Tag Archives: Town

We’ve Got Gas

We’ve got gas today, courtesy of Dan the Fan, who is here making his TLCB debut.

It won’t be long before finding gas might be rather tricky, as gas stations – so integral to society for almost a century – are about to enter a period of mass extinction.

Ultimately that’s a good thing, but it’ll be shame for the many family-owned businesses that will close, and – sometimes – the gas stations themselves disappearing, as occasionally they can be quite interesting.

Dan the Fan’s in one such interesting gas station, complete with some rather excellent ‘Shell’ lettering, a gas pump, kiosk, elevated tank, billboard, and some cool-looking mini-figure bikers.

There’s more to see at Dan’s ‘Gas Station’ album on Flickr – click the link above to get gas.

Carrying Cars

We have a happy Elf today, with not one but five finds! Kinda. The bumper haul is courtesy of Thomas Selander and his neat Town-scale Mercedes-Benz car transporter, complete with four 4-wide cars on board. Whilst we decide how many meal tokens this is worth you can check out more of Thomas’ build at his photostream via the link above.

Floating Fuel

The future is electric. The UK has banned the sale of new cars that aren’t zero emissions from 2030, Tesla have become (amazingly) the world’s most valuable car company, and Norway’s new car registrations are over 50% EV.

That message hasn’t reached Dallen Powell though, whose marvellous hover freighter is not only transporting some kind of mystery fuel, it’s also still powered by burning fossilised dinosaurs, as denoted by the four exhaust stacks.

Dallen’s alternative future may still be a polluted one, but damn; it looks so cool! Superb parts usage adds to the whimsy, including a balustrade for steps, picket fence for a grille, and a brilliant brick-built Octan logo.

There’s more of to see of Dallen’s dirty sci-fi at his photostream – click the link above to float on over!

East Coast Style

You don’t need a million bricks and a friend at (or to work for) The Brothers Brick to be appear on a great Lego blog. OK, you do, but you don’t need those things to appear here! A few well selected pieces, excellent presentation, and talent will be just fine, as proven here by Tim Henderson and his lovely ‘East Coast Style’ ’32 Ford hot rod. Based on a real car built in the late ’50s, Tim’s build captures the look superbly and there’s more to see at his photostreamplus you can see what we look for in the models that we feature via our Submission Guidelines page here.

Batlift Truck

Ever wondered how Batman moves all his stuff around the Batcave? No, us neither, but Pasq67 has.

Cue Batman’s Fenwick forklift truck, which – considering it only operates out of sight in the Batcave – has been unnecessarily restyled to make it more Batty.

It also appears to be used only to transport large quantities of brooms (Batbrooms?) for some reason, but we know very little about comic book superheroes so who are we to argue.

See more on Flickr via the link!

#vanlife

Ergh, #vanlife.

Once the preserve of smelly hippies and families who liked to sleep in a field, the humble camper van has transformed into some kind of sustainable-living fashion statement, despite the fact that the occupants are literally burning oil with every unnecessary YouTube video uploaded following their drive to the nearest Starbucks. But if they only eat ethically-sourced all-natural vegan peace-crisps then it’s all OK…

This cheery mini-figure enjoying #vanlife has himself a 6-wide Volkswagen T3 Westfalia camper, complete with a brilliant pop-up roof, sliding door, and a fully fitted interior. Built by PalBenglat of Flickr it could only be more realistic if said mini-figure had a beard and a top-knot.

Join him trying to access the free WiFi at the nearest Starbucks via the link above!

Pottinger Ploughs

This is a Claas Arion 650 with Pottinger Ploughs. We have no idea what a Pottinger Plough is, but it sounds like either a British sandwich or something you might find in the karma sutra. Whatever it is, it looks great here, as built by previous bloggee Keko007, and there’s more to see at his ‘Claas Arion 650 with Pottinger Plows’ album.

Cop Classic

Christmas is over, the decorations are down, and work begins tomorrow. Versteinert‘s previously featured classic station wagon, as driven by Santa himself, has now been repurposed as a police car, and represents this slightly depressing return to normality in Lego form.

Of course ‘return to normality’ is a relative term, as our emergency workers face probably the most difficult January in living memory, thanks to COVID-19’s decision to become even more transmissible. Yay.

So it’s Christmas hats off to our emergency service readers; you are the heroes we need right now, and there’s more to see of Versteinert’s ’50s police car at via the link above.

Scrapheap

Short of a dumpster fire, if there’s an image more suited to summarising 2020 than this we’re yet to see it. Faber Mandragore‘s scrapyard is a fitting way to end probably the weirdest year of modern times; a huge pile of broken junk largely consigned to the bin. And on that happy note we’ll sign out for 2020. See you all in 2021!

Escape to the Wilds

2020 has been a weird year. By ‘weird’, we mean ‘total crap’, and thus we completely understand those who choose to leave it all behind and head out into the wilderness.

Two of the best vehicles for ‘overlanding’, as it is known, are the Toyota 4Runner and Jeep Wrangler, recreated here brilliantly in mini-figure scale by Christian Cowgill of Flickr. Well, we say ‘overlanding’, but the Jeep does look to have an enormous gun on the roof, so maybe these mini-figures are expecting something a bit more end-timesy than a trip the wilderness would first suggest.

They’re probably right too.

Join us preparing for the inevitable apocalypse at Christian’s photostream via the link above.

Cop Classic

The Lego Car Blog Elves are gradually being returned to their cages for our Christmas break, but we still have time for a few more of their finds before the drinking, er, we mean ‘festivities’, begin.

This wonderful little classic police car was discovered by one of their number today. Leewan is the builder, and the model features opening doors, room for two mini-figures, and some beautifully neat construction techniques.

There’s more to see of Leewan’s excellent creation at the Eurobricks forum – click the link to make the jump.

A-Game

Those working in Mercedes-Benz’s commercial vehicle naming department are much better at their jobs than their counterparts in the passenger car division. Whilst Mercedes-Benz cars are just a nonsensical collection of letterstheir trucks all have proper names. Although they must begin with the letter ‘A’ for some reason.

We have two here today, each found on Flickr and each recreating an A-named Mercedes-Benz truck brilliantly in Town(ish) scale.

First up (above) is Fuku Saku‘s exceptional Mercedes-Benz Arocs tipper truck, with detailing equal to what we would expect to find on a Model Team creation several times larger. There’s a superbly lifelike cab, a realistic tipping mechanism, and building instructions are also available. Head to Fuku’s photostream via the link above to take a look.

Today’s second small-scale Mercedes-Benz truck is the work of fellow previous bloggee Keko007, who has recreated the Antos in skip lorry form. Although just six-studs wide, Keko’s model not only looks recognisable, the skip hoist kinda works too, and there’s more to see at his ‘Mercedes Antos 2133 album’. Click the link above to make the skip over to Flickr.

RRRNEEEUUUURRGGGHHHHH!

It’s said that pictures say a thousand words. This picture only says one though, and that word is ‘RRRNEEEUUUURRGGGHHHHH!’

Flickr’s Johnni D is the builder behind it, with a little photographic help from a fellow Flickr-er, and there’s more to see of his ’33 Ford hot rod via the link above.

Game of Bricks – Light Kit (10277 Crocodile Train)* | Review

*Plus a few Speed Champions kits.

Being lazy, er… we mean tremendously generous, we’re handing over to another reader today for a review of more LED lighting kits for the 2020 LEGO sets, courtesy of LEGO-compatible LED lighting experts Game of Bricks. John Olive is the lucky recipient/willing reviewer, who has fitted some twinkly lights to his 10277 Crocodile Locomotive, and a few Speed Champions sets too – over to John!

Lights are only good for 3 things. Driving in the dark, for decorating a Holiday tree, and for lighting up LEGO sets. You know that feeling you have when you’ve finished building an official set that cost you an arm and a leg, and you have the desire to take your build to the next level? Well, for a good price it’s time to look to lighting your set or own creation with a good set of lighting kits.

While the current lineup of LEGO lighting kits are few and far between, a majority of builders have to turn to 3rd party vendors for all their lighting needs.

I had the distinct pleasure of getting hooked up with some lighting kits from Game of Bricks. Curious on the build quality and lighting ability, I had 3 kits sent to me in the United States. Two were for Speed Champions sets and the third was for the 10277 Crocodile Locomotive.

While shipping did take a little while, I was pleasantly surprised that when the package arrived, the kits were packaged nicely in thin black boxes. Inside all 3 kits, were the necessary components for each set and all came with a disclaimer packet. I was thrown off for a hot second because there weren’t any installment instructions and I didn’t know which lighting kit was for which set. I was quickly corrected by my 6 year old as he noticed a sticker on each kit with the set number on there. Go figure.

I had to refer back to the website for instructions as the kits didn’t come with an installment guide which was conflicting with their website offer of having instructions in every set. The instructions online were geared towards folks that have built the corresponding set already, so it included tear down instructions prior to adding the lights. This was extremely helpful for the Speed Champions sets and Crocodile. With only receiving digital instructions, I don’t hold that against them as I prefer to use digital instructions. The pictures were clear and provided a close up view of what was happening. I may have been distracted by the model’s fingernail in some pictures, but as I replicated the instructions on my own desk, it was apparent that Game of Bricks had given some thought in this phase of the installment. While the sets I reviewed were somewhat newer, hopefully older sets have the instructions right out of the box. Just in case customers don’t have the internet.

Let’s get to the actual kits.

The quality of the lighting kits was high just by the look and feel of the components. The website promises top notch quality, and while I’m unsure of the specific requirements to that, my experience with lighting kits confirms that it’s true. The extremely thin Connecting Cables are wound tightly and I didn’t notice any unraveling wires when running the cables in between the plates and bricks. Connecting the cables to a light strip has to be done ​very carefully​ and will be rewarded with an audible click when it slipped in there correctly.

*Veteran tip: A classic technique requires you to use your fingernail to push the connector into the port when dealing with such small components.*

Once cause of concern when dealing with any kind of lighting kit is the size of the LEDs used, but luckily Game of Bricks comes through with the perfect size. On the Crocodile Locomotive set, there are several 1×1 translucent clear pips that mimic the lights.

The LEDs from GOB fit nicely inside the pip. On the flip side, the light kit for the 75894 Mini Cooper S Rally & 2018 Mini John Cooper Works Buggy came with 2 sets of pips that had small holes that snaked the connecting table inside for you. This was because the Crocodile lights had their clear pips connected to a brick that allowed the cable to be hidden. When it comes to creating lighting kits, attention to the smallest detail allows for an easy installment. Spending time with a set when developing these clever little work-arounds is important because not only does it need to be installed correctly, the cables need to be hidden in order to pull off that realistic component of the set. No one likes a gorgeous set with clunky wires being exposed. With that, Game of Bricks is going to receive good marks when it comes to hiding cables.

While it makes sense to light up a locomotive like the Crocodile, Speed Champions sets like the MINI or Jaguar were a wild card for me. In all my years going to brick shows, it is rare to see those small cars being lit up because it becomes difficult to hide those clunky battery boxes. Luckily the battery boxes provided in the lighting kits aren’t much bigger than a zippo lighter, and comfortably hold 3 triple A batteries. Just make sure that you are hiding that box behind the set as it is clear that these lighting kits are more for display than for running trains on a train layout. A nice little tidbit is having the on/off switch on that battery box and some sets like the Crocodile include a secondary battery box for two 3 volt round batteries. This extremely thin box allows for installment underneath the set and is hidden from view. The finished models shined brightly in all the right places. For example, on the Crocodile Locomotive, the main cabin’s lights shine a dull yellow, mimicking this 1919-1986 model, while the lights at the front and rear “snouts” shone a bright white light. I appreciated the thought behind those decisions.

Having so many options for kits leads to the biggest question that I will leave to others to debate. Are there certain LEGO sets that should be MODed for lighting kits or are there sets that should not be lit?

Game of Bricks throws all that into the wind with their wide selection of lighting kits and says, you shouldn’t let anybody tell you what LEGO set to light up. Their catalog of lighting kits is ever growing, and just by the looks and experience of using their lighting kits, it’s hard to not think of a LEGO set they don’t have a kit for. If they don’t have one available, you can make suggestions which I appreciate as a consumer.

As LEGO continues to pump out new sets, Game of Bricks appear to be doing a great job of creating new kits for them. With their robust catalog of kits, and accessories for your own creations, I believe that Game of Bricks is here to light up the competition.

Enter Sandman*

We’re not really sure what’s going on here but we expect the cement mixer truck won’t be the same shape by the end. Built by hachiroku24, there’s more to see of ‘Spiderman vs. Sandman’ via the link, where building instructions can also be found!

*Today’s awesome title song.