Tag Archives: rover

Bat Effect

We like a good mash-up here at The Lego Car Blog, even if we don’t really understand one or more of the things being mashed. Cue previous bloggee Slick_Brick, who has successfully merged Christopher Nolan era Batman (aka the best Batman) with the Mass Effect video game, of which we know nothing. We assume it has some lovely flowers in it though. Anyway, the results are excellent, with a neat Tumbler-esque rover driving through a wonderfully constructed alien landscape, and there’s more to see of Slick’s Bat Effect mash-up via the link above.

UniRover

No, us neither. All we can say is that a brick-built dust-cloud behind a single Technic 42054 Claas Xerion tyre looks so cool we could’t not post this, even though we have absolutely no idea what’s going on. Ask Julius Kanand via Flickr.

Ukrovery

The news from Ukraine is heartbreaking. Almost eight decades of peace in Europe has ended, and the human cost is going to be enormous.

We’ve pilloried Putin before (and received threats as a result), but the mask is off now, and what lies beneath it is monstrous.

As such we hope blue and yellow vehicles might feature here a bit more prominently for a while following our recent call, which Flickr’s Frost has answered, rounding off Febrovery with his final lunar rover looking wonderful in Ukrainian colours.

So that’s it for Febrovery 2022, but sadly not Putin’s ‘Special Military Operation’, which – thanks to the heroism of those defending Ukraine – looks far from being over. If you’re one of the 5,000 TLCB readers from Ukraine, or indeed one of the 17,000 from Russia and are as dismayed as the rest of us, a special welcome to these pages to you.

If you’re looking to help the situation in Ukraine but don’t know how, check out the Red Cross Ukraine Crisis Appeal and the UN Refugee Agency Appeal where donations are now open.

Under the Mask

Most LEGO pieces can be used in almost infinite ways. It’s the very purpose of LEGO. However there are a few parts that seem to be defiantly single-use. The Primo ride-on elephant. Anything from the awful Galidor range. And the wearable Bionicle mask.

Designed so that kids could pretend to be defending Mata-Nui or something, the mid-00’s were clearly a difficult time for LEGO. And yet out of adversity comes triumph, in the form of Scott Wilhelm‘s magnificent ‘Mobile Reactor Transport’.

Wearing the life-size Toa face like a tortoise wears its shell, the until-now-pointless-part looks purpose-made for Scott’s half-track rover. Delightful greebling is visible through the mask’s orifices and there’s more to see of the build, including the epically inventive parts usage, at Scott’s photostream.

Click the link above to see what’s under the mask.

Clearly Roving

2022’s Febrovery is drawing to a close, in which Lego builders from around the world have united in their creation of other-worldly transports. Today we round out the roverest of months with four intriguing space-based builds, each of which has deployed a few of LEGO’s more unusual pieces in the pursuit of roving brilliance.

First up is Robert Heim‘s ‘Spaceport Fire Rover’, which features so many LEGO pieces of which we know nothing it’s making us doubt we can do this job. The wheels look like cupcake cases and the rotating cockpit appears as if it’s made from a kid’s sand bucket. We have absolutely no idea what sets they’re all from, but you can find out more at Robert’s photostream via the link.

Next we have martin.with.bricks‘ impressive eight-wheeled rover, which actually looks rather like something we could well see in our lifetime. A determined-looking mini-figure sits at the controls inside the same clear buckety-brick cockpit, whilst a minimalist brick-built lunar surface passes beneath the tyres. Centre articulation and an opening rear hatch add to the fun and you can see more of Martin’s rover on Flickr at the link above.

No longer used as the cockpit, but still featuring prominently in the design, Frost‘s colourful ‘Biotron Corp Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ utilises the same transparent buckets, this time for some sort of lunar re-wilding project. A trans-lime half-dome continues the funky cockpitting however, and there’s more to see of Frost’s space-based conservation via the link above.

Today’s final Febrovery creation takes a rather more utilitarian approach, and is very possibly the reason that Frost’s ‘Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ above is required. Andreas Lenander‘s ‘Dome-rover’ is smoothing its way across a lovely brick-built moon-scape, thanks to some genius tracks and a wonderfully pink classic spaceman sealed within a transparent orb. Andreas has used said orb in other cunning ways during Febrovery ’22 too, and there’s more to see of this and his other Febrovery builds at his photostream via the link above.

And that completes our Febrovery 2022 round-up, which took on quite a transparent theme this year. Febrovery will be back in 2023, but until then there is still a whole month to go in TLCB and Bricknerd’s ‘Festival of Mundanity’ competition, in which we’re looking for vehicles that are rather more earth-bound. What better way to move on from other-wordly oddness than a white Toyota Corolla looking for a parking space…

Moon Muscle

Flickr’s Febrovery build-a-thon is drawing to a close. There have been some wonderful entries so far which we have… er, missed completely, seeing as a) we don’t understand sci-fi and b) we’re interested in things far more mundane at the moment…

Had we not blogged this one though, TLCB Elves would’ve started a riot, as it’s really not mundane at all. Frost (aka TFDesigns) owns the mind behind this glorious rover-based muscle car homage, which is fitted with some of the most splendid wheels we’ve ever seen.

Racing stripes and a giant wing complete the Elven excitement, and there’s more to see of his marvellous moon-based muscle car at his photostream. Take a look via the link above, and we’ll be back with some things far more mundane tomorrow…

Fifty Shades of Bley

Ok, one shade (this isn’t the 42115 Lamborghini Sian set), but certainly fifty types of bley.

Blueish-grey (hence ‘bley’) replaced LEGO’s ‘light grey’ colour in around 2005 for reasons we don’t understand, and The Brick Artisan has embraced the hue wholly with his ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’, which looks a bit like a spacey airport luggage tractor.

Said rover not only contains a whole lot of bley, it features a delightfully elaborate and possibly radioactive load too, as this Classic Spaceman apparently heads to the Classic Space recycling centre. Our Earth-based equivalent of this trip is only to transport TLCB’s broken electrical devices and old pieces of wood (although we do also use a Rover), so this trip looks far more exciting!

There’s more to see of The Brick Artisan’s ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’ on Flickr, where – if you have sufficient bley – you can recreate it for yourself as building instructions are available. Click the link above to make the jump!

Giant Balls (of Gas)

It’s some time in the future, and the Earth is completely depleted of helium. Clearly such a situation has massive ramifications, and the balloon-animal industry, vital to so many, have apparently take matters into their own highly-skilled balloon-bending hands.

Sending equipment to the Jupiter’s moon Europa, the inflatable contortionists are mining the satellite for its precious precious helium, returning the gas to Earth via transport ships, and – before that – these enormous gas-rovers.

With twelve-wheel-drive, a crew of five, and eight huge gas-filled balls, the gas-rovers are impressive machines, at least in the minds of Jon & Catherine Stead, whose backstory we have completely butchered for the purpose of this silliness.

We could have gone with either a testicle or enhanced-boobs theme though, so count yourself lucky Steads!

Anyway, their Europa gas-rover is a properly good build, with LED lighting, incredible brick-built wheels, and an ace five-person cockpit, where – presumably – the crew all talk in squeaky voices.

Head over to Jon and Catherine’s excellent ‘Helium Transporter’ album on Flickr to see more, and request a balloon giraffe.

Febrovery Finale

It’s the last day of Febrovery, meaning our Elves will cease bringing back sci-fi nonsense and we can re-start blogging cars! Before then though, we have three (excellent) Febrovery creations to share, about each of which we know absolutely nothing. We’re counting the hours until it’s cars again…

First up is a Febrovery entrant that is at least relatable to our humdrum transport here on Earth, being a space school bus by Flickr’s Tyler (aka Legohaulic). A diverse list of alien children are present for the trip to space school and there’s more to see at Tyler’s photostream via the link.

The second creation in our Febrovery Finale come from regular bloggee Horcik Designs, whose space tanker merges Neo-Classic Space and Octan to brilliant effect. Twenty four wheels make it exactly six times better than anything in TLCB office car park and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump to Neo-Classic Space.

Ah ‘Ice Planet 2002′, when years starting with a ’20’ seemed super futuristic. This funky looking rover by Carter pays tribute to the oft-forgotten vintage theme, and includes the coolest wheels seen since your Mum fitted spinners to her mobility scooter. There’s more of Carter’s ‘Ice Scout’ to see on Flickr – click the link above to check it out.

Roving Large

We like large off-road trucks here at TLCB, so imagine how cool we think a large off-road truck is that lives in space! That’s right; less cool – but as sci-fi is all the Elves will bring back at the moment for some reason, here’s a large off-road truck that lives in space. However, it is – as you can see here – rather awesome…

Built by Flickr’s martin.with.bricks, this enormous 10×10 Neo-Classic Space carrier measures almost 60cm long, features two space containers (which are like regular containers, only in space), and includes a wonderfully detailed cabin. Part of the ‘Febrovery’ monthly bandwagon, there’s more of Martin’s brilliant creation to see at his ‘Space Rover’ album – click the link above to take a look.

Repeatedly Roving

As this year’s Febrovery contest draws to a close we have a few more lunar rovers to share with you, mostly because it’s all TLCB Elves will bring back into the office at the moment. We’ll have to do something about that*, but until then here are two more (admittedly great) sci-fi builds.

First up is Andreas Lenander‘s ‘MW-2P’, a spacey mono-wheel that looks perfect for couples married more than a few years. Roll into Andreas’ photostream via the link to see more.

Today’s second lunar rover looks equally fun, coming from ‘Rob‘ (who must have the most straightforward Flickr handle ever), and he’s applied some wonderful photo editing to bring his rover to life. Click the link above to blast across the surface of some far-away planet!

*We may well hi-jack Febrovery in ’22. Not all Rovers are in space…

Hot Rov

We are, as has been well documented here, completely useless at blogging sci-fi. However this sci-fi creation is also a hot rod! Which means that today we’re useless at blogging hot rods too. Thanks TFDesigns.

There’s more to see of TFDesigns (aka Frost)’s Neo-Classic Space ‘RoverRod’ on Flickr, where a wide range of other Febrovery creations can also be found. Click the link above to make the jump.

Space Cat

We featured an earth-based Bobcat last week, and now we have one in space! Of course being a space Bobcat this one has a great many levers to enable it to conduct complex spacey things, controlled by a pink Classic Spaceman in a bubble canopy. TLCB regular Horcik Designs owns the mind being it and there’s more to see here.

We’re Going to Need a Bigger Cracker

Everybody knows the moon’s made of cheese. Which means that the ‘Moonmouse MkII’ makes perfect sense to us. Horcik Designs owns the mind behind it and you can check it out on Flickr by clicking these words.

The Future Belongs to the Nerds

In fact the present probably does too.

Is it engineers and racing drivers that develop cars today? Of course not, it’s software developers, writing a billion lines of code. Every part of modern life is controlled by code writers, and even those that seem cool now got to where they did by being massive nerds, however much they try to reinvent the person of their past.

Cue TFDesigns! aka Frost, who has entered this year’s Febrovery annual build-off (itself a pretty nerdy thing) with his ‘Futuron MoLab’; a big white box designed purely for science. What science we’re not told, but it looks really very nerdy indeed, so it must be important. Probably a new advert algorithm for Facebook or something.

Whatever it’s up to there’s more to see at Frost’s photostream – join the nerds writing the future via the link above.