Supercharged Smushing

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

The Lego Car Blog Elves have a long and chequered history with remote control vehicles. Regularly chased, squashed, and manhandled by one of their number at the controls of an RC creation, they only have themselves to blame. Unless we do it of course.

However if they’re going to be run over by a remotely controlled Lego model it may as well be by a vehicle they like, and we expect this brutal-looking Charger-esque supercharged muscle car is the Elves’ very favourite of all the creations that have  mowed them down.

Built by previous bloggee Paave this RC masterpiece not only looks the part, it’s packed with cool functions too. Remote control drive (by two L Motors) and steering (via a Medium Motor) of course feature, plus rather cleverly the supercharger belt also spins. There’s working suspension front and rear, positive caster angle, opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, and the bodywork is completely removable from the chassis.

There’s lots more to see of Paave’s superb Technic muscle car via MOCpages, Brickshelf and Eurobricks where you can also watch a video of the model’s features in action – click the links to check it out.

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

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Water Bomb

Lego Canadair CL-215

Ah Canada. The United States’ slightly boring neighbour. Home of singing-horse Celine Dion, the catchy pop of Carly Ray Jepsen, and perennial annoyance that is Justin Bieber. Fortunately they also know how to make some cool stuff up there, thanks almost entirely to transportation giant Bombardier.

Founded in the 1930s Bombardier began by making snowmobiles, and have since expanded to build ski-doos, trains, ATVs and aircraft. It’s the latter we have here, in the form of a Canadair CL-215 water-bombing amphibious plane. Designed in the late 1960s to operate at low speeds and in tricky winds, the CL-215 was sold to eleven countries for fire-fighting and search and rescue operations, with 125 units produced until the design was replaced in 1990.

This lovely replica of the Canadair CL-215 comes from previous bloggee Dornbi of Flickr and he’s captured the unusual shoulder-mounted engine configuration of the aircraft brilliantly. There’s more of the build to see at Dornbi’s photostream – click the link above to drop the world’s biggest water bomb.

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4x4x2

Lego Ford F-250 1975

It’s a dirty double today at The Lego Car Blog! First up (above) is TLCB regular _Tiler‘s wonderful 7-wide lifted 1975 Ford F-250, complete with beautifully chromed bumper and grille pieces and some marvellous Technic balloon tyres.

The second model in today’s double-helping of rough-riding fun comes from previous bloggee de-marco, with this supremely neat 5-wide classic Ford Bronco-esque off-roader, which has been cunningly constructed from bricks placed almost entirely sideways.

There’s more to see of each creation on Flickr – check them out via the links above whilst we congratulate ourselves on making it the whole way through this innuendo-strewn post without referencing your Mom.

Lego Off-Roader Bronco

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Not a Car

Lego Crane Train

But probably the nicest crane-train thingumy we’ve ever seen. Plus we like trains, and we like cranes, so it’s appearing here. Dario Minisini is the builder and there’s more to see of this lovely mini-figure scale build on Flickr.

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You Don’t Frighten Us English Pig-Dogs!

Lego Galleon Battle

I don’t wanna talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food-trough wiper! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries!

Much like the aforementioned medieval altercation, it looks like the French have got the better of us English-types in Sebeus I‘s galleon battle. There’s more to see of this beautifully epic scene on Flickr – click the link above to join the fray.

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Ford GT – Picture Special

Lego Technic Ford GT Supercar

Ford’s sold-out GT has got everyone talking. By everyone, mostly we mean America, where not having a V8 is still seen as bit of a novelty. Nevertheless, the new GT doesn’t have a V8, instead being fitted with a seriously tuned version of Ford’s 3.5 litre ‘Ecoboost’ V6 engine producing over 600bhp.

Ford designed the GT first and foremost as a racing car, maximising performance within GT-class rules, and then adapting the design for the road. This makes the GT a magnificently impractical car for road use, but at a track… that’s a different story.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

This stunning Technic recreation of Ford’s newest supercar has been built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron and it’s very nearly as impressive as the real car. Underneath the beautifully sculpted body work is a V6 engine, inboard pushrod suspension complete with the GT’s trick ‘track mode’ setting which drops the car to the tarmac, a raising rear spoiler, and Power Functions remote control drive and steering.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Lachlan’s incredible Ford GT Technic Supercar on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the links above for the full gallery, build details, and a video of the GT in action.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

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Gimmie a Ticket for an Aeroplane

Lego Technic Airliner

Gimmie a ticket for an aeroplane
Ain’t got time to take a fast train
Lonely days are gone I’m a goin’ home
My baby has just wrote me a letter.

We don’t often see Technic aeroplanes, but this unusual creation by BrickbyBrickTechnic shows that Technic aircraft can be done very well indeed. With working ailerons, airbrakes, elevators and tail rudder, plus functioning (and suspended) landing gear, BrickbyBrick’s jet airliner includes more functionality than many Technic models of more usual subjects. Get yourself a ticket at either Flickr or Eurobricks, and you can find today’s title song by clicking here.

Lego Technic Airliner

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Go Long

Lego DAF 3600 8X4 ATI Van Seumeren

Last night your Mom put in a request, and thanks to Flickr’s Arian Janssens we’re happy to oblige. This 1980s DAF 3600 ATi 8×4 is seriously long, thanks to the truly enormous beam being transported between itself and the support trailer.

Lego DAF 3600 8X4 ATI Van Seumeren

The whole rig is brilliantly detailed and features an accurate livery of the company that operated the truck in Holland back in the ’80s. There is lots more to see of the DAF 3600 ATi, the trailer, and the colossal beam being transported at Arian’s photostream – click the link above to go long.

Lego DAF 3600 8X4 ATI Van Seumeren

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A Little Pick-Me-Up

Lego Town Pick-Up Truck

It’s a been a small-scale day here at TLCB, proving that you don’t need NASA’s budget and more bricks than a LEGOLand theme park to build something blogworthy. Our final post of the day comes from Flickr’s de-marco and it’s entitled simply ‘Blue Pickup’. Neat building techniques abound and you can see more of de-marco’s lovely 5-wide truck at his photostream via the link above.

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Sittin’ Pretty

Lego Datsun 240Z

This TLCB writer is going to poke his head above the metaphorical parapet that is the internet’s comments and state that the prettiest sports car of the 1970s is not a Jaguar, Porsche, or Alfa Romeo… but a Datsun. In particular, this Datsun – the wonderful 1970 240Z.

This lightly JDM-modified 240Z comes from Jonathan Elliott and it captures the Japanese sports car’s curves beautifully. There’s more to see on both Flickr and MOCpages via the links, and you can find today’s title track – by none other than The Datsuns – by clicking here.

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Blue Snake

Lego AC Cobra

The second best Anglo-American collaboration (after Fleetwood Mac of course), the AC Cobra has become a car of legendary status. Based on the pretty but humble AC Ace, American racer-turned-tuner Carroll Shelby brokered a deal with Ford to supply their new Windsor V8 engine to the small British company. A giant killer was born, and today the AC Cobra is one of the most sought-after road-racers ever produced. This beautifully replicated Lego version is the work of TLCB regular Ralph Savelberg and there’s more to see of his miniature Cobra on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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Grand Theft Lego

Ever wondered what would happen if the wholesomeness of LEGO met the debauchery of Grand Theft Auto? Well thanks to digital media wizards Nukazooka you can wonder no more! The Lego Car Blog Elves are watching this madness on loop…

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Chinese Whispers

Lego J-11B Fighter

China’s home-grown vehicles often seem to have been ‘designed’ via a game of Chinese Whispers, starting with a respectable Western, Japanese or Korean product, and ending with a tragically distorted lookalike such as this. Or this. Or this. Or this.

Make no mistake though, whilst we’re happily mocking China’s complete disregard for copyright infringement, Chinese cars will be arriving on mass very soon, and it won’t be long before we’ll all be flying on Chinese-designed aircraft too.

In the meantime it’s the domestic market that China’s vehicle and aircraft manufacturers are serving with their cloned produce, as is the case with today’s creation. This is a Shenyang J-11B fighter, a licensed copy of the mid-’80s Soviet-designed Sukhoi Su-27 air superiority fighter, and currently in sole use by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force of China.

This spectacular Lego replica of the Shenyang J-11B comes from Flickr’s Lennart C and it’s a better copy than any of China’s cars could hope to be. There’s an opening cockpit, detailed landing gear, as well as an assortment of cloned Russian weaponry, and there’s lots more to see at Lennart’s photostream via the link above.

Lego Shenyang J-11

Or this.

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10258 Creator London Bus | Set Review

LEGO 10258 London Bus Review

The Set Review Library here at The Lego Car Blog is – just like your Mom – ever expanding. Today we’re joined by guest reviewer Andy Boal to add one of the most eagerly anticipated sets of 2017 to the library’s stock – the 1,686 piece Creator Expert 10258 London Bus. Is it worth £110 of your cash? Over to Andy to find out…

When I was young, I wanted LEGO’s London bus set 384. Smart, red, and it looked like a Routemaster to someone like me who had never been to London and didn’t know it was modelled on the Routemaster’s predecessor, also manufactured by AEC, the Regent III RT.

So I decided to make my own London bus, a full half-cab bus, and I made it 10 studs wide. Unfortunately I ran out of parts after the lower floor, so I didn’t bother making the stairs.

My history with Lego buses is otherwise rather chequered. 696, a white and blue bus almost entirely unlike the Ulsterbuses I would later take to school, was given to me in the 1970s, and I bought the original Knight Bus 4755 in 2004, complete with beds racing all over the floor.

I finally got my hands on 384 and, some time later another set I coveted for making models in the 6000 and 7777 Lego ideas books, 379, from eBay some years ago, and with at least one unique chassis part, 384 lives at my parents’ house.

So until this year I only had one model of a London bus. A Valentine’s trip let me pick up the four stud wide 40220 in Leicester Square, but then this week we were in Glasgow’s Buchanan Galleries shopping mall…

LEGO 10258 London Bus Set Review

The 10258 London Bus box is the standard size for Creator Expert sets, and boasts two pictures of a real life Routemaster, as well as interior shots of the completed model.

Opening up reveals what is a relief to those of us who have had to build and later rebuild a nephew’s Death Star after parts had broken off while moving house – numbered bags. The bane of many a builder’s life, but I’m fully sold on them for making it easier to find the piece you want. Call me a wuss if you want.

The instruction book is 176 pages long – I have to say I like the single books. Looking at the sticker sheet though reminds me that the number plate is incorrect, because no UK numberplate runs to five digits. Of course, I’ve no idea whatsoever whether Morten Graff-Wang could have a personalised numberplate MGW258 or not, but GW was a South-East London registration.

Anyway, back to the set itself, and I’ve thrown the bags for parts 2, 3 and 4 back into thebox to save space and leave me with four to cope with. And breathe.

Part 1 is the chassis and the body sides up to a row below the windows, and the staircase. Turning the page reveals what many will assume is a new innovation, and that is highlighting the added pieces with a yellow outline, but those of us with longer memories will remember outlines on added pieces from the 222 Lego Ideas Book (there’s my childhood again!)

As you would expect, the chassis begins with Technic bricks and frames – all studded construction, of course, and establishing a strong foundation for the rest of the set.

After 21 main steps the floor is laid, the stands for the seats are set up, the staircase has begun, we build the engine with grey bullion forming the top of the engine block, and finally it is time to start building bodywork. 4×3 panels provide most of the flat bits, with a hint of a curved back to come.

As I build the driver’s seat I decide I’m glad I’m not driving this thing, as there is only one stud of leg room between the driver’s seat and the steering wheel and gearstick, and the seat won’t go back.

And then it’s time to build the stairs! The construction is very straightforward – the end of each step is held in place with a single stud round plate. I don’t think the five resulting steps are quite enough, but shh, it’s impressionistic.

The back of the bus includes a new 1x1x1 2/3 brick with two studs on the side, which match up if placed on top of the washing machine piece. It’s used to attach both rear light clusters – the left one directly, and the right one indirectly due to the curved corner I’m now expecting. You also get a yellow number plate option. A yellow fire extinguisher goes under the stairs (Hmm. Canary yellow is for hot oil fires. Who’s keeping a commercial deep fat fryer on a Routemaster bus?).

The side benches complete Part 1, and then we move on to Part 2 to finish the lower deck. Continue reading

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Agent Orange

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

Here’s a car that we’d like to own for real. Toyota’s first generation Celica produced between 1970 and 1977 has become a seriously cool ride, even more so when painted bright orange and lightly modified. This awesome remote controlled Lego version of the 1970 TA22-type Celica comes from LegoMarat of Flickr, and he’s lightly modified his creation too.

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

With a third-party BuWizz brick installed LegoMarat’s Celica produces up to eight times the power of a model powered by a standard LEGO battery, making his model a seriously quick bit of kit.

There are more images to view on Flickr via the link above, and you can see the real-life Celica TA22 that inspired LegoMarat’s build by clicking here.

Lego Toyota Celica Remote Control

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