Black Sugar*

Lego Ford F100 V8

Another day, another Elf returns to TLCB Towers eagerly expecting a meal token and a Smartie. Today’s Elf is in luck, as it will get fed, but sadly as Smarties don’t come in black and there’s an unwritten rule about creation colours matching candy, it won’t receive the extra sugar hit. No matter, because Chris Radbone‘s custom ’50s Ford F100 pick-up hot rod looks the business in black. Opening doors, a dropping tailgate and a V8 engine all feature, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

Lego Ford F100 V8

*Today’s most excellent title song.

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125cc of Fun

Lego Go-Kart

Much like our Elves, go-karts are small, noisy, and deceptively fast. However unlike our Elves they’re also great fun, and – being rear-wheel-drive – they’re proper driver’s tools too.

This wonderful little Model Team recreation of a generic rental kart comes from previous bloggee Angka Utama, and the detail he’s squeezed into it is simply astounding! Pedals, steering rack, brake lines, fuel lines, single cylinder piston engine… there’s more to see at both Flickr and MOCpages – click the links above, aim for the chequered flag, and win that little plastic trophy!

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Dunes on the Moon

Lego Classic Space Lunar Rover

This marvellous slice of blue magnificence is apparently a ‘Moondune Rover’, and whilst we don’t really know what that is, we know we like it!

Build by Horcik Designs of Flickr this mini-figure goliath features four pivoting tracks, a huge refuse-truck-like loading area, a crew of determined-looking mini-figures, and the most wonderful vehicle cockpit we think we’ve ever seen.

Join Horcik on the moon of Classic Space at his Flickr album via the link above.

Lego Classic Space Lunar Rover

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Black Panther

Lego A-6E Intruder VA-35 Black Panthers

Jungle cat, 1960’s political movement, comic-book hero (and slightly overrated movie), and U.S Navy attack squadron, the name ‘Black Panther’ has seen varied use over the years. It’s the latter usage we’re focussing on here, and the squadron that adopted the name from the 1930s until its disbandment in 1995.

The Black Panthers were a carrier-based air squadron that flew combat missions in the Second World War, Korean War, Vietnam War and the First Iraq War, with all of those bar the first using this aircraft, the Grumman A-6 Intruder. This spectacular recreation of the A-6 comes from Master MOCer and TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg (aka Mad Physicist), who has constructed the Intruder in A6-E Black Panthers specification in glorious detail.

With folding wings, a sliding canopy, custom decals and a full armament there’s a whole lot more to see. Take a look at Ralph’s A6-E Intruder Flickr album by clicking here, where over twenty high quality image are available.

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Rear-ly Rapid

Lego Skoda Rapid

The current Skoda Rapid is one of the most boring cars ever made. Back in the 1980s though, before the company became yet another subsidiary of the Volkswagen empire, the little Skoda was much more interesting. Much worse too, but we’d take ‘interesting’ over ‘competent’ any day.

Whilst the Rapid only had 60bhp (at most) from its 1300cc engine, that engine was mounted in the rear, driving the rear wheels via a transaxle – just like a Porsche 911! Only worse.

We might be being unfair on the Rapid though, as whilst Skoda rightly had a rubbish reputation for quality in the 1980s (even compared to its British, French and Italian rivals) the Rapid was actually quite well made, being tough and reliable – even to the point of becoming a (moderately) successful rally car and being converted into a (moderately) stylish cabriolet by a UK-based specialist.

The excellent recreation of the ’80s Skoda Rapid pictured here comes from PsycoWard666 of Eurobricks, who’s taken some time away from terrorising the nurses to construct this wonderfully accurate Model Team replica of the classic rear-engined Czech coupe. With opening doors, trunk, and a brilliantly detailed interior Psyco’s Rapid is definitely worth a closer look – click on the link above to visit the Eurobricks forum and take it in the rear.

Lego Skoda Rapid

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42065 Technic Tracker Racer | Review

LEGO Technic 42065 Tracked Racer

We’ve been a bit lazy on the reviewing front here at The Lego Car Blog of late. We do have a large review coming, but in the meantime our pals over at, er… BrickPals, have joined us to add another LEGO set to our ever-expanding Set Review Library (which is now contains over 100 reviews!). Over to Jack from the BrickPals team….

Hey guys, Jack here, and today I’ll be bringing you a review of LEGO’s 42065 Technic RC Tracked Racer, a set first released in 2017. Featuring some 370 pieces, 42065 retails for £74.99 in the UK, $99.99 in the US and 79.99€ in Europe and comes with a range of Power Functions parts; an IR receiver, a remote control, a battery box and 2 medium motors. With that in mind it seems like great value, but how good is the racer itself?

The Box

This is your pretty standard Technic box with the orange Power Functions strip on the side. Opening it up you’ll find three bags. Two have parts and smaller bags in them, and the other contains the Power Functions components. Interestingly, the battery box was not included in this bag and instead is loose inside the box.

The Build

You start off by building the base of the racer. This is very straightforward and provides no real interesting building techniques but a sturdy support for what’s to come.

Next, the battery box, receiver and two medium motors are added. I was a bit surprised that the receiver was mounted on top of the battery box, but this does not interfere with the removal/inserting of the battery pack.

After this, we start to build the outer layer of the racer. This is built separately from the existing build and uses white and green panels to achieve the desired shape. A few interesting techniques are used when constructing and angling the ‘bonnet’. Two clear pieces sit at the front and represent lights – I was impressed with how well the angles line up to the triangular green pieces. There are nine stickers to be applied to the racer, and these are all added on to this green shell. This is somewhat frustrating as it means many stickers applied one after the other, due to no stickers being placed on the chassis of the car.

The completed and be-stickered bodywork is then attached to the chassis of the car at the front, where it can hinge roughly 160 degrees at the point it sits above the battery box.

LEGO Technic 42065 Tracked Racer Review

Playability

This was a very straightforward build, predominately for one reason – this set’s main purpose is to be a remote control car, unlike other Technic sets which attempt to replicate different functions of a vehicle.

So how does it drive? There is one medium motor which powers the left track and another medium motor powering the right. These are connected to the IR receiver which is connected to the battery box. The remote control communicates with the receiver.

There are two levers on the control, and they each control one motor. To go forwards, both levers must be held in the forward position. To go backwards, both leavers must be held in the backwards position. This is pretty simple, but what happens if you want to turn? Assuming the racer is driving away from you, only holding down the left control will make it turn right (so you’re essentially ‘dropping power’ on the side you want to turn). If the racer is coming towards you and you want to turn right, you hold down the right control. The opposite applies in both cases for turning left. Anyways, it takes a while to get used to the steering – especially for someone like myself who’s built RC cars where one motor does all the turning and the other powers the two back wheels.

How does 42065 perform on different surfaces? The racer works best on smooth surfaces but it also works well on carpet, being able to negotiate obstacles (or TLCB Elves, Ed.) and climb small inclines (or over TLCB Elves… Ed.). Continue reading

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I Love Gooooold!

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Goldfinger, Goldmember and… er, Donald Trump would all appreciate this car. But don’t let that put you off, because it’s something rather special.

Just twenty-nine Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadsters were constructed between 1934 and ’36, each weighing around 6,000lbs and powered by a five-litre supercharged straight-eight engine that could propel the car to over 100mph. Independent suspension, 12V electrics, hydraulic brakes, and even safety glass made the Mercedes one of the most advanced cars of the time, and it had a price-tag to match.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Today any Mercdes-Benz 500K is a seriously sought-after car, with the Roadsters even more desirable due to their extreme rarity, but if you don’t have $10million at your disposal don’t worry – car building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has one that’s rather more attainable.

Firas’ 1:16 scale Model Team replica of the 500K Special Roadster took around a month to build, and features opening doors, hood and trunk, a detailed engine, and more gold than Trump Tower. OK, that’s not true, but it’s still a lot of gold. There’s much more to see of Firas’ golden masterpiece at his Flickr photostream – click here to take a look, and to catch up on Firas’ interview here at TLCB click the link in the text above.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

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Kolos Krush

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been peaceful in 2019 thus far. Too peaceful. Fear not though avid readers, today the little scumbags were back on form courtesy of this; MajklSpajkl’s incredible remote control Tatra T813 KOLOS 8×8 trial truck.

Sitting atop eight of the enormous wheels found within the 42054 Claas Xerion set is a wonderfully be-stickered body, within which is hidden a wealth of Technic brilliance. Two Power Functions XL Motors drive all eight independently-suspended wheels, the first four of which steer via an L motor, whilst a further Power Functions motor operates a high/low range gearbox. A working V12 piston engine is placed under the cab, and the model can be driven via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz brick that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own battery system.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

That makes for a model with a seriously impressive off-roading capability, which also means the Tatra had no trouble driving over a multitude of Elves here at TLCB Towers. Even in the highest of its two gears, MajklSpajkl’s KOLOS is pretty slow beast, however the Elves have learned of ways to navigate this hindrance – in this case the lucky Elf responsible for finding the Tatra slipped away unnoticed whilst its compatriots were watching cartoons, and simply arrived back in the room riding on top of it to run them over from behind. There’s no honour in Elven battle it seems.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

Those that escaped the smushing promptly dragged the assailant from its vehicle and fed it into the VHS machine, as has become customary, so now we have many broken Elves, and possibly a broken VHS machine too. Whilst we continue the clear-up you can see more of MajklSpajkl’s brilliant Technic Tatra at the Eurobricks forum by clicking these words, where you can find a full description, some superb build and on-location shots, and a video of the creation in action too.

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Digi-Max

Lego Mad Max Fury Road

Today’s find might be digital, but seeing as the Elves have been watching Sherlock, Downton Abbey, or some other period drama that’s most un-Elven, we’re willing to post it, as we get nervous when they start doing unexpected things. We can also post it because it shows how a digital creation should be presented. Designed by Nicola Stocchi it’s a rather excellent recreation of the Nux Car from ‘Mad Max – Fury Road’, and good news! Instructions are available! Head over to Flickr for more images and the all-important instructions link whilst we let the Elves watch the movie…

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Technic Traction

Lego Traction Engine

We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves this weekend, but they’re bringing back builds of a very classical nature. From the inventively old to the actually old now, and two absolutely beautiful Technic steam tractors from Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe.

An unusual choice for a Technic build we think these – somewhat oddly – qualify for ‘Technic Supercar’ status, being equipped with working steering, brakes, piston and valve gear, and a two-speed transmission.

Head over to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, where you can also find a link to vote for Nikolaus’ design on LEGO Ideas, whilst we figure out how the Elves have been watching too much ‘Sherlock’.

Lego Traction Engine

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Moon City

Lego Steampunk City

We do not understand steampunk. Effectively what sci-fi would look like if it were devised in the late 1800s, it’s a genre so alien to TLCB staff it may as well be the plot of ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. The creations that steampunk produces however, are not like the Kardashians at all. They’re wonderful.

Lego Steampunk City

This is one such build, the Moon City originating from the mind of Dwarlin Forkbeard, which is filled with such gorgeous detail that we want to move straight there and get a job mining cheese. Complete with a marvellous motorised train (although the journey does look a bit samey), working elevators, and a rotating orrery, Dwalin’s city is packed with ingenious movement too. Click on these words to head to the moon sometime in the 1880s…

Lego Steampunk City

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8880 Supercar Reloaded

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

LEGO’s 8880 Technic Supercar of 1994 is one of the brand’s most iconic and legendary sets. The largest model ever sold (at the time), 8880 featured all-wheel-drive, all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, a working gearbox, functioning steering, pop-up headlights, adjustable seats, and a V8 engine, becoming the blueprint (and inspiration) for probably every Technic Supercar MOC that this site has ever featured.

25 years after the original release, newcomer Hitchhiker has updated 8880 for the modern age, using the latest studless parts and building techniques, whilst retaining the dimensions, colour-scheme and functions of the original set.

Suggested to us by a reader, there’s more to see of Hitchhiker’s stunning 8880 Reloaded via ReBrickable, where a full gallery, video, and the all-important parts list and building instructions are available too. Click the link above to take a look.

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

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Fine Ford

Lego Ford GT

Another day, another Elf returns to the TLCB Towers in the hope of a meal token. Today’s Elf will earn just that, thanks to this splendid 8-wide Ford GT by KMP MOCs. Despite its diminutive size it’s rather wonderful to look at (the Ford not the Elf), being an instantly recognisable miniature of Ford’s 2005 blue collar supercar. There’s more of KMP’s GT to see at both MOCpages and Flickr – click the links to make the jump.

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Ferrari Before Ferrari

Lego Alfa Romeo P3

‘Scuderia Ferrari’ have been around longer than you might think…

Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1929, Scuderia Ferrari were winning races decades before their own cars would wear the famous prancing horse shield. The young Italian began his career driving for Alfa Romeo in 1920, winning the Coppa Acerbo in 1924. By 1929 Enzo took a step back from racing himself to manage the Alfa Romeo team, which became known as Scuderia Ferrari and wore the crest of Enzo’s friend Count Francesco Baracca, a logo which has now become synonymous with Ferrari cars.

Enzo’s partnership with Alfa Romeo gave his team access to the best racing car of the era, the glorious eight-cylinder supercharged  P3, and they translated this into a string of victories. However by 1938 Alfa Romeo wanted to race under their own name, and an unhappy Enzo decided to leave to build his own cars. Mussolini had other ideas though, and racing was duly halted during the kerfuffle whilst Enzo’s factory was converted to build military tooling.

After the war ended Enzo Ferrari finally got the chance to build and race his own car under his own name, and… Alfa Romeo won absolutely everything – in 1950 Enzo’s Italian rivals won all eleven races. However in 1951 the unbelievable happened; the ex-driver-turned-manager beat his old team, winning the 1951 British Grand Prix and becoming the first team to break Alfa Romeo’s dominance in over a year.

Ferrari would compete in every Formula 1 Championship thereafter, making them the only team in the sport’s history to do so, whilst the once mighty Alfa Romeo exited Formula 1 just a year later.

This wonderful diorama containing one of Scuderia Ferrari’s first race-winning cars (even though it’s not actually a Ferrari) comes from previous bloggee and TLCB regular PixelJunkie, whose stunning recreation of the Alfa Romeo P3 – complete with Scuderia Ferrari crest – is one of the finest mini-figure scale vintage racing cars we’ve seen. There’s more to see of this Ferrari-before-Ferrari on Flickr at Pixel’s photostream – head back to the early 1930s via the link above.

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The Coolest Fire Truck

Lego Technic Tatra T815 Fire Truck

All fire trucks are cool. OK, maybe not this one, but pretty much everything else. The coolest of the lot could well be this, the awesome Tatra T815-CAS32. With six-wheel-drive and a 360-degree rotating turret-mounted water canon, there’s nothing we’d rather put out a fire with.

This fantastic Technic replica of the Tatra fire truck comes from previous bloggee Horcik Designs of Flickr, and not only has he nailed the exterior of his T815, he’s engineered a fully-working miniaturisation of the Tatra’s drivetrain, suspension and fire-fighting apparatus underneath too.

Horcik’s model features six-wheel-drive courtesy of LEGO’s Power Functions Motors, with remote control steering, powered hose-reel winches, an on-board compressor, and a motorised elevating and rotating turret.

There’s more to see of Horcik’s superb creation at his photostream, including a money-shot of how all of that lot has been squeezed in. Head to Flickr via the link above to dial 911.

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