Selectable Six

The Elves are very excited today. One of their number brought this astonishingly well-engineered 6×6 off-road truck back to TLCB Towers, and whilst it’s too slow to mow any of them down, it’s certainly fast enough for them to enjoy riding around the office grounds in it.

Built by previous bloggee Thesuperkoala, the truck’s remote control prowess comes courtesy of a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery delivering power to several LEGO Power Functions motors that drive the steering, high/low range gearbox, and selectable all-wheel-drive system.

Combined with pendular suspension on all axles this gives Koala’s truck brilliant off-road ability, allowing the Elves to ride out in the office courtyard and crush some flowers, which has excited them immensely.

It also features a working V6 engine, opening doors and hood, plus folding drop-sides. We’re about to pull the pins on these so the Elves will all fall out when they next go around a corner (in order to preserve our daffodils), so whilst we do that you can check out more of Koala’s awesome 6×6 at his Flickr album by clicking here, where you can also find a link to a video of the truck in action.

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Forgotten Land Cruiser

Toyota’s Land Cruiser has been the go-to 4×4 for decades. Sold over multiple generations, bodystyles and configurations, there have been so many derivatives it’s hard to pin down if any are representative of the name. If there is one though, it’s not FJ55, which – despite being on sale for 13 years – is often forgotten in the Land Cruiser’s history.

We love the slightly odd looking FJ55 though, particularly in blue and white two-tone as depicted here by Jonathan Elliott‘s wonderful Lego recreation. Jonathan has captured the 1970s Land Cruiser brilliantly and there’s more to see of his superb FJ55 on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump.

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Wheelie Big Cheese

FebRovery is nearly over, but as we approach the end of the annual rover-building bandwagon we’ve got time to squeeze a few more in. Today’s is a fine way to finish, as surely all good events end with cheese. David Roberts‘ is the builder behind this ‘Edam Rover’, a giant wax-skinned contraption used in the Cheese Mining industry that has been so famously represented in countless Lego creations. Grab yourself a cracker and head to David’s photostream via the link above for a taste.

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Swooosh!

If the coolness of a sci-fi creation is defined by the number of angles it has, then Nick Trotta has won. This is his ‘Firebreak’ spacecraft and – as usual – we have absolutely no idea what it is or does, just that it looks, well.. frankly incredible.

There are building techniques in here that we’re pretty sure would blow our minds if we saw how they were done, so we’ll simply look at the pictures and go ‘Oooh!’ instead. Join us on Flickr via the link above.

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The Answer’s Always Miata

Whatever the question, the answer is always Miata. Or MX-5 if you’re not American. Or Eunos if you’re in Japan. But you get the point. Light, reliable, fast enough, and able to go sideways, the Miata/MX-5/Eunos is very probably the greatest sports care ever made. This is SP_LINEUP‘s Speed Champions scale recreation of the second generation of Mazda’s iconic two seater roadster, and it captures the look of the real car beautifully, with opening doors, hood and a removable roof too. SP has made instructions for his design available should you wish to build your own and you can find these and further images at his photostream via the link above.

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The Crown

Many cities and countries are known for having an iconic taxi. London has the Black Cab, although it’s now vastly outnumbered by Prius Ubers, New York had the Ford Crown Victoria, until it was replaced by Nissan vans, Camrys and the Prius, and Mexico had the Volkswagen Beetle, now superseded by boring Asian boxes including, you’ve guessed it, the Prius. There’s a theme here…

Fortunately (and perhaps ironically) Japan still has its iconic taxi cab, the Toyota Crown Comfort, complete with its amazing automatically opening rear doors. Built right up until 2017, the Crown has served as Japan’s taxi for over two decades. It’s finally being retired though, replaced by a bespoke Toyota taxi design that will probably end up becoming even more iconic, and which owes more than a little to its London counterpart.

The Comfort will be around for a while yet though, weird doors and all, and you can hail a ride in Ralph Savelsberg‘s brilliant Miniland scale replica via the link above.

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Confederate Chrome

This is the Confederate R-131 Fighter, and it is really very shiny indeed. The real bike achieves this through unpainted aluminium, whilst Flickr’s ianying616 has had to use more chrome than a fifties Cadillac. Either way, it’s not a vehicle we’d want to leave out in the sun and then sit upon. Don your sunglasses and head to ianying’s photostream via the link above to see more of the shiniest motorcycle ever made.

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It’s Safer in the Cockpit than the Cargo Bay

It’s everyone’s favourite animated space-themed pizza restaurant! We’re not sure that ordering a Pizza Planet delivery would be quite as fun as visiting the restaurant in person and winning a three-eyed alien from the grab machine, but the pizzas sure get a fun ride. Previous bloggee November Juliet has recreated Toy Story’s famous ‘Toyota’ pizza delivery truck in 6-wide form and you can place your order on Flickr via the link above.

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Super Seventies

LEGO’s new 8-wide Speed Champions sets are generating a lot of interest in the online Lego community. Firstly because they’re rather good, and secondly because of those windscreen pieces. Suitable for all manner of cars, we’ve seen them pop up (and look perfect for) several real-world replicas as yet unlicensed by LEGO, including a Lamborghini Countach and Maserati Boomerang.

Today we have two more classic supercars that look made for the new part, Jonathan Elliott‘s superb DeTomaso Pantera (above) and RGB900‘s angular Lotus Esprit (below). Each captures their real world counterpart brilliantly and there’s more to see of both builds via the links in the text above.

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Castles Made of Sand*

Everyone likes building sandcastles at the beach. OK, not everyone – some people are more Sandcastle Destroyers than Sandcastle Makers. Which is probably a microcosm for society or something. Anyway, we like building sandcastles, and today Porsche96, who last appeared here 5 years ago, is here to help.

Pictured at the beach, this is his 1.2m tall Liebherr HS 8040 dragline excavator, a seven motor bluetooth controlled engineering masterpiece. The first two motors drive the tracks, with a Medium motor in between them operating the linear actuators that widen or contract the track spacing. Another Medium motor rotates the superstructure whilst two XL and an L motor lift control the bucket and lift the enormous boom via a series of winches.

It’s a magnificent build and one you can learn more about at the Eurobricks forum, where Porsche96 has detailed the full specification and posted a video of the dragline in operation, plus you can view the full image gallery of the Liebherr HS 8040 on Flickr by clicking here. Head to the beach via the links above.

*Today’s title song.

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Безумный Макс

Parts of Russia may look a bit like a post-apocalyptic wasteland (and even more so in the former Soviet Union), but that has meant Russians have needed to build some awesome vehicles in order to traverse the wild landscape. We’ve featured many such off-road cars and trucks over the years, but none quite like this.

Based on a ZIL 130, this is Samolot’s ‘Peacemaker’, a 6×6 skid-steer monster that imagines what Mad Max would be like if were set in Russia.

With each of the six wheels driven by a Power Functions XL Motor and offering eight studs worth of articulation, Samolot’s creation can drive over pretty much anything, particularly as the twin BuWizz bluetooth batteries on board can deliver up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system.

If that wasn’t enough, the ZIL also features a trebuchet mounted on the rear for… er, we’re not sure – shooting down airliners? Whatever it’s for it makes Samolot’s build one of the wildest we’ve featured yet, and you can guess what happened when one of our Elves brought it into the office earlier today.

It’s safe to say we have some tidying up to do, so whilst we do that you can visit Samolot’s post-apocalyptic Soviet future at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also watch a video of the Peacemaker in action.

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Mad Collab

The Future Belongs to the Mad. Especially when they collaborate. 2015’s ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ thundered into cinemas to surprising critical acclaim. Directed my George Miller (he of Happy Feet fame!), ‘Fury Road’ followed the terribly-named ‘Mad Max: Beyond the Thunderdome’ film released a full three decades previously, and it was bloody brilliant!

It’s not often that TLCB Staff and TLCB Elves are in agreement, but this is a movie that brought harmony between TLCB’s human overlords and its irritating mythical workforce. Until the little turds started reenacting scenes from the film in the corridors of TLCB Towers at least.

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ starred many incredible vehicles, all of which were build for real, and many of these have been recreated in Lego form over the past five years (you can use the search function to find those that have appeared here). However, despite only appearing briefly in the third Mad Max instalment, it’s the V8 Interceptor that has endured as the franchise’s most iconic car.

Based on a 1970s Ford Falcon XB GT Hardtop, the V8 Interceptor appeared in all three movies, and is arguably more associated with the Mad Max story than the fleshy meatbag/s that drove it. This is the version of the Interceptor from the final (for now) film, and it’s been created through the collaboration of builders Mikhail Biktimirov, FX6000, and photographer Nikolay Gamurar.

With remote control drive and steering, working independent front and solid-axle rear suspension, and opening doors and hood, Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s beautifully presented V8 Interceptor is definitely worth a closer look. FX6000 has also made building instructions available too, should you wish to pretend your kitchen floor is post-apocalyptic wasteland and reenact scenes from the movies.

The Elves will certainly be doing that, so whilst we keep a careful eye on proceedings you can see more of Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s brilliant Mad Max V8 Interceptor collaboration at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here.

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Brickworms Jaguar MkII | Review

It’s review time here at The Lego Car Blog, but today’s review is not an official LEGO set. Looking like a car from LEGO’s new 8-wide Speed Champions range – only with considerably more detail – this is Brickworms’ Jaguar MkII kit, one of the many custom real-world replicas available to buy on their website.

With kits from the ‘How to Build Brick Cars’ book by Peter Blackert (one of several books available to buy at the Brickworms online store), plus other vehicles such as this classic Jaguar, aircraft and even animals, there are dozens of models to choose from. But are they any good? Read on to find out!

Our Jaguar MkII kit arrived in a cottony drawstring bag, a neat packaging solution and one we rather like. Inside the pieces required to construct the Jag were jingling happily together, as was a paper instructions booklet, which wasn’t jingling at all.

The instructions booklet for our Jaguar was rather interesting, being printed on standard paper (not gloss), and switching the black parts for a light semi-transparent blue, as you can see below, and clear-trans for yellow. This is presumably to save on ink, but – once you get your head around blue being black – it probably makes the instructions easier to follow, as black pieces can be hard to spot. LEGO have got round this in recent years by applying all sorts of colours to the hidden parts of their sets and via their beautiful glossy instructions manuals, but the Brickworms’ approach, whilst a little odd, works pretty well.

The instructional steps themselves are clear, although more complicated than the over-simplified equivalents from LEGO, with many pieces applied at once. This is also because the Jaguar itself is more complex than LEGO’s similarly-sized Speed Champions sets, with advanced building techniques and a higher level of detail. However, we did feel a bit like Beta testers with our kit…. Continue reading

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Dirty Weekend

Your Mom rang us this weekend so we’ll be busy today, but before we sign out here’s a creation with a not-entirely-coincidental title. Previous bloggee damjan97PL (aka damianple) is back with a model that he’s not afraid to get very dirty indeed. His Technic 4×4 includes remote control steering and all-wheel-drive, a high/low range gearbox, and an operable diff-lock (both also remotely operable). There’s also fully independent suspension all round, opening doors, and a kinda-detailed interior. Head to the Eurobricks discussion forum or Damian’s Brickshelf album for both clean and dirty shots and we’ll see you again after the weekend.

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Road Train

Suggested to us by a reader, this is Bricks_n_Trucks‘ superb Kenworth T900 Australian Road Train, a fully remote controlled Model Team behemoth.  The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that whilst doubtless impressive, it’s lacking a few of the necessary components to be an actual road train, being only the tractor unit, but nevertheless this build is well worth Bricks_n_Trucks making their TLCB debut.

Controlled via bluetooth courtesy of a third-party SBrick the Kenworth is powered by two L motors with steering via a Servo, all of which is hidden underneath an exterior of brilliant detail. Take a closer look via the link above, and if you’ve spotted a creation that you think our Elves have missed you can let us know at the Feedback page (just make sure you read the Guidelines first).

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