Tag Archives: Off-Road

Just Another Jeep

Lego Jeep Mighty FC Concept

Except this really isn’t any old Jeep. This is Jeep’s little-known ‘Mighty FC Concept’, which we assume stands for ‘Forward Control’, and it’s been superbly recreated in remote control Technic form by vehicle-building legend Madoca 1977.

Lego Technic Jeep Mighty FC Remote Control

Packed inside Madoca’s brilliant creation are six LEGO Power Functions motors, three sets of LEDs, and two third-party SBrick bluetooth receivers. The first two motors are XLs, which take care of the Jeep’s all-wheel-drive via portal axles, whilst a Servo motor controls the steering. Three Medium motors drive the winch, activate the locking rear differential, and control a two-speed gearbox, all of which is powered by an on-board rechargeable battery.

Lego Technic Jeep Remote Control

The Elves, who seem to have infiltrated Jeep’s vehicle-naming department, love the Mighty FC, even though it’s much too slow to cause any carnage in TLCB office. It can carry quite a few of them at once though, which appears to be what is currently happening, so whilst we let them get on with that you can discover the build’s full details by visiting the Eurobricks forum, and you can watch Madoca’s Jeep in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

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Lego Technic H2 2017 – Set Previews!

Lego Technic 42068 Airport Fire Truck

Yup, after a few days away from TLCB keyboard we’re back! We’d been waiting for a crack team of Elves to return from a secret mission infiltrating The Lego Company headquarters, and we’re pleased to announce that some of them have returned safely!

The lucky returnees are enjoying the fame and glory associated with bringing back the clearest images yet of LEGO’s summer Technic releases, and the fact that there are no alsatians for them to evade in the grounds of TLCB Towers.

So, on to the first new set!

42068 – Airport Rescue

LEGO’s first new addition to the Technic range is this, 42068, and we feel like we’ve seen it before. Yes, it does bear a striking resemblance to 8454 from the bad-old days of Technic, but on closer inspection it’s a far more realistic attempt at an airport firetruck than was made in 2003.

With no Power Functions or Pneumatic System, 42068 relies on good ol’ fashioned mechanics to enable its working functions. Front and rear steering and a manually raising and extending boom are the key features, and the set employs a wealth of stickerage to liven up what is basically a panelled box sat atop six wheels. Next.

Lego Technic 42069 Extreme Explorer

42069 – Extreme Explorer

Are LEGO running out of new ideas for Technic vehicles? If 42069 is anything to go by, probably. Loosely based on a tracked arctic exploration vehicle, the Extreme Explorer drops into the 2017 Technic line-up right at the top, being aimed at ages 11+, and the box – intriguingly – has no upper age limit. That stops us having to make excuses to long-suffering partners at least!

With a few unusual purple panels and four separate independently sprung tracks, 42069 looks like a set that’ll be snapped up by those wishing to increase their parts stock, but we’re not sure how well it stacks up in its own right.

In addition to those suspended tracks there’s front axle steering, gull-wing doors, flashy stickers (not shown on the box above) and a working winch. There also looks to be a gearbox too, although we’re not convinced that this is the conventional sort, and it may be more to do with suspension settings or all-track-drive capabilities.

42069 will reach stores in the second half of 2017 and will be priced towards the top end of the Technic line-up, but with no pneumatics or Power Functions components it could offer a decent piece count for the price.

Lego Technic 42070 6x6

42070 – 6×6 All Terrain Tow Truck

This is more like it! With over 1,800 pieces and Power Functions remote control, 42070 becomes the flagship set in the 2017 line-up when it arrives later in the year.

Just like your Mom, this thing is massive, with those six suspended wheels running on the same tyres as the brilliant 42054 Claas Xerion tractor set.

We expect 42070 to include full remote control drive and steering, working support legs at the sides and rear, and a gearbox to transfer the motorised power to a remotely operable crane and winch.

We’ll see if we’re right when 42070 lands later on this year, but expect it to be expensive!

There you have it, the 2017 Technic line-up is now complete, plus rumour has it that combining these sets allows you to build a modern take on the very first LEGO Technic supercar set too.

We’ll bring you further set news later on in the year, and in the meantime you can check out all the official LEGO sets that have been reviewed here at The Lego Car Blog so far by visiting the enormous Set Review Library.

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Febr-over

Lego Febrovery Sci-Fi Rover

The annual bandwagon that is Febrovery is over for another year, with rovers of all shapes and sizes being submitted by the online community. We’re ending our coverage of this year’s event with two rovers from the very opposite end of the roving spectrum.

First above (above), and suggested to us by a reader, is this neat tracked satellite dish transporting rover, resplendent in a Classic Space livery and with a beautiful classic space monorail pictured behind it. There’s more to see at RVA LUG’s photostream by clicking here.

Today’s second Febrovery entry (below) comes from previous bloggee F@bz, and although it too is mini-figure scale, it’s an enormous machine. There’s some wonderfully inventive building in evidence too, and you can see more at F@bz’ photostream by clicking here.

Despite having zero sci-fi knowledge we’ve rather enjoyed this year’s Febrovery, so much so that we may get involved next year (although probably not in the way you’d expect!), so until then, happy roving, and we’ll return to vehicles of a more earthly nature.

Lego Febrovery Sci-Fi Rover

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Coming Up Trumps

Lego Murica-Mobile Truck

Flickr’s vehicle-building society LUNuts are very on-topic right now, with their current monthly building contest taking in all things dystopian.

Previous bloggee Lino Martins’ entry pays homage the bleak dystopian masterpiece ‘1984’, which contains absolutely no similarities with the current state of U.S politics.

Coincidentally, we’ll hand over to Lino to explain some of the features of his ‘Murica-mobile’; “The roof mounted loud speakers are so that the driver may broadcast alternate facts, and many people are saying that the gun rack and truck nuts are a classy touch. Many people. Believe me. And no one knows classy better than I do. Let’s make America great again. Bigly”.

No similarities whatsoever… See more courtesy of Lino’s photostream.

Lego Murica-Mobile Truck

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Technic Tacoma

Lego Technic Toyota Tacoma 4x4

[Elven Screaming]… [Thump!]… [Elven Screaming]…

Sigh. It’s been a while since we’ve had a mass Elf squashing here in the office, but today, thanks to builder Madoca 1977, we were reminded what it feels like to slide a spatular underneath a flattened mythical creature to prise it out of the carpet. Still, in this situation it’s considerably better than being an Elf.

The cause of the carnage was this, Madoca’s (brilliant) Technic Toyota Tacoma pick-up. With remote control drive and steering, plus a two speed gearbox, it’s a model that is marginally faster than some of our fatter Elves. That’s Darwinism in action right there kids.

The aforementioned Elves would have caused a traction issue for most remote control models once they became smushed underneath the wheels, but Madoca’s Technic Tacoma not only features four-wheel-drive and front and rear suspension, but locking differentials too, meaning that even with three wheels lifted off the ground the fourth will continue to drive the truck forward.

With the model now safely under our control and the jubilant Elven discoverer contentedly cashing in its meal-token, we have an exciting half an hour ahead of us tidying up, so whilst we get on with that you can check out all of the images of Madoca’s superb Toyota pick-up at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where there’s also a video of the truck in action.

Lego Technic Toyota Tacoma 4x4

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It’s Febrovery!

Lego Hot Rod Lunar Rover

It sure is. One of the many tenuously-named monthly bandwagons, Febrovery is one we can get behind. Especially when the results look like this. Previous bloggee Priovit70 has turned classic space roving up to eleven with his stupendous tracked rover ‘NCS Sobriety’, and there’s more to see on Flickr here.

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Not a DeLorean

Lego Toyota 4x4 Pick-Up BTTF

Ah, Back To The Future, an office favourite here at TLCB Towers and the film that made a star of the iconic Delorean DMC-12, a car that was… total and complete crap.

If you’re unfamiliar with the true story of the DeLorean, which is very nearly as remarkable as the film, you can read it here, but today we’ll be moving on from that steaming turd of a car, saved from obscurity only by a chance decision by Universal Pictures, to feature a vehicle from the movie that’s the total opposite of the DMC-12.

This is, of course, a humble Toyota 4×4 pick-up, known as the Hilux in most of the world, and it’s everything the DeLorean wasn’t. Hugely successful, superbly built, and unbreakably reliable, the Toyota truck was the dream vehicle for 1980s Marty McFly. His version featured a few mods too, which have been faithfully recreated in Technic form by regular bloggee paave.

Paave’s creation doesn’t just look the part either, as underneath is a four-wheel-drive fully remote controlled drivetrain, working leaf-spring suspension, and opening (and locking) doors, hood and tailgate.

You can see all of the images as well as a video of the Toyota in action at both Eurobricks and MOCpages – click the links to go back in time.

Lego Toyota 4x4 Pick-Up BTTF

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Going for a Massive Dump

Lego Euclid R-170 Remote Control Mining Truck

The Lego Car Blog Elves have had a Good Day today. Firstly, the last four models to be blogged here have been yellow, and the Elves love yellow. Secondly, this was the fourth of them; built by Beat Felber and following on from his huge LeTourneau L-1200 front loader blogged here earlier in the week, it’s a truly humungous Euclid R-170 mining truck, and like the LeTourneau it’s fully remote controlled.

Driven by a single Power Functions XL motor, with Servo-motor articulated steering and a dumping bucket powered by twin linear actuators, the Euclid can be controlled remotely via a Bluetooth device thanks to a third party SBrick.

As is usual for this type of creation, the Elf that found it tried use it to smush his colleagues into the office carpet, but thankfully for our cleaners – who have to try to remove Elven blood and sick on a regular basis – the Euclid is pretty slow, and the Elves finally seem to be wising up to the constant threat of impending smushery.

Happily therefore, rather than being squashed a whole hoard of them are merrily riding around in the back, which looks tremendous fun until the Elf at the controls figures out how to operate the dumping mechanism. Until then we’ll enjoy the merriment and you can check out more of this amazing machine, and the matching LeTourneau L-1200 loader that accompanies it, by clicking here.

Lego Euclid R-170 Remote Control Mining Truck

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Not Another Mini

Lego Mini Moke

Well, this is a Mini, but not a normal one. Designed to sell to the world’s militaries, the Mini Moke was an ultra lightweight off-road vehicle built for ease of travel and maintenance. And it did those things pretty well, being based on the standard Mini passenger car and being light enough to be picked up by its bumpers.

However, at the one thing the Moke really needed to do well, the off-roading stuff, it was a bit hopeless. Low ground clearance (and low power) meant the little car got stuck a lot, and even the addition of a second engine in the rear to give the Moke four-wheel-drive failed to convince any major militaries to back it.

Looking for a way to recoup their investment, the British Motor Corporation re-marketed the Moke as a fun car for civilian use, and in a few places – notably Australia, the Caribbean and parts of the Mediterranean – turned their initial failure into a quite a success, and the Moke has now become something of a cult car in these markets.

This lovely Lego version of the unusual Mini, built to match the scale of the official LEGO 10242 Mini Cooper set, has been built by Ritto Aydillo Zuazo of Flickr, and it’s a faithful recreation of the odd original. Ritto is hoping that his Moke replica can become an official LEGO set via the LEGO Ideas platform – to see all the images and to give it your vote check it out on Flickr via the link above.

Lego Mini Moke

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Space Walk

Lego Octan S-P31 Drone Mech

Overused by Americans with a limited vocabulary, ‘awesome’ is an adjective we try to avoid here at The Lego Car Blog. We’re making an exception today though, because this Octan ‘S-P31 Drone Mech’ by Flickr’s Bob DeQuatre is the very definition of awesome. Hidden within the striking exterior shell is a Power Functions motor, enabling this brilliant creation to really walk. You can check out all of the imagery, and watch a video of the mech in action, at Bob’s photostream via the link above.

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Trump This

Lego MM1 Teracruzer Missile Carrier

Today is the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States of America, and here at The Lego Car Blog we’re commemorating this milestone event with something old, dangerous, and orange.

Built to scare the Soviets in the late 1950s this is a MM1 Teracruzer eight-wheel-drive missile carrier, complete with a Martin Mace nuclear missile, and despite its murderous (and completely futile) purpose, it’s a magnificent looking thing. It’s as if Thunderbirds were run by a maniacal doom-monger.

Anyhow, whilst we settle in for an afternoon of pointless pickering over the state of U.S. politics you can check out more of this absolutely brilliant mini-figure replica of the Teracruzer courtesy of Brian Williams of Flickr by clicking here, or alternatively you can watch something just as old, dangerous and orange at the inauguration ceremony…

Lego MM1 Teracruzer Missile Carrier

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Unim-odd

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog U90 4x4

Just like your Mom, the Mercedes-Benz Unimog U90 is a bit… er, aesthetically challenged, but it likes to get dirty. With portal axles, four-wheel-drive and huge travel suspension the 1992 U90 series Unimog was about as capable an off-road vehicle as you could conceive, and it could be fitted with an enormous array of attachments and tools to suit almost any job. The strange off-centre hood was in fact designed to allow the driver to better see any tools attached to the front from the driver’s seat.

This neat Technic recreation of the asymmetrical ‘mog comes from previous bloggee Thirdwigg, and it’s just as odd on the outside and clever underneath as the real U90. Remote control drive and steering, four-wheel-drive via portal axles, live axle suspension, a 4-cylinder piston engine and a three-way tipper bed all feature, and you can see all of that lot plus a video of the model in action via Flickr, Brickshelf and Eurobricks.

Lego Technic Unimog U90 Remote Control

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Sandbeetle

Lego Octan Sandbeetle

We’re not sure what this is or what it does, but it’s absolutely magnificent! Built by Flickr’s BobDeQuatre it’s called the ‘Ocean Sandbeetle’, and it’s made us wonder why all cars don’t have five wheels. Whilst we figure out how we can up the wheel count on the office Rover 200 you can check out Bob’s build via his photostream by clicking here.

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White Russian

Lego GAZ-3308 "Sadko"

This beautifully built canvas-covered GAZ 3308 dropside truck comes from Flickr’s VR Workshop, and it’s a lovely way to start 2017’s medium scale LEGO trucks. See more at the link above.

Lego GAZ-3308 "Sadko"

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Surface Rider

Lego Sci-Fi Off-Road

This gloriously retro sci-fi off-road racer comes from TLCB newcomer Faber Madragore, and it’s everything we could wish for in a Classic Space vehicle. Old-school solid Technic tyres? Check. Working suspension? Check. Magnificently ’80s styling? Check. And it’s yellow! In fact we like it so much we think we ought to run a competition next year to encourage more builds like this. While we mull that over you can check out Faber’s wonderful ‘Surface Rider’ creation at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Surface Rider Lunar Buggy

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