever-increasing garage of brilliantly-built mini-figure 4x4s.

Both real vehicles were designed for very particular purposes, with the Marauder as an armoured transport for military applications in urban environments and the Sherp ATV for reaching the most inhospitable places on earth, even if that means crossing open water.

Such credentials make them slightly over-engineered for civilian use, however neither would look out of place at the school gates close to TLCB Towers, where AMG G-Wagons, Range Rovers, and Bentley Bentayga’s all fight for the title of most over-the-top school run vehicle. And if you fancy a Marauder to keep your precious children safe on the way to school – as Kate has done – then you can, as it really is available as a road-legal civilian version. And you thought the Hummer was stupid…

Our money’s on Julia in the Sherp though, because she can escape by crossing the ornamental lake. View the battle for school run supremacy via the links above and place your bets!

 

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Ride-On LEGO

Every Lego fan has wanted to do it. We’ve all imagined what it would be like, dreaming that one day, if we tried hard enough, it might just be possible. And some have even got close. No, we’re not referring to talking to a girl, but building a real, ride-on, controllable Lego creation.

That unrealised dream has now become a reality for the guys at third-party bluetooth brick builders BuWizz, who have built an actual ride-on go-kart (OK, ‘mobility scooter’ might be a better description…) from seven thousand LEGO pieces!

Thirty-two Large Power Functions motors power all four wheels (via individual in-wheel motors actually, meaning their creation could feature torque vectoring!), with eight BuWizz bricks providing the power and control via the BuWizz mobile app. They’ve even managed to talk to a girl and convince her drive it.

You can watch their amazing creation in action via the video below and read more about it at the BuWizz website, plus if you’d like to learn more about the little bluetooth battery control that allows a creation like this to happen you can read our review of the BuWizz brick here.

YouTube Video

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Scorpion King

No, not that awful movie with the Rock in it, but this rather splendid looking Claas Scorprion 756 telehandler by previous bloggee and tractor-building legend Eric Trax.

Underneath that Claas lime green paint job (and some excellent Model Team detailing) is a model packed with motorised functionality, all of it remotely operable via bluetooth thanks to two third-party SBrick control bricks.

A Large Power Functions Motor drives all four wheels whilst a Servo steers all four too. A further three Medium motors operate the boom, giving it the ability to raise, extend, and tilt the variety of dangerous looking implements that can be attached to the end of it.

Fortunately for our Elves Eric’s model is a bit too slow for the Scoprion’s motorised weaponry to have been deployed on them, so they’re riding around on it instead, which they seem pretty happy about.

There are loads more images to see of this superbly engineered and photographed creation at Eric’s Claas Scorprion 756 album on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum where you can also find a video showing all of the model’s features. Take a look via the links!

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Pick-Me-Up

After this week’s earlier incident we’re a bit light on Elves at the moment, and thus when another ridiculously capable remote controlled creation was found by one of our smelly little workers we feared another violent event.

Fortunately the creation in question was much too slow to meet out any vengeance (much to the Elf at the controls’ annoyance), but it is no less excellent for that, which has cheered TLCB office immensely.

Built by Attika of Eurobricks it’s entitled ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’, which is a bold claim, but a potentially accurate one.

A raft of Power Functions motors provide all-wheel-drive through planetary hubs, whilst a high/low range gearbox allows Attika’s truck to climb gradients in excess of 50 degrees.

A full compliment of LEDs light the head and tail lamps whilst a third-party SBrick enables all of that to be controlled via Bluetooth, plus there are opening and locking doors, hood and tailgate and adjustable seats.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Attika’s ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’ at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find photos showing the chassis and driveline construction and a video of the truck in action. Click the link above to take a look.

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Classic Car Garage

After posting definitely Not a Car yesterday, here’s over a dozen! Ralph Savelsberg‘s brilliant expanding classic car garage includes some wonderful pieces of beautiful, historic and iconic American metal. And a Buick Roadmaster.

Many of the cars have featured here at The Lego Car Blog over the years and you can see more of Ralph’s scene at the Great Western Lego Show in the UK later this year, or on Flickr via the link above, which is probably more convenient.

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To School!

Alice has got herself a new SUV and it’s the perfect car to one-up Rachel and her Range Rover Sport outside the school gates. It was expensive, but you can’t put a price on safety, and David’s job in the city is paying really well now.

Alice’s new school-run monstrosity (an Oshkosh M-ATV) comes from Robson M aka BrickDesigners and is – frankly – not that absurd at all compared to the pointless car-based one-upmanship that occurs outside the education establishment close to TLCB Towers.

Surely this SUV craze has got to end soon? See more of Alice’s new wheels on Flickr via the link.

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Proper Defender

After mocking those who fail to embrace change and progress in yesterday’s post, today we’re failing to embrace change and progress…

The new Land Rover Defender, revealed inadvertently in LEGO form here at The Lego Car Blog earlier this year, looks tragically like yet another Discovery iteration. Not the Discovery is a bad car (apart from reliability maybe…), but Land Rover already make the Discovery, Discovery Sport, Ranger Rover Evoque, Range Rover Sport and Range Rover Velar, which are all basically the same car. The last thing we needed was the Defender to become just another clone.

It’ll probably sell very well to begin with mind, as being the new Defender will be enough to make it cool, but we fear it won’t last long. We’d much rather have this; the original Defender, a vehicle that was in continuous production relatively unchanged for decades and that is now a surefire appreciating classic.

This beautiful Model Team recreation of the iconic Land Rover Defender in 110 Station Wagon form comes from BrickMonkey MOCs who has captured the real car brilliantly. A few choice mods including an external cage, winch, roof lights and luggage rack up the coolness even further and there’s more to see of Monkey’s wonderful creation at his Land Rover Defender Flickr album. Click the link above to rail against progress…

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Piëch’s Peak

Earlier this week one of the automotive industry’s greatest talents passed away. Ferdinand Piech, the grandson of Ferdinand Porsche, ex-chairman of the Volkswagen Group, and the man behind some of the most iconic cars ever made, collapsed in a restaurant in Germany. He was 82.

Sometimes controversial, there was considerable hostility between Piech and Porsche – the company founded by his grandfather – during his tenure at the top of Volkswagen, eventually resulting in Piech buying Porsche to oust their chairman. The Volkswagen Group has since faced the biggest scandal in its history (dragging Porsche into it the mire too), yet has also become the world’s largest automotive manufacturer by volume, with much of that down to Piech’s reign at the top.

Piech’s legacy is as astonishing one, including diesel engines for Mercedes-Benz, the amazing Porsche 917, the Bugatti Veyron, and this, the original Audi ‘UR’ quattro – the car that, whilst not the first, popularised the advantages of all-wheel-drive beyond off-roaders.

This cartoon-like Technic recreation of the legendary Audi quattro Group B rally car comes from Teo Technic and features remote control drive and steering, independent suspension, working headlights and – of course – all-wheel-drive.

There’s more to see of Teo’s Audi quattro at both Flickr and the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the links to make the jump – and tip your hat to the man behind it and some of the other greatest cars in modern history.

Ferdinand Karl Piëch, 1937 – 2019

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Starship Trooper

This is an Isuzu Trooper, a robust, reliable, bland, Japanese 4×4 from the 1990s. But it is a rather good Technic model and it also allows us to tenuously link to a movie trailer where everything blows up, so there’s that.

This neat Technic version of the Trooper comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, features working steering, suspension, and opening hood, tailgate and doors, and there’s more to see via the link above.

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Bending Bricks

The Elves are happy today. Firstly this huge remote control truck is orange, so it’s already off to a winning start, and secondly it can fit a gaggle of them in the back to ride around the office, and only a few got run over.

This unique machine comes from Waler of Brickshelf, who designed and built it for his engineering diploma thesis. Waler’s design allows his truck to articulate in the middle in two dimensions, both left/right and up/down. To accomplish this Waler’s truck includes a cleverly-constructed pivoting differential, kind of like a helicopter’s swash plate, that can deliver power whichever way the the two halves of the truck are pointing.

The truck is steered by two linear actuators that swing the chassis around a central pivot point which – as it can also pivot vertically – allows for insane articulation. All-wheel-drive, a remotely operable gearbox, all-wheel-suspension, and custom 3D-printed differentials complete the drivetrain, upon which a simple removable body is mounted.

There’s a whole lot more to see, including the clever central pivot design, custom diffs, and on-location photos showing the truck off-road, at Waler’s Brickshelf gallery. Click the link above to make the jump.

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They See Me Crawlin’

This is a remote control 4×4 rock crawler and it comes from previous bloggee Technic BOOM. If you’re a regular reader of this dilapidated corner of the ‘net you might now be expecting a tale of mass Elven destruction, corridor smushings, and even a trip to the ‘Elf Hospital‘.

However the clue is in the title with this post, as Technic BOOM’s creation is one of the slowest that we’ve ever encountered. This inevitably enraged the Elf that discovered it, unable as it was to inflict mayhem on its fellow Elves, but it also means that BOOM’s model is ridiculously capable off-road.

With gearing of 9:1, enormous non-LEGO RC tyres, remote control drive, steering, and differential lockers, Technic BOOM’s rock crawler can inch its way over almost anything. Very slowly.

There’s more to see of this superbly engineered machine on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also watch a video of it doing its thing on-location off-road.

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Chevrolet Silverado K30 Crew Cab | Picture Special

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re not usually fans of American pick-up trucks. This is because they are, by and large, complete crap. However – and we appreciate there is little logic to this whatsoever – old American pick-up trucks, even though they’re still complete crap, are somehow becoming rather cool. This is one such ageing pick-up, the Chevrolet Silverado K30, in dually crew cab specification.

Perhaps it’s because as vehicles get older we’re willing to overlook their shortcomings, but we really want this truck. The Elves do too, seeing as it’s a giant tasteless 4×4. Fortunately for one of them, it did get its grubby little claws on this, as it found this rather impressive Technic recreation of the classic(?) Silverado K30 crew cab by previous bloggee filswagood on Flickr.

A few of the other Elves in TLCB Towers soon got to experience it too, but not in the way they hoped, as it ran them down in the corridor. Power Functions remote control drive and steering combined with bouncy suspension enabled filsawgood’s Chevy to comfortably squash a couple of our little workers before we took the controls away to take a look for ourselves.

And look we did, because filsawgood’s Silverado is a brilliantly-engineered build, not only featuring the aforementioned (and excellent) remote control drivetrain, but also opening doors, hood (under which is a detailed engine), tailgate, and toolbox (battery compartment), plus the model includes LED lights and a detailed interior too.

There’s much more of filsawgood’s superb Chevrolet Silverado K30 crew cab to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you can check out filsawgood’s other Technic 4x4s to appear here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking this bonus link.

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The Martian

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. The world no doubt thought following NASA’s incredible achievement in 1969 that lunar exploration would become routine. As it turned out man last visited the moon just 3 years later, leaving a vast 47 year wait (and still counting) for a return.

Space it seems, is now pretty boring (we suppose it is mostly empty anyway), only utilised in 2019 to enable aubergine emojis to be sent around the world and to allow drivers to completely ignore road signs.

Hollywood however hasn’t forgotten the romanticism of a proper space adventure, and in 2015 ‘The Martian‘ showed us via incredible attention to detail how a manned mission to Mars might look. It even had it’s own star car, the funky and yet very probable-looking Mars Rover.

This is that vehicle, albeit in Technic form, as built by Samolot of Eurobricks. Underneath the movie-realistic exterior Samolot had included an array of clever remote control functionality, all of it powered by LEGO’s own Power Functions motors and controlled via the third-party SBrick bluetooth brick and mobile app.

Each of the rover’s four enormous wheels is powered independently by a separate L Motor which – due to their size – are ingeniously housed inside the wheels themselves. All four wheels steer too, courtesy of a Medium Motor, whilst independent suspension allows the model to traverse the rocky martian landscape.

Finally two more Medium motors power the rover’s winch and rear crane (switchable via a gearbox) and an on-board compressor that feeds air to the crane’s pneumatic cylinders and those that open the cockpit doors.

Samolot’s creation is superbly accurate to the ‘real’ vehicle that starred in the movie and there’s loads more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, including a video of the model in action. Click the link above to make the trip, and remember that help is only 140 million miles away…

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