Tag Archives: 8-wide

Super Duty

In the ludicrous arms-race that is the American pick-up truck market, there’s a sure-fire way to one-up the Raptors and Ram TRXs; the Ford F-650. Because it’s a truck.

Yup, of course there’s a ridiculous civilian version of the F-650 to cater to a certain flag-waving, firearms enthusing, election-denying section of America’s population, but thankfully we don’t have to feature that abomination here because regular bloggee Damian Z. (aka Thietmaier) has built the proper white trucky truck version, which is used across America to, you know, actually do stuff.

Damian’s is the flatbed configuration; no bling, all work, and it’s all the better for that. Clever building techniques capture the real F-650’s details perfectly and there’s more to see of Damian’s excellent Ford F-650 flatbed on Flickr. Click the link to do your duty.

Grand National Experimental

Ah Buick. Maker of boring cars for old people, and later re-badged Vauxhalls for old people, they’re about as interesting as a Brother’s Brick parts cataloguing evening.

Except in the late ’80s, when they went mad.

Working in partnership with McLaren, Buick took their soporific Regal sedan and turbocharged the 3.8 litre V6, with the resultant GNX producing almost 300bhp and a 0-60mph time of 4.6 seconds. In 1987!

Quite what they ate for breakfast that day we don’t know but we wish they’d eat it again.

Recreating the Buick ‘Grand National Experimental’ is Rolling Bricks, whose 8-wide Speed Champions scale model captures the aesthetic of the original brilliantly. There’s a detailed engine under the opening hood, room for two mini-figures, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

Maximum Five

Renault are weird. They’ve made wonderful cars, dull cars, terrible cars, and this… a supermini with a mid-mounted 1.4 litre turbo that produced – in race trim – around 380bhp. Back in the early ’80s!

That remarkable figure propelled the Renault 5 Maxi Turbo to the top step of the podium on its maiden event, at the 1981 Monte Carlo Rally.

This WRC success was to be relatively short-lived though, as the arrival of Group B and all-wheel-drive meant the Maxi Turbo was quickly outclassed on anything that wasn’t tarmac.

When an event was on tarmac though, the little Renault continued to be a formidable racer, finding success for the next two decades.

This lovely Speed Champions recreation of the legendary ’80s rally car was found by one of our Elves on Flickr, coming from Fabrice Larcheveque who has updated (and beautifully presented) a model he first created several years ago.

Authentic bespoke decals, a realistic interior, life-like engine bay, and even a roll-cage make for an exceptionally detailed Speed Champions creation, and there’s more to see – including a link to building instructions – at Fabrice’s ‘Renault 5 Maxi Turbo’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look and maybe recreate the 1981 Monte Carlo Rally on your desk at home. Not that we’re doing that right now of course, we’re much too grown up…

One Part Three Speed

LEGO’s increase to eight studs of width for their Speed Champions range has added a dose more realism to the real world vehicles represented in brick form. Key to this change was a new windshield piece, which is somehow perfect for all manner of completely different supercars.

Previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has utilised this part superbly, creating a myriad of instantly recognisable Speed Champions supercars centred around a uniform cockpit brick. We have three of his builds here today, with a Ferrari F40, Lamborghini Countach, and Ferrari 512 BB from left to right.

Each captures its real world counterpart brilliantly, with clever sticker use – as per LEGO’s official Speed Champions sets – making them even more authentic.

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see of these three ’80s supercars, plus many more besides, at Fabrice’s photostream. Take a look via the link.

Digital Boss

We rarely post renders. Rarer still creations where the first part of the description is a link to building instructions. We are today though, because a) this Ford Mustang Boss 302 looks epic, and b) because builder w35wvi, here making their TLCB debut, has released building instructions for free. And that – in an era of increasing Lego building profiteering – earns them a hundred TLCB points. See more, including that link to those free instructions, via the link.

Did You Drive Your Car Tonight Mr. Belfort?

A recent post here at TLCB was less than complimentary about the new Lamborghini ‘Countach’. We weren’t that complimentary about the original either, but – in its early form at least – the 1970s Gandini design was an absolute masterpiece.

Not so by the 1980s, when the Countach had become considerably fatter and more overblown, losing its striking lines and spectacular angles under a preposterously excessive bodykit. Which of course suited the decade it found itself in perfectly.

Cue previous bloggee Jerry Builds Bricks, who has recreated the ’80s Countach wonderfully in Speed Champions form, building his Lego version in ‘Wolf of Wall Street’ spec, which is about as ’80s as it gets.

Take some over-strength pills and crash it into everything on the way home via the link above!

White Angles

Back when this TLCB Writer was a boy, LEGO bricks came in exactly three angles; Right, 45°, and Somewhere (half-way?) in Between.

Not so today, where a myriad of wedges are available in numerous widths, lengths, and thicknesses, and it seems previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has deployed every single one of them in his recreation of Lamborghini’s ultra limited-run Reventon.

Inspired by a fellow previous bloggee The G Brix and constructed in 8-wide Speed Champions scale, Fabrice’s Reventon captures the angular aesthetic of the real car brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his collection of wedges here.

Longer than Expected*

McLaren seem to have a new limited run special edition every week, which means this TLCB Writer has all but lost interest in them. However there is one limited run special edition McLaren that is worth noticing; the, 3-seater, 5 metre long hybrid Speedtail.

Powered by the same 4.0 litre as most other McLarens, the Speedtail also features a parallel ‘self charging’ Hybrid set-up, much like the far more humdrum Toyota hybrids tootling about cities in their millions. Except the Speedtail’s hybrid system delivers over 1,000bhp.

It also looks like nothing else on the road, in part thanks to its enormous length*, which is greater even than a Range Rover.

Capturing this remarkable car in 8-wide Speed Champions form is The G Brix of Flickr, who has done such an excellent job this could be an official LEGO set, with space for three mini-figures inside, and front wheel covers that remain fixed even as the wheels behind them spin, just like the real car.

There’s more to see of G’s McLaren Speedtail on Flickr, click the link above to make the jump.

*That’s what she said.

Topless Summer

It’s summer here at TLCB and it’s HOT. Elves are scattered everywhere panting, and the office ‘air conditioner’ (a fan gaffa-taped to a window ledge) is just moving hot air about like the one in the back of an oven, ensuring everything is equally cooked.

Those of you reading this in sunnier climes than the UK (that’s all of you) will be wondering what all the fuss is about, but this TLCB Writer is well-travelled and no-where gets hot like the UK. Thank the high humidity, limited air conditioning, and buildings designed to keep in, not out, for that.

It also might explain why the British buy more convertibles than the French, Germans, Italians, and Spanish. Put together. Thus we have two here today, and they’re both… um, a bit crap.

The Dodge Viper was basically a truck engine shoved in a kids’ plastic toy, and was predictably rubbish as a result. But on the other hand, it was a truck engine shoved in a kids’ plastic toy, and it was therefore excellent. This superb Speed Champions scale Dodge Viper convertible was suggested by a reader, and it comes from previous bloggee RGB900 who has nailed the 1990s American icon in 6-wide form.

Equally iconic (and rubbish) was the modern Volkswagen Beetle convertible; a bubble-shaped Golf with a pram roof stuck on the back that predictably became the must-have accessory for people that knew nothing about cars.

Fashion is fickle though, and without any substance whatsoever the modern Beetle is now dead, and its customers have all moved on to Mini convertibles. SP_LINEUP hasn’t forgotten it though, creating this excellent brick-built version that was also suggested by a reader.

There’s more to see of each convertible on Flickr via the links, and if you’re wondering why we haven’t featured good drop-tops instead of a kids’ toy and VW pram, just be thankful we didn’t find one of these to post. See, the British do stupid things when it gets hot.

Toothpick in an Alley

If there’s a car more likely to be driven by people who are usually found chewing a toothpick in an alley wearing a leather jacket and a bad moustache than the ’77 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, we’re yet to find it.

This Speed Champions scale Trans Am comes from Rolling Bricks, complete with a lift-out T-top, opening doors, and a golden flaming bird motif.

Don your leather jacket and head to an alley to chew a toothpick via the link above.

404 Error: File Found

Ah Error 404. The Hypertext Transfer Protocol standard response code that indicates the browser communicated with a given server, but the server couldn’t find what was requested.

Which, as purveyors of a website with a million views a year, we of course knew without looking it up on Google… Honestly, it’s a miracle that this site functions at all.

Anyway, today 404 was found, as one of Elves brought back this rather lovely Peugeot 404 pick-up, as built by regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott.

Based on Peugeot’s 1960s large passenger car, the 404 pick-up was produced into the late ’80s in Europe, and until 1991 in Kenya, where it’s still a common sight thanks to its almost unbreakable toughness. Yup, we really did say that about a Peugeot.

Jonathan’s 8-wide recreation captures the 404 pick-up beautifully, and you can check out the build, along with his extensive garage of other Speed Champions scale vehicles, at his photostream on Flickr.

Click the link above to instruct your browser to communicate with the server. Or something.

Charger R/T

Produced for just two years between 1968 and 1970, the second generation Dodge Charger was  a roaring success. Almost 100,000 second-gen Chargers were built, versus a planned production run of just 35,000, with seven different engine options ranging from a 3.7 litre slant-6 to a 7.2 litre V8. The R/T (road/track) was top of the tree, and over 17,000 were built (one of which featured in probably the most famous movie car chase of all time). This excellent 8-wide Speed Champions scale Charger R/T comes from Jonathan Elliott of Flickr, who has captured the iconic Chrysler Corporation muscle car superbly in brick form. Click here to take a closer look, or the the link above to see the real thing lose more hubcaps than it has wheels on the streets of San Francisco…

Anything but Meh

Lego’s 75892 Speed Champions McLaren Senna set is, to this TLCB Writer at least, a bit ‘meh’. Not that we should begrudge another real-world car being available as an official LEGO set, but still… meh.

LEGO’s new 8-wide Speed Champions scale offers the opportunity up the realism, both for sets we’d forgotten about and models that maybe didn’t hit the mark in 6-wide form.

Cue previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque, who has rebuilt 75892 in 8-wide scale, and what a difference two studs make! Gone is the awkward shaping of the official set, replaced by a complex and realistic model of McLaren’s track-only hyper car.

Excellent presentation completes the build and there’s more to see of Fabrice’s McLaren Senna redux on Flickr via the link above.

Small Brits

Over one in three Americans are obese, but TLCB’s home nation isn’t far behind, with 28% of the population being medically categorised as ‘chunkadunk’. Today though, we have two really small Brits, each being constructed in diminutive Speed Champions scale, yet still instantly recognisable as miniatures of their real-world brethren.

The first (above) is a tiny car in real life too, being a delightful recreation of the late-’50s Austin-Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite by RGB900. The real Spite measured just 3.5 metres in length, making it almost a third shorter than McLaren’s ridiculously-long 5.1 metre Speedtail.

Suggested by a reader, this neat Speed Champions version of one of McLaren’s million special editions is the work of newcomer User 5346 and there’s more of each small-scale Brit to see on Flickr. Take a look via the links above whilst we go and eat a donut or six.

A Whale of a Time

We’re not sure why whales are renowned for having such a good time, but we guess their partying reputation fits with the matra ‘Go Big or Go Home’.

Whatever the reason, Porsche decided that their 911 could do with being a bit more whaley in the 1970s, and fitted it with a huge ‘whale tail’ spoiler. And a turbo.

Said turbo added to the whaley fun, providing absolutely no power at all for a long time, and then suddenly all the power at once. This meant ’70s 911 Turbo drivers did indeed have a whale of a time right up until the point when they were upside-down in a field. That’s ‘Go Big or Go Home’ again we suppose…

This brilliant Porsche 911 Turbo comes from barneius, who has recreated the whale-tailed classic superbly in 8-wide Speed Champions scale. There are more beautifully sharp images available to view on Flickr, where you can also find a link to building instructions so that you can recreate chronic turbo lag and snap oversteer in miniature at home!

Click the link above to have a whale of a time!