Tag Archives: supercar

Super Thursday

Technic Supercars have long been the pinnacle of the Technic line-up. Containing working steering, suspension, engine and gearbox, they’re as close as it’s possible to get to the engineering of real-world cars in Lego form.

They’re also a favourite build amongst advanced Lego car designers, and we’ve featured dozens of incredible Technic Supercars here at The Lego Car Blog over the years. Two more take their places in the Archives today, each being a fantastic example of the Technic Supercar form.

The first, in a rather splendid orange, is IA creations‘ ‘Apricus V8’, a fictional super sports car in the mould of the Dodge Viper, McLaren-Mercedes SLS and various Aston Martins according to the builder.

The slick bodywork certainly captures the aesthetic of the real-world cars that inspired the build, and under it lies a complete Technic Supercar chassis, with working steering, adjustable double-wishbone suspension, a paddle-shift sequential gearbox, and a V8 engine. There’s also a deployable rear wing, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, and there’s more to see of IA creations’ superb supercar concept on Eurobricks via the link above.

Our second Technic supercar comes from previous bloggee Pvdb, and replicates one of the greatest hypercars of recent times; the McLaren P1.

Launched in 2013, and sold out within two months, the P1 was McLaren’s first Hybrid hypercar, with over 900bhp and an electric-only range of… er, 6 miles. But still, that wasn’t exactly the point of the electric motor, which added 180bhp to the twin-turbo V8’s already substantial 737.

Constructed in 1:10 scale, Pvdb’s McLaren includes steering, adjustable suspension (complete with a ‘track’ model that also deploys the rear spoiler), scissor doors, and an eight-speed gearbox (one more than the real thing!), authentically operated via steering wheel paddles.

It’s a masterclass in Technic Supercars one of which can see more at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to take a closer look, and if you’re thinking of having a go at Technic Supercar building yourself, we might just have a competition later in the year that’ll be of interest…

Carbon Clam

The Ferrari F40 was a technical marvel when it was revealed in 1987. The last car personally approved by Enzo Ferrari, the F40 deployed twin-turbo-chargers to produce around 500bhp from its relatively small 2.9 litre V8, featured electronically adjustable suspension, and became the first series-production car in the world to be built from composite materials; carbon fibre and kevlar.

Often overlooked, it’s the F40’s composite bodywork that is its most ground-breaking feature, and Darren Thew has recreated the complex opening front and rear carbon fibre clamshells brilliantly in Technic form.

Working steering, suspension, pop-up headlights, and a realistic V8 engine live underneath the huge opening pieces, and there’s more to see of Darren’s excellent Technic Ferrari F40 on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look inside the clam.

High Five

It’s not just Chrysler from an earlier post this week that went mad for a bit. The French have a history of going berserk, automotively speaking, with even Renualt – who currently manufacture nothing but boring crossovers – having moments of insanity. This is their best.

The Renault 5 was an excellent city car. Front-wheel-drive, well packaged, safely slow. Not a rally car then. But Renault wanted to go rallying, and thus they took their aforementioned econo-box, removed the engine, turbocharged it, and then put it back in where the rear seats used to be. And let it power the rear wheels instead.

The result was the Renault 5 Turbo, a wild mid-engined super-hatch designed to go rallying, with just under 5,000 across two generations also produced for the road. Road cars made a healthy-for-the-time 160bhp, but in rally trim the R5 Turbo could make almost 400bhp (from just 1.4 litres!), and won the Monte Carlo Rally at the first attempt in 1981.

The spectacular Technic model pictured here is a recreation of the road going R5 Turbo, as built by TLCB Master MOCer Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego). Featuring remote control drive and steering, LED lights, working suspension, opening doors, front trunk and tailgate, and – of course – a mid-mounted engine, Lachlan’s creation captures Renault’s moment of madness brilliantly, and there’s a whole lot more of it to see at his ‘Renault Turbo R5’ album on Flickr.

Click the second link above to make the jump to all the images, and the first to read how Lachlan creates his amazing models like this one.

Ride of the Valkyries*

The economic outlook, driven largely by worldwide energy price inflation, is looking increasingly bleak. A global recession is not unlikely, but – if you’re rich enough – such events can have no effect whatsoever. They might even make you richer.

Thus whilst normal cars for us plebs are certain to become more expensive (and sales will slow accordingly), we expect the production of ultra-limited hypercars to continue unabated. Which is fine by us, because dream cars, within reach of only a few, provide inspiration for the many.

Cue Jeroen Ottens, who has recreated Aston Martin’s sold-out 2023 $3m Valkyrie hybrid hypercar, rising to $3.5m if you’re one of the lucky 25 who’ve placed a deposit for the track version.

Designed in conjunction with Red Bull Advanced Technologies (back when Red Bull and Aston Martin weren’t fighting) and powered by a Cosworth V12 with a Rimac hybrid system, the Valkyrie will be the highest revving and most powerful naturally-aspirated road car ever built.

It also features some wild aerodynamics, which Jeroen has replicated brilliantly in brick from. Accurate venturi channels necessitate pushrod in-board suspension, whilst the mid-mounted V12 connected to an eight-speed gearbox sits within one of the tightest engine bays we’ve ever seen.

Working steering via a brick-built yoke plus an opening engine cover and butterfly doors complete the technical features, and you can recreate Jeroen’s expertly-engineered creation for yourself as building instructions are available. Click these links to Flickr and Eurobricks to ride out the coming recession like the super rich with your very own Aston Martin Valkyrie.

*Today’s title song. We’re feeling very cultured. (Normal service of Your Mom jokes and poo references will resume shortly).

Pagani Huayra | Picture Special

This is the Pagani Huayra, an AMG V12-engined, limited production hypercar built by Pagani between 2011 and 2021, and reserved only for the quite fantastically wealthy.

Despite the sizeable riches that accumulate from blogging about Lego, even we can’t afford a real Huayra, thus the version we have here today is more suitable for our budget.

Built by langko, this incredible Technic recreation of the iconic Italian hypercar captures the real deal as perfectly as is possible from plastic bricks, with the astounding looks matched by an astonishing breadth of working features.

There are no motors, with langko instead deploying their considerable talents to create a benchmark Technic ‘Supercar’, complete with a working V12 engine, all-wheel cantilever suspension, a 7-speed sequential gearbox, functioning steering with connected aero flaps, an adjustable nose-lift, opening gull-wing doors, front and rear clamshells, and luggage compartments, plus adjustable seats inside a spectacularly detailed interior.

It’s one of the finest Technic Supercars we’ve seen yet, and doubtless one of the most impressive creations of 2022 so far, with much more to see at the Eurobricks forum and the full gallery of stunning images available to view on Bricksafe. Join us in taking a closer look via the links.

A Super Car

Technic Supercars are one of our very favourite things in the Lego Community, and despite LEGO’s foray into officially-licensed replicas of real-world vehicles, we do still like seeing interpretations of the fictional Technic Supercars that used to be LEGO’s flagships.

Cue this rather lovely example by IA Creations, whose fictional supercar nods to several real-world counterparts as well as LEGO’s own past flagship sets, and includes a wealth of Technic functionality.

Working suspension, opening doors, front trunk and engine cover, LED lights, and a V8 engine all feature, with IA going a step further by including full remote control drive and steering, plus an electronically deployed rear spoiler, courtesy of four Power Functions motors and a BuWizz 2.0 bluetooth battery brick.

It’s a fantastic build and one of which you can see more at both Eurobricks, where a link to building instructions can be found, and Bricksafe, where over forty high quality images are available.

Click the links above to see more of IA Creations’ super car.

Alright M8

This rather excellent Technic Supercar is a BMW M8 Competition, BMW’s 600bhp, twin-turbo V8, all-wheel-drive flagship.

Constructed by IA creations, this recreation of BMW’s super coupe includes a wealth of Technic functionality, with both traditional mechanical ‘supercar’ elements and motorised remote control.

A working V8 engine, all-wheel-drive, steering, and double-wishbone suspension take care of the former, whilst a BuWizz bluetooth battery powers twin drive motors, servo steering, and three sets of LEDs for the head and tail lights, enabling programmable bluetooth remote control.

It’s a fantastically well engineered creation and one that you can build for yourself too, as IA has made instructions available. Head to the Eurobricks forum for full details, plus you can find the complete image gallery of IA BMW M8 Competition on Bricksafe.

Finally, you can win an awesome BuWizz 3.0 Pro like the one powering IA’s magnificent M8 by entering TLCB and BrickNerd’s Festival of Mundanity competition! This M8 Competition is definitely much too interesting of course, but a grey 320d… that could do very well indeed!

Acceptable in the ’80s

And the 2020s it seems, as the once fairly unfashionable Ferrari Testarossa is now a bonafide millionaires’ toy, worth much much more than the entire contents TLCB office car park.

This one comes from Technic-building legend Lachlan Cameron (aka LoxLego), whose Technic recreation of the ’80s supercar includes a full remote control drivetrain, LED lights, custom (and really rather accurate) wheels, working suspension, a flat-12 engine, pop-up headlights, and opening doors, front trunk and engine cover.

There’s much more of the build to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum and on Flickr, plus you can read Lachlan’s interview here at TLCB in the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

*Today’s title song.

Life Begins at Forty

Or so say people over the age of forty. For Ferrari, with whom we have a love/hate relationship here at TLCB Towers, Enzo decided to celebrate his brand’s big 4-0 with a spectacular present to itself; a carbon-fibre, twin-turbocharged racing car for the road.

This was back in 1987 too, so the F40 was nothing short of a sensation. 35 years later and Ferrari’s big launch is an SUV…

Still, we suppose it’s not Ferrari’s fault that the best selling Lamborghini (by miles) is an SUV, the best selling Bentley (by miles) is an SUV, and the best selling Porsche (by miles) is an SUV, but the future of cars is looking bleaker by the day.

Which is probably why classic cars like the F40 are worth astronomical sums these days, as people rail against the SUVness of everything new.

Flickr’s LN TEKNIK is the builder giving us license to reminisce about ‘how things were better in the olden days’, with this gorgeous 1:10 scale Technic Ferrari F40.

Equipped with the full suite of Technic Supercar functions, LN’s recreation of the definitive Ferrari includes working steering, suspension, gearbox and engine, plus pop-up headlights, opening doors, and front and rear clam-shells. And some slightly dodgy looking non-LEGO wheels.

Which means in this post we’ve moaned about SUVs, non-standard wheels, and declared that things aren’t as good as they used to be. And the TLCB is only 10 – imagine how grumpy we’ll be in 30 years! Still, life begins then…

Don’t Mention the War II

For some reason people don’t seem to like it when Germany and Japan collaborate. What? We’ve already done that joke today? Damn…

Moving on, this is the fifth generation Toyota Supra, a frankly wonderful looking sports car widely hated by the internet for being a partnership between BMW and Toyota. Which means of course that it’s rather excellent.

This spectacular Technic recreation of the internet’s least favourite collaboration is the work of Jeroen Ottens, who was commissioned to replicate the A90 Supra’s wild bodywork in brick form.

Not only has Jeroen done that, he’s included a working 6-cylinder engine linked to the rear wheels, an 8-speed gearbox, independent suspension, and working steering, plus opening doors, tailgate and hood.

It’s a fantastic creation, and – whether you’re a xenophobic internet commenter or can appreciate a good car regardless of badge stamped into the components – one that’s worth a closer look.

Head over to Flickr or Eurobricks for full build details, further imagery, and the potential for “That’s not a Supra”/”Nice BMW” comments.

Rolled Gold

Let’s get the obvious bit out of the way. Those are not official LEGO wheels. But they are excellent. And the model riding atop them is even more so.

This spectacular Technic Lamborghini Countach LP500s is the work of Diego Auguanno, as presented by Polo-Freak of Brickshelf, and it’s about as accurate a Lego Lamborghini as we’ve ever seen.

Diego’s incredible creation utilises Technic panels, System bricks, and those custom golden wheels to beautifully replicate the real ’80s supercar, including a brick-built replica of the Countach’s V12 engine and its signature scissor doors.

Over thirty high quality images can be found at Polo’s ‘Lamborghini Countach LP500S’ Brickshelf album (plus you can buy building instructions at the designer Diego’s Facebook page) and you can take a look at all of this rolled gold via the links above.

The Car of Choice

Car choice seems to be shrinking of late. Despite manufacturers creating ever more models, they mostly seem to be crossovers of marginally different sizing but uniform monotony.

Engine choices are shrinking too, with many cars in TLCB’s home nation available with just one. Thankfully the Germans, although very much on the make-everything-a-crossover bandwagon, do still offer a bewildering array of engine options.

However even that’s a bit of a ruse, as they’re pretty much all the same engine, only you have to pay extra for the software to release more power (which the engine already has, locked behind a paywall). Urgh.

Fortunately Wigboldly (aka Thirdwigg) of Flickr is railing against the current miserable new car situation with this, his ‘Ionos Sports Sedan’ Technic Supercar.

A good old-fashioned executive saloon, Wigboldly’s creation can be had with three different engines, rear or all-wheel-drive, and a manual or sequential gearbox, just like real cars used to be.

Of course if it were real, Wigboldly’s Ionis would totally bomb in today’s new car market, as it’s not a boring one-engined crossover with power-behind-a-paywall, but we’d still choose it!

Luckily Wigboldly isn’t trying to make money out of his design, what with it being Lego, but that even extends to the building instructions, which he has created and published for free.

We rarely publish direct links to instructions here at The Lego Car Blog, but we will today.

Click here to jump to the Ionis’s free building instructions on Rebrickable, where there’s more drivetrain choice than many cars on sale today, and give Wigboldly a thumbs up on Flickr via the link in the text above.

Spania GTA Spano

What? Yes, us too, but apparently the Spania GTA Spano is Spain’s hypercar, and with 925bhp on tap, it’s quite a potent one.

This incredible Technic recreation of the GTA Spano first appeared here yesterday, when BuWizz used it to reach 181mph (we may have adjusted that for scale), and in doing so set a record for the fastest 1:8 scale Technic car.

The builder responsible for this amazing record-breaking model is Zerobricks of Eurobricks, who has now revealed further details and imagery of the spectacular engineering behind it.

No less than ten BuWizz motors power the 3D-printed rear wheels to deliver that awesome top speed, whilst five LEGO Powered-Up motors power the rear spoiler, steering, opening doors, and V10 piston engine.

All-wheel independent suspension, plus an opening hood, engine cover and rear trunk also feature, and there’s more to see of this astonishing build at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here, and you can watch the model in action at 181mph (kinda) by clicking here.

181mph* LEGO Supercar

*Kinda. This is the Spania GTA Spano, a 925bhp, 400km/h supercar power by a twin-turbocharged version of the V10 engine found in the Dodge/SRT Viper.

Well, except this one isn’t of course, being only an eighth of the size. No, this Technic version is powered by something rather different…

First the model, which was engineered via CAD and is constructed from 3,800 LEGO pieces. Far from a lightweight shell, the 1:8 scale GTA Spano includes opening doors, active aerodynamics, working suspension, remote controlled steering, and 3D-printed wheels to ensure they’re up to the job.

That ‘job’, is to handle the power of ten BuWizz propulsion motors, coordinated through three BuWizz 3.0 Pro controllers (plus a further five motors powering other functions), with the aim of setting the record for the fastest 1:8 scale LEGO car.

BuWizz’s 1:8 scale GTA Spano powered its way to 36.5km/h, which when factored up for scale equates to 292km/h (181mph)! That might be little way off the real GTA Spano’s 400km/h top speed, but it was enough to secure the record.

BuWizz took their record-breaking model to meet its real-life counterpart (and the man behind it), and you can watch that meeting, the record attempt, and the amazing design process required to produce a 181mph Technic Supercar via the excellent video below.

Plus if you’d like to see how fast your Technic models will go, check out BuWizz by clicking here.

My Other’s Truck’s a Bugatti

Is there anything in the vehicular world more pointless than truck racing? OK, The Brothers Brick’s review of the blue LEGO Fiat 500 set – which is exactly the same as the yellow one, only blue – probably takes the win, but truck racing is a close second.

Why take something designed specifically to pull heavy things long distances in the most fuel efficient way, and adapt it to go a short distance quickly whilst pulling nothing? It’s like using an airliner as the basis for a powerboat.

Anyway, pointlessness of source material aside, TLCB Master MOCer Nico71 has created a rather excellent racing truck from his 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set, with steering, an eight-speed sequential gearbox, functioning suspension, a working piston engine, and a tilting cab.

Nico’s made building instructions of his alternate available too, so you can convert your own 42083 Bugatti Chiron set into this brilliant Lego version of the world’s most pointless racing vehicle at home.

There’s more of Nico’s Bugatti B-Model to see at his Brickshelf gallery by clicking here, you can read his Master MOCers interview here at TLCB via the link in the text link above, and you can watch all of the race truck’s features in action in the video below.

YouTube Video