Paddy Wagon

Apparently police vans are known as ‘Paddy Wagons’ because cops were often Irish (with ‘paddy’ being slang for Irish nationals). Or the people in the back of them were often Irish, we’re not sure. Whatever the reason, it was the name given to this wild Tom Daniel’s-designed show rod from 1968, which became a huge selling plastic toy kit thanks to Monogram models.

This incredible recreation of the iconic hot rod is the work of previous bloggee, Master MOCer, and TLCB favourite Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74), who has captured Tom Daniel’s design wonderfully in his trademark Model Team style.

Head to Andrea’s ‘Paddy Wagon’ Flickr album via the second link above to see more of the build, and you can read his interview as part of the Master MOCers series here at TLCB by clicking on the first.

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Hey Hey We’re The Monkees

Hey, hey, we’re the Monkees
And people say we monkey around
But we’re too busy singing
To put anybody down

This marvellous Creator-style Honda ‘Monkey Bike’ comes from TLCB regular ianying616 who has uploaded forty images of his new build to Flickr. That may sound a lot (because it is), but there is a rather cool rider in some of them, and it’s not a monkey. See more at the link.

*Today’s title song.

 

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Scania S730

Every so often one of our Elves finds a creation that makes us all go ‘whoa’. This is one of those times. This spectacular Scania S730 comes from mpj of Eurobricks at it’s beautiful. One of the finest looking Technic trucks we’ve seen, helped by some brilliant custom decals, mpj‘s Scania also features remote control drive and steering, SBrick bluetooth control, pneumatic rear suspension and a highly detailed cab interior. There’s more to see of this superb build at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to make the jump.

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Ghostly Creation

It’s nearly Halloween!* The unique time of year when kids can pressure the elderly into giving them chocolate, girls can make literally any outfit sexy, and we find a tenuous link between the season of spookiness and an almost completely unrelated Lego model…

This is an almost completely unrelated Lego model. Created by Master MOCer and Technic building legend Paul Boratko (aka Crowkillers) it’s called the ‘Copia’ and has been built in homage to the Swedish rock band ‘Ghost’, of whom we have never heard but who have enabled this year’s tenuous Halloween link.

With all-wheel-drive, working steering, a mid-mounted V10 engine, D-N-R gearbox with functioning steering wheel paddles, independent suspension, and opening doors, hood and engine cover, Crowkillers’ latest creation checks every Technic ‘Supercar’ box and a few more too. Although it does have very little to do with Halloween (and Swedish rock bands as far as we can tell).

Suggested to us by a reader there’s much more to see of Crowkillers’ ‘Copia’ supercar tribute to ‘Ghost’ at his Bricksafe album here, plus you can watch a video demonstrating the model’s features complete with a ‘Ghost’ soundtrack on YouTube by clicking here.

*Or – as a one-off for 2019 only – Brexit-geddon

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Constellation

This gorgeous Lockheed Constellation airliner was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. Built by the aptly-named BigPlanes it’s a fully fitted mini-figure scale replica of the iconic triple-tailed aircraft, complete with a highly detailed cabin including cockpit, toilets and even a kitchen!

The Constellation first flew in the early 1940s and was produced until 1958, by which point jets were quickly replacing piston engined aircraft. The ‘Connie’s four piston engines were eighteen-cylinders each, and allowed the plane to fly at over 375mph (faster than a Mitsubishi Zero fighter!) and for 3,500 miles.

The Constellation was also the first mainstream aircraft to feature a pressurised cabin, and saw deployment by both the military and civilian airlines with carriers including Air France, Pan-Am, and – as shown here – Trans World Airlines.

Still in limited service today we think the Constellation is one of the most beautiful airliners of all time, and BigPlanes’ Lego recreation certainly does it justice. Head over to his photostream via the link above check out more images of his spectacular model including some wonderful interior shots.

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Honda-Kinda

Despite the stickers on the doors we’re 99% sure this is not a Honda. Partly because we know our cars (it goes with the job), but mostly because LEGO are yet to partner with Honda (or any Japanese brand for that matter). Still, Michael A‘s ‘GT Racecar’ still looks the business, with Elf-approved racing stripes, a big wing and some tricksy aero. There’s more to see of his sort-of-Honda on Flickr – click the link to make the jump.

 

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Moresus

Damian Z (aka Thietmaier) may have appeared here just last week with a superb Ursus tractor, but when his builds are this good we don’t mind featuring another on the bounce.

This beautiful Ursus 255 complete with a drawbar trailer and a seasonally-appropriate pumpkin field continues Damian’s run of brilliantly thought-out Town-scale tractors, with a wealth of clever parts usage and techniques used to add stunning realism to mini-figure builds.

Damian’s latest model includes a mini-figure hand/flex pipe rear hitch, a visible engine, posable steering, ingenious wheel/tyre designs, and some kind of spiky axle arrangement on the rear of the trailer whose function we don’t know but which looks marvellous nonetheless.

There’s more to see of Damian’s lovely Ursus 255 tractor on Flickr and you can do just that by clicking here.

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Colide Concept

The Elves are grouchy today. They missed this rather awesome looking concept car by previous bloggee Vibor Cavor (aka Veeborg) when it was first uploaded, however a reader contacted us via our Facebook page as Vibor has released some new images, giving us the chance to feature it. And we don’t have to feed any Elves!

Vibor’s concept is called the ‘Colide’, which we’re not sure will catch on as a car name, but it nevertheless looks very cool. The design includes brick-built wheels, ingenious multi-directional bodywork, and a double canopy cockpit so you can still journey with your partner even after an argument. Vibor’s concept car is available to view on Flickr via the link above, where you can also find a link to vote for it at the LEGO Ideas platform.

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French Fishing

Despite it being on the news every day in TLCB’s home nation for three years, this website has so far managed to avoid taking about Brexit. We’ll segway neatly to it today though, because a) something might actually happen this month (but probably not) and b) this lovely digital French fishing vessel by Flickr’s Edouard Clo provides a neat Brexit metaphor.

OK, first the elephant in the room – yes this is a digital ‘build’ (boo), but it’s also so well rendered that it’s really hard to tell – only an error/glitch in the image below (see if you can spot it!) gives the game away.

The detail is astonishing though, particularly as this is mini-figure scale, with a brilliant hull, a beautifully recreated deck, plentiful equipment, and some French fisherman stationed aboard ready to throw rocks at the English. And on to the segway…

You see one of the reasons the English narrowly voted for Brexit was the EU allows anyone from within it to bid for fishing rights, which means there are parts of the UK where fisherman are not allowed to fish in their own waters because the quota has been given to boats from another country, despite generations of fishing families living and working off those waters for centuries.

However this rule works both ways, with English boats plundering the French coasts of their precious scallops all year, when the French are only allowed to fish for them during certain months. This has caused some annoyance in France to put it mildly.

This one industry sums up both the greatness and folly of the EU; Everyone is in one big happy family, where everyone has access to everything. Except for when people aren’t really happy at all because generations of traditions and livelihoods have been sacrificed for a common objective. And that leads to people sometimes showing rocks at each other.

Still, the UK and France have a long and noble tradition of antagonising each other so all we need now is for someone to build a mini-figure scale English scallop trawler to enable a fair representation of both sides. Until then grab some rocks and set sail to intercept the thieving English pig-dogs!

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Sand’s Going to Get Everywhere…

If you think sand gets everywhere at the beach, try driving one of these things. Fifteen minutes in a sand buggy and there’ll be sand in places you didn’t know you had.

This excellent Technic rendition of a skeletally-framed sand-insertion device comes from Dicky Laban of Flickr, and includes front and rear suspension as well as working steering thanks to LEGO’s x136 wishbones and new wheel hub pieces. See more to see via the link.

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Plus Size

LEGO’s new Control+ app has finally brought bluetooth control to LEGO sets. Available on the new 42100 Technic Liebherr R 980 excavator set, the largest set LEGO have ever produced, the Control+ app allows all seven motors to be operated, and programmed, via a mobile device.

But what if the new app was used to control something a bit… larger?

Weighing 890 tons and with around 4,000 bhp the real Liebherr R 9800 excavator is the third largest excavator in the world and it has, courtesy of LEGO and TLCB Master MOCer Sariel, been turned into the world’s largest remote control toy.

With a suite of ingenious motorised Technic mechanisms installed in the cab the real Liebherr R 9800’s controls could be operated remotely through the new LEGO Control+ app, allowing it to drive, steer and excavate via a mobile phone just like the 42100 set. Only on a much much bigger scale.

Take a look a video above to see how the team did it, and get some ideas for how to control your annoying neighbour’s Honda Odessey through your phone…

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Harvest Time

Well this is a bit more sinister than baskets of bread at the front of the church…

LEGO’s classic space themes have been getting increasingly serious of late, thanks to the slightly warped minds of you lot. Today it’s Blacktron’s turn, courtesy of previous bloggee ZCerberus and his spectacularly evil-looking ‘Harvester’. Enormous spider-like legs support a 360 degree cockpit mounted upon which is a huge cannon/rail gun/laser arrangement. Well, we’re assuming it’s not a telescope…

If that wasn’t terrifying enough Z’s Havester mech is equipped with a pair of equally monstrous smaller mechs, which are giving the Elves nightmares. We’d better return to cars…

Until then you can see more the Blacktron Harvester at ZCerberus’ photostream and you can check out its real-life equivalent (minus the cannon/rail gun/laser) by clicking here.

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Creations for Charity 2019

Creations for Charity 2019 is here!

Creations for Charity, the awesome annual event that provides thousands of LEGO toys to underprivileged children is back for 2019! Many of the world’s best builders will be donating their models to the Creations for Charity online store, raising money to purchase LEGO sets for children in need around the world. Last year Creations for Charity raised over $16,000; that’s a whole lot of LEGO, with hundreds of children receiving a LEGO set as a gift – perhaps the only one they received – at Christmas.

You Can Help!

You can join this incredible initiative in a number of ways; by publicising Creations for Charity, donating your own creation, or by buying one of the unique creations for that will be for sale via the online store.

Donate a Creation: Donations are now open – if you’d like to give away a creation that you think could raise money to buy LEGO toys for children who may otherwise receive nothing this Christmas then please click here to get in touch with the Creations for Charity team!

Buy a Creation: Click here to visit the Creations for Charity Bricklink store to watch the brilliant bespoke creations appearing for sale over the coming weeks, with all proceeds used to buy LEGO sets for children in need.

Finally, remember that just by visiting The Lego Car Blog you are helping to do good around the world too;

All of the advertising revenue received through your clicks and views here at TLCB is donated to those who need it more than we do.

So please keep clicking, keep liking, and share us if you can : )

TLCB Team

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Scorpion King

No, not that awful movie with the Rock in it, but this rather splendid looking Claas Scorprion 756 telehandler by previous bloggee and tractor-building legend Eric Trax.

Underneath that Claas lime green paint job (and some excellent Model Team detailing) is a model packed with motorised functionality, all of it remotely operable via bluetooth thanks to two third-party SBrick control bricks.

A Large Power Functions Motor drives all four wheels whilst a Servo steers all four too. A further three Medium motors operate the boom, giving it the ability to raise, extend, and tilt the variety of dangerous looking implements that can be attached to the end of it.

Fortunately for our Elves Eric’s model is a bit too slow for the Scoprion’s motorised weaponry to have been deployed on them, so they’re riding around on it instead, which they seem pretty happy about.

There are loads more images to see of this superbly engineered and photographed creation at Eric’s Claas Scorprion 756 album on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum where you can also find a video showing all of the model’s features. Take a look via the links!

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Honey, I shrunk the 42100

LEGO’s 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 is the largest Technic set ever produced. With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, bluetooth control and a $450 price tag, we’re fairly sure that most MOCs will be quite a lot smaller than LEGO’s latest Goliath. Cyberdyne Systems hasn’t let that stifle his ambition though, building this tiny mechanical version of the mighty 42100 set and equipping it with all* the functionality of its much bigger brother.

The bucket arm can swing, raise and extend mechanically via linear actuators (and much finger twiddling we suspect), whilst the bucket itself can both tilt thanks to a worm gear and open by pulling on a string.

There’s more to see of Cyberdyne’s 42100-in-miniature at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above where you can also find a video of it in action.

*Kinda.

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