Tag Archives: Town

Yellow Bull

We like big yellow bulldozers here at The Lego Car Blog. Because we’re eight. This one is a Komatsu D65EX-18, as built (superbly) by Flickr’s Y Akimeshi in mini-figure scale. Clever techniques and top quality presentation are evident throughout, and there’re more to see via the link above if you’re eight too.

Smokin’

This is a Baureihe 57 / Prussian G10, a German steam locomotive built in the 1910s-’20s for heavy goods transport. Around 2,600 Prussian G10s were produced, with an extra one – pictured here – arriving courtesy of Pieter Post, who has recreated the steam train in beautiful detail. Powered by a hidden Power Functions L Motor and BuWizz bluetooth battery, Pieter’s Prussian G10 is depicted navigating a wonderfully constructed forest track, complete with a transformer building and the best pine trees we’ve ever seen. Top of the billing however, is the smoke – which looks as real as anything made from plastic bricks could possibly be. Click the link above to smoke your way through a German forest in the 1920s.

Insert Out-of-Fuel DeLorean Here

This steam locomotive might look familiar to you… Built by Rogers Locomotive and Machine works in the 1890s, locomotive ‘No.3’ was a coal and later oil-fired steam locomotive used for various steam locomotive things; hauling freight, transporting passengers, and constructing various railroads across California during the early 20th century.

After three decades of service Locomotive No.3’s owners, the Sierra Railway Company, went bankrupt during the Great Depression, and it was laid up for fifteen years in a siding. The locomotive somehow dodged being melted down for the war effort, and after the Second World War ended it was acquired for film use, whereupon ‘No.3’ began a career that saw it star in around forty movies and TV shows, including ‘High Noon’, TLCB favourite ‘The Great Race’, and – perhaps most famously – ‘Back to the Future, Part III‘.

Restored in the 2010s, Locomotive No.3 is still running today, and thus may yet add even more stardust to an already incredible legacy. This wonderful recreation by firefabric of Eurobricks captures probably the world’s most seen steam train beautifully, and it includes a LEGO Powered-Up motor and LED lights hidden inside.

There’s much to more of the model to see, including full build details, at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you can step into one of almost forty movie sets via the link in the text above.

Parallelogram

The parallelogram; a shape that confuses physicists, NASA, MIT, and the entire TLCB Office. But not David Roberts, who has somehow formed this rather Philip K. Dick-ish hovercar from the unfeasible shape, even infusing the sides with number ‘4’s for added impossibility.

Such mind-bending brick-work is well beyond our comprehension here at TLCB, so it’s best you jump straight to David’s photostream before we think any harder and hurt ourselves. Prepare your brain and click here to join in the confusion.

Bwushhhhh!

If ever there was in image that went ‘Bwushhhhh!’, this is it. Constructed by keiichi kamei, this fantastic ‘Spinner’ police hovercar take-off captures life on the streets of Blade Runner’s dystopian Los Angeles brilliantly. Thirty-eight LED lights add to the ambiance and there’s more of this superb scene to see at keiichi’s photostream. Click the link above to take off.

Mammoth Extension

Ah, a mobile crane, which means you’ll be expecting TLCB to make erection jokes. But no! We’ve grown up, and are rising above it. Yup, we’re stiffly sticking to sensibility today, as Ralph Savelsberg‘s Town-scale Mammoet-liveried Liebherr LTM-1350 is a properly well-constructed piece of equipment, with an impressive rotating superstructure, extending stabilisers, and a meaty hook well-hung from the two-piece boom. There’s more to see at Ralph’s ‘Mammoet Mobile Crane’ album, and you can take a look at the full package via the link above!

Grand Prix ’64

The year is 2064, and the Formula 1 has gone from strength to strength! The ’64 season features an amazing 42 races , 36 of which are in the United States, wherein the best drivers in the world (and Nicholas Latifi) battle to discover who the FIA’s Race Director will deem worthy of becoming World Champion!

Yuki Studona is hoping the fresh engines being fitted to his Octan Racing car in the final pitstop of the ’64 U.S. Grand Prix will give him the win, and he’ll be able to carry that momentum into next week’s ’64 U.S.A Grand Prix before the season wraps up in the Unites States in two weeks’ time.

Join the F1 fans at the ’64 U.S. Grand Prix and cheer on Yuki courtesy of lokiloki29 via the link above!

Tiny Erection

The raising drawbridge, the most famous of which has even become an official LEGO set, is a staple feature in bad car chase movies, in which cars seem to happily jump over them with no effect whatsoever on their suspension, nor the driver’s spine. The reality of course would be somewhat different, but we think even TLCB’s Rover 200 could manage to jump the Somerset Bridge in Bermuda, what with its mighty hand-operated lifting section measuring… 32 inches.

The reason for the tiny measurement is the raising portion only needs to be wide enough to let the masts of sailboats pass through, as depicted here in this lovely recreation of the Somerset Bridge, complete with sailing boat and an array of bridge traffic, by Flickr’s dicken liu. Head to Bermuda for a tiny erection via the link above!

Depositing a Floater

Sorry, we mean ‘Depositing by Floater’. The first is something else. Anyway, this delightful scene depicting a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver floatplane comes from Flickr’s Slick_Brick, and it looks beautiful! From the dog in the boat by the jetty to the forest and snow-capped mountains beyond to the wait… what’s that lurking in the water? Whatever it is the scene is still somewhere we’d love to be, and you can join us there at Slick’s photostream via the link in the text above.

#buslife

#buslife. It’s like #vanlife, only harder to park. But with the end of civilisation a genuine possibility thanks to mankind’s continued CO2 output, perhaps now is the time to buy an old bus and park it in readiness for the arriving apocalypse.

Norton74 thinks so too, having equipped two of his mini-figures with this beautifully ramshackle bus for the post-apoc world, built while he (and we) sweltered in record 40°C heat. Thanks Climate Change.

A myriad of wonderful details make Norton’s heatwave-built bus an absolute delight, and you can take a closer look at his mini-figures’ post-apoc future (and perhaps ours too…) on Flickr. Click the link above to join dystopian #buslife.

Seventies Cycling

Peugeot, like many car manufacturers, didn’t begin by making cars. The company’s earliest products were saw blades and coffee and pepper grinders, but it was the bicycles that followed that made the business famous.

A decline in cycling interest post-war forced the company to refocus on automobile production, but a resurgence in the 1960s, as the bicycle transitioned from a transportation method to a leisure activity, created a new market for Peugeot’s pedal-powered products.

The company capitalised on this, producing road and race bikes that became world famous, and demonstrated their leadership in the world’s toughest (and Frenchiest) cycle race; the Tour de France, winning the event in ’75 and ’77.

This lovely 6-wide recreation of Peugeot’s 1970s Tour de France support car, complete with boot-mounted bicycles, comes from previous bloggee PalBenglat, who has captured both the ’70s Peugeot 504 and the vintage building style of LEGO at the time wonderfully.

Clever techniques and excellent presentation are evident throughout the build, and there’s more of the classic Peugeot to see at Pal’s photostream. Click the link above to put on your jersey and head into the French mountains c1975.

Moe-Mobile

What’s this, two creations from one builder in the same day? How lazy are we?

The answer is ‘Yes’, and ‘Very’, but 1saac W.‘s ‘Moes Mobile Diner’ is just too delightful not to publish. Plus it’s lunch time in TLCB Towers and this writer was thinking about food.

Place your order at 1saac’s photostream via the link above, whilst this writer heads to the fridge.

Cream Cracker


After more than a few posts that definitely weren’t cars at all, we’re back on brief with previous TLCB competition winner 1saac W.’s beautifully presented ‘32 Ford hot rod. Disc wheels, a detailed exposed engine, and an Adventurers windshield create an accurate period aesthetic and there’s more to see on Flickr at the link.

Future Fuelling

Uh oh – cyberpunk! A genre about which we know less than your Mom does about portion control.

Still, despite this incompetence, we absolutely love this scene by Flickr’s Slick_Brick, which is packed with so much brilliant detail even TLCB Staff have stopped to take a look. And usually that only happens for some obscure car from 1976.

See if you can spot; the jet bike, the tracked robot helper, the pot plant, and the ingenious dog water bowl with the rest of TLCB Team at Slick’s photostream.

The Walking Dead

In this TLCB Writer’s opinion, it’s only a matter of time before the dead rise up to feast on the squishy bits of the living.

What we’d want in those inevitably approaching times is a shotgun and an RV, so we could a) shoot at reanimated corpses from the safety of the roof, and b) take a crap in comfort.

Dale in ‘The Walking Dead’ had the right idea, well – until he went for a walk in a field and his squishy bits were pulled out, but had he stayed atop his classic Winnebago he’d have been fine.

Jonas Kramm has recreated Dale and his RV pre-zombie dinner, and a dead-good job he’s done too! All details are present and correct including the roll-out awning, radio arial, roof-mounted parasol and deck-chair arrangement, and a mini-figure Dale with shotgun.

Best of all, Jonas has made instructions available so you can recreate it too, meaning at least a mini-figure or two in your collection will be safe from the certain zombie apocalypse that’s coming.