Tag Archives: 2020s

Venom (Unverified)

Several cars currently claim to be the fastest ever produced. The race for the highest top speed has brought about some incredible machines, but it’s also reached a fairly pointless level, as a whole pit crew, the hiring of a desert, plus bespoke tyres, fuel, and fluids are all required. If TLCB were in charge of the record, a car’s run would only stand if it was filled up on the M32, just outside Bristol, and driven by an elderly lady plucked at random from a nearby bowls club.

Hennessey somewhat understandably chose not to take this approach, going the whole pit-crew-desert-bespoke route when they beat the Bugatti Veyron’s record last decade, reaching an official top speed of 270mph in what was basically a Lotus Exige with an LS in it.

Bugatti have since upped their game but – not counting SSC’s recent slightly embarrassing and completely unverified claim – no production car has yet hit a verified 300mph.

Hennessey aim to do so imminently though, with this; the 1,800bhp Venom F5.

Built in England (as most American supercar icons seem to be), and powered by a hugely reworked Chevrolet LS (as most American supercar icons seem to be), just twenty-four Venom F5s are due to be produced, each costing $2.1m, and each capable (if Hennessey’s maths are proved correct) of a record-breaking 301mph top speed.

We’ll find out if the claims are true when the Venom F5 records a verified run, so until then we’re happy to focus on a rather smaller version, as built in 1:8 scale by previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens.

With all-wheel-suspension, a V8 engine, working scissor doors, functioning steering, and an 8-speed sequential gearbox, Jeroen’s Technic Venom F5 is certainly every bit as impressive as an on-paper top speed of 301mph.

You can also build Jeroen’s model for yourself, as it’s constructed mostly from the various green pieces (and variously green pieces) from the 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 set, with instructions available at Jeroen’s website.

There’s more to see – including the complete gallery and full build details – at both Flickr and Eurobricks – Click the links above, grab your pit crew and some bespoke tyres, and probably/possibly/maybe hit 301mph!

Scuderia Glickenhaus

Every Lego car builder has probably dreamed of running their own supercar company. So too has every multi-millionaire, with a new one popping up on an almost weekly basis claiming that they’re actually going to do it, their car has two thousand horsepower and will do 400mph, before quietly disappearing never to be heard from again.

Except Cameron Glickenhaus actually did it. Starting by creating unique Ferraris for his own personal use through their bespoke programme, Glickenhaus has since gone the whole hog and built his own car. From scratch. And now he’s going racing.

This is his new racing car, the Glickenhaus 007 LMH, which is already fighting Toyota in the top-tier World Endurance Championship, and it’ll go wheel-to-wheel with Porsche, Ferrari, Peugeot and others as the Hypercar class expands next year.

This excellent Speed Champions recreation of the unlikely hypercar was suggested by a reader, and comes from ReddishBlueMOCs. Instructions are available and there are more images to view via Bricksafe at the link above.

Trade it in for a Newer Model

This is not the best Lego Porsche 911 model ever made. In fact, it’s not even the best Porsche 911 model made by this builder. However, what it is, is the best Porsche 911 model built from another Porsche 911 model. By miles.

LEGO’s ace official 10295 Porsche 911 set is a wonderful addition to the line-up, particularly as it features a classic version of Porsche’s iconic sports car. However what if you like your 911s a little newer?

TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has the answer, constructing this 2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S only from the parts found within the official LEGO 10295 classic 911 set.

Now the usual 911 joke here would be ‘well, all 911s look the same anyway’, but the proportions of the modern iteration (and any new car) are actually drastically different to those from 40 yers ago.

Firas’s B-Model somehow manages to convey these superbly, even if the outcome is a little squashed, and best of all he’s made building instructions available via his excellent Bricks Garage website so that you can swap your classic 911 for the latest model too.

There’s more to see of Firas’ 10295 911-alternate-911 by clicking these words, plus you can see an ex-LEGO set designer’s take on a 10295 B-Model by clicking here.

Small Brits

Over one in three Americans are obese, but TLCB’s home nation isn’t far behind, with 28% of the population being medically categorised as ‘chunkadunk’. Today though, we have two really small Brits, each being constructed in diminutive Speed Champions scale, yet still instantly recognisable as miniatures of their real-world brethren.

The first (above) is a tiny car in real life too, being a delightful recreation of the late-’50s Austin-Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite by RGB900. The real Spite measured just 3.5 metres in length, making it almost a third shorter than McLaren’s ridiculously-long 5.1 metre Speedtail.

Suggested by a reader, this neat Speed Champions version of one of McLaren’s million special editions is the work of newcomer User 5346 and there’s more of each small-scale Brit to see on Flickr. Take a look via the links above whilst we go and eat a donut or six.

Stradale

Lego Technic Ferrari SF90 Stradale

Most plug-in hybrids are a tax-dodging con. Including this one.

The Ferrari SF90 Stradale’s 8kw/h battery gives an an electric range of… 16 miles. So with the heater and the radio on, that’ll be less than 10. Probably a lot less.

So an EV it isn’t, but the three electric motors with which the Stradale is equipped do boost power from 780bhp to 1,000bhp, and that is a very good thing indeed. They also mean that Ferrari can keep making supercars even when new car electrification becomes mandatory, which – in the case of TLCB’s home nation – isn’t far away at all.

Until then tax dodges like the SF90 allow V8’s to keep rumbling for a little while longer, and there’s more to see of this stellar Technic Supercar recreation of the Stradale courtesy of Lukas Rs (aka F1Moc) on Flickr.

Click the link above to visit Lukas’ ‘Ferrari SF90 Stradale’ album. Just make sure you turn the heater and radio off.

The Best Car Ever!*

*Well, according to The Straight Pipes at least.

Lexus are a curious car company. They make immensely dull econo-boxes like this, the ugliest car in the entire world, Jeremy Clarkson’s favourite car of all time, and then this; the stunning LC500, described by The Straight Pipes as the best car they’ve ever driven.

That might be going a bit far, but an atmospheric V8 in a car that looks like a concept from 2035 is quite a rare thing, so maybe they have a point.

This superb Model Team version of Lexus’ current flagship comes from previous bloggee Lasse Deleuran (aka gtahelper) who, um… owns one of Lexus’ dull econo-boxes. Still, his real-life Lexus CT200h is the same shade of red as his brilliant LC500 model, so they have at least one thing in common other than the badge.

There’s more of Lasse’s fiendishly complicated and utterly wonderful Lexus LC500 Coupe to see on Brickshelf, and you can take a look via the link in the text above.

The Estate is Dead

Volvo, once the estate car manufacturer, now produce more SUV/crossover models than estate cars.

Because everyone produces more SUV/crossover models than anything else these days, and unless a car projects an image that you’re about to go hang-gliding off a mountain, consumers aren’t interested in it.

Still, at least Volvo’s SUV/crossovers looks slightly interesting, unlike the vast majority of their rivals, as shown here by TLCB debutant Peter Zieske and his excellent 1:16 scale recreation of the Volvo XC40 R-Design.

Peter’s model is presented beautifully and there’s more to see of his Model Team XC40 at his album on Flickr. Click the link above to drive to a mountain to go hang-gliding, or whatever it is that SUV/crossovers are supposed to be for.

Dog Vomit

We like fast estate cars here at The Lego Car Blog – mostly because they’re not fast SUVs – and the latest Audi RS6 Avant is perhaps the best of them all.

With a turbocharged V8 producing nearly 600bhp, the RS6 can take your labrador to 60mph in just over three seconds, which is supercar fast. And supercars can’t fit a labrador in the boot at all.

This exceptionally clean Speed Champions style recreation of Audi’s fastest wagon is the work of regular bloggee SP_LINEUP and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to make a dog violently sick.

C3-R2

This post title refers not to some Star Warsy droid (we’re not Bricknerd), but rather this; the spectacular-looking Citroen C3 ‘Rally2’.

‘Rally2’ is the second tier of the World Rally Championship, with cars a little less powerful (and less expensive) than the WRC top class, and a little closer to production spec.

Confusingly these ‘R2’ cars are classified as ‘R5’ in the regulations, which makes no sense to us at all, but whilst they tend to be a bit slower than the full-fat WRC machines they nevertheless compete on the same stages over the same distances, occasionally beating a few WRC cars in the process.

This is Citroen’s latest ‘Rally2’ entrant, based upon their new C3 road car. Powered by a 1600cc turbocharged engine driving all four wheels, the C3 will face similarly-specified entrants from Skoda, Volkswagen, Peugeot, Ford, and sister-brand DS.

The incredible Lego replica of the C3 R2 pictured here was commissioned by Citroen themselves, coming from Martin Vala, who has recreated their latest ‘Rally2’ car in astonishing detail.

Opening doors reveal a remarkably life-like interior, complete with a full cage, realistic dashboard, pedals, and seats, whilst the superbly replicated exterior is enhanced by some brilliant decals that accurately recreate the real car’s livery.

Martin’s model has been photographed and presented beautifully too, and there’s more of the build to see at his ‘Citroen C3 Rally2’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump to the complete gallery of immaculate images.

Technic Tributo

LEGO’s new for 2021 Technic sets look rather good from the outside, with no less than three officially-licensed real-world vehicles revealed so far. However, whilst attention has been paid to decals and exterior design, many are a bit light on actual technical functions. Boo.

Proving you can do both in a mid-size model is paave, who has recreated Ferrari’s amazing F8 Tributo in Technic form, and not only does it look great, it’s packed with features too.

Despite the relatively small size paave’s F8 includes all-wheel independent suspension, a working V8 engine, ‘Hand of God’ steering, adjustable seats, and opening doors, hood and engine cover. Which is more than LEGO’s own 42125 Ferrari 488 GTE AF CORSE set.

You can check out all of those features on Eurobricks and via the video below, both of which include links to building instructions should you wish to build this F8 Tributo for yourself, plus you can see LEGO’s offically-licensed 76895 Speed Champions version of the F8 by clicking here.

YouTube Video

Centodieci

This is the Bugatti Centodieci, a Chiron-based, $9million, 10 unit hypercar. But if you’re a bit short of $9m, Fabrice Larcheveque has the answer. Suggested by a reader, Fabrice’s Speed Champions version of the Centodieci captures the real car rather well, despite wheels that are Speed-Champions-but-not-hypercar appropriate, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

Collection of Letters

We’ve said it before, but Mercedes-Benz’s naming structure is about as interesting and imaginative as a Brothers Brick article on piece sorting. Still, tremendously dull names aside, the cars are quite good, and the AMG GT S is no exception.

Fitted with the AMG 4.0 twin-turbo V8 that powers all sorts of Mercedes-Benz products (plus a few Aston Martins), the AMG GT S is a quick and refined way to cross a country, plus it’s the Formula 1 safety car which is cool. Lennart Cort is the builder behind this one and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

Gemera

The Koenigsegg Gemera – the brand’s first four-seater – hasn’t been released yet, but has already generated a fair bit of interest thanks to a 2.0 three-cylinder engine that is supposed to make a scarcely believable 600bhp. Of course we’re in the age of electrification now though, so that’s not all the Gemera has, with three electric motors boosting the total power to a claimed 1,600bhp.

Normally at this point we’d lose interest, as we do with every hypercar concept proclaiming ridiculous performance figures, however Koenigsegg do have a habit of building what they say they will, making the Gemera concept really very interesting indeed.

We have a while to wait until we learn how realistic Koenigsegg are being, so until then here’s a Speed Champions version of the wild 1,600bhp hyper-sedan from previous bloggee Gerald Cacas, who has captured the 2020 concept car beautifully, even matching its real world colour scheme.

There’s more to see of Gerald’s model at his Koenigsegg Gemera album on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump.

Build-A-Bronco

Ford’s new 2020 Bronco looks right in a way that Land Rover’s new Defender just doesn’t. Who’d have thought that, after Ford mis-managed Land Rover (and Jaguar, Volvo, and Aston Martin…) into the ground only a decade or so ago, before bailing on all of them.

Anyway, Ford seems to have nailed it with their homage to their own classic nameplate, and fittingly today’s bloggee LoMaC has nailed his homage to Ford’s, er… homage.

Capturing the 2020 Bronco in Technic form, LoMaC’s recreation features working steering (by both the wheel and HoG), independent front and three-link rear suspension, a working engine, opening doors, hood and trunk, plus a detailed interior with adjustable seats.

We think the new Ford Bronco would make a fine official LEGO set (which maybe is on the cards with Ford and LEGO’s fruitful partnership), but until then you can build LoMaC’s brilliant Bronco for yourself, as building instructions are available!

Head to LoMaC’s Ford Bronco Bricksafe gallery to see all the images and to the Eurobricks forum for full build details and that link to building instructions.

Failari

The 2020 Formula 1 World Championship has been weird. Months late, races cancelled, double-header races to make up for lost time, but no spectators, the season will probably be remembered more for Coronavirus than anything else. Well, that and Ferrari turning up in what seems to be an FSO Polonez.

Despite the 2020 SF1000 apparently being based on last year’s car and having one of most talented young drivers on the grid, Scuderia Ferrari have been awful. Currently sitting fifth in the standings behind a newly resurgent McLaren (who are finally exiting their own period of woe), and even Force India/Racing Point/Aston Martin/Stroll F1/whateverthey’recalledthisweek, with Leclerc in 7th place and multiple World Champion Vettel in 10th. Sheesh*.

The Scuderia Ferrari SF1000 at least looks rather nice, as demonstrated here by Noah_L’s superbly presented Model Team replica, itself an updated version of his recreation of Ferrari’s 2019 Formula 1 car. Give it a really hard push and might even beat the real thing.

There’s more to see of Noah’s excellent creation at his ‘Ferrari SF1000′ album – click the link to take a look, and then sit back and watch Mercedes-Benz AMG dominate the field as usual in today’s British Grand Prix, before they do the same at next week’s er… British Grand Prix. This double-header thing is going to take some getting used to…

*Still, maybe it’s karma for Ferrari’s active participation in the gradual killing of children.