Porsche Carrera GT – Picture Special

Lego Technic Porsche Carrera GT

This incredible replica of Porsche’s mighty 2005 V10 supercar was discovered by one of our Elves on Eurobricks today. It’s the work of Artemy Zotov, and it’s one of the finest Technic Supercars that this site has ever featured.

Lego Technic Porsche Carrera GT

Artemy’s Carrera GT is a near-perfect one tenth scale replica of one of Porsche’s most ambitious vehicles and it features a wealth of superbly engineered mechanical functions, including the Carrera’s unique V10 engine, all-wheel independent suspension, working steering, opening hood, doors and engine cover, and the Porsche’s clever rising and retracting rear spoiler.

Lego Porsche Carrera GT

There’s more of this stunning build to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum (and probably Flickr, MOCpages and Brickshelf too in the near future, but we’re quite early featuring this creation). Click this link to check out one of the finest Technic Supercars you’re likely to see his year.

Lego Technic Supercar Porsche Carrera GT

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Not a Car…

Lego German Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern

It is in fact a Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern steam locomotive operated by Deutsche Reichsbahn, and, if we’re being honest, we only know that from the builder’s description. But we are a car blog so European railways of the 1930s are a bit outside of our (admittedly limited) skill set.

This stunning model is the work of previous bloggee, TLCB favourite, and Master MOCer BricksonWheels, and it’s a beautifully thought-out build. With exquisite custom 3D printed wheels and valve train (see the image below), plus two Power Functions XL motors and in-built IR receivers driving it, the Polarstern locomotive demonstrates an incredible attention to detail.

Lego 3D Printed Steam Train Parts

You can read further details of both the build and the real train, and see the full gallery of stunning imagery, at BricksonWheels’ photostream – click here to buy a ticket.

Lego Steam Locomotive BricksonWheels

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Flip Front

Lego Ford GT Racing

This neat 7-wide Ford GT in racing and road iterations was suggested by a reader, and it features the most ingenious use for LEGO’s mini-figure flippers that we’ve ever seen. There’s a few other clever techniques at work too – check them out courtesy of Zeto Vince’s photostream here.

Lego Ford GT

Tagged , , , , ,

Yes M’Lady

Lego FAB1 Thunderbirds Rolls Royce

The gloomy catchphrase of Lady Penelope’s chauffeur Parker there, who seemed permanently beset my misery at the prospect of driving her ladyship around in a bright pink six-wheeled Rolls Royce. Cheer up Parker, it’s still a six-wheeled Rolls Royce, and we bet she got changed in the back a few times too…

Recreated by Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg, and complete with Lady Penelope and Parker, you can see more of the amazing ‘FAB1’ Rolls Royce from Thunderbirds at the link above.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Build-Your-Own

Lego Porsche 911 Convertible

We were very excited when we first broke the news of LEGO’s brilliant-looking 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set, especially when TLCB anoraks deciphered that it would feature a working paddle-shift gearbox. Unfortunately the reality of 42056 – especially that much hyped gearbox – hasn’t lived up to the sky-high expectations that preceded it, a fact made all to clear here at TLCB. So what if you’d like a Technic Porsche that doesn’t cost the earth and that works? Well handily we have two answers for you today…

First up (above) is paave’s fantastic 964 series 911 cabriolet. With working steering, a flat-6 engine, and opening doors, hood and engine cover, paave’s creation has everything you’d expect to find in a small Technic set, and to these eyes it looks better than the official 42056 product too. You can see more of this excellent build on both MOCpages and Eurobricks via these links.

Second (below) is Horcik Designs‘ effort, and it too looks a fine home-brewed attempt at bettering LEGO’s official 911 GT3 set. With working steering, a flat-6 engine, a functioning gearbox, all-wheel independent suspension, a working clutch, and a pneumatically adjustable rear spoiler Horcik’s creation is what LEGO’s could have been if they hadn’t spent so much money on a fancy booklet for collectors (who won’t open the box anyway so it’s wasted on them). There’s more to see of Horcik’s Porcshe 911 on Flickr at the link above, and you can check out a very disgruntled review rant of the official LEGO Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set by clicking here.

Lego Technic Porsche 911

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Tignado

Panavia Tornado ECR - Tigermeet

We’re not sure why this Panavia Tornado ECR is wearing a tiger-stripe paint-job – if anything it’s more conspicuous – but we must admit that it looks ridiculously good. It’s the work of previous bloggee Kenneth Vaessen and you can see more at his photostream by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

The Big Blue – 42042 Crawler Crane Set Review

Most of The Lego Car Blog team are die-hard petrol heads, who exclusively build Technic supercars, filled with working features and Power Functions. However, this writer is not really a car expert nor a Technic expert either. I was recently defenestrated at a TLCB party for having suggested that it might be fun to try to build a spaceship. Fortunately, I survived the incident. The TLCB executive penthouse offices are actually located on the ground floor of a small industrial unit near Wolverhampton. Much chastened, I have resolved to learn more of the art and craft of big-scale, motorised Technic models. What better way to do this than to build one of the monsters of the current Technic range: the 42042 Crawler Crane.

Lego Technic 42042 Review

The set came in nicely large box, with the usual high-quality photos showing the various functions of the crane. The back of the box shows the “A” and “B” models. In contrast to Sariel’s review, I thought that the box was nicely full when I opened it. Tipping the various bags out of the box took me back to childhood Christmases and the excitement of opening the old Technic sets with their studded beams. The first thing that struck me was that the various bags were numbered, just like big System models are nowadays. As I built the model, it was great that I only had one bag open at a time. This made finding the right parts quicker, less frustrating and more fun. A previous big Technic model that I have built had numbered bags but you had to open most of them early in the build, which defeated the point of them in my eyes.

The instruction book is neatly presented and strongly bound. It’s a nice artefact in its own right. Lego instruction books are a lot better at differentiating between dark grey and black than they used to be and this one was easy to use. Disappointingly, for a model in this price range, you have download the instructions for the “B” model from Lego’s website. As the “B” model looks to have the same chassis, there wouldn’t even be the expense of an entire second book. The stickers for the model are in the same bag, which had kept them flat in my case. However, I can see that there’s scope for them to be creased and mangled by the heavy instruction book and so it would be better if they were mounted on a separate card.

LEGO_42042_PROD_DET02_1488

Once I started the build, it turned out that there were actually multiple bags to open for each stage of the build. It was still a lot quicker than sorting through all 1,401 parts in a big pile. First up is the chassis, based around the ubiquitous but strong 64178 differential frame. Building progresses rapidly, with lots of pieces per page. This contrasts noticeably to System sets, especially the ones aimed at younger builders. For most of the stages, I had just five small piles of parts to look through, thanks again to the numbered bags.  After the main chassis, you build each of the sponsons for the tracks. When the two are mated, you begin to realise quite how big this model is going to be. Building the second sponson is a bit boring, as it’s a mirror image of the first but that’s inevitable with this design. When I attached the sponsons, I thought that 5L axles with end stops will be awkward to remove when I disassemble the model. I couldn’t work out why Lego hadn’t used ordinary 5L axles instead. Perhaps one of our Technic expert readers has an idea? Page 48 of the instructions has another step that might prove hard to reverse on disassembly.

By page 54, the chassis was done and it was time to get a coffee and then sit down to assemble each of the huge, 45 link tracks. Whilst I clicked the links together, I reflected on the size and complexity of the finished chassis. It reminded me that much of what you pay for in a Technic set is the immense amount of R&D time that must go into a model like this. To speed up the assembly of the tracks, I made standard 10 link lengths and then clipped them together, adding the last five.  Strangely, for a set of this size and price, there is no spare link of track. Technic is a harsh mistress. Be careful opening the bags of parts and accidentally losing some. By the end of stage one, I had just five spare pieces and no spares of the small cogs or blue, 2L axle/peg connectors. By the end of the build, I had just over a dozen spares, including the 1×1 round transparent plates used as lights.

Stage 2 looks fast, with just three bags of parts. It builds the gearbox and includes four of the newer sliding gear change collars and a pair of the white, 24T, torque limiting clutch gears. There are also some of the new and very useful 1L collars. Once more, the complexity of the design reminded me of how much design and development time you’re paying for in a big Technic set. This also applies to the design and quality of the individual pieces. Just one L motor drives the all of the functions through this gearbox. That two functions can operate simultaneously, is a testament to the power of modern Lego motors. The end of this stage leaves very few spare parts again. I was actually a blue 2L connector peg short and had to nip upstairs and get one from my collection.

LEGO 42042 Review

By now I was 96 pages and 1 ¾ hours into the build. There were four more bags of parts left to go. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

A Close Shave

Lego Motorbike and Sidecar

This magnificent motorcycle and sidecar from previous bloggee redfern1950s probably has nothing to do with our favourite plasticine duo, but it’s close enough to allow us to tenuously include this link! You can see more of redfern’s gorgeous bike at his photostream via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

What’s in a Name?

Lego SAAB 39 Gripen

Company names are bit weird these days. Saab automotive died a few years ago when General Motors killed it off, but the Saab Aerospace and Defence business, which separated from the automotive company in 1990 (in the same way that the Rolls Royce aero engine and vehicle companies used to be one business until 1973) is going strong.

Powered by an RM12 after-burning jet engine produced by Volvo Aero (which no longer has anything to do with Volvo cars. Or trucks for that matter, although Volvo trucks do own Renault trucks, which have nothing to do with Renault cars… This is getting confusing…) the Saab JAS 39 Gripen can reach Mach 2 and is currently in service with four national air forces. Around 250 Gripens have been produced since launching in 1997, with several other air forces recently placing orders for the latest versions.

This superb Lego recreation of the Swedish fighter comes from previous bloggee Stefan Johansson, who is continuing his chronology of Saab aircraft. There’s lots more to see at his Flickr photostream at the link above, and you can see Stefan’s past Saab (aerospace) builds to feature here via this bonus link.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

McMerc

Lego McLaren Mercedes SLR 722

McLaren are successfully forging their own supercar path now, and in the past they’ve helped to produce some pretty special machinery with other manufacturers. BMW contributed their mighty V12 engine to the McLaren F1 project, but it’s their collaboration with Mercedes, until recently McLaren’s long-time Formula 1 engine supplier, for which they are probably most well known.

This is the McLaren-Mercedes SLR 722, produced in 2006 to celebrate Stirling Moss’s 1955 win of the Millie Miglia in a Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR (with the racing number ‘722’). Producing 650bhp the SLR 722 could reach 60mph in just 3.6 seconds and went on to a top speed of over 200mph.

This spectacular replica of the famous supercar comes from previous bloggee Alexander Paschoaletto and it’s a work of Lego art. Everything opens and the detailing is second-to-none – you can see more on Flickr by clicking the link above plus there’s a huge gallery of images available on MOCpages; click here to see all the photos.

McLaren Mercedes SLR 722 Lego

Tagged , , , , , ,

Dubs in Space

Lego VW Beetle Space Sci-Fi

Dude, we could like, totally go to outta space! This far-out space Beetle and Camper pairing arrive courtesy of Flickr’s Priovit70. Drink the bong water via the links above to go on the trip of a lifetime!*

Lego Space VW Camper

*Don’t do drugs kids. But do click.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cheap Thrills

Lego Technic Porsche 911

Things that do a lot for a little are very much liked here at TLCB. Now we aren’t suggesting that the real Porsche 911 is a cheap thrills option – unfortunately classic cars are being hunted down like Pokemon at the moment, so even the lowest spec, ugliest bumper-ed 911 is worth silly money these days – but this tidy Technic recreation of Porsche’s 964 series 911 shows what can be done with a few bricks and a bit of talent.

Underneath the simple but actually quite effective bodywork is a working flat-6 engine, functioning steering via both hand-of-god and the steering wheel, folding seats, plus opening doors, hood and engine cover. Which means that this little gem has nearly as much going on as the official £250 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3, only it uses about a tenth of the pieces.

You can see the full gallery on Brickshelf courtesy of Atrx, where’s there’s also a link to a video demonstrating the model’s features. Good stuff Atrx!

Tagged , , , , , ,

Red Russian Repeat

Lego MTZ-52 Belarus Tractor

Following his appearance here last week, Flickr’s Jakeof_ is back with another beautifully recreated Soviet oddity. This is a Belarus MTZ-52 tractor and approximately 200,000 were built from the mid ’60s until production ceased in the mid ’80s. Powered by a 4.7 litre four-cylinder diesel engine the all-wheel-drive MTZ-52 made around 50bhp, giving it a top speed of about… 17mph. Don’t worry though, we’ve sent the Elves out to try to find something fast to rebalance the blog a bit later in the week! You can see more of the Belarus at Jakeof_’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Belarus Tractor

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Review Your LEGO Set – Win Loot!

Lego Set Reviews

Containing over 50 reviews of almost 70 LEGO sets spanning 4 decades, The Lego Car Blog’s Set Review Library is easily the most professional looking part of the entire TLCB establishment*.

Our expert Set Reviewers, shunning the fame and glory normally associated with such a task, quietly and anonymously pick apart The LEGO Group’s efforts, helping you to decide whether or not to open up your wallet.

They’re diligent, knowledgeable, nerdy… and most importantly they’re willing to work for nothing more than a microwave meal and the chance to gaze at TLCB’s intern from across the office.

Seriously though, our Set Reviewers do an excellent job and they really know their stuff, having reviewed everything from LEGO’s first large-scale vehicles from the late 1970s right up to the latest limited-edition Technic flagships. There may even be a famous name or two amongst them. And now we’d like you to join them!

If you own an official LEGO set that you think should be in the Set Review Library, you can help to put it there! We’re looking for funny, articulate writers to help increase the Library’s stock, and in doing so your words will feature on a site reaching over a million annual readers. There’s even some loot up for grabs for the best submission (details of which will follow).

How to Enter

  1. Contact us; either here, via Flickr message, or via one of our Flickr group discussions, stating the LEGO set that you wish to review and providing us with a link to one of your online presences.
  2. Stage 1 Approval; TLCB staff will review your suitability and respond with an acceptance or rejection. Apologies, not everyone will be accepted – please be prepared for a rejection if your chosen set is deemed unsuitable. If you are accepted we’ll ask for you to send us an image of your LEGO set with a unique phrase featuring somewhere in the photo to ensure that you do own the set in question.
  3. Write your Review! You can get an idea of past Set Reviews via the Set Review Library, but you can be as creative as you like!
  4. Stage 2 Approval; TLCB staff will review your Set Review, assessing its suitability for publication. Your words may require editing, and your Review may also be rejected – again, please be prepared for the possibility that your words are deemed to be unsuitable.
  5. Publication! Once your Set Review is accepted it will be published on The Lego Car Blog! You can choose whether you’d like a link to your online presence to be included, or you can choose to remain anonymous.
  6. Win! The Set Review with the most hits in its first 2 weeks of publication, combined with our judges’ assessment, will earn its writer some of the Lego loot that we have acquired here at TLCB!

That’s it! Simple huh? If you’d like to get your Set Review online for up to a million people a year, increase exposure to your own work, or if you’re just after some loot, then get in touch! Success could also open the door to other opportunities here at TLCB…

Good luck!

TLCB Team

*It’s a very low baseline.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Remote Control Raptor

Lego Technic Ford Raptor Remote Control

Ford’s Raptor is arguably the most hardcore production off-road pick-up truck on sale. For 2017 Ford are preparing  a new version, ditching the old V8 and replacing it with their new twin-turbo V6 as found in the Ford GT. No doubt some backwards-thinking rednecks will lament this update, but we’re all for it here at TLCB. Previous bloggee Rage Hobbit of MOCpages seems to be too, and he’s recreated the upcoming Raptor in monster RC Technic form.

With twin buggy motors driving a selectable 4×4 system through a 4-speed sequential gearbox, working steering, independent front and 4-link live axle rear suspension, opening (and locking) doors, hood and tailgate, plus a the 2017 Raptor’s Ecoboost V6 up front, Rage’s Raptor replica is one of the best off-roading Lego creations we’ve seen this year.

There’s lots more to see at Rage Hobbit’s MOCpage, including an extensive image gallery, full technical details and a video of model in action – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Ford SVT Raptor 2017

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 618 other followers

%d bloggers like this: