To the Bat Bus!

What’s this? Is Batman giving up on vigilante crime-fighting in favour of all-natural-ethnically-sustainable-like-and-subscribe-#vanlife? Thankfully a ginormous gas-turbine-rocket-engine-propulsion-thingumy mounted in the bed of his ’60s Volkswagen Transporter suggests not.

Our hope is the Dark Knight is off to infiltrate the #vanlife community before beating the living crap out them. Not for being criminals, just for being douchbags. Whilst we luxuriate in that thought you can check out more of Batman’s new ride courtesy of 1saac W. of Flickr.

Batman’s going to give them not the beating that they deserve, but the one they need.

A Very Disney Holiday

A Disney holiday is sure to be filled with wholesome activities, harmless japes, musical numbers, and mild antisemitism. Besides the last one you can count us in!

Suggested by a reader, Bas van Houwelingen‘s delightful creation could be straight from a Disney cartoon, with Mickey and Pluto on a caravan road trip courtesy of Goofy’s jalopy.

Bas has used some wonderfully chosen pieces to capture the cartoon high jinks, and you can join in the fun on Flickr at the link above, or alternatively click here to see how this holiday would unfold in real life. The Disney one would be better…

Mack and Cheese

This beautiful creation is a Mack R Series, one of America’s most ubiquitous heavy duty trucks, introduced in the 1960s and built for almost forty years, they were even made under license in Iran.

R Series trucks came in a huge variety of cab and drive configurations, with this lovely Lego version depicting a simple 6×4 single cab hauling a container trailer.

It’s the work of previous bloggee Vladimir Drozd, who has captured the Mack’s subtle curves brilliantly using a wealth of ‘cheese slopes’, curved bricks and wedges.

Underneath the superbly replicated bodywork Vladimir has fitted a Power Functions remote control drivetrain, with motorised drive and steering, working suspension, and a mechanised fifth-wheel trailer hitch, whilst the trailer itself also includes suspension and working support legs.

Photographed and presented beautifully, there’s more to see of Vladimir’s wonderful Mack R Series on Flickr – click the link in the text above to take a look.

The Garbage Man Can!

Is this post mostly an excuse to link to one of The Simpsons’ greatest ever songs? Yes. Yes it is.

But the model’s good too.

Eurobricks mihao has created this superbly engineered remote control garbage truck (or ‘bin lorry’ to us here at TLCB), complete with motorised drive and steering, a tilting cab, suspension, piston engine, tipping garbage compactor, and – most ingeniously – a side-mounted garbage can (‘wheelie bin’) arm that grabs, raises and tips said receptacle automatically.

Have we been using this to grab TLCB Elves and tip them upside-down for fun? Yes. Yes we have. Because the garbage man can! See more at Eurobricks via the link.

Travelling the Globe

What better way to travel the globe than in an, er…. travelling globe! Suspended beneath the LEGO Ideas 21332 Globe set, Kristof has created a beautifully well-matched steampunk ship, complete with a variety of appropriately whimsical steampunk accompaniments. Take flight on Flickr via the link above!

Honey, I Shrunk the 10220

LEGO’s fab 10220 Creator Volkswagen Camper set has – after eight years on sale – finally been replaced. One of the earliest officially-licensed Creator sets, 10220 will likely become one of LEGO’s all time greats, and Flickr’s 1saac W. has channeled the Lego icon into his own astonishing miniaturised Volkswagen T1 Westfalia, some two years in the making.

1saac’s model looks every bit as detailed as its giant inspiration, with techniques used within it that seem to defy physics. Yet it’s all Lego, and the genius of its assembly is matched only by the perfection of the presentation.

We genuinely can’t figure out how it’s all been done, and if you’d like to try to work out how 1ssac has seemingly shrunk 10220 head to his photostream via the link above.

El Camino

Car-based pick-ups have been a strangely transient body style over the years. Currently popular in South America, previously popular but now dead in Australia, and returning once more after a long hiatus to the U.S.

This new crop of car-based pick-ups being marketed in the U.S includes the new Ford Maverick and the decidedly strange-looking Hyundai Santa Cruz, and it could mean there’s room for the famous of them all to make a comeback; the mighty Chevrolet El Camino SS.

Based on the Chevrolet Chevelle, the El Camino swapped the traditional sedan/station-wagon bodywork for a two-door cab with a pick-up bed, and it could be bought with Chevrolet’s most powerful engine of the time, a 13-second 1/4 mile 450bhp V8.

Despite this prodigious power, suspension and steering were still, well… it had them we suppose, and disc brakes were an optional extra. Handling was clearly not an El Camino strong-suite then, but if it could stop and go round corners quickly all your stuff would fly out of the bed, so perhaps Chevrolet were cleverer than we’re giving them credit for. Or it could be that American consumers only cared about big power and racing stripes…

This wonderful recreation of the definitive muscle-car-pick-up comes from Jakub Marcisz, who has replicated the 1970 El Camino SS brilliantly in brick-form. Jakub’s model includes (somewhat superfluous) working steering, the requisite big piston engine connected to the rear wheels, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and – most importantly of all – racing stripes.

There’s lots more to see at Jakub’s ‘Chevrolet El Camino SS’ album, and you can make the jump to ’70s racing-striped muscle-car-based-pick-up wonderfulness via the link above.

Fork This

This a motorised forklift truck, it comes from previous bloggee Vladimir Drozd, and it is quite good at squashing Elves.

With a number of our smelly little workers distracted by something shiny, the Elven discoverer of this creation snuck up and dropped a box on them. Because it could.

Doubtless a victim of past smushings, it enjoyed being the perpetrator immensely, and is now happily eating an orange Smartie whilst we patch up the victims.

A pair of Power Functions motors raise and tilt the forklift boom (enabling a brick built box to tip smartly onto those underneath), whilst a further two motors drive and steer the truck itself, and there’s more to see at both Flickr, Eurobricks, and via the video below.

YouTube Video

 

Retro-Future

The past was very futuristic. This is a CF-104 Starfighter, essentially a Lockheed F-104 Starfighter built under license by Canadair for the Royal Canadian Air Force, and exported to several NATO allies during the 1960s. And it’s very shiny indeed.

The Elves are rather transfixed by it, as – honestly speaking – are we. Perhaps we’re not so different…

There’s more to see of this artfully recreated replica of the ’60s supersonic fighter courtesy of Ryan Harris, and you can join us staring in wonder at his ‘CF-104 Starfighter’ album by clicking here.

Acceptable in the ’80s

And the 2020s it seems, as the once fairly unfashionable Ferrari Testarossa is now a bonafide millionaires’ toy, worth much much more than the entire contents TLCB office car park.

This one comes from Technic-building legend Lachlan Cameron (aka LoxLego), whose Technic recreation of the ’80s supercar includes a full remote control drivetrain, LED lights, custom (and really rather accurate) wheels, working suspension, a flat-12 engine, pop-up headlights, and opening doors, front trunk and engine cover.

There’s much more of the build to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum and on Flickr, plus you can read Lachlan’s interview here at TLCB in the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

*Today’s title song.

Hash Brown

We’re on two wheels today, thanks to Jonathan Elliott and this lovely BMW R80 ‘Cafe Racer’ motorcycle. There’s a brick-built boxer engine, single-shock suspension, and shaft drive constructed from the five-hundred carefully chosen pieces, a good few of which are brown. And brown bikes look ace. Ride to the cafe via the link above.

70cc

…is all you need to move yourself about. And – as anyone that’s familiar with transport methods in many Asian countries will know – not just yourself, but your spouse, children, family dog, and shop. All at once.

The Yamaha 70cc scooter is one of millions and millions that form the backbone of much of the world’s travel, and this 1974 example perfectly captures the simplicity of the real thing.

Built by Marco Gan of Flickr, just a handful of carefully chosen pieces have been used, some of which might be held together by magic.

Climb on board (along with three others, a box of live geese, and shop selling delicious snacks) via the link above, whilst we ready a rather marvellous building competition that celebrates vehicles just like this one…

Wheat Season

It’s wheat season. Not here in TLCB’s home nation, where everything is under a thin layer of ice, but somewhere it probably it is.

Regular bloggee 1saac W. is bringing in the wheat harvest back in the 1950s, with his lovely brick-built Ford 8N tractor and ’49 Chevrolet pick-up.

A neat Technic-pin field of wheat stands behind the classic farm due, and there’s more to see of both the Ford 8N and the Chevy at 1saac’s photostream.

Grab your hay fork and head to 1950s rural America via the link in the text above.

Itsa Me… Anti-Gravity Mario!

People have been lobbing green shells at one another for three decades, and the glorious carnage that is Mario Kart is just as appealing now as ever!

Mario Kart 8 was released in 2014, enabling Mario and his assortment of fellow racers to hover in ‘anti-gravity’ mode for the first time. And you could still lob green shells.

Cue Stephan Froden, who has recreated everyone’s favourite Italian plumber and his anti-gravity go-kart from nearly 23,000 LEGO bricks.

There are LED lights inside as well as motorised movements, and there’s more to see of Stephan’s wonderful homage to Mario Kart 8 at Ryan McNaught’s ‘Brickvention 2022’ album on Flickr, of which Stephan’s model and many other equally stupendous creations are part. Click the link above to lob your green shell!

Life Begins at Forty

Or so say people over the age of forty. For Ferrari, with whom we have a love/hate relationship here at TLCB Towers, Enzo decided to celebrate his brand’s big 4-0 with a spectacular present to itself; a carbon-fibre, twin-turbocharged racing car for the road.

This was back in 1987 too, so the F40 was nothing short of a sensation. 35 years later and Ferrari’s big launch is an SUV…

Still, we suppose it’s not Ferrari’s fault that the best selling Lamborghini (by miles) is an SUV, the best selling Bentley (by miles) is an SUV, and the best selling Porsche (by miles) is an SUV, but the future of cars is looking bleaker by the day.

Which is probably why classic cars like the F40 are worth astronomical sums these days, as people rail against the SUVness of everything new.

Flickr’s LN TEKNIK is the builder giving us license to reminisce about ‘how things were better in the olden days’, with this gorgeous 1:10 scale Technic Ferrari F40.

Equipped with the full suite of Technic Supercar functions, LN’s recreation of the definitive Ferrari includes working steering, suspension, gearbox and engine, plus pop-up headlights, opening doors, and front and rear clam-shells. And some slightly dodgy looking non-LEGO wheels.

Which means in this post we’ve moaned about SUVs, non-standard wheels, and declared that things aren’t as good as they used to be. And the TLCB is only 10 – imagine how grumpy we’ll be in 30 years! Still, life begins then…