Tag Archives: Off-Road

Sand’s Going to Get Everywhere…

If you think sand gets everywhere at the beach, try driving one of these things. Fifteen minutes in a sand buggy and there’ll be sand in places you didn’t know you had.

This excellent Technic rendition of a skeletally-framed sand-insertion device comes from Dicky Laban of Flickr, and includes front and rear suspension as well as working steering thanks to LEGO’s x136 wishbones and new wheel hub pieces. See more to see via the link.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , ,

Tanky Picker

This is a Foremost Chieftain R, a high-speed rubber-tracked personnel and cargo carrier, and it looks like a cherry picker and a tank have had one hell of an accident.

This amazing Technic version of Foremost’s bizarre tank-cherry-picker-thingy has been built by Thesuperkoala of Flickr who has packed it with incredible mechanised functionality.

Like the real Chieftain R, Koala’s Technic version features four powered tracks separated front to rear by a central articulated pivot. LEGO’s linear actuators operate the steering of Koala’s model whilst Power Functions motors provide the drive for these and the four tracks.

Mounted upon the rear section of the Chieftain is a large motorised cherry picker crane, with further linear actuators driving the boom raising/lowering and extension. The crane superstructure can also rotate, with four motorised stabilisers ensuring the Chieftain doesn’t tip over whilst it’s, er… picking cherries(?).

Koala’s creation is a hugely impressive build and one well worth a closer look. Head to Thesuperkoala’s Foremost Chieftain R album on Flickr via the link above to view the full gallery of excellent imagery.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Pick-Me-Up

After this week’s earlier incident we’re a bit light on Elves at the moment, and thus when another ridiculously capable remote controlled creation was found by one of our smelly little workers we feared another violent event.

Fortunately the creation in question was much too slow to meet out any vengeance (much to the Elf at the controls’ annoyance), but it is no less excellent for that, which has cheered TLCB office immensely.

Built by Attika of Eurobricks it’s entitled ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’, which is a bold claim, but a potentially accurate one.

A raft of Power Functions motors provide all-wheel-drive through planetary hubs, whilst a high/low range gearbox allows Attika’s truck to climb gradients in excess of 50 degrees.

A full compliment of LEDs light the head and tail lamps whilst a third-party SBrick enables all of that to be controlled via Bluetooth, plus there are opening and locking doors, hood and tailgate and adjustable seats.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Attika’s ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’ at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find photos showing the chassis and driveline construction and a video of the truck in action. Click the link above to take a look.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Mechanical Mehari

Citroen are not known for their off-roaders. Ok, these days all they seem to make are – like every car company – SUVs, but they’re about as good off-road as Kim Kardashian is at plumbing.

However Citroen’s roots are far more off-roady than you might think; one of the 2CV’s key objectives was to cross a field without breaking any eggs.

And that’s where this comes in; the delightful 2CV-based Mehari.

Produced from the late ‘60s the Mehari was designed as a utilitarian two-wheel-drive off-roader (although four-wheel-drive versions followed) for civilian and military use, and – just like the models we have here – it was made out of plastic.

The models we have here come from TLCB favourite Nico71, who has recreated the Mehari beautifully in Technic form.

Nico’s design features steering, a removable roof, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and – most importantly – an accurate recreation of the Mahari’s superb suspension system.

There’s loads more to see of Nico’s wonderful build at his website by clicking here, where full details, an extensive image gallery, and building instructions are all available.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Extinction Rebellion

What the…?

This TLCB Writer stepped into the office this morning to find a scene from a horror film.

Well, if you’re an Elf at least. For humans it just looked like someone had dealt with a rodent problem via one of those comedy mallets. Squashed Elves were everywhere; on the floor, against the walls, even on top of shoes left in the corridor. But what could cause such total Elven carnage?

The answer was to be found in the office where – lying crashed on its side – a tracked buggy lay dormant.

Marxpek’s Technic recreation of the Howe & Howe Ripsaw EV1 had caught and smushed almost every single Elf on the floor of TLCB Towers, methodically running them down until it finally overturned in the office, whereupon the Elf at the controls had fled into the night.

Powered by eight Buggy Motors and four BuWizz Bluetooth control bricks, we have never featured a creation as powerful as this one. Ever.

A trick suspension and a track tensioning system allow that ludicrous power to be deployed on any surface, making Marxpek’s Ripsaw the most capable off-road Lego creation yet.

The Elf responsible for last night’s mass extinction attempt will be back for a meal token later, giving us some time to patch up the wounded. In the meantime you can check out more about this incredible machine at the Eurobricks forum here, and you can get an idea of how it managed to dispatch so many Elves last night in the video below.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

KAMAZ Flatbed

Another day, another Elf returns to TLCB Towers with a find in the hope of getting fed. It has been too, as this Technic KAMAZ 43118 truck is thoroughly excellent. The Elven happiness has extended beyond the discoverer of this creation too, as there are currently several Elves riding around in the back of it.

Built by ArsMan064 (is there a theme with today’s builder names?) this KAMAZ 43118 flatbed includes a remote control drivetrain courtesy of LEGO’s Power Functions motors and a third-party SBrick bluetooth control. An XL motor provides the drive whilst two Medium motors power the steering and the front winch.

ArsMan has also given his model some brilliant suspension, with all six wheels able to articulate over rough ground or any Elf that gets in the way today, as well as opening cab doors and drop-sides for the truck’s flatbed.

There’s loads more to see of ArsMan’s KAMAZ at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where a complete gallery of images, video of the model in action and a link to building instructions can all be found.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

To School!

Alice has got herself a new SUV and it’s the perfect car to one-up Rachel and her Range Rover Sport outside the school gates. It was expensive, but you can’t put a price on safety, and David’s job in the city is paying really well now.

Alice’s new school-run monstrosity (an Oshkosh M-ATV) comes from Robson M aka BrickDesigners and is – frankly – not that absurd at all compared to the pointless car-based one-upmanship that occurs outside the education establishment close to TLCB Towers.

Surely this SUV craze has got to end soon? See more of Alice’s new wheels on Flickr via the link.

Tagged , , , , ,

Proper Defender

After mocking those who fail to embrace change and progress in yesterday’s post, today we’re failing to embrace change and progress…

The new Land Rover Defender, revealed inadvertently in LEGO form here at The Lego Car Blog earlier this year, looks tragically like yet another Discovery iteration. Not the Discovery is a bad car (apart from reliability maybe…), but Land Rover already make the Discovery, Discovery Sport, Ranger Rover Evoque, Range Rover Sport and Range Rover Velar, which are all basically the same car. The last thing we needed was the Defender to become just another clone.

It’ll probably sell very well to begin with mind, as being the new Defender will be enough to make it cool, but we fear it won’t last long. We’d much rather have this; the original Defender, a vehicle that was in continuous production relatively unchanged for decades and that is now a surefire appreciating classic.

This beautiful Model Team recreation of the iconic Land Rover Defender in 110 Station Wagon form comes from BrickMonkey MOCs who has captured the real car brilliantly. A few choice mods including an external cage, winch, roof lights and luggage rack up the coolness even further and there’s more to see of Monkey’s wonderful creation at his Land Rover Defender Flickr album. Click the link above to rail against progress…

Tagged , , , , ,

Mars Corp.

The Mars Corporation is set to branch out a bit in the future, if Flickr’s BobDeQuatre is to believed. Currently makers of pet food, chewing gum, Uncle Ben’s rice, and… er, Mars bars, apparently the company will one day need an off-road buggy fitted with an enormous plasma rifle. Perhaps Pedigree Chum is going to get some more exotic ingredients…

Whatever its purpose, there’s more to see of Bob’s ‘Mars Corporation Escort Vehicle’ at his Flickr album. Click the link above to take a closer look – just don’t ask how your dog food is made.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Starship Trooper

This is an Isuzu Trooper, a robust, reliable, bland, Japanese 4×4 from the 1990s. But it is a rather good Technic model and it also allows us to tenuously link to a movie trailer where everything blows up, so there’s that.

This neat Technic version of the Trooper comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, features working steering, suspension, and opening hood, tailgate and doors, and there’s more to see via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Bending Bricks

The Elves are happy today. Firstly this huge remote control truck is orange, so it’s already off to a winning start, and secondly it can fit a gaggle of them in the back to ride around the office, and only a few got run over.

This unique machine comes from Waler of Brickshelf, who designed and built it for his engineering diploma thesis. Waler’s design allows his truck to articulate in the middle in two dimensions, both left/right and up/down. To accomplish this Waler’s truck includes a cleverly-constructed pivoting differential, kind of like a helicopter’s swash plate, that can deliver power whichever way the the two halves of the truck are pointing.

The truck is steered by two linear actuators that swing the chassis around a central pivot point which – as it can also pivot vertically – allows for insane articulation. All-wheel-drive, a remotely operable gearbox, all-wheel-suspension, and custom 3D-printed differentials complete the drivetrain, upon which a simple removable body is mounted.

There’s a whole lot more to see, including the clever central pivot design, custom diffs, and on-location photos showing the truck off-road, at Waler’s Brickshelf gallery. Click the link above to make the jump.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Proper PROFA Off-Road

This is a Tatra T813 8×8 PROFA trial truck and it’s epic. Yes, we just dropped the most over-used word on the internet, but we’re sticking with it.

These amazing machines can traverse just about anything, with this one being run by Team Jansa in European Truck Trial events. Well not this one, because this is a fully functional remote control recreation of the real deal, powered by a total of nine motors, two SBricks and with some of the coolest suspension we’ve ever seen.

It comes from Technic-building legend Madoca 1977 whose work has appeared here numerous times over the years. His latest truck evolves a previous design with more power, more weight, and more off-road capability. Six L Motors drive all eight wheels, whilst two Medium Motors pivot the front four. A third Medium Motor operates a high/low range gearbox, with all of that controllable via bluetooth thanks to a pair of SBricks.

Finally there’s a V12 piston engine mounted under the cab, which is accessible through opening doors and front hatch. It’s an incredibly well engineered creation and there’s more to see of Madoca’s Tatra T813 8×8 (including a video of it in action) at the Eurobricks forum and on ReBrickable, where a parts list and yes – instructions – are available!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

They See Me Crawlin’

This is a remote control 4×4 rock crawler and it comes from previous bloggee Technic BOOM. If you’re a regular reader of this dilapidated corner of the ‘net you might now be expecting a tale of mass Elven destruction, corridor smushings, and even a trip to the ‘Elf Hospital‘.

However the clue is in the title with this post, as Technic BOOM’s creation is one of the slowest that we’ve ever encountered. This inevitably enraged the Elf that discovered it, unable as it was to inflict mayhem on its fellow Elves, but it also means that BOOM’s model is ridiculously capable off-road.

With gearing of 9:1, enormous non-LEGO RC tyres, remote control drive, steering, and differential lockers, Technic BOOM’s rock crawler can inch its way over almost anything. Very slowly.

There’s more to see of this superbly engineered machine on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also watch a video of it doing its thing on-location off-road.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Squashed in Space

After today’s earlier build we’re back to the usual TLCB nonsense and mayhem with this, a ‘multi-purpose all-terrain vehicle’ built by LXF and found by one of our Elves on Brickshelf. Despite the mini-figure in the cockpit LXF’s model is a Technic one, with a suite of remote control goodies inside too. Each track is powered by a separate LEGO Buggy Motor, whilst the single rear wheel steers via a Medium Motor. Those three motors are hooked up to a third party BuWizz brick, allowing not only Bluetooth control but also delivering eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery.

If you’re thinking that sounds like a recipe for Elves getting squashed you would be right, as those caught at ground level stood no chance once this came hooning down the corridor. Thanks BuWizz…

We’ve now got to get some Elves (and their various bodily fluids) out of the carpet, so whilst we do that you can check out all the images of LXF’s mad creation on Brickshelf via the link in the text above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Chevrolet Silverado K30 Crew Cab | Picture Special

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re not usually fans of American pick-up trucks. This is because they are, by and large, complete crap. However – and we appreciate there is little logic to this whatsoever – old American pick-up trucks, even though they’re still complete crap, are somehow becoming rather cool. This is one such ageing pick-up, the Chevrolet Silverado K30, in dually crew cab specification.

Perhaps it’s because as vehicles get older we’re willing to overlook their shortcomings, but we really want this truck. The Elves do too, seeing as it’s a giant tasteless 4×4. Fortunately for one of them, it did get its grubby little claws on this, as it found this rather impressive Technic recreation of the classic(?) Silverado K30 crew cab by previous bloggee filswagood on Flickr.

A few of the other Elves in TLCB Towers soon got to experience it too, but not in the way they hoped, as it ran them down in the corridor. Power Functions remote control drive and steering combined with bouncy suspension enabled filsawgood’s Chevy to comfortably squash a couple of our little workers before we took the controls away to take a look for ourselves.

And look we did, because filsawgood’s Silverado is a brilliantly-engineered build, not only featuring the aforementioned (and excellent) remote control drivetrain, but also opening doors, hood (under which is a detailed engine), tailgate, and toolbox (battery compartment), plus the model includes LED lights and a detailed interior too.

There’s much more of filsawgood’s superb Chevrolet Silverado K30 crew cab to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you can check out filsawgood’s other Technic 4x4s to appear here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking this bonus link.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: