Tag Archives: F40

Shell Suit

Lego Ferrari F40 GT Shell

This is an ultra-rare Ferrari F40 GT, built from 1991-92 to take Ferrari back into endurance racing. Just seven GT’s were built, each featuring a stripped-out interior, fixed perspex headlights (replacing the pop-up units fitted to the road car) and an engine upgrade to the tune of near 600bhp. That upgrade actually included a restrictor to limit the power produced by the twin-turbo V8 in order for it to meet national championship regulations, the full-fat LM version was rumoured to produce over 900bhp in qualifying trim…

This superb recreation of the 1991 Shell-liveried racer comes from Flickr’s Nuno Taborda, and much like the real F40 GT it’s based on the production version, in this case LEGO’s excellent 10248 Creator set. Nuno has upgraded the set’s bodywork and interior to GT specification, and re-liveried the car in Shell’s iconic white, red and yellow sponsorship.

There’s lots more to see of Nuno’s 10248 modification at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to go GT racing circa 1991.

Lego Ferrari F40 GT Shell

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

F-Shorty

Lego Ferrari F40

This quirky cartoon-like Ferrari F40 was discovered on Flickr today. Yubnub is the builder, and his interesting use for hot dogs continues with his latest build. There’s more to see of his neat miniature from Maranello at the link above.

Tagged , , , , ,

FORZA LEGO!

Welcome to TLCB’s almost timely review of the latest in a short line of Creator Expert car models…

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Looks nice, doesn’t it? Usually in these reviews I open by rambling on a bit about personal experiences with the car in question, but since I’m not a millionaire that won’t happen this time.

Much.

Y’see, I have had the pleasure of inspecting this fine beast up close and in the plastic (the panels are glassfibre!). All you have to do is visit your friendly neighbourhood Supercar dealer. These places are almost always staffed by knowledgeable enthusiasts who sell what they sell because they love it. If they have the time, they’ll happily share it with you, a fellow enthusiast. Just try not to touch the cars they’ve spent ages polishing… Generally, they’re happy to entertain respectful sightseers and you’ll encounter none of the snootiness you might get from the classic boys…

The Ferrari F40 is an amazing thing, and hardly a people’s car like the other Lego Creator sets… except it is. It’s a thing that’s a joy to see (and hear) whether you own it or not. Three cheers for those who do and share them with the world by driving them around! If you ever see one behind you, wind down the window and hope he gives it the berries when he comes fanging past!

So, if you can’t get a real one, is 10248 the next best thing?

At £70 for 1158 pieces it’s better value, certainly… better value than the Mini even, with 80 more pieces for a fiver less. Considering the likely cost of the Ferrari licence, LEGO are being pretty generous here.

The box seems smallish, same size as the Mini’s I think, but it’s simple and uncluttered design is very appealing – it’s just a shame it’s got those destroy-box-here tabs to open it up. Inside, there’s two sets of numbered bags full of mostly small pieces – there’s a lot of detail here – a small sticker sheet that if you’re lucky won’t be crumpled and the single perfect bound instruction book that’s fast becoming the norm in larger sets. And a brick separator, because you can never have too many of those…

Instructions are pretty clear, so long as you realize Lego’s inconsistent representations of dark grey and black result in what could be black parts in the early stages actually being dark grey… Another minor niggle is the usually-helpful highlighting of parts just added occasionally obscures some parts already there, which can create confusion.

No biggie. It’s a fun thing to build, with very little repetition and like the Mini and Camper before it, plenty of interesting techniques and details along the way. I especially like the way they did those NACA ducts on the bonnet and sides. Here’s a fun fact: the duct was developed in 1945 as a way of allowing cooling air in with a minimal disruption to airflow, by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in the US (NACA eventually became NASA when it’s remit expanded just a bit).

I’m a riot at parties…

As for the rest of it, it’s mostly very good, starting with the engine.

19127457456_d7d7e352f0_b

The heart of any Ferrari, of course, and this has had plenty of attention lavished on it. The 2.85L turbocharged V8 isn’t the prettiest Ferrari engine but it ain’t exactly a diesel either… LEGO have done a great job of this, right down to the pistols used as manifold outlets that you can barely even see once it’s in the car.

The interior is simpler to build, mostly because (entirely accurately) there’s very little in it. What’s there is nicely done, although it would be good if the steering wheel’s rake was fixed instead of relying on a pin’s friction to hold it at the right angle. And good luck getting the tiny Prancing Horse sticker on the 1×1 round tile in the centre of the steering wheel! They probably should have printed that…

They probably shouldn’t have printed the rear pillars. This is the only area that lets it down somewhat. Apparently the genius responsible for the camper’s front and the Mini’s A pillar is yet to retire… One issue I have with this solution is the fact that printing in red on a black part results in a darker shade of red, a point that’s not evident from the pictures on the box but does stand out on the model. Also, because the side window / pillar is one big part, the side window lifts up with the rear cover. Any MOCer worth his salt would have bricked this part properly, as LEGO themselves did with the rest of it.

While we’re having a moan, do you ever wish that LEGO would stop unnecessarily redesigning parts? I’m talking here about the 1×6 arches used over the rear wheels that have an awkward little step that isn’t there if you use a couple of older, smoothly curving ones instead. It looks a lot better if you do.

I am now done moaning. I’m not even going to complain about the stickered ducts over the rear wheels, simply because there isn’t a better way that I can see to do this with an opening engine cover in the space available.

The front end is more successful, capturing the form of the F40 in bricks accurately and well. The pop-up headlights are quite neat (you have to lever them up individually yourself using a thin gap at the front – luckily they’ve provided the brick separator you’ll need for this!). The shape of the bonnet is excellent and there’s even a bit of detail under it, including a spanner (what are they trying to tell us about Italian reliability?). While you’re in there you might notice the multicoloured structure of the bonnet’s underside – the only place where the hidden BOLOCsness of this model becomes evident.

And then there’s that windscreen… Manna from heaven for MOCers, surely! Just so long as the car you build with it is red… There’s a slightly surprising omission here, since with a 1×4 black brick right below it at the same angle, a simple substitution provides somewhere to place a wiper. After all, they’ve thought of everything else, including door mirrors that are actually attached to the doors. Hooray!

Despite a couple of visual hiccups, the model as a whole does look pretty good:

19690153636_0aa1efeb9c_z

All the panels that should open, do, which we always like to see. The engine cover pivots on an axle so there’s no friction – you’ll need the handy stick provided to hold it up. I guess Ferrari must have done the same.

Aside from opening stuff and peering at detail, there’s no playability here, as with the other cars in this theme, but I’m pretty sure any attempt at stuffing mechanics in would ruin it.

Like the Camper and Mini before it, it exists for display and it looks good enough to do that; it’s one visual flaw not quite enough to detract from the whole.

If you have petrol in your veins you’ll like it. 8/10.

Buy the LEGO Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 set

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Set Preview

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Today might have been Clarkson, Hammond and May’s last episode of Top Gear, but LEGO have gone a very long way to cheering up TLCB office…

This is the new 10248 Creator set, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Following on from the 10220 Volkswagen Camper and 10242 Mini Cooper sets, LEGO have teamed up with Ferrari once more to bring us a stunning brick-built recreation of possibly the greatest car ever made.

Ferrari’s F40 was launched way back in the late 1980s to triumphant acclaim and it became the definitive supercar of the era. Powered by a small 2.9 litre twin turbo-charged V8 shrouded within kevlar and carbon fibre bodywork, the 201mph F40 was the fastest and most expensive Ferrari ever built.

Production lasted just 5 years, during which time around 1,300 units were manufactured. This means that today the F40 is a little too pricey for most of us, but luckily LEGO have the answer…

LEGO’s 10248 Ferrari F40 Creator set arrives in August of 2015 and contains over 1,150 pieces, a few of which are new and unique to the set, including the wheels, tyres and windshield. There’s an opening engine cover to reveal a detailed V8 engine, opening doors, clamshell front section, pop-up headlights and a detailed interior.

Aimed at ages 14+ the LEGO Creator Ferrari F40 won’t be cheap (RRP is estimated to be around $90/£70), but that’s quite a lot cheaper than the real car. Plus you can park it on your desk.

As is often the way a Set Review for 10248 may follow – in the meantime you can remind yourself of the previous iconic vehicles in the Creator line-up by clicking on the links in the text above.

Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Ferrari F40 Picture Special

Lego Technic Ferrari F40

Our Elves have been very successful over the past few days, which is great news for them (some are even looking quite plump), but it has meant much busyness for us. As such we’re going to round off this period of frequent blogging with one of the nicest Technic Supercars that we’ve ever seen; Jorge Garcia’s amazing Ferrari F40.

Lego Technic Ferrari F40 SupercarThis beautiful supercar by the previous TLCB bloggee is a truly exceptional replica of the late ’80s Ferrari. Underneath the exquisitely recreated bodywork sits a working engine and gearbox, and a full remote control drive system.

It’s the perfect finale to our millionaire-week, and you can see all the incredible details of Jorge’s recreation of one of the all time great supercars on both Brickshelf and MOCpages.

Lego Technic Supercar Ferrari F40

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

F40

Ferrari F40

The best Ferrari ever made. And therefore the best car ever made.

A straightforward find by one of The Lego Car Blog Elves today. No fancy title, no cunning caption, just a brilliant model of a brilliant car. LEGO Bro is the builder, and you can view this and his other works on Flickr.

Tagged , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: