Tag Archives: Off-Road

SuperGreat

Unlike today’s other off-road truck post, this one certainly doesn’t have a bland name. The Mitsubishi Fuso SuperGreat FX 6×6 is an off-road military tow truck, depicted here in Technic Japanese Self Defence Force form.

All six wheels are driven by a Medium Motor, the steering is powered by a combination of a  Medium and a Micro Motor, whilst the crane rotation, elevation, extension, and outriggers are all controlled manually.

Leaf-spring suspension features too and there’s more to see courtesy of LXF (Brickshelf) / syclone (Eurobricks) via the links.

Heavy Metal

This is some heavy metal. The Ural 43206 features the usual terrible Soviet name, but otherwise it’s a most excellent heavy-duty off-road truck.

This Model Team recreation of the Ural 43206 is equally excellent, and it comes from previous bloggee Krzysztof Cytacki (aka dirtzonemaster).

Featuring a full remote control drivetrain, Krysztof’s model deploys two XL Motors to drive all four wheels, with impressive suspension on both axles, and a Power Functions IR receiver mounted in the cab.

Of course as anyone who’s put XL Motor torque through a LEGO UV-joint will know, off-roading with a driveline made from plastic can cause a few issues, usually in the form of a UV-joint exploding.

This isn’t something that will afflict Krzysztof’s Ural however, as he’s replaced the LEGO UV-joints in his model with custom metal ones, allowing for proper off-road ability.

A canvas load cover, opening tailgate, and detailed cab complete the build, and there’s more to see of Krzysztof’s metal-enhanced Ural 43206 off-road truck at both Flickr and via the video below, which includes a suitably metallic soundtrack. Click the links to take a look!

YouTube Video

Whirligigs & Thingamabobs

Things (amongst many) that TLCB staff are not very good at; Fashion. Displays of emotion. Star Wars. Snack self-control. Reality television. Construction machinery.

Cue TLCB Regular Damian Z (aka Thietmaier), and some construction machinery. Sigh.

This is, apparently, a DitchWitch RT75 trencher/cable plowing machine, but if we were told it was a spaghetti extractor we’d probably have believed it. However it is also absolutely excellent, being constructed superbly from an array of ingenious building techniques with Damian’s trademark amazing attention to detail.

Fortunately for this TLCB Writer there’s also a wonderfully realistic Mercedes-Benz Unimog U1250 truck and trailer to accompany it, and all three are packed with lifelike detailing and playable functions that belie their small scale.

There’s much more to see of Damian’s WitchDitch RT75, Unimog U1250, and cable-reel trailer on Flickr via the link above, plus you can check out a previous construction machine of his about which we also know nothing by clicking here.

Modular Building

LEGO’s brilliant line-up of modular buildings have been a roaring success, but they’re not really TLCB fodder. This awesome Neo-Classic Space ‘T-ATV’ by Flickr’s SweStar is though, and it’s ‘modular building’ too. Sort of.

A superb tracked chassis can carry an assortment of spacey things atop it, including a cabin that doubles as a spaceship, a pair of containers for important spacey-looking devices, and there’s even a mini-figure jet-suit arrangement concealed in the back!

Each module can stand alone as a thoroughly good build, and add them all together and you have a model with such great playability that this TLCB Writer could happily spend an entire afternoon swooshing and tracking and doing other suitably spacey stuff with it.

Whilst he does that you can see more of SweStar’s brilliant build at his ‘T-ATV’ album on Flickr – click the link above for more modular building.

Caseload

This is a fully remote controlled Case QuadTrac 620, built by mktechniccreations, and it’s really very good at squashing Elves. It’s also one heck of a build, with no less than six Power Functions motors, two BuWizz bluetooth batteries, and a pneumatic system with on-board compressors. And that’s before we get to the Elmer HaulMaster 2000 trailer.

Back to the Case, where two L Motors drive the fully suspended tracks, whilst a Servo articulates the pivot steering (the rear section of which can also oscillate independently from the front to keep the vehicle level on uneven ground).

Two M Motors power the on-board pneumatic compressors/switches, a third drives the rear PTO, there’s a suspended cab, swing-out ladder (that automatically pivots out of the way of the tracks when the tractor articulates), a rotating driver’s seat, and pneumatically operated hitches.

The Elmer HaulMaster trailer features a few trick of its own too, with the Case’s PTO driving the conveyor belt and auger worm-gear, pneumatically operated auger boom extension, and pneumatically deployed support legs.

It’s an unfathomably complex and wonderfully engineered build, and there’s lots more to see of mktechniccreations’ incredible creation at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where complete technical details, further imagery, and a link to building instructions can be found.

You can also see all the amazing working functions of both the Case Quadtrac 620 and Elmer HaulMaster 2000 in action via the video below; click play to take a look at one of the best models of 2021 so far.

YouTube Video

Hummers Suck

Categories of people that like Hummer; Under nines. TLCB Elves. Conspiracy-theorising, ‘FREEDOM!’-yelling neanderthals. Middle-eastern oil sheiks. Idiots.

This is a Hummer H2, and we absolutely love it! Not the real car of course, which is total garbage, but this thoroughly excellent fully remote controlled Technic recreation by Eurobricks’ damjan97PL.

The real Hummer H2 was neither capable nor sophisticated, but damjan97’s version is certainly both. Two XL Motors power the 4×4 drivetrain which includes three differentials, independent front and live-axle rear suspension, and Servo steering (which is also linked to the steering wheel).

A working V8 engine resides under the opening hood, all four doors open and lock, the seats adjust via geared racks, and there’s an SBrick programable brick mounted in the cabin providing bluetooth remote control.

It’s as excellent as the real Hummer H2 is terrible and there’s much more to see of damjan97PL’s incredible creation at the Eurobricks forum at the link above, or via the extensive image gallery available on Bricksafe.

Click the links above to join under nines, TLCB Elves, conspiracy-theorising ‘FREEDOM!’-yelling neanderthals, middle-eastern oil sheiks, and this TLCB Writer (an idiot) in taking a look!

It’s Not Easy Being Green

Green has traditionally (and logically) been LEGO’s colour of choice for flora, being used for trees, plants, and grassy baseplates. It also features as a stripe in fictional energy company Octan’s livery, but that’s about as far as it went for green pieces for decades.

In recent times though, LEGO’s range of green hues has expanded massively, with ‘sand green’, ‘lime green’, ‘dark green’, ‘blueish green’ and, as here, ‘olive green’.

Despite increase in variety of greens however, the pieces within each hue are often still rarer than evidence of humility from Donald Trump, which explains why Rolands Kirpis took a year to find all the olive green parts required for his Ural 375D. Find them he did though, and his 12 month search paid off as his Ural looks stunning.

Underneath the olive green exterior Rolands’ truck is fully remote controlled, with three L motors driving all six wheels, a Medium motor powering the steering, along with working suspension, opening doors and hood, plus a detailed interior and engine bay.

There’s loads more of Rolands’ brilliant build to see at his photostream – click the link above to go (olive) green.

Humdinger

As has been well-documented on these pages, TLCB does not like Hummer. Today however we have a Hummer that is the exact opposite of what the hateful brand stood for; being both small, and really rather clever.

Built by Flickr’s Frantisek Hajdekr, this 10-wide Hummer H1 might only be Speed Champions-ish scale, but it includes both working steering and pendular suspension under the bright red bodywork.

An artfully placed rock shows the clever chassis in action and there’s more to see of Frantisek’s ace Hummer H1 build at his photostream. Click the link above to make the jump!

Ardennes ’44

It must have been beautiful but bleak navigating the Ardennes in 1944. Nicholas Goodman has depicted the scene beautifully, with his tank advancing through the mud and ice, wonderfully recreated in brick form. Head to Nicholas’ photostream for the full image, and – as we do from time to time – click here for the other side of war.

Soviet Snowrunner

This is a UAZ 3151, one of the Soviet Union’s many fantastically-boringly-titled, but actually very capable off-roaders. Built by Keymaker, this stunning fully RC recreation of the Russian off-roader not only looks the part in both standard and off-road modified forms, it’s absolutely packed with brilliant Technic engineering.

Drive for all four wheels comes from two L Motors whilst a Servo controls the steering. A Medium Motor operates front and rear remotely locking differentials, and not only are both axles suspended, the suspension height can be adjusted via an L Motor to vary the ground clearance.

These off-road mods are apparently inspired the video game ‘Snowrunner’, and Keymaker has gone further with his Technic model equipping it with a removable hardtop roof, removable bodywork, folding rear seats, an opening glovebox, opening and locking doors, a working inline-4 engine, and LED head and tail lights.

It’s an incredible build and one that’s definitely worth a closer look. Head to Eurobricks for full details and a video of the UAZ in action, and to Bricksafe for the complete image gallery, where you can find outdoor shots and pictures of the model in various states of off-road modification.

Motocross | Picture Special

Riding a dirt bike on the road is the preserve of annoying scallies. However riding one in the dirt where they are meant to be is excellent in every way.

Cue Luis Baixinho, who has created this absolutely wonderful (and huge) motocross track, complete with starting gate, spectators, jumps, streams, rocks and various other motocross staples.

Spanning two 32×32 baseplates Luis’ vignette manages to convey the sand, mud and ruts created by the dirt bikes beautifully – we can almost smell the exhaust fumes and hear the BNEEEEEERRRR-ing.

There are loads more images to see at Luis’ ‘Motocross’ album on Flickr and you can join in the two-wheeled fun via the link above!

Fast Running Camel

Cheap ubiquitous ‘Peoples’ Cars’ have a habit of becoming off-roaders. There are Baja Beetles, beach buggy Beetles, the Mini Moke, and – if those are too fast for you – the Citroen Mehari.

Based on the already off-road capable 2CV and ironically named after a fast-running camel, the Mehari kept the 2CV’s 602cc two-cylinder engine and added plastic body panels and a removable roof, creating a kind of off-road roadster. Just a very slow one.

This superb Speed Champions scale recreation of the plastic snail comes from TLCB regular Jonathan Elliott, which is both built and presented beautifully, and there’s more to see at the link.

Carryall

The title of this post could well apply to this TLCB Writer at the airport, when Mrs TLCB Writer fills a suitcase with things she’s then unable to carry. He’s basically a donkey.

So too though is the Dodge Power Wagon, which a) has one of the best names of any vehicle ever, and b) was used to carry all sorts of things over some pretty unforgiving ground back in the 1950s.

It was particularly favoured by middle eastern oil extractors, where this superb cartoonish recreation of the Power Wagon ‘Carryall’ would fit in beautifully thanks to its sandy hue.

Flickr’s Redfern1950s is the builder behind it, whose earlier covered pick-up version appeared here last year, and there are lots more superb images of his Dodge Power Wagon ‘Carryall’ available to see at his photostream via the link above.

Life on Mars*

NASA’s ‘Perseverance‘ rover is currently relaying some truly magical images back to Earth from the surface of Mars, where it has been for over a month.

Perseverance’s mission is to look for the building blocks that support life, either in Mars’ distant past, or for a human colonisation future. Fast forward an undetermined number of years and – if BobDeQuatre is correct – Perseverance found what it was looking for.

This is the Mars Corporation ‘Poseidon Mobile Water Extractor’, which uses a powerful microwave generator and magnetic field to raise water to the surface to support the planet’s colony. Or something. To be honest we’re a bit hazy on the science, but that doesn’t matter when it looks this cool!

A detailed microwave/magnetron/robotic arm thingumy is carried between a pair of articulated and suspended bogies, whilst a crew of two control the water extraction from the cockpit up front.

There’s lots more to see of Bob’s impressive ‘Poseidon Mobile Water Extractor’ via his album on Flickr at the link above, plus you can see one of his (and Mars Corp.’s) other machines by clicking here.

*Today’s title song, naturally.

Ghost Rider

Every once in a while a creation appears at TLCB Towers that makes us all think ‘that’s clever’. This is one such model, plus it has the added benefit of terrifying TLCB Elves.

Eurobricks’ piterx has designed this Technic scrambler motorbike, which – whilst not special to look at – is incredible to behold in motion. LEGO’s most powerful motor drives the back wheel, which is controlled via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz battery.

Said battery not only delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, it has been ingeniously used as a motorised sliding counterweight, enabling piterx’s bike to rocket around on its own, appearing to be under the spooky control of an invisible rider.

We’re having great fun terrorising the Elves with this, so whilst we continue the ghostly ruse on our smelly little workers you can check out more of piterx’s cunning remote control creation via the video and link to Eurobricks above!