Multiple Loads

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

Nope, not your Dad’s browsing history but this, Dennis Bosman’s incredible Scania T143H bulk hauler, with not one but two enormous tilting hauler bodies behind the cab. Based on a 1994 Scania T143H used in Nieuwveen, the Netherlands, a truck which racked up over 2,300,000kms in seventeen years of service, Dennis’ model replicates every aspect of the real truck, including an wonderfully accurate recreation of the original livery.

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

Both tilting bodies are operational, powered by an XL Motor hidden within the truck unit (with a power-take-off for the trailer) and a linear actuator mounted underneath each tipper. The truck itself is also remote controlled, with both drive and steering operable via a bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth receiver.

There’s a lot more to see of Dennis’ stunning Scania T143H on Flickr, where you can also see images of the real truck on which his model is based. Head over to the Scania’s album by clicking here, and you can read our interview with the builder as part of our Master MOCers series by clicking here too.

Lego Scania T143H Bulk Carrier

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Acceptable in the ’80s*

Lego Lancia Delta Peugeot 205 T16 Group B

We’re back in the 1980s today, and one of the greatest battles in rallying history. The Group B rally era from 1982 to ’86 created some of the wildest (and most dangerous) racing cars ever seen. Minimal regulations and the arrival of turbo-charging and all-wheel-drive led to huge speed, and the cars – whilst outwardly similar – had almost nothing in common with their road-going counterparts.

By the mid-’80s engines were mounted in the middle and surrounded by space-framed shells of composite and magnesium. Peugeot’s ridiculous 205 Turbo 16 took power to well over 400bhp from just 1.8 litres and won the final two Group B Championships in ’85 and ’86. Previous champions Lancia come in second with their carbon-composite Delta S4, the first car to be both turbo and super-charged (known as twin-charging). It was tragically this car that led to the cessation of Group B, when in 1986 Henri Toivonen and Sergio Cresto’s S4 left the road on the Tour de Course and burst into flames, killing both men. The FIA had to act and Group B, rallying’s maddest era, was banned.

MOCpages’ Fabrice Larcheveque remembers the fastest rally cars ever seen with his 6-wide replicas of both the Peugeot Turbo 16 and and Lancia Delta S4. Each includes a detailed engine and interior under removable bodywork, but our favourite elements are the stunning liveries, recreating those seen on the real cars brilliantly in miniature. There’s more to see of Fabrice’s Speed Champions-style Group B racers on MOCpages – click the link above to head back to 1986.

Lego Lancia Delta Peugeot 205 T16 Group B

*Today’s title song (and the only decent Calvin Harris song) can be found here.

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I Like to Move It (Move It!)

Lego Ford E-350 Penske Truck

Everyone knows the fastest car in the world is a rental car. Here though is the rental exception. Not because it’s a box truck. That wouldn’t stop this staff writer from doing a million in it. No, this Ford E-350 Penske rental truck is the exception because it would have the driver’s own furniture in the back of it, and thus be driven in a manner similar to that adopted on his driving test. Once it’s unloaded though, the drive back the rental office would definitely make up for lost time.

This top-notch recreation of the humble Ford E-350 box truck complete with a lovely brick-built Penske livery is the latest build by colognebrick of Flickr. The model is wonderfully detailed and features some excellent decals too; head over to colognebrick’s photostream to check out all the images, and you can hear today’s title song (featuring some of the most complex and beautiful lyrics ever penned) by clicking here.

Lego Ford E-350 Penske Truck

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Pukka Porsche

Lego Porsche 911

Is it us or is Porsche’s original 911 becoming increasingly pretty the older it gets? Now looking wonderfully simple, the original Porsche 911 was launched in the early 1960s with an air-cooled 2-litre flat-6 making around 130bhp. By the 1980s 911s were producing almost three times as much power, and they were almost all crap, making the 1960s original the perfect example of ‘less is more’.

Lego Porsche 911

The beautiful 1960s 911 pictured here comes from Flickr’s klingen_guru and it captures the original car brilliantly. Opening doors, front trunk and engine cover reveal wonderfully detailed internals to match the accurate exterior and you can see all the photos at klingen’s photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Porsche 911

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The Dazzling Knight

Lego 1966 Batmobile

Kapow!! Batman wasn’t always dark and moody. There was a time when he was kitsch, flamboyant, and – let’s face it – more than a little bit camp, and this was certainly reflected in his choice of wheels.

Built by hot rodding legend George Barris the outlandish 1966 Batmobile was based on the 1955 Ford Futura concept car that Barris bought from the Ford Motor Company for the nominal sum of $1. In just three weeks he turned the old concept into what would become one of the most famous TV vehicles of all time, complete with turbo-electric drive (whatever that is), a Bat-scope (ditto), a mobile phone, reverse rocket thrusters, and a remote tracking system.

Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg hasn’t managed to built that lot, but his Lego recreation of Barris’ masterpiece pays tribute to the Dark Knight’s gaudier days in superb style. You can see more of Ralph’s brilliant replica of the 1966 Batmobile, complete with Batman and Robin figures, over at his photostream – click the link above to light the Bat Signal.

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Lego O2 Concept Car

It’s the morning after Friday night here at The Lego Car Blog, which means we’re in no state to write anything. Luckily reader and previous bloggee Alexander Paschoaletto has found a creation to share and joins us as Guest Blogger. Over to Alex…

How does it feel to breathe oxygen? If you’re on your normal routine maybe it won’t be anything special, unless, maybe, as a reminder that you’re alive. If you’re exercising, each breath is a new pump of energy to keep you going. But if you’ve just escaped danger and can finally breathe relieved, oxygen will be all you need and all you want in that moment. A similar description fits for this little piece of brick that the author (RGB900) geniously assembled and named ‘O²’: it’s all you need in a supercar with all you want to feel while driving it.

Well, although we can’t confirm much of that, we can at least take a closer look and wonder. There are SNOT techniques on most parts, some brilliantly created front fenders, a beautiful tail light and the famous duck-tail, all packed in orange. Certainly one of the best Speed Champions scaled vehicles made to date!

An orange Smartie to Alex! (Much to the Elves’ chagrin). If you’d like to suggest a model as Alex has done you can do so via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page, and you can see what we look for in a blog-worth creation by reading The Lego Car Blog Submission Guidelines here.

Lego O² Concept

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Goldmember

Lego V8 Hot Rod

Because it’s a rod. And it’s gold! Ok, we’ll get our coats, but before we go you can check out more of Redfern1950s‘ gloriously golden supercharged V8 hot rod via the link above, and the amusing film scene from a decade-and-a-half-ago which prompted today’s title by clicking here; I love goooooold!

Lego V8 Hot Rod

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Once I was a Cop…

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

…A road warrior searching for a righteous cause. As the world fell… each of us in our own way was broken. It was hard to know who was more crazy. Me… or everyone else.

_Tiler returns to The Lego Car Blog with the last of the V8 Interceptors and one of the moodiest shots we’ve published to date. See more on Flickr.

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We’re Tramming, and I Hope You Like Tramming Too*

Lego Sci-Fi Tram

This huge odd-looking device is a Suburban Tram, and it can give a ride to most of the town.** It comes from the mind of Flickr’s Vince Toulouse, who has deployed all manner of unusual pieces from several decades of LEGO themes to create it.

There’s lots more to see at the tram’s album on Flickr – click the link above to hop on-board, although we have no idea where it’s going.

Lego Sci-Fi Tram

*Today’s (slightly butchered) title song can be found here.

**Just like your Mom.

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Party Animals!

Lego Ford Model T Party Animals

Things are getting wild down on the farm! This menagerie of drunken farm animals doesn’t look dissimilar to the last party we had here at TLCB Towers. If you replace the Ford Model T with a wheelie chair. And the farm animals with a near-comatose TLCB staff writer. And the riotous abandon with remorseful crying. And ‘party’ with ‘drinking alone’.

Anyway, enough about this blogger’s Friday night, this wonderful scene comes from Paul (aka Brick Baron) of Flickr and it was built for this year’s BrickCon Lego convention. There’s more to see of his colourful party animals at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump!

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Yule Mog

Lego Technic Unimog 406 Remote Control

As you may be able to tell from the falling snow on this page (if you’re visiting at the time of writing), winter has arrived here at TLCB Towers.

This means our microwave will do double duty, both as the sole provider of nourishment for the TLCB Team and as an Elf-defroster, and TLCB vehicle fleet will likely rust even closer to a final drive to the scrapyard. What we need is one of these, a mighty Mercedes-Benz Unimog 406, built from the 1960s all the way up until 1989.

Suggested by a reader (so no Elf smushings today), this spectacular Model Team / Technic replica of the classic ‘mog by Functional Technic packs in just as much winter-beating tech as the real truck, including live-axle suspension, remote control all-wheel-drive courtesy of two XL Motors, steering via a Servo, a Medium Motor powered remotely operable diff-lock controlled by on-board pneumatic valve, a working Medium Motor powered gearbox, and five sets of LED lights.

All that lot is hidden within a wonderfully realistic Model Team-style body and mounted atop four of the huge wheels found within the 42052 Claas Xerion set, giving Functional Technic’s model genuine off-road ability (which you can watch below).

YouTube Video

There’s lots more to see of Functional Technic’s remote control Mercredes-Benz Unimog 406 at his website, including some superb on-location photos plus detailed images of the chassis construction.

There are also downloadable instructions available for some of the mechanisms used within both the Unimog build and Functional Technic’s other creations, including the remotely operable valve, all-wheel-drive system and functioning diff-lock. Head over to www.functionaltechnic.com to see more of the ‘mog and the builder’s other designs.

Lego Technic Unimog 406 Remote Control

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The Best Car in the World

Lego Lexus LFA

Or so claimed Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson and the Stig. The Lexus LFA wowed the motoring world when it arrived in 2010. Over a decade in the making and built using one of only two carbon-fibre spinning looms in existence the V10-engined supercar shot Lexus into the automotive premier league.

Just 500 units were manufactured in a two year production run and despite a base price of nearly $400,000 Lexus made a loss on every single one. You’ll need a lot more than $400,000 to get hold of one now though.

But why such high praise? The LFA was built celebrate Toyota’s F1 success which never came, and it wasn’t the fastest, nor the best handling, nor the best looking supercar of its time. One reason; noise. If you’ve never heard an LFA, click here and turn the volume up!

Previous bloggee gtahelper‘s Lego Lexus LFA may not be able to recreate the real LFA’s incredible sound, but in every other regard it’s one of the most remarkably accurate replicas that our Elves have ever brought back to the office. In fact we’re astonished that such a stunning recreation of a pretty tricky car can be made at this scale at all.

A whole gallery of images of gtahelper’s Lexus LFA is available to view on Brickshelf, where there’s even a link to building instructions so that you can create your own. Click the link above to make the jump to check out the best model of the best car in the world.

Lego Lexus LFA

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Wheelie Good

Lego Dirtbike

What to do if LEGO don’t make wheels in the size you need? TLCB Office would, being quite fantastically lazy, simply change the scale of their creation to match the wheels available, but not Scott of Flickr. Suggested by a reader Scott’s Model Team style dirt bike features brick-built wheels made from an assortment of LEGO’s weirder pieces. We’ve no idea how it all holds together but you can head over to Scott’s photostream via the link above top see if you can figure it out.

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Ursus 912 | Picture Special

Lego Usus 912 Tractor

Founded in 1893 by a team of seven engineers and businessmen the Ursus factory began producing exhaust engines and trucks. In 1930 the company was nationalised during the Great Depression and Ursus switched to making vehicles, machinery and arms for the Polish military. Not enough of them sadly as Germany (and the Soviet Union weirdly) successfully invaded and then annexed Poland in 1939, triggering the start of the Second World War.

The Ursus factory, now under German control, was forced into producing arms for the German military, building Panzer II and Wespe tanks. Following the Allied victory in 1945 Ursus returned to making tractors, copying designs from Germany and working with Zetor of Czechoslovakia to dramatically increase tractor production in Eastern Europe.

Lego Usus 912 Tractor

It worked too, with a combined 120,000 units produced across both brands annually at the firms’ peak. However, the Cold War loomed, and an over-ambitious state-sponsored expansion programme in the late ’70s and 1980s led to Ursus (and many other Polish businesses) incurring massive amounts of debt in the push for modernisation. Although up to 80% of these loans were eventually written off Ursus production was crippled, and now numbers around just 1,500 units a year.

Builder Marek Markiewicz (aka M-longer) remembers happier times at Ursus when orders were c60,000 a year with his gloriously accurate 1980s Ursus 912 4-cylinder tractor. Using the wheels from the LEGO Technic 42054 Claas Xerion set has enabled Marek to build his Ursus big and as such it’s absolutely packed with detail. An opening ventilated roof and a pendular front axle also feature and there’s a whole lot more to see courtesy of Marek’s Flickr photostream and via the Eurobricks discussion forum. Follow the links in the text above for the full set of images of Marek’s brilliant Ursus 912.

Lego Usus 912 Tractor

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Toyota Land Cruiser 80 | Picture Special

Lego Toyota Land Cruiser 80 RC

The Toyota Land Cruiser. In production since the early 1950s it’s Toyota’s longest running nameplate and it shows no signs of stopping. The best selling body-on-frame 4×4 in most of the world, the Land Cruiser has a reputation for being simply unbreakable, favoured by Australian farmers, the UN, middle eastern families and, er… ISIS.

Lego Technic Toyota Land Cruiser 80 Series

However, undeniably good though the latest iteration of the Land Cruiser is, it’s so capable off road thanks to a wealth of electronic wizardry that it doesn’t really need any driver skill at all (in fact we’re guessing the next generation of Land Cruiser will actually be able to drive itself off-road automatously).

We prefer this one then, the iconic 80-Series built from 1990 to 1997. Formidable off-road, but only if you have the skill to match it, the Land Cruiser 80-Series is still found in the world’s harshest environments, unbreakingly reliable some 30 years after it was first produced.

Lego Technic Toyota Land Cruiser 80 Series Remote Control

These absolutely superb Technic replicas of the 80-Series come from previous bloggee Madoca 1977 and they feature everything that the real Land Cruiser does that makes it so epic off-road. A four-wheel-drive system is powered by an XL motor, whilst a Servo takes care of the steering. A Medium motor allows the models to switch between high and low range, and it can also lock the centre and rear differentials for serious off-roading, and if that’s not enough there’s a powered winch to get you out of trouble. There are also LED lights front and rear, accurate suspension with mega wheel articulation, and there’s a third-party SBrick installed to allow for remote control via bluetooth devices.

Lego Toyota Land Cruiser 80 Series Remote Control

There’s lots more to see of Madoca’s stunning fully-loaded black Land Cruiser 80-Series and his simplified grey version at the Eurobricks discussion forum, including videos of the models in action and detailed chassis build images – Click the link above to head off-road.

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