The People Eater’s Limousine

Lego Mad Max Fury Road People Eater's Limousine

It’s been a while since we featured a vehicle from Mad Max – Fury Road, but thanks to a reader we’re back in the apocalyptic wastelands of George Miller’s 2015 epic. The Elves – despite not finding this creation themselves – are watching a screening of the movie in their cage room, so we can probably expect extreme violence from them tomorrow. In the meantime let’s take a closer look at today’s build.

Based on an AM General M814 military truck with a Mercedes-Benz W123 limousine body mounted atop it, this is the ‘People Eater’s Limousine’. Like all the vehicles from the movie the truck/limo hybrid was built for real, using two salvaged Mercedes-Benz limousines due to be scrapped by a wedding car company.

In the film the truck is used by the Mayor of Gastown as his own personal transportation and can also refine oil on the move, allowing his business to continue earning revenue even while he traverses the desert between Gastown and the Citadel. A smart man then, but he also wears nipple-clamps at all times, so that probably cancels out.

Nipple-clamp wearing businessman aside, this Lego recreation of the People Eater’s Limousine is about an accurate a replica of a Mad Max – Fury Road vehicle as we’ve seen yet, and includes a highly detailed engine, a perfectly replicated interior, and the two oil-refining trailers in tow.

It’s the work of Scott of Flickr and there’s a huge gallery of images available to view at his photostream, which also includes some of the other vehicles from the Mad Max – Fury Road film. Click on the link above to make the jump to Scott’s photostream, and if you want to see what happened to the real vehicle (clue: fire and explosions!) then click here!

Lego Mad Max Fury Road People Eater's Limousine

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Porsche 911 Targa – Picture Special

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

This glorious 1980s Porsche 911 Targa comes from very probably the most talented vehicle-building pairing anywhere on the ‘net. The Avro Brothers have been constructing some of the world’s best Lego vehicles for some time, with this particular model debuting almost a decade ago. The brothers’ classic Porsche 911 Targa is surely one of the most perfectly realistic Lego replicas ever built, and now you can build it too.

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

For once the most frequently asked question of them all here at The Lego Car Blog (‘Can I have instructions?’) can be answered with a resounding Yes, as The Avro Brothers have produced detailed step-by-step building plans which are due to be made available via their new website. In just over 150 pages and just under 900 pieces you could build your own stunning 1980s Porsche 911 Targa. Get started by visiting The Avro Brothers’ Porsche 911 Flickr album via the link above, click on one of the images, and follow the links.

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

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Once Upon a Time in the West

Lego Western Train Robbery

Yes it’s no use saying that you don’t know nothing
It’s still gonna get you if you don’t do something
Sitting on a fence that’s a dangerous course
Oh, you could even catch a bullet from the peace-keeping force
Even the hero gets a bullet in the chest
Oh yeah, once upon a time in the west

Our obscure British music theme continues here at The Lego Car Blog. If that’s not your thing (and if it isn’t, take a long look at yourself), perhaps try this alternative. Oh, the model! This superb Western train robbery scene comes from Flickr’s markus19840420 (there must be a lot of Markuses on Flickr) and there’s more to see by clicking here.

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Remote Control

Normally a mixture of Elves and remote control vehicles heralds chaos and destruction across The Lego Car Blog’s offices. Fortunately this excellent model from Arran Hearn lacks the Power Functions that our workforce require for “fun”. It’s left to us to enjoy the look of the build and neat connections that make its shock absorbers. As well as the control unit in the background of the photo, Arran has built a full-sized radio control unit in Lego. Click on the link in the text to see Arran’s work or click here for today’s British pop song in the title.

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Technic Expedition

Lego Technic Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Remote Control Truck Trial

If you were surprised that yesterday’s find resulted in no Elven carnage, so were we. Fast, nimble and easily controllable from a bluetooth device, Anto’s remote control Citroen World Rally Car would have been the perfect tool to – if not drive over Elves – at least splat them against the corridor walls. But fear not readers, the Elves are back on form today.

This brutal-looking Jeep Wrangler Expedition is neither fast nor nimble, but it is a hugely capable machine. Powered by an on-board LiPo battery, two XL motors drive all four wheels whilst two L motors power the steering and a front-mounted winch. Working lights and monster suspension complete the list of functions, equipping the Jeep for the tough off-road competition for which it was built.

We don’t know how the Jeep fared in the aforementioned event, but if  the carnage here at TLCB Towers is anything to go buy, we suspect it did quite well.

Lego Technic Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Remote Control Truck Trial

Knowing it isn’t the fastest creation, the discoverer Elf waited until nightfall to unleash the Jeep on its unsuspecting colleagues. Many of TLCB Elves sleep in their cages. A sign of their oppression they may be, but a cage-based Elf is usually a safe Elf. However, some of the Elves had taken their chances, simply falling asleep in various poses on the cage room floor. These Elves were not safe. Not safe at all.

Unable to wake and run fast enough, the Jeep made easy work of the snoozing Elves. By the time we reached the cage room at least a dozen had been flattened and one was still desperately clinging the the bumper in a bid to avoid the Jeep’s balloon tyres before Mr. Airhorn put an end to the rampage.

Delighted with its success the lucky Elf at the controls bounded off into the night, leaving us to tidy up the mess. We have Horcik Designs to thank for our troubles, and you can see further images and details of his remote control Jeep Wrangler Expedition at both the Eurobricks forum and Horcik’s Flickr album.

Click the links above to take a look, and you can watch the Jeep in action off-road via the video below.

YouTube Video:

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Sliding Citroen

Lego Remote Control Citroen DS3 WRC

Dogs on hardwood floors. The masters of indoor drifting. Until now.

This angry-looking creation is a Citroen DS3 World Rally Car, as driven by nine time World Champion Sébastien Loeb, who has now switched to the World Rallycross series.

Underneath the shopping-car-on-steroids bodywork would normally be a trick all-wheel-drive system powered by a monster turbo engine. However builder Anto has taken a different route…

Lego Remote Control Citroen DS3 WRC

Driving the rear wheels only are two Large Power Functions motors, whilst a servo takes care of the steering. The steering has a clever caster angle built in, meaning that when it’s turned the stiff chassis unloads a rear wheel. In principle this means Anto’s Citroen could drift, if only LEGO motors had a bit more power…

With the addition of a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery brick however, they do. A lot more. The BuWizz system delivers up to eight times more power than normal to the LEGO motors, and that is easily enough to spin the rear wheels on a not just a hardwood floor, but pretty much anything.

There’s more to see of Anto’s drifting DS3 WRC on Eurobricks, where there are also instructions available so you can build it yourself, and you can watch what the car can do courtesy of the brilliant video below…

YouTube Video:

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Hot Copper

Lego Steampunk Hot Rod

This delightfully whimsical steampunkesque hot rod comes from perennial bloggee Redfern. With a V12 engine up front and copper detailing in abundance it looks to be just the vehicle for a vulgarian gentleman. There’s more to see on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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Big Red

Lego Technic Remote Control Peterbilt Truck

This big red box is a Peterbilt 579 truck, and it comes from TLCB debutant Abhi Jain. Underneath the Technic panelled exterior is a full remote control drivetrain, with two L Motors powering the rear wheels, a Servo controlling the steering, a Medium Motor changing the gears, and a another one controlling the fifth wheel mechanism. There’s also working suspension and a fully suspended cab, and you can see more of the build to see on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also find a video of the truck in action.

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Twin Trucks

Lego DAF XF Truck

Two Elves returned to the office today, each with a wonderfully realistic Model Team truck, each of which conceals a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain inside.

This of course led to a dispute over whose truck was better, and this of course led to spectacularly violent Elf-fight. But it’s the weekend, we’re feeling generous, and to be honest you couldn’t slide a credit card between these two models in terms of excellence, so thus they’re both appearing here.

First up (above) is Lasse Deleuran’s stunningly replicated DAF XF Super Space Cab, pictured with a character that bears a striking resemblance to your Mom. It’s powered by two L Motors, contains 8 LED lights and is controlled via a third-party SBrick bluetooth brick. There’s only one image available but you can see it up close on Flickr by clicking here.

Today’s second RC truck comes from Flickr’s keko007, and it’s actually based on an earlier model by Lasse. Keko’s Scania R 4×2 Highline also features Power Functions drive and steering, and Keko has built a neat linear actuated tipper trailer to accompany it. There’s more to see at the Scania’s Flickr album here, where you can also find a link to Lasse’s building instructions so that you can create your own!

Lego Scania 4x2 Truck

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Little Yellow Corvette

Lego Corvette C7R

This instantly recognisable Chevrolet Corvette C7R race car was discovered by one of our Elven workforce on Brickshelf today. It’s been built by gtahelper and it’s a superbly accurate 1:20 scale recreation of the GT3 contender. See more at the Brickshelf album via the link above.

Lego Corvette C7R

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Fall of Saigon

Lego Saigon Street Corner

This beautifully messy street scene entitled ‘Street corner of Saigon’ comes from Flickr’s Know Your Pieces, and it perfectly captures the jumble of detritus found on any number of East Asian street corners, with plastic stools, a broken moped, and a compressor all expertly recreated in Lego form. One fixture of Saigon’s street corners is notably absent, but seeing as the metropolis, now know as Ho Chi Minh City, is today a throughly modern and advanced megacity we won’t give credence to that old stereotype. See more of the way things used to be at Know Your Pieces’ photostream via the link above.

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Ferrari Fursday

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

We suppose we could have just waited a day to post this so the title made more sense, but say it with an Essex accent and it’s fine. If you’re an international reader sorry, that reference is probably meaningless…

Anyway, the models! These two superb Speed Champions style Ferraris are the work of Jonathan Elliott of Flickr, and he’s done a thoroughly good job of recreating the mid-’80s Testarossa and mid-’70s 512 BB in 7-wide(ish) form.

If you fancy a closer look click here for more of the Testarossa and here for more of the 512 BB, and if you’re an international reader and you don’t know what an Essex accent sounds like click here and brace yourself count yourself lucky.

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

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In the Bank

Lego Brooklands 1935

It’s time for some history here at TLCB, because we are – at heart – complete nerds.

The world’s first purpose-built racetrack (or what’s left of it) lies not far from TLCB Towers. The Brooklands race circuit opened in 1907, built partly for manufacturers of the newly emerging auto-industry to test their cars, and partly because driving really quickly is bloody good fun.

Measuring just under 3 miles long the Brooklands track was built from uncoated concrete banking, which in places reached 30ft high, and was simply unimaginably steep, far steeper than any modern banked circuit. With no safety barrier at the top and cars routinely getting airborne over the bumpy concrete the spectacle was incredible, and crowds topped a quarter of a million in the circuit’s hay-day.

The outbreak of the First World War saw Brooklands requisitioned by the War Office, as the site also included an aerodrome, becoming the UK’s largest aircraft manufacturing centre by 1918. The end of the war saw motor racing return the the track, alongside the continuation of aircraft manufacturing, but when Hitler decided that Germany hadn’t quite finished with Europe yet motor racing at the track ceased for good.

During the Second World War the Brooklands site became the hub of Hawker fighter and Wellington bomber manufacturing, amongst other aircraft, and the track’s survival as a piece of British heritage sadly, but necessarily, came second to the war effort. Trees were planted on the track to disguise it from German bombers, and whole sections ripped up to expand the runways.

By the end of the war the track was in a poor state, and the site was sold to Vickers-Armstrong to continue operations as an aircraft factory, at one time laying claim to being the largest aircraft hanger in the world. However as the UK’s aircraft manufacturing industry declined the Brooklands site was gradually sold off, becoming a business park, a supermarket, and the Mercedes-Benz World driving instruction track.

Today not much of the original circuit remains, but what does is managed by the Brooklands Museum, who are endeavouring to preserve possibly the most important motor racing, aeronautical and war-time manufacturing site in the world. A recent heritage grant aims to return both the aero-buildings and the famous Finishing Straight to their former glory, and a section of the incredible concrete banking is still standing. You can even take a car on it if you’re feeling brave.

If you’re in the UK and you get the chance to visit the Brooklands Museum we highly recommend it, but for our readers further afield you can get an idea of the insanity of the vintage racing that once took place there courtesy of this lovely scene recreating Brooklands circa-1935 by Flickr’s Redfern. There’s more to see of his 1930s Maserati, its racing counterpart, and his wonderfully recreated Brooklands banking his photostream. Click the link above to step back in time.

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FTF FS-20 Roseboom – Picture Special

Lego FTF FS-20 Heavy Haulage Truck

This is probably the most beautiful Lego truck you’ll see this year. It might be the most beautiful Lego truck you’ll see ever.

It comes from Dirk Klijn of Flickr, and it’s an exact replica of an FTF FS-20 M 26 DT used by heavy haulage firm Roseboom in the Netherlands from 1989.

FTF (Floor Truck Factory) were a Dutch assembler of very heavy trucks, who sourced components such as engines from the USA and cabs from the UK to create specialist haulage vehicles.

Lego FTF FS-20 Heavy Haulage Truck

FTF now only manufacture trailers rather than tractor units, but this particular FTF truck has been totally restored to its former glory.

After finding details of the restoration Dirk has recreated Roseboom’s classic FTF in absolutely breathtaking detail, completing the build with a truly enormous Scheurle EuroCombi trailer carrying a mammoth steel beam, a load typical of the truck when it was in haulage service.

Lego FTF Truck RC

Dirk’s incredible model is more than a display piece too, as full Power Functions remote control – operated by a third-party SBrick bluetooth brick – is included, along with working suspension, a tilting cab, and mechanical steering on the Scheurle trailer.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Dirk’s amazing Roseboom-livereied classic FTF truck at his photostream – click here to heavy-haul circa-1989.

Lego FTF FS-20 Heavy Haulage Truck

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Building the Panama Canal – 2000451 Set Preview

LEGO Education Panama Canal Set

One of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, the Panama Canal opened just over 100 years ago, taking over 30 years to complete and costing an estimated 28,000 people their lives. Started by the French in the 1880s, the project was completed by America in 1914, whereupon it completely transformed the worldwide shipping industry. No longer did vessels have to navigate the lengthy and dangerous Cape Horn – the tip of South America – instead able to cut straight through the centre of the Americas.

LEGO Education Panama Canal Set

To date almost 1 million ships have passed through the canal, each taking around seven hours to traverse the 77km mix of channels and artificial lakes, and the three huge sets of locks.

It’s these locks that are the defining characteristic of the canal, allowing the water and the ships that float upon it to rise and fall with the land in order to cross from one side of the continent to the other.

So important is the Panama Canal and the locks that allow it to function that their width and length has become the determining factor for shipbuilding, with ships built specifically to the largest size that is able to fit through them, known as ‘Panamax’.

Today though, we have a set of locks that are rather smaller. This wonderful new set comes from LEGO Education, and it recreates the third set of locks of the Panama Canal.

Constructed from over 1,180 pieces, the 2000451 El Canal de Panama set is built in five sections (plus a few micro-scale ships), allowing five children (or adults!) to contribute to the finished model simultaneously. Each section contains a set of gears and mechanically operated lock gates, allowing the ‘water’ to rise and fall as the gates are opened and closed. We’ve seen similar mechanisms in paper or card form, but not yet in LEGO, and it seems to work beautifully – making this set a great learning aid for the those wishing to understand both mechanics and hydrodynamics.

Originally destined just for sale in Panama, the LEGO Education 2000451 El Canal de Panama set is now available with worldwide shipping (we do hope this means that some sets will travel through the real world counterpart!), and can be bought via the Panama STEM website.

If you’d like to get your hands on this unique limited edition set click on the link below to visit Panama STEM, and you can watch the Lego locks in action on YouTube by clicking here.

Click here for the Panama STEM LEGO Education site 

 

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