Tag Archives: supercar

Honda NSX – Picture Special

Lego Technic Honda NSX

After over a decade out of the supercar game Honda’s new NSX supercar has just gone on sale, a near-600bhp hybrid-powered torque-vectoring computer with wheels. But that’s not the one we have here today.

Launched in 1990 the original Honda NSX was designed to take on the established supercars from manufacturers such as Ferrari, only at a lower price point, and to upset the supercar order through the virtue of it, well, being a supercar that actually worked.

Honda F1 driver Ayrton Senna helped to tune the handling in the final stages of development, and although the NSX was powered by ‘only’ a transversely mounted naturally aspirated 3.0 V6 making 270bhp (albeit with an 8,000rpm redline), it quickly gained a reputation for being one hell of a drivers’ car.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

Lightweight (the NSX was the first mass produced car to be made from aluminium) and beautifully nimble, Honda showed that you didn’t need all-wheel-drive, turbos, or a prancing horse on the hood to build a superb supercar. And unlike pretty much every other supercar at the time the NSX was reliable, because above all else, it was a Honda.

These days something of the original NSX’s simplicity is missing from the latest crop of overpowered, over-assisted supercars – the new NSX included, and arguably the same is true for their Technic equivalents. Packed with Power Functions electric motors, remote control, and bluetooth, we seem to have lost the joy of hands-on mechanics. Luckily for us though, Nico71 has not only recreated one of the finest old-school supercars ever made, he’s done it in a profoundly old-school way too…

Lego Technic Honda NSX

This is Nico’s Technic Honda NSX, and it’s as delightfully manual as the real car. An accurate transversely mounted V6 engine is turned by the rear wheels, which are independently suspended along with those at the front. The front wheels also steer by hand, thanks to a connected steering wheel plus a ‘hand-of-God’ connection mounted on the roof. The pop-up headlights are also manually raised and lowered via lever mounted on the dashboard, and the seats can slide fore and aft manually too. Lastly the doors, hood, rear window, engine cover and glovebox all open by hand, and there isn’t a Power Functions motor in sight.

Nico’s Honda NSX is – much like the real car – a triumph of mechanical engineering, and well worth a closer look. Check out the full details at Nico’s discussion topic at the Eurobricks forum, and you can find all the images, a video of the model’s features and instructions (yes, really, so we we won’t be getting the usual ‘Can I have instructions?’ messages for once!) at Nico’s own excellent website – Click here to take a look.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

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Ford GT – Picture Special

Lego Technic Ford GT Supercar

Ford’s sold-out GT has got everyone talking. By everyone, mostly we mean America, where not having a V8 is still seen as bit of a novelty. Nevertheless, the new GT doesn’t have a V8, instead being fitted with a seriously tuned version of Ford’s 3.5 litre ‘Ecoboost’ V6 engine producing over 600bhp.

Ford designed the GT first and foremost as a racing car, maximising performance within GT-class rules, and then adapting the design for the road. This makes the GT a magnificently impractical car for road use, but at a track… that’s a different story.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

This stunning Technic recreation of Ford’s newest supercar has been built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron and it’s very nearly as impressive as the real car. Underneath the beautifully sculpted body work is a V6 engine, inboard pushrod suspension complete with the GT’s trick ‘track mode’ setting which drops the car to the tarmac, a raising rear spoiler, and Power Functions remote control drive and steering.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Lachlan’s incredible Ford GT Technic Supercar on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the links above for the full gallery, build details, and a video of the GT in action.

Lego Technic Ford GT Remote Control

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To Supercar or Not to Supercar?

Lego Technic Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Remote Control

Is the Chevrolet Corvette a supercar? If this were YouTube there would now be a heated discussion, someone would call someone else something rude, and Hitler would probably eventually be mentioned.

This is The Lego Car Blog though, and our readers are (generally) more civilised than the baying mob found within the YouTube comments section. However, we’ll throw our thoughts into the Corvette Supercar argument because, well… we can: We don’t know.

Yup, we’ve wussed out and sat on the fence, because the area the Corvette occupies between Sports and Super Car is greyer than ever. Once ridiculed by us here in Europe, the Chevrolet Corvette is now actually quite good, and in Z06 form it’s certainly quick enough to enter the supercar league. But ‘quick’ doesn’t necessarily mean ‘supercar’.

It seems that Chevrolet themselves have had enough of the argument and rumour has it they’re readying a mid-engined version of the Corvette to silence the debate. Whether that happens or not what we are confident in is that this stunning C7 series Corvette Z06 by newcomer Dylan Sebastian is a bona-fide Technic Supercar.

With a working V8 engine, independent suspension on all four wheels, plus steering and drive via remote control, Dylan’s Corvette has all the Technic Supercar boxes ticked, plus opening doors and hood, and LED lights.

What’s that? Technic Supercars need to have a gearbox? Damn…

Well it seems Dylan’s Z06 is even more true to the real Corvette than we thought, itself being as supercar debatable as the real thing. Whatever it is though, it’s a model that’s definitely worth a closer look, and you can check out all of the photos at Dylan’s Flickr album and you can read more about the build and watch a video of the model in action at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Lego Technic Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Remote Control

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McLaren P1

Lego Technic McLaren P1

McLaren’s past few Formula 1 seasons are probably best forgotten, but whilst their F1 campaign is currently something of a disaster, thanks to the dog of a Honda power unit in the back of their MCL32, their road car division is going from strength to strength. Top of the McLaren tree is this, the 900bhp petrol-electric P1.

Just 375 P1s were produced between 2013 and 2015, and thanks to a hybrid powertrain the P1 can run on electricity alone for about 30km. This stunning Technic recreation of McLaren’s hypercar is electric too, driven by LEGO’s excellent Power Functions motors. A remotely operated 4-speed gearbox and rear wing / air-brake are also included, along with fully independent suspension and opening doors.

Newcomer Ed Hoes (aka madcow) is the builder and there’s lots more to see on Flickr and via the Eurobricks forum here.

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My Other Car is a Porsche

Lego Technic Audi R8 V10 Plus

LEGO’s 42056 Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS set did not fair well here under the Reviewer’s gaze. Over-priced and under-engineered, 42056 is – in that regard at least – quite un-Porsche-like. However the Lego Community have been taking their hands to the GT3 RS to see if they can do better. This is the latest 42056 B-Model effort to come our way, and it looks tremendous.

Built by MOCpages’ Kasper Hansen, this Audi R8 V10 Plus almost exclusively uses parts from the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, apart from the 3D-printed wheels (which are some of the most accurate replicas of the wheels from a real car that we’ve ever seen).

Kasper’s R8 also features a V10 engine, steering, suspension, paddle-shift gearbox (likely lifted straight from the official set),  plus opening doors, hood and engine cover. There’s more to see of Kasper’s creation over on MOCpages – click the link above to make the jump – and if you’d like to dismantle your own 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS to have a go at your own B-Model, here’s one fast way to do it…

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Eruption*

Lego Technic Supercar

This striking-looking supercar entitled ‘Volcano’ comes from Charbel of Flickr and Eurobricks, and it’s one of the coolest Technic creations we’ve seen in ages. Featuring all the prerequisites of a Technic Supercar Charbel’s creation includes all-wheel independent suspension, working steering, opening doors, hood and engine cover, a flat-6 engine and a 4-speed gearbox. There’s lots more to see of the Volcano at both Flickr and Eurobricks – click the links to make the jump.

Lego Technic Supercar

*We’re still going with songs for post titles. We could’ve gone with this one, but it’s much too classy for this blog. Van Halen on the other hand…

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Veneno

Lego Lamborghini Veneno

This is a Lamborghini Veneno Roadster, a car that – even by Lamborghini standards – is completely mad. Based on the Aventador supercar, the 740bhp V12-engined carbon-fibre Veneno celebrated the marque’s 50th birthday with a limited production run of fewer than 10 units, each costing over $4million, making the Veneno the most expensive production car in the world.

Lego Technic Lamborghini Veneno

A bit pricy for us here at TLCB then, but fortunately Flickr’s Lachlan Cameron has the answer with this superb Technic recreation of the nutty Lamborghini. Featuring full remote control drive, inboard suspension, a V12 piston engine and working lights, Lachlan’s Technic Veneno is brilliantly engineered inside and out. An extensive gallery of images detailing the build is available to view on Flickr and you can take a closer look via the link in the text above.

Lego Technic Lamborghini Veneno

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Outlawed Electronics

Lego Technic Supercar Crowkillers

This fantastic looking Technic Supercar ‘Outlaw’ comes from TLCB Master MOCer and serial bloggee Paul Boratko, better known as Crowkillers. His latest creation celebrates 40 years of LEGO Technic, and returns the theme to its mechanical roots. Paul’s model forgoes Power Functions motors and remote control for gears and levers, and we love it for that. Working steering, all-wheel suspension, a deployable rear wing, 4+R gearbox and a V8 engine are all included, and all must be powered manually by the human (or Elf) in control. There’s more to see of Paul’s build, including detailed images of the chassis, gearbox and suspension, on MOCpages – click the link above to make the jump to the full gallery and build specs.

Lego Technic Outlaw Supercar

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Lykan Hypersport – Picture Special

Lego Lykan Hypersport SBrick

This is the Lykan Hypersport, a car with a base price of $3.4million, a production run of just seven units, and diamonds embedded in the headlights. It is a spectacularly pointless machine, built for people who are only interested in having the most expensive of everything (the Abu Dhabi Police Department included, who have – unbelievably – ordered one), and yet… the world would be a duller place without it.

Lego Lykan Hypersport Remote Control

This jaw-dropping SBrick-controlled replica of the Middle East’s first (but almost certainly not last) hypercar is the work of previous bloggee dgustafsson1317, who may not have a talent for screen names but he sure does with Danish plastic. Featuring opening everything and exquisite detail, dgustafsson’s Lykan is one of the most impressive cars of the year so far, and you can see more of the build at the huge Flickr album via the link above.

Lego Lykan Hypersport Remote Control

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Supermarket Special Stage

Lego Technic Rally Car

The World Rally Championship has a long association with humble hatchbacks. This is probably because of the sport’s grass-roots origins, when cars really were just road-going shopping appliances, and where the tightness of the rural European roads on which the stages were held favoured the small and nimble.

These days the WRC is used primarily as an advertising tool for mass-market products. If a car can deal with a Swedish forest, it’ll probably be alright in the supermarket carpark. The current crop of works WRC cars include the Ford Fiesta, Skoda Fabia, Hyundai i20, Citroen C3, and Toyota Yaris, and they are becoming increasingly (and gloriously) nuts.

Lego Technic Rally Car

Previous bloggee Horcik Designs has decided to construct his very own WRC contender to join in the fun, and it’s a beautifully packaged bit of kit. A three-cylinder piston engine is mounted transversely under the hood, delivering the power to the independently-sprung wheels via a four-speed gearbox. Working steering, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a roll cage all feature too, and the body panels can be easily removed to reveal the internal construction.

A full gallery of images is available at Horcik’s Flickr photostream – click the link above to the make the jump.

Lego Technic Rally Car

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Back in Black

Lego Technic Porsche Carrera GT

The Lego Car Blog Archives are a scary place. Dark, forbidding, and – rumour has it – stalked by a band of long-feral Elves, it’s a part of TLCB Towers that this writer tries to avoid.

Needs must though, as we were sure that this spectacular Technic Porsche Carrera GT had appeared here before. It turns out that it has, but builder Artemy Zotov has newly rebuilt his Porsche in an updated black colour scheme to coincide with the release of the model’s building instructions.

Featuring a V10 engine, working steering and suspension, and a rising and retracting rear spoiler, Artemy’s Carrera GT is one of the finest Technic Supercars of recent times. You can check out the full details of the build at Artemy’s MOCpage, where you can now find a link to the model’s building instructions so that you can create your own!

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Volkswagen Golf GTI | Picture Special

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

The Volkswagen Golf GTI is one of the all-time great hot hatchbacks. Now in it’s seventh generation there have been roughly five good Golf GTIs, and three really good ones. This is one of the really good ones…

Launched in 1976, two years after the Golf first went on sale, the GTI was the product of a few VW engineers having some fun. In a very German way of course, as having some fun meant staying on late at work.

Still, the product of their inventiveness helped to re-write the rules of quick cars. Powered by a fuel-injected 1.6, and then 1.8 litre engine, the Mark 1 Golf GTI was quicker than the contemporary sports cars of the time, it could fit four people in it, and it didn’t leak when it rained.

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

Now a seriously sought after car, there sadly aren’t many Mark 1 Golf GTIs left, but if you’d like one Damian Plesniak may have the answer.

Featuring a transversely-mounted 4-cylinder engine, accurate McPherson front and twist-beam rear suspension, opening doors, hood, and hatchback with parcel shelf, a detailed interior with a working steering wheel, adjustable seats, and opening glovebox, plus full remote control drive and LED lights, Damian’s Technic Golf GTI is very nearly as well engineered as the real thing.

There are loads more images to see at Damian’s Flickr and Brickshelf albums, and you can read more about the build, as well as watch a video of the Golf GTI in action, at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

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Money Monday Bonus

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron Aston Martin Vantage GT3

It wouldn’t be a money themed day without the investment banker’s favourite word; Bonus! So we’ve got a bonus for you in the form of an extra post showing both of today’s builds side-by-side. This is fitting because those ordering a new Bugatti Chiron already own on average over fifty cars each, so it’s highly likely they’ll have an Aston Martin too. Or seven.

These shots have been made possible by the fact the the builders of the Chiron and Vantage GT3 are brothers, uploading their creations within a few hours of each other. You can read more about each build by clicking here for the Bugatti Chiron and here for the Aston Martin Vantage GT3, plus you can see more the models together by visiting Lachlan’s Cameron’s Flickr photostream, and we’ll see you tomorrow for something much more humble!

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron Aston Martin Vantage GT3

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More Money Monday

Lego Technic Aston Martin Vantage GT3

The money theme continues today with this, newcomer Dugald Cameron’s incredible Aston Martin Vantage GT3 racer. Constructed from many of the parts in LEGO’s 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set (and putting them to considerably better use), Dugald’s GT3 is a seriously beautiful build. Plus it’s orange, and we like orange.

Underneath that retina-searing bodywork is a full remote control drivetrain, with two XL Motors powering the wheels, a Servo controlling the steering (and linked the steering wheel), plus a Medium Motor driving the sequential transmission. A V12 piston engine sits up front, whilst a mechanically adjustable rear wing is mounted at the back, and the cockpit in-between features a fully adjustable driving position with a tilting steering wheel, pedals with feedback, and a sliding racing seat.

Lego Technic Aston Martin Vantage GT3

The suspension on all four corners is fully independent, with torsion and sway bars, plus a trick air-jack system powered by an on-board compressors is fitted to allow for quick pit stops.

The complete model is one of the most impressive we’ve seen this year, and the entire build process has been catalogued on both Eurobricks and Flickr, showing both the steps taken to create the Vantage GT3 and the brilliant engineering within it.

You can see the full gallery of images at the Aston Martin Vantage GT3 Flickr album, and you can read about the build process by flicking through the Eurobricks discussion that charted it by clicking here.

Lego Technic Aston Martin Vantage GT3

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Money Monday

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron RC

The Lego Car Blog is not a money-focussed organisation. We only allow limited advertising, the proceeds of which you can read about here, and the staff all work for nowt (human), or Smarties (elf). However, we are still amongst the richest people on earth, thanks entirely to the place of our birth. And if you’re reading this, you probably are too.

But there’s rich, and then there’s rich! Today’s car certainly belongs to the latter. Costing $2,700,000 in base specification, the Chiron is the world’s fastest (when tested) and most powerful production car, expected to hit around 285mph when de-limited.

We’ll have to wait to see what top speed the Chiron achieves once testing is complete, as the car (and more importantly, the tyres) are in the realms of experimental physics, but even with the car’s main purpose – top speed – being an unknown statistic, it hasn’t stopped 200 Chiron orders being placed before anyone has driven it.

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron RC

Like we said, there’s rich, then there’s rich! In fact the average Chiron customer already owns over fifty other cars. And a helicopter.

We’ll stick with this one then, built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron it’s the first Technic Supercar sized Bugatti Chiron we’ve seen, and it is absolutely spectacular. With Bugatti’s trademark W16 engine hooked up to an all-wheel-drive system, independent suspension, full remote control drive, steering and electronically deployable rear wing, LED lighting, and SBrick bluetooth control, Lachlan’s Chiron is one of the finest Technic Supercars of the year.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Lachlan’s Bugatti at his Flickr photostream or via Eurobricks, including WIP shots and images of the rolling-chassis mechanics. Click the links above to make the jump, and you can see the Chiron in action via the video below.

YouTube Video:

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