Tag Archives: rover

Deep Dish

This TLCB Writer isn’t thinking about pizza (it’d be thin and crispy all the way), but rather pondering the ingenious nature of this ‘Heavy Communications Rover’ by The Brick Artisan. According to Brick, when dust storms or Blacktron agents disrupted satellite transmissions, a fleet of just four Heavy Communications Rovers could be used to communicate ‘seismically through a planet’s interior’, giving the entire surface network coverage. Mrs Mavis’ pot plants are shaking on her windowsill four thousand miles away and she’s convinced they’re taking to her, but it’s a small inconvenience to keep the Federation’s messages flowing. You can pick up the story at The Brick Artisan’s photostream via the link above, whilst this TLCB Writer orders a pizza for some reason.

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Neo-Classic Nightmares


Simultaneously harmlessly brilliant and magnificently creepy, Flickr’s Blake Foster sure knows how to both delight and terrify in equal measure.

This Neo-Classic Space walking rover features the usual perennially smiling Classic Spaceman, but riding atop a mechanised body of horror.

There’s more to see of Blakes’s ‘AT-CST’ at his photostream; Click the link above to make the jump or alternatively try here for something featuring a bit less dread.

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Galactic Piratic

Uh oh! Space Pirates! You know, pirates… but in space! Flickr’s captainsmog owns the mind that has magnificently merged two of LEGO’s most beloved themes and you can see more of his piratical antics via the link above.

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Oh, Go On Then

FebRovery really is over… (isn’t it Markus Rollbuhler and Chris Perron?). Luckily Markus and Chris’s building skills are significantly better than their timekeeping, so here are two more rovers before we really will get back to posting cars. Probably.

Markus’s effort (above), entitled ‘Stardust Snooper’, harks back to LEGO’s earliest space themes in its purpose, being solely an exploratory rover. A living space and research lab support the crew of two and there’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

Today’s second rover comes from Chris Perron, whose Blacktron ‘Surface Scout’ is also apparently an exploratory vehicle. Just one with a giant double laser cannon thingy on the roof. Four wheel steering and a beautifully built cockpit for one feature alongside the ginormous death ray and there’s more to see of Chris’s build on Flickr.

And here endeth the FebRovery Rovers. Unless someone uploads a cool one tomorrow. Now let’s find some cars…

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Febrovery Finale

There was a whole extra day in this year’s Febrovery competition, with many builders taking advantage of this to squeeze their creations across the finish line. And some still missed it…

In celebration of those that didn’t quite manage the deadline, which was fittingly extended this year for space-based reasons, here are three of our favourite rovers that might be more Marovery than Febrovery.

First (above) is Scott Willhelm‘s enormous entry, complete with magnificent brick-built wheels fitted to ends of whatever you all those chassis-arm-thingies. Those chassis-arm-thingies are a bit of a theme this year, kinda like full-width light bars appearing on literally every new car design of late, but much like them they do look cool. See more at the link!

Our second fashionably-late Febrovery entry comes (above) from Faber Mandragore, who has also deployed chassis-arm-thingies to great effect. A transparent domed cockpit and an assortment of science fictiony equipment keep the build suitably futuristic and there’s more to see at Faber’s photostream via the link above.

Our final featured Febrovery creation (above) is very possibly our favourite, eschewing cool chassis-arm-thingies for a single slightly tragic looking jockey wheel, reminiscent of those miserable looking tractor tugs you see at the airport.

Spectacularly inappropriate for a surface littered with craters and rocks, and with an exhaust stack that raises unanswerable questions about how an internal combustion engine works without air, ‘Benny’s Space Trike’ is clearly our winner and you can see more courtesy of Blake Foster by clicking here.

Until next year, keep rovin’…

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Wheelie Big Cheese

FebRovery is nearly over, but as we approach the end of the annual rover-building bandwagon we’ve got time to squeeze a few more in. Today’s is a fine way to finish, as surely all good events end with cheese. David Roberts‘ is the builder behind this ‘Edam Rover’, a giant wax-skinned contraption used in the Cheese Mining industry that has been so famously represented in countless Lego creations. Grab yourself a cracker and head to David’s photostream via the link above for a taste.

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Double Bubble

It’s Valentine’s Day, and what better way to show the Classic Spacewoman in your life that you love her than through a romantic journey across the wilderness of an empty moon? Flickr’s Horcik Designs has built the perfect tool for the job, with this brilliant Neo-Classic Space rover able to transport two mini-figures in style thanks to separate bubble canopies suspended above the rover’s six wheels. This setup may make conversation difficult of course, but perhaps that’s the secret to a long and happy relationship. Click the link above to head out on a date across the moon.

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Sci-Fi Spectrum

Febrovery continues apace and today we have two builds from the annual nerdfest to share with you, one which looks like it could be an actual lunar rover in the not too distant future and one which… doesn’t.

First up (above) is Ivan Martynov‘s ‘SOL 317’. We assume that by the use of those little 1×1 figures that Ivan’s design is for a rather massive machine, but increase the scale about ten times and it could easily be one of the small robotised vehicles that mankind is so fond of for current planetary exploration. Whichever it is it’s a great build and you can see more at Ivan’s photostream via the link above.

Today’s second rover throws realism out of the emergency airlock and arms the space villains Blacktron with an enormous rocket, which has got both your Mom and TLCB Elves excited for different reasons.

Shannon Sproule‘s Blacktron ‘BRUTE’ missile launching rover involves ‘towing a nuke onto the battlefield, launching it and then hiding in the observation tower to record the destruction’ according to the builder’s mildly unhinged description. Apparently he’s working on one twice as big too…

Stand well back and shield your eyes at Shannon’s photostream via the link above.

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Lunar Rescue

The annual nerd-filled bandwagon that is Febrovery is upon us once more, with rovers of all shapes and sizes expected top appear over the next four weeks. For those new to this blog and/or the online Lego Community, we’re not referring to the defunct British car manufacturer (although maybe one day we’ll run our own – considerably less cool – Febrovery…), rather the wheeled contraptions that inhabit all sorts of far away planetary objects in the minds of Lego builders.

This is one such vehicle, TFDesigns / Frost‘s ‘Roveside Assistance Wrecker’, built to fix your magnetonium fusion reactor, busted thread sprocket, solar panel failure, or any other cosmic malady. With a brick-seperator tow hitch, the coolest wheels we think we’ve ever seen, and that canopy again, it’s a fine way to kick off the Febrovery month. Call Intergalactic Roveside Assistance via the link above for more.

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Road of Bones

The R504 Kolyma Highway, also known as the ‘Road of Bones’, is one of the grimmest construction projects in history. It’s not some distant relic either, being completed in 1953, with the bones of those that died building it (who were forced to do so under Stalinist Communism) laid underneath.

Chris Perron‘s ‘Ridge Ranger’ rover is far from grim, being a brightly-coloured homage to the concept art of Darren Bartley. It does however feature some ingenious (but rather grim if you’re a LEGO mini-figure) wheels, constructed from dozens of dismembered mini-figure arms. Yuk!

We genuinely can’t figure out how Chris has built said wheels, but they mean his rover drives upon a road of bones wherever it goes. See if you can work out how he’s done it via the link above, although we bet your mini-figures are hoping you can’t…

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The Martian

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. The world no doubt thought following NASA’s incredible achievement in 1969 that lunar exploration would become routine. As it turned out man last visited the moon just 3 years later, leaving a vast 47 year wait (and still counting) for a return.

Space it seems, is now pretty boring (we suppose it is mostly empty anyway), only utilised in 2019 to enable aubergine emojis to be sent around the world and to allow drivers to completely ignore road signs.

Hollywood however hasn’t forgotten the romanticism of a proper space adventure, and in 2015 ‘The Martian‘ showed us via incredible attention to detail how a manned mission to Mars might look. It even had it’s own star car, the funky and yet very probable-looking Mars Rover.

This is that vehicle, albeit in Technic form, as built by Samolot of Eurobricks. Underneath the movie-realistic exterior Samolot had included an array of clever remote control functionality, all of it powered by LEGO’s own Power Functions motors and controlled via the third-party SBrick bluetooth brick and mobile app.

Each of the rover’s four enormous wheels is powered independently by a separate L Motor which – due to their size – are ingeniously housed inside the wheels themselves. All four wheels steer too, courtesy of a Medium Motor, whilst independent suspension allows the model to traverse the rocky martian landscape.

Finally two more Medium motors power the rover’s winch and rear crane (switchable via a gearbox) and an on-board compressor that feeds air to the crane’s pneumatic cylinders and those that open the cockpit doors.

Samolot’s creation is superbly accurate to the ‘real’ vehicle that starred in the movie and there’s loads more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, including a video of the model in action. Click the link above to make the trip, and remember that help is only 140 million miles away…

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Galactic Tanking

We’re pretty sure that the mini-figure heroes of Classic Space (and every other kind of LEGO Space) don’t use fossil fuels to move around. Firstly, hopefully we’ll be off the oil drug in the next decade or so (even as a car blog we hope for that!), so future spacemen definitely won’t need it, and secondly as we all know, Classic Spacemen always wear helmets and air tanks, so internal combustion engines can’t be an option.

Nevertheless, liquid spacey stuff is still evidently in use in the LEGO Space universe, whether that be space beer, space coke, or – we suppose – regular non-space air for those mini-figure air tanks. Thus space tankers are a certain space requirement, and if they look like this marvellous Classic Space ‘Tanker Rover’ by Flickr’s Alec Hole that’s totally OK with us.

Head to Alec’s photostream (which is mostly in space) via the link above to see more, whilst we see if we’ve broken some sort of TLCB record for the most uses of the word ‘space’ in a single post.

Space.

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Kick-Ass Classic Space

Lego Classic Space Rover

The mini-figures of Classic Space led a peaceful and research-based life, flying across the galaxy to explore new worlds with a permanent smile printed upon their little yellow faces.

But things have changed. M-Tron, Blacktron and even the nerds of Ice Planet have recently got a whole lot more fighty, leaving the Classic Spacemen vulnerable. Flickr’s Uspez has arrived to help however, equipping the smiling spacemen with a brand new ‘LL-221 Leap-Frog’ rover, complete with a detachable cockpit spaceship and what looks like one heck of a rail-gun. That’s sure to keep them smiling.

See more of Uspez’s new Classic Space weapon on Flickr via the link above.

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It’s All White on the Night

Lego Febrovery

‘Febrovery’ 2019 has entered its final days, with rovers of all shapes, sizes and colours being uploaded to Flickr. Previous Febrovery bloggee Frost has built many of them, but today we’re featuring three of his builds that take a more minimalist approach to aesthetics.

Frost has successfully managed to combine the colour approaches of these folks and this guy to create the planet Whitetron and the seriously cool-looking vehicles that rove about on it.

Lego Febrovery

Using pieces of only black and white Frost’s ‘Whitetron’ rovers are some of our very favourites from this year’s ‘Febrovery’ contest, and range from small quads to huge eight-wheel-drive armoured transports.

We’ve featured three of Frost’s rovers here and there are more available to view at his ‘Whitetron’ album on Flickr – click here to make the jump!

Lego Febrovery

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Millennium Fal-gone

Lego Febrovery Rover

Febrovery continues apace, with rovers of all shapes and sizes appearing across the interweb. The nerdier among you may recognise the shape and size of this one, which recycles the cockpit from some ship that appeared in a series of over-rated movies. Tim Henderson is the scrap metal dealer behind it and there’s more to see at his photostream here.

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