Tag Archives: Town

Speed Week

Bonneville’s Speed Week is approaching, assuming Coronavirus doesn’t put the brakes on, where vehicles of all shapes and sizes will take the famous salt flats in pursuit of speed.

Flickr’s 1saac W. pays homage to one of the automotive world’s greatest spectacles with his marvellous ’32 Ford. Neat building techniques and excellent photography are obvious to see and there’s more of the model available at 1saac’s photostream via the link above.

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Hey Joe*

Joe (aka Tormund Giantsbane from Game of Thrones) has got himself a nice tow truck. Built by TLCB regular Andrea Lattanzio it’s also got some very nice parts usage going on. See if you can spot the swords, pirates’ hooks, meat cleavers, ice skates, and binoculars all cunningly deployed to different uses throughout the build. See more of ‘Joe’s Tow Truck’ at Andrea’s photostream via the link above.

*Today’s excellent title song

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Tractorly Tragic

These days tractors are often enormous, hugely impressive machines, however in the past they’ve tended to look… a bit shit. Tiny wheels, cabin perched up way to high, microscopic engine struggling along the road – Flickr’s de-marco has nailed it. There’s more to see of de-marco’s ‘Red Tractor T25’ at his photostream, where you can also find building instructions should you wish to recreate this slightly tragic looking vehicle at home – click the link to take a look!

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Deep Dish

This TLCB Writer isn’t thinking about pizza (it’d be thin and crispy all the way), but rather pondering the ingenious nature of this ‘Heavy Communications Rover’ by The Brick Artisan. According to Brick, when dust storms or Blacktron agents disrupted satellite transmissions, a fleet of just four Heavy Communications Rovers could be used to communicate ‘seismically through a planet’s interior’, giving the entire surface network coverage. Mrs Mavis’ pot plants are shaking on her windowsill four thousand miles away and she’s convinced they’re taking to her, but it’s a small inconvenience to keep the Federation’s messages flowing. You can pick up the story at The Brick Artisan’s photostream via the link above, whilst this TLCB Writer orders a pizza for some reason.

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EMU

Not the running bird type (we’re not sure why things are avian-themed today), but this rather beautiful Japanese National Railways 583-series ‘EMU’ train, built and photographed superbly by TLCB debutant Orient R. Minesky.

Orient has eschewed the usual plain background set-up (that admittedly we usually prefer) for gorgeous (and incredibly life-life) outdoor photography, making his stunning EMU train appear almost real.

Head to Orient’s photostream via the link above for all of the wonderful on-location imagery.

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Race to the Bottom

The early days of flight were perilous ones. Aeronautical understanding was limited and building materials more so, meaning things that operated a long way from the ground were made out of bits of wood and chickenwire. However by the late 1920s mankind’s incredible rate of progress (no doubt helped by the otherwise totally pointless First World War) had made flying relatively safe and normal. Except in one area; Speed.

Like racing cars of the era, racing planes were fantastically dangerous, pushing the limits of physics and effectively working by trail and error, when error often meant death. This is one example from the time, the bonkers Savoia-Marchetti S.65 racing seaplane, designed for the 1929 Schneider Trophy race. With two 1,050bhp V12 engines mounted fore and aft of the pilot, the S.65 proved so unstable it didn’t get airborne at all and the Italian team behind it returned to Italy for more development.

On Lake Garda in 1930 the trails continued, and on the forth attempt the seaplane took to the air in a glorious rush of wind and noise. Whereupon it stalled, crashed into the water, and sunk to the bottom taking its young pilot with it. Thankfully although recovered the S.65 did not attempt to fly again, but a failure though it was it did look rather wonderful, as does Henrik Jensen‘s marvellous mini-figure scale recreation, pictured here in a neat diorama depicting the plane before its fateful flight attempt.

There’s more to see of Henrik’s excellent Savoia-Marchetti S.65 at his photostream – head to Lake Garda in 1930 via the link in the text above, but maybe watch from a distance.

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5920 Redux

One of LEGO’s weirder themes, Dino Island (basically Jurassic Park meets Indiana Jones without paying the licensing) did feature some rather nice vintage vehicles. 5920 was one of them, and TLCB favourite Chris Elliott has rebuilt it in his trademark style; with beautiful attention to detail and gorgeous presentation. Suggested by a reader, there’s more to see of Chris’s 5920 Redux on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

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Chop Shop

This beautiful chopper motorcycle workshop comes from yesterday’s bloggee Faber Mandragore, who’s becoming a regular here at TLCB. Fantastic attention to detail is in abundance, both in the garage and the brick-built custom chopper, and you can take a closer look on Flickr via the link.

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Blurry*

Blurry photos do not get published here at TLCB. In fact we’re quite picky when it comes to what we publish (you can read our publication standards here), however today we have an exception, because Faber Madragore‘s blurry hot rod is brilliant. In fact it’s not the rather excellent Town scale hot rod that’s blurry, rather the wooded background behind and road underneath it, giving the model a superb sense of speed.

You can see Faber’s stunning photo in full size at his photostream, along with many other top quality images, one more of which will appear here tomorrow…

*Today’s distinctly early 2000s title song.

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Why Do Only Fools and Horses Work?

Britain has many famous TV cars. Ford Capris, Jaguar MkIIs, Volvo P1800s, and, er… the Reliant Regal Supervan. Yes, they really called it that, meaning it held the most ironic name in vehicular history until it was finally surpassed by the Mitsubishi Carisma in the late ’90s.

Flickr’s de-marco has captured the classic three-wheeled delivery van to perfection, and only the addition of ‘Trotters Independent Traders’ to the sides could make it any more cushty.

Click the link above to head to Peckham sometime in the 1980s. Lovely jubbly.

(If you have absolutely no idea what we’re on about, click here…)

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Timberjack

This TLCB writer prefers the planting of trees to the harvesting of them (seriously, why the heck aren’t we planting trees everywhere? There is literally no downside, only cleaner air, more wildlife, and less CO2), but if they must be ‘harvested’ there are some pretty cool vehicles with which to do it. This is one example, a Timberjack 1010B as built by previous bloggee Keko007. With an articulated middle, rear tracks, and a giant grabby claw thing, it does look rather fun. See more of Keko’s beautifully presented model on Flickr via the link.

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60075 Redux

We’ve featured a few models here at TLCB that have brought an old set into the new age, however Flickr’s Thomas Selander has kinda done the opposite, taking the 60075 set from 2015 and making it rather more classic, at least in using a 1960s-’70s Volvo F88 truck as inspiration for his tipper. It’s an excellent Town build and considerably slicker than the official set it emulates, and there’s more to see at the link.

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Mortal Engines

Markus Ronge is back! Creator of the spell-binding Netbrix epic ‘Full Steam‘, Markus has returned bringing Mortal Engines into the brick. And the finest photo editing you will find anywhere in the Lego Community.

The ‘Jenny Haniver’ is a stunning demonstration of this; an enormous sky-fi airship packed with incredible building techniques and a phenomenal attention to detail, surpassed only by the way it is presented.

Sailing through the clouds Markus’s build looks as though Lego has come to life, and that surely is the definition of the art. An enormous gallery of images is available to view on Flickr, showing how this amazing model was constructed (very carefully we would think) and the details within it.

Head skywards via the link in the text above.

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Happy*

It might seem crazy what I’m ’bout to say
Sunshine she’s here, you can take a break
I’m a hot air balloon that could go to space
With the air, like I don’t care baby by the way

This happy hot air balloon comes from ExeSandbox who has built it for a sub 250-piece Lego Ideas competition. Head to the skies via Flickr at the link.

*Today’s title song.

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Feeling Blue

It seems a slice of the online Lego community is feeling rather blue right now. On top of Coronavirus, rioting in America, another example of systematic racism and police brutality, and a rising mass of unemployment, the place where it all started for many – MOCpages – has been expunged from the internet. Which is quite remarkable really, as very few things ever leave the internet for good. Just ask your Mom. Anyway, here’s a deeply blue hot rod by Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott to sum up how we’re all feeling in a model, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

In all seriousness, if you’re reading this and struggling with any of the above or anything else, things will get better. Talk to someone in confidence here (US) or search ‘Samaritans’ in your home nation for support.

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