Tag Archives: steampunk

Travelling the Globe

What better way to travel the globe than in an, er…. travelling globe! Suspended beneath the LEGO Ideas 21332 Globe set, Kristof has created a beautifully well-matched steampunk ship, complete with a variety of appropriately whimsical steampunk accompaniments. Take flight on Flickr via the link above!

I’m Going Out, I May Be Some Time

He might sound like something from the Urban Dictionary, but Windle Poons is in fact the oldest wizard of Ankh-Morpork’s Unseen University faculty, with an age of well over 120. Fortunately Windle’s mobility is aided by a magnificent wheeled chair complete with a variety of horns, which even saw service in battle during one of Ankh-Morpork’s regular magical crisis. Recreated here by Eero Okkonen, who sounds fairly wizardy himself, Windle’s chair looks marvellous in brick form, as does the mystical centenarian himself. Take a trip to the Disc’s finest university of befuddled old men via Eero’s photostream at the link above.

Chumdinger

This gloriously grey steamer comes from Daniel Church of Flickr, whose ‘Chumdinger’ steampunk tugboat plies the dirty waters of a Victorian Thames. And what waters they are too, with Daniel creating the bow waves and paddle churn absolutely beautifully in trans tiles. That’s not a very ‘TLCB’ thing to write, as we’re normally focussed on engines and whatnot, but fortunately the Chumdinger has one of those too, with the pistons pumping and paddle turning brilliantly via a hidden Power Function motor. There’s more to see of Daniel’s superb creation at his photostream – click the link above to head to the past on London’s river.

Going Cottaging

This is a walking cottage, designed to survive the spider apocalypse. Because of course it is. Letranger Absurde owns the mind behind it and there’s more to see at his photostream on Flickr. Click here to go cottaging. Sorry, we mean here. We’re nothing if not educational!

Mortal Engines

Markus Ronge is back! Creator of the spell-binding Netbrix epic ‘Full Steam‘, Markus has returned bringing Mortal Engines into the brick. And the finest photo editing you will find anywhere in the Lego Community.

The ‘Jenny Haniver’ is a stunning demonstration of this; an enormous sky-fi airship packed with incredible building techniques and a phenomenal attention to detail, surpassed only by the way it is presented.

Sailing through the clouds Markus’s build looks as though Lego has come to life, and that surely is the definition of the art. An enormous gallery of images is available to view on Flickr, showing how this amazing model was constructed (very carefully we would think) and the details within it.

Head skywards via the link in the text above.

It’s Just Not Cricket

The mind of Vince_Toulouse is a magical place. After his Walking Bus featured here last month – a creation that should be rather terrifying yet appears utterly delightful – he’s back with another steampunky insectoid.

No, not those Insectoids, but his latest creation does draw upon an even more pointless and short-lived theme, with a few Galidor parts proving that even the worst LEGO sets of all time can be put to good use.

Vince’s ‘Cricket Automobile’ looks a lot more spidery than crickety to us, even though it has the cricket-correct six legs, but whatever its animal equivalent it looks marvellous. See more at Vince’s ‘Cricket Automobile’ album on Flickr via the first link in this text.

Caught a Bug

If you’re going to catch a bug, it may as well be as big one. Flickr’s Vince_Toulous owns the mind behind this ‘Myriapodobus’, which is complete with a lavish interior and a great many legs. With the passengers all having caught it there’s no need for them to enact ‘social distancing’ so they can have a chat over a drink from the bar-segment. That said, as no one really likes sitting next to one another on the bus, letting alone talking to fellow passengers, we’re not sure Coronavirus has made any discernible difference to public transport etiquette. Catch Vince’s bug for yourself via the link above.

Steampunk Snail

This is a steampunk snail (of course it is) and that’s about all we can say about Andreas Lenander‘s latest build. You’ll have to head to his photostream via the link above to ask the inevitable questions, like ‘But… why?’, and ‘How fast is it?’, and ‘But… why’? again. Do just that via the link.

The Lego Steam Company

Extinction Rebellion wouldn’t like this. Steampunk, that odd mashup of Victorian tech applied to modern inventions, is thankfully pure whimsy. Sure the brass, iron and wood look damn cool, but that’s a whole lotta coal, and however many times the orange man-child in charge of the free world puts the word ‘clean’ in front of it, coal just isn’t.

Fortunately most of the world (we said most, and we’re looking at you China…) have moved off burning the black stuff, and its use in the modern world is now solely a retro throwback for train and traction engine enthusiasts. Which in a way makes dioramas such as this one all the more magical, as coal is now largely a historical relic.

This gorgeous (and enormous) steampunk display has been built for the Lego World Utrecht 2019 show by builders Brick Rebel and Monstrophonic and is certainly the most stunning display we’ve seen this year. An assortment of delightfully impractical vehicles feature, including airships, a monorail, a steamboat, and even an elevator, all powered by coal in the imagination and by Power Functions electric motors in the display, bringing this spectacular collaboration to life.

There’s loads more to see of this incredible display at both Brick Rebel and Monstrophonic’s photostreams via the links above, plus you can see their ‘Lego Steam Company’ build in person at the Lego World Utrecht 2019 show.

Atomic Bug

This is the Atomic Bug. Is it sci-fi? Is is steampunk? Is it a mech? Is it a spacecraft? All questions we don’t know the answer to, but even if we did it probably wouldn’t help us. Whatever this is it’s a neat bit of building and there’s more to see courtesy of Kobalt on Flickr. We’d better stick to cars…

Extreme Ironing

Extreme Ironing, designed to illustrate the futility of unnecessary ironing, is surely one of mankind’s greatest sports. From the depths of the ocean to Mount Everest, this noble activity has achieved some magnificent feats of garment de-creasing since its inception a few decades ago.

But – so far as we know – the sport has yet to reach space (NASA, if you’re reading this…). However previous bloggee Dwarlin Forkbeard aims to right that wrong! Sort of… (this is a link tenuous even for us).

This mighty iron-shaped spaceship is an Iron-class corvette, so called because it looks… well, like a giant floating iron. At least that’s what our cast-iron (hah!) sci-fi knowledge has allowed us determine. There’s probably a steampunk pun in there too somewhere…

Press (hah!) the link above to head into space to smooth out some creases!

Desert Roll

Lego Monocycle

We don’t understand steampunk at the best of times, so we’re really lost here. No matter though, because this ‘Wasteland Monocycle’ by Flickr’s Daniel Church is achingly cool. And that’s before you see it working. Yup, this sort-of-but-not-quite-Victorian-oddity is motorised, allowing it to roll across an endless desert for eternity. Click the links to see how!

Fighting Fires in Flight

Lego Sky-Fi Firefly Ship

The Skytanic has floundered. After departing the Maersk Pier some weeks ago the great skyliner reached the treacherous Northern Floating Icefield and the welcoming navigation lights of Trusty Rusty. Only Trusty Rusty’s lights weren’t showing.

Unable to see the floating icebergs the Skytanic stood little chance, and the huge ship – now engulfed in flames – is doomed. With the evacuation underway the passengers and crew are hoping for a miracle, a miracle which which may arrive in the shape of the FRSS ‘Firefly’.

Lego Sky-Fi Airship

A mighty ‘Dipteria Class’ airship, the Firefly can stay airborne for a month at a time, travelling at up to 60 knots thanks to two massive ‘Brickerton’ engines powering a pair of enormous platinum-coated six-blade rotors. With a capacity of 400,000 litres of water, plus nine water cannons, sucking moisture-rich air out of the clouds and firing it up to 250 metres, the Firefly is the Skytanic’s only hope.

Only Markus Ronge knows if the Firefly will arrive in time. Until then you can check out his amazing Sky-Fi airship by clicking here, and you can catch up on the complete ‘Netbrix’ original story ‘Full Steam’ at Markus’ Flickr photostream here.

Moon City

Lego Steampunk City

We do not understand steampunk. Effectively what sci-fi would look like if it were devised in the late 1800s, it’s a genre so alien to TLCB staff it may as well be the plot of ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. The creations that steampunk produces however, are not like the Kardashians at all. They’re wonderful.

Lego Steampunk City

This is one such build, the Moon City originating from the mind of Dwarlin Forkbeard, which is filled with such gorgeous detail that we want to move straight there and get a job mining cheese. Complete with a marvellous motorised train (although the journey does look a bit samey), working elevators, and a rotating orrery, Dwalin’s city is packed with ingenious movement too. Click on these words to head to the moon sometime in the 1880s…

Lego Steampunk City

A Flight to Remember

Lego Skytanic Sinking

Since departing the Maersk Pier some months ago, the mighty skyliner ‘Skytanic‘ has been steaming through the skies towards Belville on its maiden voyage. Approaching the notoriously dangerous floating ice field, the ship’s captain scanned the horizon for ‘Trusty Rusty‘, the great lightship tasked with guiding travellers through the floating icebergs. But the light is no longer shining…

With no light to guide them the floating icebergs are all but invisible to the crew of the Skytanic, but there’s no panic – the huge ship is deemed to be near indestructible.

CRASH.

The moment we’ve been fearing since the Skytanic’s departure back in September has occurred, and storyteller Markus Ronge has captured it in spectacular brilliance. Brick-built flames are now rising from the hull of the stricken skyliner, and the order to evacuate has been given. All we can do now is pray – and tune in for the next episode of course.

There’s more to see of Markus’ incredible scene at his photostream by clicking here, and if you missed earlier episodes you can catch up via the links in the text above.

Lego Skytanic Sinking