Rock Blunts Scissors

Lego Indiana Jones Tank

And tanks apparently. There was a point in time where tanks and horses fought side-by-side (and against one another) on the battlefield. At first it was definitely better to be on the horse, but so quick was the pace of development that just a few short years later the tank – and the various other machinery designed for us to kill one another more efficiently – had all but eradicated the horse from use in war. Which is good news for horses.

However that didn’t stop Indiana Jones who, in ‘The Last Crusade’ (which sadly proved not be thanks to the dreadful 2008 return), used his hoofed companion to shove a rock down the barrel of a tank cannon.

In reality this would probably just mean you got killed by both a rock and a tank shell, but hey – this is the movies! This glorious recreation of the famous scene from 1989’s ‘Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade’ comes from Flickr’s Joshua Brooks aka JBIronworks who has recreated both the Nazi tank and the scene’s dynamism brilliantly in Lego form.

There’s more to see of mini-figure Indiana Jones’s rock-based sabotage on Flickr via the link above, and in case you want to see the real one doing just the same click here to watch the original scene on YouTube.

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Brick-Built-Bikes

Lego Motorbikes

The Elves are grumpy today. Grumpy because this find is one of yours, suggested via the Feedback page, and thus none of them are getting fed. Still, don’t let that put you off, if you have a suggestion check out our Submission Guidelines and if you think it passes drop us a note.

These two excellent brick-built bikes come from Lennart C of Flickr, who has used all manner of ingenious connections to build what is probably the hardest vehicle-type to create in small scale. On the left is superb and fiendishly complicated looking Harley Davidson Seventy-Two whilst on the right is beautifully sleek Honda CBR 1000 RR. See more of each via the links in the text.

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LEGO Technic H2 2018 | Set Previews

Lego Technic 42081 Volvo Concept

It’s that time of year again! With LEGO’s H2 Technic sets on the horizon the survivors from our crack team of Elves – sent to infiltrate The LEGO Company’s HQ – have returned to TLCB Towers with this summer’s bounty. So without further ado, here are the brand new Technic sets due to reach stores on August 1st!

42081 Volvo Autonomous Loader

OK, let’s get the weird one out of the way first. This is a Volvo autonomous loader concept and it is, frankly, one of the oddest Technic sets to appear in recent times. Continuing LEGO’s successful line of officially-licensed vehicles the new concept loader joins the previous (and excellent) Volvo Technic sets, but differs in that it isn’t a replica of a real-life Volvo at all. This makes it – in our eyes at least – utterly pointless.

Like many of LEGO’s recent Technic sets 42081 straddles the Model Team and Technic themes, bringing increased visual realism to functional models (only 42081 can’t be visually realistic because there is no real-world equivalent). All-wheel-steering, a mechanically raising and tipping bucket, and – for reasons we simply don’t understand – a model of a quadcopter drone are all included.

Expected to cost around $140 there are probably better ways to obtain 1,167 yellow and black pieces for your collection…

Lego Technic 42080 Forester

42080 Forest Harvester

This is more like it. Aimed at ages 10+ LEGO’s new 1,000-peice 42080 Forest Harvester set is the first to include Power Functions 2.0 (which may also mean the possibility of App control). We’ll have to wait until we get our hands on the new components to test out the upgrades, but the fact that the set also includes new pneumatics is cause for celebration!

We expect 42080 to use the new system to drive a pneumatic compressor that powers both the raising/lowering of the arm and the grabby/rolly/cutty thingumy on the end of it (which also looks to feature some new spiky round bricks). Mechanical functions are likely to include centre articulation and working steering, plus a little workbench and brick-built chainsaw are thrown in (somewhat unnecessarily) for good measure too.

We expect the brightly-coloured 42080 Forest Harvester set to cost around $150 when it reaches shelves later this year, which makes it $150 better value than that Volvo…

Lego Technic 42079 Forklift

42079 Forklift Truck

A staple feature throughout Technic’s long history, we’ve lost count of the number of forklift trucks in LEGO’s back-catalogue. The new set does appear to be one of the best though, and it could very well be the sweet-spot in the H2 Technic range. With Hand-of-God rear-wheel steering, a tilting fork, and an interesting-looking rope-activated lift mechanism, 42079 includes just enough mechanically-operated functionality to be interesting.

We think it looks rather nice too, with well-judged Model Team detailing, a few stickers teamed with a nice colour choice, and a bonus mystery barrel containing something dangerous. Aimed at ages 9+ 42079 is constructed from just under 600 pieces and is expected to cost around $70 when it reaches stores in August 2018.

https://thelegocarblog.com/2014/03/04/fork-off/

42082 Rough Terrain Crane

Now for the big one. This is 42082, LEGO’s 4,000+ piece, $300 flagship, and it’s massive. With the highest piece-count of any Technic set to date, plus Power Functions, 42082 is set to lift (hah!) the top tier of LEGO Technic even further towards engineering for adults.

An enormous extending boom (and it really is huge – the picture above shows it in its most compact setting), superstructure slew, boom raising/lowering and winch control are all driven electronically by LEGO’s Power Functions system, plus there are working outriggers, steering, and a V8 piston engine.

As with all of the new Technic sets 42082 will include instructions for a B-model, and it also features a wealth of stickers (each new set seems to include decals denoting the set no.) as part of a trend towards increasing the visual realism of Technic.

So there you have it, LEGO’s new-for-H2 2018 Technic sets. It’s quite a construction-heavy line-up, and one that we think is largely a decent effort. Apart from that pointless Volvo. Of course, the Volvo isn’t LEGO’s only officially-licensed new Technic set due for release later this year…

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Cutting Lead

Lego Technic Lead Sled

Horcik Designs has clearly been taking photo advice from your Mom, because there is a lot on show in his latest images. That’s because his Technic ‘Leadsled’ is a ‘cutaway’, a tactic used by car companies at motor shows to display the inner working of their vehicles. Horcik’s creation uses the technique to great effect too, with one side of the model devoid of panelling, allowing us to see the highly-detailed V8 engine hooked up to a 4-speed gearbox, working steering, and door locking mechanisms. There’s also a slightly terrifying doll impersonating a motor show girl, but we’re doing our best not to look her in the eyes. There’s much more to see (and there really is in this case) at Horcik’s Flickr photostream, plus you can read more about the build and join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum.

Lego Technic Lead Sled

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Dispatches

Lego Dispatch Bike

Delivery by motorcycle was far classier in the olden days…

This gorgeous dispatch bike comes from TLCB regular Redfern1950s and it looks infinitely more distinguished than today’s equivalent (a wobbly student on an ‘L’-plated moped). Redfern’s also built a slightly jazzier version – although we prefer this more simple iteration – and there’s more to see of each at his photostream. Place your delivery order via the link above.

Lego Dispatch Bike

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Esmeralda

Lego Steam Corvette

Nope, not that Spanish exchange girl from your youth that you always wish you’d kept in touch with, but this rather neat steam corvette sailing under Chilean colours.

Built for the Chilean Navy by a British shipyard in the 1850s this Esmeralda is one of several Chilean warships to carry the name, and was sunk in the Battle of Iquique in Chile’s defeat to Peru and Bolivia in 1879. We know so little about about South American conflicts that our narrative ends there, but the model of the lost ship itself is nevertheless beautiful. Flickr’s Luis Peña is the builder behind it and there’s more to see of his gorgeous recreation of the Esmeralda via the link above.

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The Lego Movie 2 Preview

The LEGO Movie 2

Warner Brothers’ brilliant The LEGO Movie wowed the animation film world upon it’s release four years ago. Smart, funny, and with an endearing message, critics and filmgoers loved it (as did we). A pretty good The Lego Batman Movie soon followed, which was quickly succeeded by a mediocre The Lego Ninjago Movie… you can see where this could have been heading.

Thankfully Warner Brothers have returned the franchise to its roots, with a sequel to The Lego Movie picking up where the original left off (and hopefully allowing us to forget about that Ninjago one…). Cunningly entitled ‘The Lego Movie 2’, original writers Phil Lord and Christopher Miller return to produce and co-write the next instalment, as do actors Chris Pratt and Elizabeth Banks alongside a plethora of famous talent.

The new movie is expected to explore issues around gender; “[It looks at] what’s different and similar about gender, when a boy plays vs. how a girl plays… Every one of our movies, so far, have been told from the point of view of one kid’s imagination. The LEGO Movie 2 will be the first one told through two kids’ imaginations – Finn and his sister. It’s going to be really interesting juxtaposing those two different visions”. It’s sure going to be fun to see what the city of Bricksburg looks like after Finn’s sister’s Duplo invasion at the end of the original movie.

The Lego Movie 2 is due to reach cinemas in February 2019, exactly 5 years after the original. We will of course bring you a full review upon its release, and we may even be able to take the Elves if our local cinema’s ban is lifted by then.

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Tracked Lunch Box

Lego Technic Hägglunds BV 206 ATV

OK, after today’s earlier dalliance, we’re back in the room. This is a Hägglunds Bv 206, and it’s one of the mot unusual vehicles ever made. Built for the Swedish military in 1980 the Bv 206 consists of two linked tracked units, with all four tracks powered, and a payload of over two tons, even on snow. Plus you can add another two tons behind the second unit on a trailer, creating a wonderfully weird train-like arrangement.

Despite looking like a pair of lunch boxes the Bv 206 has been a huge success, and is now in use with various militaries, Antarctic research organisations, the British, Icelandic and Canadian Search & Rescue services, and even the Singapore fire department.

This excellent Technic recreation of the Hägglunds Bv 206 comes from Technic BOOM of Eurobricks, and it features an authentically articulated tracked chassis powered by three Power Functions L motors (plus a Technic V6 piston engine), suspended tracks and a fully detailed cabin, er… we mean cabins.

There’s more to see of this delightfully odd creation at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can also watch a video of the vehicle in action and find a military version too. We’re wondering whether we could even fit our lunch inside it…

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Iron Road

Lego Microscale Train Bridge

We’re a bit nerdy here at The Lego Car Blog, so sometimes we like a good bridge. OK, we’ll show ourselves out, but before we go and have a quite word with ourselves if you suffer from this unfortunate disposition too you can check out of more of Tim Schwalfenberg‘s (brilliant) ‘River Crossing’ at the link.

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Bee Gees

Lego GEE BEE Aircraft

Sorry, we mean Gee Bees. An important distinction that avoids you having to hear this. Founded in 1925, the Granville Brothers Aircraft company built just twenty-four aircraft until their bankruptcy eight years later, but they left one hell of mark. In the ground mostly, with a trail of fire behind it, but we’ll come on to that in a bit…

Designed primarily as sports cars for the sky, Granville Brothers’ aircraft excelled at air racing in the ’20s and ’30s, winning multiple trophy races and speed records. Known as ‘Gee Bees’ the outrageous designs looked like caricatures, with absurdly short fuselages, tiny control surfaces, and hot-rod-esque engines.

The superb Lego recreations of two of Granville Brothers’ designs pictured here come from Volker Brodkorb of Flickr, and whilst they may look like exaggerated cartoons, their real-life counterparts really did look like this. Well, until they inevitably crashed of course…

The Gee Bee Model Z Super Sportster (above) was constructed in just five weeks in 1931, with the smallest possible airframe built around the largest possible engine. The Model Z’s enormous Pratt & Witney supercharged ‘Wasp’ radial engine gave it well over 500bhp, powering it to victory in every race it entered, despite it being ‘tricky’ to fly. Later that year Granville Brothers re-engineered the Model Z with an even bigger 750bhp Wasp Senior engine in at attempt at the Landplane Speed Record, when tragically a wing failure sent the aircraft spinning into the ground in a ball of flame, killing air-racer Lowell Bayles.

The next year Granville Brothers Aircraft built a successor to the destroyed Model Z, the R-1 Super Sportster (below). With a 25ft wingspan but just 17ft long, the R-1 was if anything even more dangerous to fly than the Model Z. Nevertheless the R-1 took victory in the Thompson Trophy in 1932 and the Landplane Speed Record the same year, before its inevitable fatal crash in 1933. Granville Brothers Aircraft re-built the wreck whereupon it crashed almost immediately.

Of the twenty-four aircraft built by Granville Brothers almost every single one was destroyed in a crash, with almost a dozen fatalities. By the mid-’30s the effects of the Great Depression – and a reputation as killers – meant that orders for new Super Sportster aircraft dried up, and the Granville Brothers Aircraft company filed for bankruptcy in 1934.

A few replica Gee Bees have been constructed since, however the Granville family have only shared the original designs with museums under the promise that the recreated aircraft will never be flown. Which is probably a good thing. Even so, we’ll stick with these fantastic and non-lethal Lego replicas. There’s more to see of each, plus Volker’s other planes, by clicking here.

Lego GEE BEE Aircraft

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76112 App-Controlled Batmobile | Set Preview

Lego 76112 App Controlled Batmobile

Third-party (i.e. non-LEGO) bluetooth connection devices such as the superb SBrick and BuWizz feature regularly in the models that we publicise here at The Lego Car Blog. Able to connect your creation to your phone for remote control, and – in the case of the SBrick – even programme your model in way that betters LEGO’s own purpose-built robotics systems, they’ve revolutionised what can be achieved in Lego building.

The LEGO Company have been unusually slow to meet this demand themselves, however now (and probably unfortunately for the companies above), LEGO’s own bluetooth-controller is nearly here, launching first as part of the 321-piece 76112 Batmobile set.

Part of LEGO’s rebranded ‘Powered Up’ range, the new controller adds bluetooth control and programming to Power Functions and will be available as a stand-alone product that can be added to existing sets and creations following the launch as part of the 76112 Batmobile set.

LEGO’s press release states;

“The LEGO Batman App-Controlled Batmobile, created for children 8 years of age and older, combines LEGO building and remote-control car play. It is the first codeable and programmable LEGO Batmobile that is fully controllable via smart device. Users can steer the Batmobile using one of two preset remote-control interfaces or personalize their experience through a customizable interface. With the interface unlocked, users move sliders, buttons and other elements to customize the remote control to their liking. Through a coding canvas that will be introduced later this year, users can code and re-code speed, direction, sound and duration to program various movements and stunts and create their own unique driving experiences.”

Whether this will ultimately usher in the demise of the excellent third-party bluetooth products used by the Lego Community currently or spur them on to further innovation and development we’re not sure. We hope it’s the latter, as this competition could bring about a multitude of top-quality bluetooth options for Lego models in the near future (we’ll see if we can do a back-to-back review of all three bluetooth controllers later in the year).

LEGO’s 76122 App-Powered Batmobile set will hit shelves on August 1st costing around $100, and you can read our reviews of the SBrick and BuWizz bluetooth controllers currently available via the links in the text above.

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Class of ’71

Lego Speed Champions Seventies Supercars

Not to rub Jonathan Elliott’s nose in it, but 1971 was a long time before this TLCB writer was born. Nevertheless he’s still able to determine the make and model all four of Jonathan’s brilliant Speed Champions scale seventies supercars, so well do they recreate their real-world counterparts. See if you can guess all four and then head to Jonathan’s photostream to get your score!

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Bronco-ish

Lego Trial Truck 4x4

Today’s creation comes from serial bloggee paave, who has inadvertently built a Ford Bronco. His generic truck trial 4×4 has ended up very Bronco-ish, which is not bad thing, and it features a wealth of off-road goodies to help it navigate the devious obstacles of the recent St. Petersburg Lego truck trial competition.

All-wheel-drive and leaf-sprung front / coil-sprung rear suspension each with panhard rods are teamed with remote control drive and steering via LEGO’s own Power Functions infrared system. It’s a simple set-up that works remarkably well, just like the best real-world off-roaders.

There’s more to see of paave’s Bronco-ish 4×4 trial truck on Brickshelf and you can watch the model in action in the St. Petersburg trial courtesy of Eurobricks – click the links to take a look.

Lego Trial Truck 4x4

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Spray Pattern

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

It’s weird animal-related vehicle day here at The Lego Car Blog. First we post a flying crab, and now we’ve got some sort of tracked locust. Ironically, considering its resemblance to the winged eater of crops, this Goldacres G8CT is employed to protect the bounty of the fields.

Built by BrickbyBrickTechnic this impressive Technic crop sprayer is one of the most intricately engineered creations we’ve found in a while, with independently suspended all-track-drive linked to a four-cylinder piston engine, Hand-of-God steering, and a pair of huge motorised spraying arms that can both unfold and lower electrically.

There’s much more to see of BrickbyBrick’s Goldacres G8CT at both Eurobricks (where there is a video showing the 1 metre wide arms in action) and Flickr – take a closer look via the links.

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

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Space Crabs

Lego Spaceship

Like regular crabs, only in space. Make sure you don’t accept that extra service from the girls at the space truck stop. Anyhoo, this delightfully odd spacecraft does indeed resemble the humble horseshoe crab for reasons that we simply can’t fathom other than to make it look more science fiction-y. Tammo S. is the builder behind it and you can contract crabs for yourself via the link above.

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