Tag Archives: Town

Yellow Snow

Lego Muscle Car

Today’s post title is as tenuous as it gets here at The Lego Car Blog! This beautifully photographed yellow muscle car comes from TLCB favourite _Tiler of Flickr and it’s overflowing with wonderful techniques. Our highlight is that enormous supercharger, or ‘blower’, sticking out of the hood. Blow is also known as snow, and yellow snow is funny. See, seamless! Moving on… there’s more to see of _Tiler’s gorgeous build at his photostream – take a look via the link above.

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Bananarama*

Lego Desert Clipper

LEGO produce all manor of weird and wonderful pieces these days. Take the humble banana for example. Usually a neat accessory for a Town market or a man in a gorilla suit, LegoGallifrey of Flickr has deployed the tropical fruit in use as mudguards for this rather wonderful looking ‘Desert Clipper’ concept. There’s more cunning parts use elsewhere in the build too – check it out at LegoGallifrey’s photostream here.

*Today’s musical link. Click at your own risk.

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The Clerk

Lego Ford Anglia

Ford’s humble Anglia has enjoyed something of a resurgence thanks to Harry Potter, but it was a neat classic car before J.K Rowling included it her books. Before that of course it was a rather neat modern car, with some pretty distinctive styling for the time. Whilst not a Jaguar, a Singer or a Humber, the little Ford was still a respectable middle-manager-y sort of car, driven by clerks, accountants and bank manager-types throughout the 1960s.

This lovely 5-wide mini-figure scale version of Ford’s popular European sedan comes from regular bloggee _Tyler of Flickr and it’s both built and photographed beautifully. There’s more to see at _Tyler’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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Plenty More Fish

Lego Jeep CJ

It’s Valentines Day here at The Lego Car Blog, and what better way to commemorate it than with an illegal fishing trip! The park ranger doesn’t look particularly impressed with this chap’s fishing success, but there are plenty more fish in the sea! See Laura, this writer has like, totally moved on. And he was just about to call it off anyway, so you did him a favour really. Anyway, there are plenty more fish and you can go fishing too thanks to Pixel Fox and this brilliant mini-figure scale Jeep CJ-7. See more on Flickr at the link.

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Policing District 18

Lego Police Speeder

The District 18 Speeder Competition run by the Lego Speeder Bikes group is gathering pace. This entry is the work of Pico van Grootveld and it’s been build for the ‘Enforce’ category of the contest, featuring a rather smug looking cop aboard an incredibly speedy-looking, er… speeder. There are three other categories to choose from and prizes up for grabs too. Take a look at Pico’s submission via the link above and you can see the other entries and submit a model yourself by visiting the Lego Speeder Bikes group.

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Meyers Manx

Lego Meyers Manx Beach Buggy

Flickr’s Pixel Fox has appeared here several times with his ever-growing assortment of off-road vehicles. His latest are these, a pair of wonderful Meyers Manx beach buggies.

Designed by a Californian boat-builder named Bruce F. Meyers in the 1960s the Manx took a shortened Volkswagen Beetle chassis and running-gear and added a custom glass-fibre body. Around 6,000 Manxes were built between 1965 and ’71 and the design dominated dune racing, despite the lowly Beetle engine power.

The B. F. Meyers & Co. company disbanded in 1971, by which point a wave of imitators had arisen. However the Meyers original is still held as the definition of the beach buggy and after several decades out of production a new Manx company formed in 1999, meaning you can still buy Meyers’ 1965 design today.

Pixel Fox’s lovely mini-figure scale Meyers Manxes capture the real car brilliantly and there’s more to see of the Manx and his other excellent off-road vehicles at his photostream via the link above.

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Traditional Caravans

Letranger Absurde has made this lovely pair of Gypsy caravans. Nicely decorated in traditional style, we particularly liked the rounded roof of the right most of the two. Being proper petrolheads at TLCB, we all love a good caravaning trip. Click the links in the text to go caravaning too.

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Black on Black

Lego Classic Police Car

A double post today, as two previous bloggees appear here with a pair of black mini-figure scale classics. First up (above) is _Tyler‘s glorious 5-wide Ford Anglia 100E in police specification, complete with a brilliantly authentic 1950s British police officer.

Today’s second black classic comes from Jonathan Elliot who has built a lovely 6-wide ‘anonymous black sedan’ from a similar era. Smart techniques abound on both models and there’s more to see of each via the links above.

Lego Black Sedan

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Hot Doggin’

Lego Hot Dog Truck

The Elves’, who go hungry unless they successfully find a blog-worthy creation, seem intent on continuing the mobile snack theme started yesterday. Maybe they’re trying to tell us something? Whatever, this brilliant hot dog truck by Flickr’s LEGO7 is a magnificent example of vehicular cuisine, and you can grab yourself a snack via the link!

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Vital Vittles

After a hard day at work, subduing rampant rampaging Elves and occasionally writing a bit of copy, there’s nothing TLCB’s editors enjoy more than relaxing with a tin of chilled beverage. Because of this, DOGOD Brick Design’s can shaped truck instantly caught our eye on Flickr. Vitali is a popular drink in Taiwan, with a fleet of delivery vehicle shaped liked its tins of drink. Disappointingly for us, it turned out that Vitali is non-alcoholic but we still enjoyed the nicely filled interior and custom stickers.

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The LEGO Trains Book | Book Review

The Lego Trains Book

Thump. It was just before Christmas, and a brown package slammed onto the hallway floor of TLCB Towers. A dozen TLCB Elves immediately ran towards it, but thwarted by its weight were unable to make off with their prize. A lot of post goes missing here.

Fortunately this TLCB writer is considerably bigger than a TLCB Elf and thus was able to pick up said package and, with some Elves still attached, retreat to the TLCB ‘staffroom’ (an ancient sofa in the corner of the office).

Usually heavy packages received here at TLCB Towers are ‘Cease and Desist’ notifications wrapped around a breeze block from The Brothers Brick, but this time we had a present! No Starch Press; we like you!

The Lego Trains Book

No Starch have been in the Lego book game for a while, consistently churning out books about our favourite plastic building blocks for some years. Their latest publication is this, the 230-page ‘The Lego Trains Book‘ by Holger Matthes.

In compact landscape format and produced in No Starch’s usual glossy high quality form ‘The Lego Trains Book’ really is surprisingly heavy, but does the content live up to the cover?

‘The Lego Trains’ book begins, after a brief Forward and Acknowledgements section, with a chapter detailing the history of LEGO’s official Trains line, following the range from its beginnings in the 1960s, through the battery era, live rail era (this writer’s favourite), to the latest remote control Power Functions sets. It’s a comprehensive compilation of the LEGO Trains history and one that’s sure to be of interest to anyone who loves the theme, although it is perhaps a bit too in-depth for the more casual Lego builder.

The Lego Trains Book

Chapter two is entitled ‘Basic Principles’, and it’s brilliant. Detailing building techniques and parts ratios it’s perfect for any builder of any theme (not just Trains) looking to create more advanced Lego creations. Utilising well-chosen digital depictions the author makes even the more complex techniques easy to understand, and whilst these aren’t quite as high quality visually as LEGO’s own they are good enough to make for useful teaching-aids.

Chapters three and four build upon these techniques with practical application, detailing the considerations and choices available when designing your own train models. This is a very thorough chapter offering insights into a variety of scales, how to ensure models can handle tight corners, how to connect carriages to one another, how to create realistic steam train mechanisms and such like.

It’s a gloriously nerdy section and as such Holger includes links to third-party products and design software that can help a builder reach the utmost level of realism. This may be a bit too in-depth for most builders (ourselves included), but it’s usually better to have too much information than too little.

The Lego Trains Book

The final chapter, which at 100 pages long makes up nearly half the book, is where ‘The Lego Trains Book’ comes alive. Continue reading

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Tipping Obligatory

Our Elven workforce couldn’t resist this nicely detailed mining lorry from Flickr’s LEGO 7. As well the detailing, the “Giant Dump Truck” has some nice play features, including an opening cab & tipping function.  Depending on how you choose to read its name, it could also be a bit rude. Perfect for our Elves and sadly perfect for us too.  Click the link in the text for more photos.

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A Space Classic

Lego Classic Spaceship

We don’t often publish sci-fi builds here at The Lego Car Blog. This is mostly because we’re a Car Blog, but partly because we understand sci-fi about as well as Kim Kardashian understands plumbing.

Today though, we are posting about sci-fi – and we do understand it – because this kids, is Classic Space!

Classic Space (or just ‘Space’ at the time) was LEGO’s hugely successful sci-fi theme in the 1980s. Colours were blue, grey and trans-yellow, missions were exclusively science and exploration – never conflict, and everyone was always smiling.

Lego Classic Space Hangar

Sadly the theme ended before this TLCB Writer was old enough to walk, but it paved the way for such gems as Futuron, M-Tron, Blacktron and Space Police. Today though, we’re remembering the original, thanks to Jon Blackford’s wonderful Neo Classic Space Hanger.

Complete with an LL221 spacecraft, a variety of classic space vehicles, a multitude of classic spacemen, and some beautiful-looking blue lighting, Jon’s build is the prefect homage to LEGO’s long-dead theme. It uses some truly brilliant building techniques too that are well worth further investigation.

Take a look for yourself at Jon’s Flickr album and via MOCpages.

Lego Neo Classic Space Hangar

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It’s a Gas!

Lego Gas Station 1920s Bugatti

Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74) is becoming a regular at The Lego Car Blog with his beautiful vintage motoring scenes. This wonderful Bugatti Type 35 has appeared here before, pictured being unearthed in an elderly farmer’s barn. This time Andrea takes us back to the when the car (and farmer) were a little younger, with this brilliant historic gas station scene. We’re not sure the Bugatti would be a new car, even in this era, as something much more recent seems to be poking out of the garage, but nevertheless we’re willing to bet that the Type 35 caused a bit of a stir at the Shell Service. There’s more to see of Andrea’s gorgeous build on Flickr – click here to step back in time, or here for today’s title song.

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