Monster Bug

Lego Monster Bug 4x4 Crawler

We’re going to need a bigger slipper…

Sariel’s latest creation sure looks tough to squash. Not so our Elves, who are famously easy to smush into the office carpet. It’s been a while since the last Elven flattening, but fear not readers – today Elf-on-Elf violence returned in a big way.

With all-wheel-drive powered by two XL Motors geared for rock-crawling Sariel’s latest build wouldn’t normally be fast enough to claim any victims. Add in a third-party BuWizz battery and bluetooth receiver combo though, and up to eight times more power than LEGO’s own system can be delivered to the motors.

The aggressively low gearing still caps the top speed at a lowly figure mind, but if an Elf were to quietly sneak out of the cage room while its colleagues were seated around the old TV watching Transformers cartoons, and return at the controls of this, there really wouldn’t be much chance of escape.

Sigh. We now have some clearing up to do and a jubilant Elf needs a meal token reward (not for the smushing, just the find), so we’ll hand you over to Sariel’s photostream for all the photos. Click the link to take a look at his monster bug.

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Worth a Second Look

Lego 23

Missed by our Elves, but found by a reader, we’re handing over to a Guest Blogger today. Nils O picks up TLCB pen…

Some things are worth a second look and you’ll discover a hidden gem. This rover built by (Neo) Classic Space veteran David Roberts is such a gem. At the first glance you’ll see a good looking chunky rover in a cool NCS style. But if you look closer you’ll see a bit more…

The design is almost 100% SNOT, with a very detailed interior, and there are some very well hidden Technic functions… Look closely and you may notice the tip of an IR receiver. That’s because the whole model has aPower Functions remote control system hidden within, with an L motor for drive and a Servo motor for steering. And there’s still more. The steering has cunning Ackermann geometry, giving a different steering angle for each wheel, and there’s pendular suspension for the rear axle too. The more you look the more you’ll find. How cool is that?

Thanks to Nils for joining us as a Guest Blogger. If you’ve found a creation that our slovenly Elves have missed you can suggest it to us via the Feedback Page, and you may even be asked to pick up TLCB pen yourself!

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The Most Beautiful Model…

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

…of the most beautiful aircraft ever built. This is of course the thunderous Supermarine Spitfire, recreated in astonishing realism in Mk. 1a form by Lennart C of Flickr. There really aren’t words to do the photos justice, so we’ll get straight to the link. Click here to see more of this incredible creation.

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

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Ford GT – Picture Special

Lego Technic Ford GT

This glorious Technic Ford GT was found by one of our Elves this morning, and it comes from previous bloggee Artemy Zotov (aka Fanylover). One of the most visually accurate Technic vehicles we’ve seen in some time, Artemy’s GT is loaded with aesthetic realism. Being a Technic creation the beauty isn’t just skin deep though, as a working miniature V8 engine driven by the rear wheels, functioning steering via both the steering wheel and a hand-of-God system, and opening doors, engine cover and front trunk all feature.

Lego Technic Ford GT

There’s more too, as Artemy has built a remotely controlled version alongside the manual car pictured here, utilising a third-party SBrick bluetooth receiver, two L Motors for drive, a Servo for steering, and four sets of LED lights. There are more images to see of the manual car via both MOCpages and the Eurobricks forum, where you can also watch a video of the RC version in action. Click the links above to find out more.

Lego Technic Ford GT

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Get It Up

Lego Liebherr Mobile Crane

Nick Barrett’s got a big one. It might not look it here, but this 15-wide Liebherr LTM 1130 mobile crane can grow to almost six feet tall! A four part extending boom is the key to such impressive length, utilising reels of string and a full-length ratchet mechanism (no linear actuators here). The entire superstructure can turn too, allowing the boom to slew left and right whilst the control cab can tilt to enable the driver to look along his huge appendage.

Working suspension on all five axles provides a smooth ride, and helps to keep the boom up when the going gets rough, a V8 piston engine is turned via axle 4, whilst steering on axles 1, 2 and 5 allows the crane to get into tighter positions. That’s quite a list, as Nick’s build is packed with playable features, and you can see more – including photos of the Liebherr in its fully-extended glory – at his MOCpage. Click the link to get it up!

Lego Liebherr Mobile Crane

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Rove Big

Rover’s are, to most of TLCB staff, slightly sad old cars driven by the chronically elderly. Unless you can find a really old one which has come full circle back into cool again. Not so to Alec Hole. To Alec rovers are enormous 10×10 mobile space stations crewed by a team of perpetually smiling mini-figures whose task it is to… er, well you know we never did figure that out. Answers in the comments of you know more about Classic Space than we do. Anyhoo, Alec’s wonderful (and enormous) mini-figure scale ‘MCU Rover’ is something of a work of brilliance and there’s more to see over at his photostream by clicking here.

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Yule Rod

Lego Hot Rod Pick-Up

What’s more manly than taking your hot rod to the forest and cutting down your own Christmas tree? Nothing, that’s what. Flickr’s sanellukovic is the builder behind this scene of yuletide masculinity and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link!

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Dentistry Unchained

Lego Django Unchained Cart

Django Unchained’s Dr. King Schultz, performing orthodontics from town to town in his horse-drawn dentistry. Hopefully not whilst it’s moving though. This ace little build comes from Flickr’s speedyhead (which is coincidentally a nickname your Mom used to have too), and there’s more to see via the link.

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Multiple Loads

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

Nope, not your Dad’s browsing history but this, Dennis Bosman’s incredible Scania T143H bulk hauler, with not one but two enormous tilting hauler bodies behind the cab. Based on a 1994 Scania T143H used in Nieuwveen, the Netherlands, a truck which racked up over 2,300,000kms in seventeen years of service, Dennis’ model replicates every aspect of the real truck, including an wonderfully accurate recreation of the original livery.

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

Both tilting bodies are operational, powered by an XL Motor hidden within the truck unit (with a power-take-off for the trailer) and a linear actuator mounted underneath each tipper. The truck itself is also remote controlled, with both drive and steering operable via a bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth receiver.

There’s a lot more to see of Dennis’ stunning Scania T143H on Flickr, where you can also see images of the real truck on which his model is based. Head over to the Scania’s album by clicking here, and you can read our interview with the builder as part of our Master MOCers series by clicking here too.

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

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Acceptable in the ’80s*

Lego Lancia Delta Peugeot 205 T16 Group B

We’re back in the 1980s today, and one of the greatest battles in rallying history. The Group B rally era from 1982 to ’86 created some of the wildest (and most dangerous) racing cars ever seen. Minimal regulations and the arrival of turbo-charging and all-wheel-drive led to huge speed, and the cars – whilst outwardly similar – had almost nothing in common with their road-going counterparts.

By the mid-’80s engines were mounted in the middle and surrounded by space-framed shells of composite and magnesium. Peugeot’s ridiculous 205 Turbo 16 took power to well over 400bhp from just 1.8 litres and won the final two Group B Championships in ’85 and ’86. Previous champions Lancia come in second with their carbon-composite Delta S4, the first car to be both turbo and super-charged (known as twin-charging). It was tragically this car that led to the cessation of Group B, when in 1986 Henri Toivonen and Sergio Cresto’s S4 left the road on the Tour de Course and burst into flames, killing both men. The FIA had to act and Group B, rallying’s maddest era, was banned.

MOCpages’ Fabrice Larcheveque remembers the fastest rally cars ever seen with his 6-wide replicas of both the Peugeot Turbo 16 and and Lancia Delta S4. Each includes a detailed engine and interior under removable bodywork, but our favourite elements are the stunning liveries, recreating those seen on the real cars brilliantly in miniature. There’s more to see of Fabrice’s Speed Champions-style Group B racers on MOCpages – click the link above to head back to 1986.

Lego Lancia Delta Peugeot 205 T16 Group B

*Today’s title song (and the only decent Calvin Harris song) can be found here.

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I Like to Move It (Move It!)

Lego Ford E-350 Penske Truck

Everyone knows the fastest car in the world is a rental car. Here though is the rental exception. Not because it’s a box truck. That wouldn’t stop this staff writer from doing a million in it. No, this Ford E-350 Penske rental truck is the exception because it would have the driver’s own furniture in the back of it, and thus be driven in a manner similar to that adopted on his driving test. Once it’s unloaded though, the drive back the rental office would definitely make up for lost time.

This top-notch recreation of the humble Ford E-350 box truck complete with a lovely brick-built Penske livery is the latest build by colognebrick of Flickr. The model is wonderfully detailed and features some excellent decals too; head over to colognebrick’s photostream to check out all the images, and you can hear today’s title song (featuring some of the most complex and beautiful lyrics ever penned) by clicking here.

Lego Ford E-350 Penske Truck

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Pukka Porsche

Lego Porsche 911

Is it us or is Porsche’s original 911 becoming increasingly pretty the older it gets? Now looking wonderfully simple, the original Porsche 911 was launched in the early 1960s with an air-cooled 2-litre flat-6 making around 130bhp. By the 1980s 911s were producing almost three times as much power, and they were almost all crap, making the 1960s original the perfect example of ‘less is more’.

Lego Porsche 911

The beautiful 1960s 911 pictured here comes from Flickr’s klingen_guru and it captures the original car brilliantly. Opening doors, front trunk and engine cover reveal wonderfully detailed internals to match the accurate exterior and you can see all the photos at klingen’s photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Porsche 911

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The Dazzling Knight

Lego 1966 Batmobile

Kapow!! Batman wasn’t always dark and moody. There was a time when he was kitsch, flamboyant, and – let’s face it – more than a little bit camp, and this was certainly reflected in his choice of wheels.

Built by hot rodding legend George Barris the outlandish 1966 Batmobile was based on the 1955 Ford Futura concept car that Barris bought from the Ford Motor Company for the nominal sum of $1. In just three weeks he turned the old concept into what would become one of the most famous TV vehicles of all time, complete with turbo-electric drive (whatever that is), a Bat-scope (ditto), a mobile phone, reverse rocket thrusters, and a remote tracking system.

Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg hasn’t managed to built that lot, but his Lego recreation of Barris’ masterpiece pays tribute to the Dark Knight’s gaudier days in superb style. You can see more of Ralph’s brilliant replica of the 1966 Batmobile, complete with Batman and Robin figures, over at his photostream – click the link above to light the Bat Signal.

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Lego O2 Concept Car

It’s the morning after Friday night here at The Lego Car Blog, which means we’re in no state to write anything. Luckily reader and previous bloggee Alexander Paschoaletto has found a creation to share and joins us as Guest Blogger. Over to Alex…

How does it feel to breathe oxygen? If you’re on your normal routine maybe it won’t be anything special, unless, maybe, as a reminder that you’re alive. If you’re exercising, each breath is a new pump of energy to keep you going. But if you’ve just escaped danger and can finally breathe relieved, oxygen will be all you need and all you want in that moment. A similar description fits for this little piece of brick that the author (RGB900) geniously assembled and named ‘O²’: it’s all you need in a supercar with all you want to feel while driving it.

Well, although we can’t confirm much of that, we can at least take a closer look and wonder. There are SNOT techniques on most parts, some brilliantly created front fenders, a beautiful tail light and the famous duck-tail, all packed in orange. Certainly one of the best Speed Champions scaled vehicles made to date!

An orange Smartie to Alex! (Much to the Elves’ chagrin). If you’d like to suggest a model as Alex has done you can do so via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page, and you can see what we look for in a blog-worth creation by reading The Lego Car Blog Submission Guidelines here.

Lego O² Concept

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Goldmember

Lego V8 Hot Rod

Because it’s a rod. And it’s gold! Ok, we’ll get our coats, but before we go you can check out more of Redfern1950s‘ gloriously golden supercharged V8 hot rod via the link above, and the amusing film scene from a decade-and-a-half-ago which prompted today’s title by clicking here; I love goooooold!

Lego V8 Hot Rod

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