Tag Archives: Off-Road

Bird Watching

This TLCB writer quite likes birds. They come in a hilarious variety of shapes and sizes, some of them can swim, run and fly (which makes them some sort of super animal), and some of them are – frankly – delicious. What’s not to like?

Flickr’s Luis Pena likes them too, although he’s a bit more professional about it, being an actual bird watcher/photographer as well as a Lego builder. Combining his two hobbies he’s built this; a neat mini-figure scale Jeep Wrangler 4×4 and two of Patagonia’s native birds; a Rhea (comical running variety), and an Andean Condor (giant flappy variety). David Attenborough (or Luis himself) would probably be able to categorise those better…

No matter, see more of Luis’ Jeep and Patagonian birds on Flickr!

Tagged , , , , , ,

Blue Monday*

We round off today’s creations with one of our very favourite vehicles ever, the Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40. Created by TLCB Regular Simon Przpiorka (aka SP_LINEUP) this gorgeous 1:24 Lego replica of the legendary 4×4 evolves his previous tan version with the addition of a bright blue paint job, one of the FJ’s most iconic hues, and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

*Title song. Naturally.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Lancia-Martini Historic Rally Team | Picture Special

It’s time for something rather special here at The Lego Car Blog; this is Bricksonwheels’ phenomenal Lancia Martini Historic Rally Team, formed of a a ’92 Lancia Delta Integrale Evo, an ’85 Lancia 037, and – proving Martini’s racing livery can make literally anything cool – a Fiat Ducato van, complete with tools, spares, and equipment. And each is amongst the finest examples of Lego model-making that you will ever see.

With expertly recreated liveries courtesy of fellow previous bloggee JaapTechnic, Bricksonwheel‘s creations are near perfect replicas of the stars of Lancia’s greatest era. And a Fiat van, but that’s a near perfect replica too.

Each model is built from around 2,000 pieces and includes fully detailed suspension, engine and interior, with every aspect constructed with mind-bending attention to detail.

There’s much more to see at Bricksonwheels’ Lancia Martini Historic Rally Team album on Flickr by clicking the link above, you can see the Delta Integrale’s individual appearance here at TLCB last year by clicking these words, and you can read Bricksonwheels’ interview as part of the Master Mocer Series by clicking here to learn how he creates amazing models like these.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

6648 Redux

The year is 1993, mini-figures come in smiling form only, and Octan sponsor just about everything. LEGO also produce some marvellous spring suspension pieces for Town sets too, with all of the above being put to excellent use on the 6648 off-road buggy set, one of three sets to feature this particular vehicular design that year.

Cue TLCB favourite Jonathan Elliott, who has reimagined 6648 some twenty-seven years later. Gone is the smiling mini-figure, Octan sponsorship, and even the marvellous spring suspension, but we still love his homage to the classic Town set. Head to Flickr to see more and party like it’s 1993.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Gazza

A footballer with a drinking problem, a guy in every pub in the Midlands, and a Soviet truck maker. GAZ (Gorkovsky Avtomobilny Zavod) have produced vehicles for almost 90 years, mostly (as with everything in the times of the Soviet Union) for the military. These days they also produce vehicles for Volkswagen, Chevrolet, and others under license, but it’s their military trucks they remain most known for, like this excellent mini-figure GAZ-66 built by Flickr’s de-marco. Clever techniques abound and there’s more to see of de-marco’s truck at his photostream – click the link above to check it out.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

To the Moon and Back!*

The Space Race was an incredible time. Not only were the two world Superpowers spending millions on things to blow one another up and poison the earth for a hundred-thousand years, they were also spending millions sending things into space. Probably so they could use it to blow one another up and poison the earth for a hundred-thousand years, but still – it was pretty cool.

It was the U.S. that got to the moon first (and is still the only nation to have done so)*, but it was actually the Soviet Union that won pretty much every other race, sending the first satellite into space, the first man, the first woman, and conducting the first EVA (extra-vehicular activity); or spacewalk to us non-astronaut types.

Of course getting there was only half the battle, as getting home again (unless you were a Soviet dog) was just as tricky. To that end the Soviets developed this in the 1970s; the remarkable Zil 4906. They may have won the Race for Space but the Americans had a much better Naming Department.

The ZIL 4906’s boring title hid its remarkable ability, being a 6×6 amphibious off-road crane designed to fit aboard a transport plane and recover the Soyuz astronaut capsules from the vast Russian wilderness.

Powered by a standard Zil 150bhp V8 the 4906’s weren’t fast, but they could go literally anywhere, with six-wheel-drive, four-wheel-steering, and two propellors with rudders for water recoveries.

This amazing Technic recreation of one of the Soviet Union’s coolest designs comes from previous bloggee Samolot, who has replicated the 4906’s incredible drivetrain brilliantly in Lego form. Two Control+ XL Motors power all six wheels, with a separate driveshaft for each side. This allows a gearbox to transfer power to the propellors when in water, whilst the L Motor that steers the front and rear axles also turns the two rudders.

A second L Motor controls the differential locks, whilst a fourth powers a compressor that builds pressure for the pneumatic crane, which the real Zil 4906 used to fish the Soyuz capsules from watery landings. A LEGO Education WeDo motor winds the crane winches and all of the above is controlled via bluetooth courtesy of LEGO’s new Powered Up Control+ system.

It’s a remarkable build and one that is definitely worth a closer look, which you can do at Eurobricks – where full build details are available, Bricksafe – which houses a complete image gallery of both Samolot’s Technic Zil 4906 and the real deal, and via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video

*Unless you believe it was filmed in a studio, the Earth is flat, and that climate change is a hoax invented by Al Gore. In which case go back to school.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My Other Car is a Giant Mobile Crane

LEGO’s huge 42082 Rough Terrain Crane is one the largest Technic sets the company has ever created, with over four thousand pieces. That’s a whole, lot of bricks that can be, in the very best traditions of Lego-building, repurposed.

And that is exactly was previous Master MOCer Nico71 has done with this incredible 4×4 Crane Truck, constructed only from the parts found within the 42082 set. Nico’s B-Model (in fact for Nico this is an ‘E-Model’, as he’s constructed several alternate vehicles (and all of this) from the Rough Terrain Crane set already) deploys the set’s single motor to perform a scarcely believable six separate functions, thanks to a pair of gearboxes that multiply the motor’s outputs.

Before we get onto those though, there are a host of mechanical functions too, including leaf-spring suspension, a V8 engine driven by all four wheels, opening doors, functioning steering, and the boom’s final extension.

The single motor delivers just as much on its own, thanks to those two gearboxes, powering the crane’s two-fold unfurling and rotation, the outriggers, and the truck’s tipper, which can tip both to rear and side of the vehicle depending upon which gear is selected.

It’s a brilliant feat of engineering and one that you can explore for yourself if you own a Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane set, as Nico has made instructions for this unbelievable B-Model available via his excellent website. Click this link to head over and take a look at the complete build description, the full gallery of images, and to find a link to the building instructions so you can build this amazing model for yourself.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

VAG BUG

Today’s creation might sound like something you picked up on that trip to Thailand, but it is in fact the dubious name given to this marvellous Technic Volkswagen Beetle buggy by its maker, februar88. Stupendous in its appearance, februar88’s creation includes four drive motors – with one L Motor powering each wheel, plus Servo steering, a V8 engine (turned by a Medium Motor), mega suspension, opening and locking doors, LED lights, and SBrick programmable bluetooth control. There’s lots more to see – including a video of the bug in action – at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Take your penicillin and learn a valuable lesson about using protection via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

BuWizz Buggy

Like our Elves, this BuWizz Buggy by Anto is small, nimble, and a little aesthetically challenged. However unlike our Elves it’s also rather clever and it can be controlled via a mobile phone.

A LEGO Buggy Motor and a BuWizz bluetooth battery provide Anto’s buggy with ludicrous power, whilst all-wheel suspension aims to keep that power on the ground.

Anto has released instructions for his design should you wish to have a go yourself and you can find those and further imagery on Eurobricks via the link.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

The Other M3

This is not a fast, irritatingly driven yet excellent German sports saloon, but it is an M3. Constructed by Spain’s awesome indigenous heavy duty truck maker Uro, the M3 is the military version of their F3 civilian truck, deployed by Spain’s ‘Military Emergencies Unit’ (UME) in disaster relief within the country and abroad. Which makes it probably the very opposite of its BMW namesake in terms of worthiness.

This superb Technic replica of the Uro M3 in complete UME specification comes from corujoxx of Eurobricks, who is using his time in coronavirus lock-down to pay tribute to his country’s frontline workers, such as those manning its Uro M3s.

A working winch and working suspension feature and there’s more to see of his excellent model at the Eurobricks forum – click the link above to take a look.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Arctic Roll

It’s been a while since the last Elven smushing. Today the familiar sounds of Elven screaming, followed by crunching noises, echoed down the corridor, and this TLCB writer wearily got to his feet to investigate. Powering across the carpet was this, Andrew Gurtovoy‘s 6×6 Arctic truck, inspired (loosely) by the LEGO City 60194 ‘Arctic Scout Truck’ set.

Considerably larger than its mini-figure scale inspiration, Andrew’s model packs in all-wheel-drive courtesy of three Buggy Motors, working suspension on all wheels, Servo steering, and a surprising top speed thanks to twin BuWizz bluetooth batteries.

After grabbing the truck as sped past, the Elf at the controls ran off, leaving us to tidy up as usual. Whilst we do that you can check out more of Andrew’s Arctic Truck in a fairly un-arctic looking setting via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Ice Ice Baby

These two arctic exploration vehicles were uncovered on Flickr today, each coming from David VII. Above is a truly marvellous looking tracked container carrier, complete with pallets of supplies and a, er… container, whilst below is a ‘High Mobility Snow Vehicle’ (or HMSV for short) that looks a riot to drive but frikkin’ freezing. Fortunately David has equipped his mini-figures with some toasty looking snow suits and you can join them in the arctic wilderness at his photostream via the link above.

*Today’s title song, obviously.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

More Mini-‘Mog

Following yesterday‘s Mercedes-Benz Unimog here’s another recreation of the iconic off-road truck. If the escalating Coronavirus apocalypse continues vehicles like this could become very in-vogue, so perhaps it’s reaching building habits on a subconscious level?

This one – a much older ‘406’ variant – comes from TLCB regular Jonathan Elliott, is fitted with a ‘canvas’ top, and looks just the thing for raiding the supermarket to stockpile toilet paper. But don’t do that, because you’re not an absolute douchebag.

Head to Flickr via the link above to check it out, whilst we expect a flurry of apocalypse-proof vehicles to appear here over the coming weeks…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Mini-‘Mog

LEGO’s incredible 8110 Mercedes-Benz Unimog was one of the first officially licensed Technic sets and – we think – still one of the all-time greats. With a vast array of functionality, motorised, pneumatic and mechanical, it’s one of the finest ever showcases of what LEGO can do. But LEGO’s not just about the big stuff, and little builds can be equally brilliant – case in point, this beautifully presented Town-scale version of the 8110 set.

Built by previous bloggee Nikolaus Lowe it not only looks absolutely brilliant, it kinda functions too, with a posable crane, steering, and working stabiliser legs too.

There’s more to see of Nikolaus’s fantastic mini-figure Unimog at his photostream via the link above, you can read our review of the huge 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog set via the first link, and you can read some tips on how to create images as stunning as Nikolaus’s by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Yeehaw!

Is there anything more American than a pick-up truck with a dead animal nailed to the front? OK, maybe obesity and firearms activism, but other than those this has got to be top.

This particular pick-up truck with a dead animal nailed to the front is a late ’70s Chevrolet Silverado K30 series, as built by previous bloggee Filsawgood.

Working suspension, remotely controlled four-wheel-drive and steering, opening hood and doors, and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery all feature, and you can see more of Filsawgood’s classic Chevy K30 at both Flickr and Eurobricks.

Click the links to grab your gun and bag yourself a new hood ornament. Yeehaw!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: