Tag Archives: supercar

You Can’t Put a Price on Exclusivity

Lego Lykan Hypersport

Unless that price is $3.4 Million…

Barely a week goes by without a millionaire somewhere deciding that they’re going to start up their own supercar company and it’s going to make the fastest car in the world, with a four thousand horsepower and a top speed of a billion.

Unsurprisingly almost every single one of these start-ups comes to absolutely nothing, because like a guy who sounds hard in his YouTube comments but is actually 33 and still living with his Mom, there’s no substance behind the wild claims.

However Lykan – the Middle East’s first supercar manufacturer – are an exception, because despite the extravagant press releases before a car had turned a wheel, they’ve actually gone and built the car they claimed to.

Funded by the UAE and engineered in Lebanon by a team of French and Italian engineers, just seven Lykan Hypersports will be built, at a cost of an insane $3.4million each.

This being the Middle East, the Abu Dhabi Police Department have already snapped one up, which alongside two other buyers leaves four still to sell. So what does $3.4million get you?

Lego Technic Lykan Hypersport

Exclusivity, that’s for sure. With only six Hypersports available to public any buyer is going to be in a very small club. They’ll also get an RUF-developed 780bhp 3.7litre twin-turbo flat-6 engine, which sounds a lot like it’s come from a Porsche 911, and the first headlights to be embedded with jewels (420 of them).

If we’re honest, if we had $3.4million we’d probably take a Koenigsegg Agera R and still have change for a McLaren P1, a Ford GT, and eight Toyota GT86s, but unfortunately TLCB’s policy on advertising revenue means we’ll unlikely to ever make it onto the world’s rich list.

However if you do hanker after a Lykan, but are a bit short in the cash department, Flickr’s Lachlan Cameron may have the answer. Whilst we don’t think the Hypersport is a particularly good supercar, Lachlan’s remote control Technic version sure is.

With Power Functions controlled steering and drive, a 4-speed gearbox, all-wheel independent suspension, a flat-6 engine, LED head and tail lights, electronically opening doors, an electronically controlled rear wing, and some of the best Technic bodywork we’ve ever seen, Lachlan’s Lykan is a seriously impressive build.

There’s more to see of this incredible replica of an incredible car at the Eurobricks discussion forum and on Flickr – click here to make the jump to the complete gallery.

Lego Lykan Hypersport

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My Other Car is a Mercedes-Benz…

Lego Mercedes-Benz AMG C63 DTM

This stunning Mercedes-Benz AMG C63 DTM racing car was discovered on Eurobricks, and it’s one of the most original Technic Supercars we’ve published in ages. Underneath the brilliant bodywork, complete with wonderfully authentic decals, is a wealth of superb mechanical engineering, including a paddle-shift operated 4-speed gearbox, a miniaturised working V8 engine, independent suspension on all wheels, and working steering.

Lego Mercedes-Benz AMG C63 DTM

Builder Brunojj1 hasn’t stopped there though as he’s constructed a matching AMG C63, replacing the mechanical goodies with a Power Functions remote control drivetrain and LED lights. Drive is delivered by a combination of an XL Motor and an L Motor, geared to match one another, with a Servo powering the steering. There’s loads more to see of both models, including a of each, at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the link above to join the race.

Lego Mercedes-Benz AMG C63 DTM

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Pagani Huayra – Picture Special

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

It’s time for something special. Really special. Poland’s Paul Kmiec, better known as Sariel, has been wowing the online Lego community for years. He’s a published Lego author and a veteran of this site, with a huge range of diverse Technic machinery published here over the years. His latest creation, in construction for months, reached TLCB yesterday, and we may only be a few weeks in but 2017 will have to be a pretty incredible year to beat it. This is Sariel’s fully remote controlled Technic Pagani Huayra…

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

Built in 1:8 scale Sariel’s Huayra is a perfect Technic replica of the ultra-rare Italian hypercar. The bodywork, constructed from LEGO’s Technic panels, flex tubing and lift-arms, is a work of art, but it’s what’s underneath it that is truly remarkable.

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

A remote control drive train, controlled by a third-party SBrick bluetooth module, powers the Huayra, with a remotely operable two-speed gearbox and fully independent adjustable suspension included too. There are opening doors, and functioning turn signals, reversing and brake lights – all engaged automatically when the Huayra turns, reverses or decelerates.

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra Sariel

Yes, decelerates – because Sariel’s Pagani features remotely operated working pneumatic brakes and the Huayra’s trick active aerodynamics, including the front and rear spoilers deployed on each side when cornering and the rear-mounted airbrake used during heavy deceleration.

The whole set-up is a delight to watch and you can do so via the beautifully shot video below, plus you can see the full gallery of exquisite imagery via Sariel’s photostream – click here to view one of the finest Technic Supercars ever built.

YouTube Video

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McLaren Monday

Lego McLaren 675LT Spider

McLaren Automotive are on a roll right now. After two decades away from car building they’ve re-entered the market big time, first with the MP4-12C (easily the worst named supercar in history), and now with a range of super sports cars based around the same carbon fibre tub and twin turbo V8 engine.

This one is the most powerful in the range (excluding the limited run P1 hypercar), the 675 LT, and it’s been recreated in Technic form as a commission piece by previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens. With remote control drive and steering, an electrically deployed rear wing and a working electric convertible roof Jeroen’s build is more than just a static display piece.

There’s more to see at Eurobricks and Flickr, where you can also find a link to a video of the functions in action and where instructions are available so that you can build your own 675 LT Spider too.

Lego McLaren 675LT Spider

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Christmas Orange

Lego Technic Scorpion Supercar Crowkillers

We’re not really sure why you always get an orange at the bottom of your Christmas stocking. This TLCB writer usually gives his to the Elves, who – having been caged over Christmas – are usually pretty hungry and devour the fruit – skin, pith and all.

Technic car building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Paul Boratko (aka Crowkillers) has returned with his Christmas orange, and it’s far more exciting than a loose piece of citrusy fruit. Even if you’re an Elf.

Featuring a 4-speed sequential gearbox, working steering, a mid-mounted V8 engine, all-wheel drive and all-wheel suspension, Crowkiller’s ‘Scorpion’ is a proper mechanical Technic supercar, and we love it.

There’s a huge gallery of the build available to view on Brickshelf, which includes detailed chassis imagery as well as further photos of the complete car. Click the link above to start peeling!

Lego Technic Scorpion Supercar Crowkilers

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Heresy

Lego Technic Hennessey Venom GT

We don’t particularly like the Hennessey Venom GT. There, we said it. Cue the wrath of the internet. OK, we’ll explain. The Venom GT is a Lotus Exige with a GM V8 shoved in it. There’s nothing wrong with a Lotus Exige with a GM V8 shoved in it, but it’s a long way from being the greatest car ever made ever, which is how much of the internet views the Venom.

In fact we get the feeling that the Venom was built purely to satisfy the aforementioned keyboard warriors who only look at the stats of a car to judge how good it is. If the Venom is the fastest ‘production’ car in the world it must, therefore, be the best. Which it isn’t. At all.

Anyhoo, this Technic recreation of a car we don’t particularly like is a model that we do like rather a lot. Built by Lachlan Cameron it’s packed with working features, and it looks spectacular too.

Underneath the wonderfully replicated Exige-on-steriods bodywork is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain, electronically deployable rear wing, working V8 engine, all-wheel suspension, and opening doors, engine cover and roof.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s Venom GT at both his Flickr photostream and the Eurobricks forum – click the links to join the discussion.

Lego Technic Hennessey Venom GT RC

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Nine One Nine

Lego Technic Porsche 919 Le Mans

Due to the ongoing Dieselgate scandal the Volkswagen Group have a bit of reputation rebuilding to do. Cue motorsport; get your cars on the track, win some races, and everyone loves you.

Unfortunately for motorsport fans (and for Volkswagen), this method is very expensive, and criminal investigations, lawsuits, and fines do not come cheap. It also doesn’t look too good if you’re caught fiddling diesel emissions tests to then put said diesel engine on a racetrack to promote its sales…

Sadly the current situation has meant that Volkswagen have decided to pull the plug on both their WRC campaign and their Audi Diesel Le Mans team, both of which have won everything going in the last few years. We think they’ll probably enter Formula E at some point to show how they’ve turned over a new leaf and that they really do care about the environment after all, but until then it falls to Porsche to keep the Group active in motorsport.

Fortunately Porsche have picked up exactly where Audi left off, winning the Le Mans 24 Hour race back-to-back in 2015 and 2016 with this, their magnificent 919 hybrid LMP1 racer. This incredible replica of last year’s race-winning car is the work of Manuel Nascimento of Flickr, and it’s one of the finest Technic supercars of the year.

Manuel has built the 919’s LMP1 bodywork beautifully, including accurate recreations of the sponsorship and branding decals found on the real car. The beauty is more than skin deep too, as the model features Power Functions lights, remote control drive and steering, and electrically opening doors.

There’s a huge gallery of stunning images available to view; click the link above to see more at Manuel’s photostream.

Lego Porsche 919 Le Mans Technic RC

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Scorpion Supercar

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

We round off a busy day here at TLCB Towers with this, Crowkillers‘ stunning new supercar. Built from the pieces of the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Technic set, Crowkillers’ latest creation goes back to the roots of the Technic Supercar franchise, without Power Functions, pneumatics, or a limited edition book.

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

Instead Crowkillers has focussed on mechanical functionality, and in doing so he’s created a wonderfully functional model. Suspension is independent on all wheels with an in-board pushrod set-up, there’s a mid-mounted V8 engine connected to a sequential 4-speed gearbox driving all four wheels, plus working steering, opening doors, engine cover and luggage space.

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

There’s more to see of Crowkillers’ ‘Scorpion’ Supercar via his Brickshelf gallery and the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus you can read our interview with Crowkillers as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

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Ferrari Fursday*

Lego Technic Ferrari 308 GTS

Time to go old-school. This is Ferrari’s glorious 308 GTS, built between 1975 and 1985, and powered by a mid-mounted V8 producing around 250bhp (unless you were in America, where emission regulations dropped that a bit).

Made famous by the cult TV show Magnum P.I, the 308 is widely regarded as one of the most iconic Ferrari designs of all time. There were some anomalies, including a 2 litre version (which was still – incredibly – a V8) that made a whopping 150bhp, but these aside the 308 is probably the quintessential Ferrari.

Lego Technic Ferrari 308 GTS

Lightly updated to become the 328 in the late ’80s, the 308/328 platform is also one of Ferrari’s most successful models, with nearly 20,000 units produced over three decades. Somebody decided that one more was needed though, and commissioned Flickr’s Jeroen Ottens to recreate the classic Ferrari in Lego form.

It was a wise move too, as Jeroen has absolutely nailed it. Featuring a replica V8 engine mounted to a working 3+R gearbox, four wheel independent suspension, steering (Ackermann with caster), pop-up headlights controlled via the dashboard, adjustable seats and a removable roof, this 308 replica is every bit as good underneath as it looks on top. There’s loads more to see of this incredible Technic supercar at Jeroen’s photostream – click here to check it out.

Lego Technic Ferrari 308 GTS

*Read in a flashy Essex/South London ’80s banker accent. If you’re not from the UK and don’t know what that sounds like, lucky you.

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Nightcrawler

Lego Technic Remote Control 4x4 Crawler

Another day and another Elf successfully returns to TLCB Towers. Today’s find is the work of Stari89, and it’s quite a cleverly engineered creation. Featuring remote control all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering, a flat-4 ‘boxer’ engine, live axle suspension, and opening gull-wing doors, Stari’s stealthy black ‘Trial Crawler’ includes as many features as LEGO’s own version. There’s lots more to see, including some great chassis photos, via Eurobricks and Brickshelf.

Lego Technic 4x4 Crawler

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Plan B

Lego Technic Group B Rally Car

Back in the mid-’80s world rally cars were a very different animal to those racing today. With only the loosest affiliation to their road-going counterparts, the racers of Group B took rallying (and then rally-cross, after they were banned from the WRC in 1987) to a whole new level or speed, and – unsurprisingly – risk. Formula 1 had mostly cleaned up its safety record by the mid-’80s, however Group B rallying ensured that professional motorsport continued to send people home in boxes.

A series of fatalities in 1986 prompted the FIA to act, and it was to be Group B’s last WRC season. The cars were not forgotten though, with many transferring to rally-cross, whilst Peugeot updated their monstrous 205 T16 to run in the Paris-Dakar rally, winning in ’87. ’89 and ’90.

Previous bloggee and Technic legend Nico71 hasn’t forgotten either, paying homage to the insanity of Group B with his latest creation, this superb Technic Group B rally car. Based on no particular model Nico’s model looks a bit like an Opel Astra to us (if Opel has created a Group B challenger), and it’s packed with mechanical Technic functions. These include a mid-mounted V6 engine, all-wheel-drive with three differentials, working steering both by the wheel and Hand-of-God, opening doors and rear engine bodywork, and fully independent suspension on all wheels.

As the time of writing Nico’s latest build isn’t on Brickshelf or the other main creation-sharing websites (big points for the Elf that found it!), but you can see all the details, a huge gallery of high quality images, and access instructions to build this model yourself at Nico’s own website. Click the link above to head to a forest in 1985.

Lego Technic Group B WRC Nico71

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Life on the Edge

Lego Technic Ford Edge RC

After the near collapse of America’s ‘Big Three’ auto manufacturers following decades of crappy products, poor investment and safety cover-ups, Ford have progressed rather well. Their ‘One Ford’ programme is central to the company’s recovery, and it aims to create cars that are suitable for multiple markets, in doing so leveraging greater economies of scale and utilising Ford’s breadth of expertise around the world.

The results are that America gets down-sized turbo engines and the Focus and Fiesta from Europe (a Good Thing), and here in Europe we get the South American Ecosport crossover (Not a Good Thing), the new Europe-friendly Mustang (a Very Good Thing) and – in the last few weeks – this; the large American-developed Edge SUV.

The jury is still out on whether this is a Good Thing or not, as although the European Edge comes with EU-friendly turbo-diesels, it’s a bit big and a bit soft to appeal to European reviewers. Still, they’re largely numpties anyway because no-one wants to throw a car round a corner at 60mph if it has two kids and a labrador in the back, yet this seems to be a priority for every automotive journalist.

Anyhoo, what we are certain of is that this Technic recreation of Ford’s latest offensive into the European SUV market is absolutely brilliant. Built by Flickr’s chumuhou it features a full remote control drivetrain with two L Motors powering all four wheels, Servo steering, all-wheel independent suspension, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a beautifully realistic interior. There’s lots more to see at chumuhou’s Flickr photostream – click the link above to make the jump to check it out.

Lego Technic Ford Edge Remote Control 4x4

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Nice Pair

Lego Technic Porsche 911

This glorious Porsche 911 wide-body racer is part of the current LEGO ReBrick competition. Built by previous bloggee jorgeopesi it’s true Technic supercar, featuring working suspension, a flat-6 engine, all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering, and it looks… well it looks like that. Bloody brilliant. There’s more to see at the jorgeopesi’s Rebrick page – click the link above to see more on ReBrick, or here for the Brickshelf gallery.

The second part of today’s Porsche pairing comes from newcomer Jacob Lockett and is also built for LEGO’s ReBrick Porsche competition. Jacob has chosen to recreate one of Porsche’s rarest and most interesting cars, the mid ’60s flat-4 engined 904. Despite only having four cylinders and a two litre capacity, the 904 made almost 200bhp, and that was way back in 1964! Even today that’s a good figure for a two litre 4-cylinder. Jacob’s Technic recreation features working suspension, functioning steering, and a replica flat-4 piston engine. There’s more to see via ReBrick – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Porsche 904

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Counting Cars with Crowkillers

Lego Crowkillers Count's Kustoms

The Lego Car Blog favourite Crowkillers is back, and this time he’s not working alone – but he hasn’t teamed up with another builder as you might expect. Instead Crowkillers has collaborated with the legendary Count’s Kustoms hot rod shop from the History Channel’s ‘Counting Cars’ TV show in order to create a pair of unique creations.

Above viewers of the show will recognise Count’s 1956 Chevrolet truck, complete with custom flame decals, whilst below is a model that some of our readers may recognise from a previous post.

Based on his ‘Assassin’ Technic Supercar, Crowkiller’s latest creation has been custom-painted by Count’s Kustoms’ own Ryan Evans and you can own it!

This amazing one-off Technic Supercar is being auctioned for charity to raise money for a little boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and it also includes two customised mini-figures from the TV show. You can read more about the model via Eurobricks, and if you’d like to see more of this unique collaboration and bid for your chance to own it you can do so by clicking on the giant letters below.

Click here to visit the Crowkillers & Count’s Kustoms auction

Lego Crowkillers Assassin

 

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8070 Technic Supercar Review

Lego Technic 8070 Review

The Lego Car Blog Review My Set Competition is underway! Today we’re joined by MOCpages’ Rage Hobbit, who has donned TLCB Reviewing Anorak in order to pen a review of one of his favourite sets. Over to Rage…

The 8070 Supercar from 2011. This car had a lot to live up to.

As part of the Technic Supercar flagship series that started all the way back with the 8880, this set had to try and live up to high expectations and even higher hopes. Was it truly the successor to the acclaimed 8448 Super Street Sensation?

Mostly yes. Sort of.

Differences between this car and its predecessors become evident upon opening the box. This is no old-fashioned Technic set; there’s hardly a single studded beam to be found. I’m sure some people liked this change, others probably hated it, but no amount of pointless arguing will change the fact that this is the way Technic is going to stay.

This retinue of studless pieces is found in several unnumbered bags sprawled inside a rather empty box. Don’t ask me how many bags; they didn’t seem all that special and as such I threw them out moments after opening the set. The three instruction booklets – ranging from 50 to 80 pages – are packed neatly into a plastic bag, along with a cardboard plate so that the booklets don’t get beat up during transit. It’s a nice touch, and something that LEGO should revisit. As per the usual, no B-model instructions are to be found inside the box; they’re found exclusively online *sigh*. LEGO should get the point eventually.

The wheels and hubs are free-floating inside the box, with the electronic components – a Power Functions battery box and M-motor – packaged individually. Tear everything open, dump it all in a big pile, and you’re ready to build.

The build process is fairly engaging yet still pretty simple as compared to more recent Technic sets. Starting with the distribution transmission for the M-motor, you add the rear axle and chassis frame rails before moving on to booklet number 2 and all the other stuff. Some of the aesthetic portions can be a bit of a drag, but overall it’s a good build.

Lego Technic 8070 Supercar Review

Let’s start with the functions and features. The car rolls very nicely, with the rear wheels driving a V8 piston engine found under the front hood. At this point, supercar snobs will complain along the lines of “It needs a V10!” and “REAL supercars have V12s”, but the V8 suits the scale of the car well. Dual-wishbone independent suspension (a little bit too hard on the rear wheels, with decent travel all-around) is found on all wheels, with the front ones steered through a hand-of-god knob behind the cabin. Steering lock is only okay, but I won’t complain too much.

The 4 main functions of this car are controlled by a distribution transmission found in between the seats where it should be. The solitary M-motor in the set drives the transmission by way of a clutch gear so that you don’t break anything.

The first of the functions is the deployable rear wing. The function works fine, but the mechanism leaves an ugly gap in the rear aesthetics, and the wing looks a bit half-baked. Tip the switch to the other side, and the hood starts to open through a neat and effective linkage mechanism that emulates the kind of thing found in real supercars. The other two functions on the transmission are reserved for the doors, which is also my very favorite function. The doors open individually on a butterfly-ish hinge; a function which works flawlessly and doesn’t compromise the aesthetics. Overall, kudos to LEGO for the functions on this car. Continue reading

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