Creations for Charity 2018

Creations for Charity

Creations for Charity 2018 has arrived!

Creations for Charity, the amazing annual fundraiser that provides thousands of LEGO toys to underprivileged children is back for another year! Many of the world’s best builders will be donating creations to the Creations for Charity online store, raising money to purchase LEGO toys for children in need around the world.

You Can Help!

You can join this incredible initiative in a number of ways; by publicising Creations for Charity, donating your own creation, or by buying one of the unique creations for sale via the online store.

Donate a Creation: Donations are now open – if you’d like to give away a creation that you think could raise money to buy LEGO toys for children who may otherwise receive nothing this Christmas then please click here to get in touch with the Creations for Charity team!

Buy a Creation: Click here to see the brilliant creations already donated to the Bricklink store, where each model is for sale with all proceeds used to buy LEGO sets for children in need.

Creations for Charity 2018

Creations for Charity 2018

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Volvos in Space

Lego Technic Volvo ConceptYou wait all day for an autonomous Volvo concept loader, and then two come along at once. Or so the saying goes. Following the 42081 Volvo Concept set, LEGO and Volvo have teamed up to run a competition to design the Volvo construction vehicle of the future.

Here are two entries, each packed with Power Functions motors and remote control functionality, and each looking quietly terrifying to boot.

First up (above) is R. Skittle‘s ‘Volvo Proteus’, a fully autonomous self-loading hauler. Many many motors power the loader’s drive, all-wheel-steering, the huge swivelling bucket arm, and the sliding and tipping bucket, and there’s much more to see at Skittle’s photostream. Click the link above to view the full gallery of this superbly engineered creation.

Today’s second concept (below) sends Volvo into space, with this enormous ‘Mars Mission’ loader/dozer/tunneller/excavator, all the things required for some Mars-based construction. Built by Desert Eagle (aka Desert752) of Eurobricks this metre-long monster is powered by sixteen motors, with all-track drive, crab steering, a self-levelling superstructure via linear actuators, 360 degree excavator boom rotation with elevation, extension and a synchronised counterweight, 360 degree tunneller boom rotation and elevation, and a drill head that looks like something from your Mom’s Ann Summers chest.

There’s a whole lot more to see of both of today’s Volvo concepts via the links above, and you can enter the competition yourself via LEGO Ideas by clicking here.

Lego Technic Volvo Concept

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And Now for Something…

Lego Sci-Fi Airport Service

Completely Different. We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves today, but they’ve brought back some properly weird creations over the weekend. Of course we’re a car blog, so we’ll only be blogging those that closely match our title subject. First up, here’s a giant hovering airport tug thingumy!

Built by Flickr’s Vince Toulouse, this ‘Airport Service’ is constructed from a variety of unusual pieces that originated in some of LEGO’s weirdest (and long-forgotten) themes. A Fabuland caravan, rubber Technic bumpers, and a gate from LEGO’s Track System (which we have zero memory of ever existing) all make appearances, and there’s more to see of how they all fit together via the link above.

Lego MaK Camel

OK, so we’re wildly off-topic today. We may as well continue with this, a bi-pedal walking tank arrangement by Flickr’s Chris Perron. Named the CAMEL, Chris’ creation also features some ingenious parts usage including pieces from Bionicle, Technic steering racks, and of course that biosphere cockpit. See more at the link!

Lego Speeder Bike

Next up we have a huge engine with a mini-figure perched on top. Built by previous bloggee David Roberts it’s apparently a ‘Proboscis’ speeder bike, and a championship-winning one at that. We have no idea what championship that may be, but we’re betting it would be fun to watch. Head to Flickr via the link above to see more.

Lego Sky-Fi Aircraft

The final creation of today’s four mini-figure scale oddities is an aircraft called the ‘F11-Locust’ built by Sylon-tw of Flickr. Designed in the ‘Sky-Fi’ genre, a sub-theme of a sub-theme of which we know absolutely nothing, it’s a fine way to wrap up today’s four-part special.

There’s more to see of Sylon’s Locust at his photostream via the link above, you can check out each of today’s creations via their respective links in the text, and we’ll be back soon – hopefully when someone somewhere builds a bloody car.

Until next time…

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HEMTT

Lego Oshkosh HEMTT M978A4

The Oshkosh Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) is one of the world’s most versatile vehicles. In use by around sixteen militaries worldwide over 27,000 have been produced since the early 1980s, performing roles as diverse missile launching, fire fighting, towing, and simply carrying cargo. Powered by a variety of engines whatever its purpose the HEMTT can climb slopes of over 60% and ford water up to 1.2m deep.

This particular HEMTT is an M978A4 Fuel Servicing Truck, or ‘tanker’ to the rest of us. and it comes from Evan M of Flickr who has recreated the huge 8×8 truck brilliantly in mini-figure scale. Evan’s model features a whole host of neat playable features and there’s more to see of his Oshkosh HEMTT via the link above.

Lego Oshkosh HEMTT M978A4

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Scrambled Eggs

Lego Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer

We have no idea why ‘Cafe Racer’ motorcycles are named as they are. The results do look very cool though, as this gorgeous Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer (hence our witty title!) by Flickr’s Thomas Poulsom (aka DeTomaso77) proves.

Built for a friend Thomas’ Ducati looks the perfect way to race to the cafe (if that’s what these bikes are for?). Click here to head to Flickr and order your eggs.

Lego Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer

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Neat Niva

Lego Lada Niva

Lada have come in for some stick here at The Lego Car Blog. Now owned by the Renault-Nissan alliance they’ll be making good cars soon enough, but their legacy is one of reheating the leftovers from Fiat, badly. Apart that is, from one car…

The Niva was not built from bits of old Fiat, but was actually rather sophisticated. Launched in 1977 it was the world’s first mass-produced unibody car, featured independent suspension, and with permanent four-wheel-drive and locking differentials it was as good as a Land Rover off-road.

So good that the design is still being produced today, almost completely unchanged in over 40 years. Despite this it’s a car that doesn’t appear much in Lego form, so de-marco‘s brilliant 4-wide version of the iconic 4×4 makes a refreshing change from the usual Land Rovers and Jeeps. de-marco has captured the design superbly in mini-figure scale and there’s more to see of his little Lada on Flickr via the link above.

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Arkham Knight

Lego Arkham Knight Batmobile

Batman, in all his various forms, has owned an expansive range of vehicles. Some were good, some were interesting, and others will be almost instantly forgotten. One of the very best comes not from a Batman Movie, but instead from the successful Arkham Knight range of video games.

The Arkham Knight Batmobile hails from a similar school of thought to the Nolan Trilogy’s ‘Tumblr’ and it’s been brilliantly recreated in mini-figure scale by Lucas Inc. of MOCpages. Lucas’ build uses some ingenious techniques to capture the design and there’s more to see of his Arkham Knight Batmobile via the link above.

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Got a Light?

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

A question we’ve all been asked by those who always seem to be just a little shiftier than ourselves. Flickr’s Dennis Glaasker, aka Brickonwheels, does have a light though. In fact he’s got fifty-two of them!

Thanks to third-party custom lighting specialists Brickstuff, Dennis’s beautiful 1:16 scale Peterbilt 379 features a spectacularly realistic lighting set-up to match the brilliance of the build. Fifty-two LEDs are placed throughout the model with power coming from a battery box hidden within the sleeper portion of the cab.

Dennis hasn’t stopped there either, as whilst the bricks are 100% LEGO many have been chromed for added realism, whilst a third-party SBrick brings programmable bluetooth control to the three Power Functions motors that power the truck.

Built for the Legoworld 2018 event in the Netherlands there’s more to see of Dennis’s 3,000-piece masterpiece at his photostream – Click this link to light up.

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

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Put an LS in it

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

The internet’s answer to literally any engine-related question, ‘Put an LS in it‘ seems to be the default setting for most YouTube commenters, and – although it pains us to say it – not without good reason.

Compact, plentiful, powerful, and even available off-the-shelf new in ‘crate’ form, General Motors’ iconic V8 has been in use since 1996, powering everything in their line-up from sports cars to trucks.

The LS has since found its way into a myriad of other vehicles, often thanks to the fact that whilst the engine was good many of the cars in which it was originally fitted were complete crap, making it readily available for pocket-money in breakers yards.

Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka has built a car that could be based on any number from the depths of YouTube, and it looks – well – awesome! Simon’s classic ’70s Datsun 240Z features a wide-arch kit, custom aero, and – of course – the obligatory LS V8-swap under the hood.

There’s much more to see of Simon’s transplanted 240Z on Flickr – click the link above to put an LS in it…

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

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Dirty Photo

Lego Workshop

Much has been written in the nerdier corners of the online Lego Community about keeping your Lego bricks in the best condition. Put them in the dishwasher. Use baking soda on yellowed white pieces. Keep them away from sunlight. Don’t open the box…

We’re don’t exactly share this school of thought here at The Lego Car Blog, preferring to, you know, use our bricks. Flickr’s PixelJunkie has gone one step further though, and deliberately dirtied his Danish plastic.* We can hear the incredulous tutting from the aforementioned nerds from here… Good.

The creation resulting from Pixel’s liberal application of grime is gloriously realistic, with a ’50s Chevrolet/Frazer-Nash-ish type vehicle suspended above its chassis during restoration inside a wonderfully real-looking workshop, complete with hoist, tools, pallets and lots of dirt!

Click the link above to put on your overalls and get dirty with PixelJunkie on Flickr.

*It might be digital dirt – we’re not sure – but our statement still stands. Get your bricks dirty; it’s more fun that way.

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Sign-Written Steyr

Lego STEYR 26s37 Truck

Steyr trucks are relatively unknown in TLCB’s home nation, but the huge Austrian manufacturing conglomerate built them from the mid-1960s, and made all sorts of things as far back as the mid-1860s.

The business has since been split up and is today owned by a variety of different companies making an assortment of different products, however back when it was one entity it dominated the Austrian truck market with vehicles such as this one, the 26s37 6×2 truck.

This brilliant recreation of said hauler comes from previous bloggee Arian Janssens, and not only has he recreated the 26s37 beautifully, and added a curtain-sided trailer, he’s absolutely nailed the intricate ‘Nabek’ logos donating the company that ran it.

There’s much more to see of Arian’s superb brick-built lettering and the truck on which it’s written at his photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Supercar Sedan

Lego Technic Supercar Sedan

‘Supercar’ is something of a blurry definition in the real world. With cars becoming ever quicker, what was once supercar-performance can now be had in a hatchback. And then there are hypercars, which make supercar-performance look like it belongs in a hatchback anyway.

In the LEGO Technic world things are simpler. Here a ‘supercar’ can be any car, fast or slow, provided it has a minimum set of features. These models can of course be, er… supercars, like the Technic sets 8880, 8448, or the latest Porsche and Bugatti licensed models, but they could also be far more humdrum.

Previous bloggee Thirdwigg (aka Wigboldy) has pitched his Technic Supercar somewhere in the middle, being a 6-cylinder sports sedan. Thirdwigg’s creation meets all of the Technic Supercar pre-requisites, with a complete drivetrain made up of a 6-cylinder boxer engine, a working gearbox and rear wheel drive, plus fully independent suspension on all wheels and working steering.

There’s much more to see of Thirdwigg’s Technic Sports Sedan on Brickshelf, Flickr, and at his website, where there are instructions available too. Take a look via the links.

Lego Technic Supercar Sedan

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75887 Speed Champions Porsche 919 Hybrid | Review

Lego 75887 Speed Champions Porsche 919 Hybrid

It’s Review Time here at The Lego Car Blog, and for those of you who’ve been reading reviews of LEGO’s large expensive sets and wondering ‘But what about something I can afford?’, this one is for you!

75887 is another result of LEGO’s tie-up with Porsche, which most famously brought us the 42056 Technic 911 GT3 RS set. Aimed at ages 7+, measuring just 6-studs wide, and costing around $15/£12, 75887 is a very different offering to the enormous 911, but it’s no less authentic.

Based upon Porsche’s Le Mans winning 919 Hybrid racing car, 75887 is a mini-figure scale homage to the race-winner, complete with an accurately printed mini-figure driver, a traffic light pole, a laptop piece, and a lot of stickers. We’ll come on to those in a bit…

The build itself takes only around 20 minutes, and includes some lovely SNOT techniques to create the smooth, almost studless aesthetic. As always the instructions are beautifully clear, if a bit over-simplified as has become the way with them these days, and they utilise a few odd-coloured pieces in hidden places, presumably to make the images easier to follow. There’s nothing wrong with that of course, as it possibly means builders will acquire a wider range of parts in their collection quicker, but was it really that taxing when everything was black or grey in the old days?

The resultant shape is pretty good, with any strange colours perfectly hidden from view, and a wide array of curves, bows and tiles used to recreate the 919’s bodywork with reasonable accuracy. The authenticity is further enhanced by no less than twenty-four separate stickers, some of which are no bigger than a stud, and the placement of which takes up around half of the 20 minute build-time.

Applying these may be a little tricky for those at the younger end of 75887’s age range, and to be honest the set probably doesn’t need all of them, but it’s nice that LEGO went all-in!

After much peeling, placing and sticking you’ll have really rather lovely replica of the Porsche 919 Hybrid, (even if it’s a bit stumpy when compared to the real car), that can be zoomed beautifully across a desk and will survive the inevitable plummet to the floor intact to boot.

75887 is probably not the most accurate officially-licensed vehicle in the Speed Champions range, but it’ll be good enough for the target audience, it’s a fun (and reasonably technical) build, and if you like stickers (and what 7 year old doesn’t?) it has them in abundance! A worthwhile starter set, 7/10.

Lego 75887 Porsche 919 Review

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Tankpool 24

Lego Mercedes-Benz RC Truck Tankpool24 BuWizz

Truck racing is one of motorsport’s weirder classes, taking vehicles that are the least suitable for any form of speed and cornering, and making them corner at speed. Mostly.

Still, the resultant vehicles are immensely impressive, and it’s one of these, the Mercedes-Benz Tankpool racing truck, that Technic-building legend Sariel has chosen to recreate in his latest model.

Lego Mercedes-Benz Racing Truck Remote Control

Driven by four LEGO Buggy Motors, Sariel’s racing truck harnesses the power of two BuWizz bluetooth bricks, delivering up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery. That gives Sariel’s 1.5kg model a top speed approaching 20km/h, and makes it massive fun to pilot down the halls of TLCB Towers.

Besides BuWizz power, RC tyres and custom stickers, Sariel’s creation is all LEGO, and really showcases how far the little Danish bricks can be pushed. Watch the video below to see Sariel’s Mercedes-Benz Tankpool truck in action, and you can read all the details on Flickr, the Eurobricks forum, and at Sariel’s website.

YouTube Video


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Tower of Green

Lego Classic Space Tower

This is not a car. Not even close. But it is really cool and we like Classic Space, so here it is. Built by Flickr’s Kloou in collaboration with two other builders, this 1.2metre tall tower finally gives the humble Classic Spacemen a base of their very own.

Lego Classic Space Tower

Constructed using the baseplates from LEGO’s long-forgotten Soccer range, Kloou’s monument to classic space is an impressive feat of engineering featuring a variety of spacecraft and other vehicles, and is also packed with easter eggs.

Lego Classic Space Tower

Head over to Flickr via the link above to climb the tower, and see if you can spot Darth Vader and Luke’s famous scene, the three-eyed alien from Toy Story, and Batman amongst the classic spacemen.

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