Tag Archives: Ship

Amerigo Vespucci

This amazing creation is a near-perfect brick-built replica of the Amerigo Vespucci, a tall ship of the Italian Navy named after the 14th Century explorer of the same name. Surprisingly despite its late 18th century appearance the Amerigo Vespucci was actually built in 1930 as a training ship, and is still in use today based at the Italian port of La Spazia. This incredible recreation of the tall ship is the work of Luca Gaudenzi and it’s one of the most spectacular vessels this site has ever featured. Head over to Luca’s ‘Amerigo Vespucci’ album to begin your Italian Naval training.

Tiny Erection

The raising drawbridge, the most famous of which has even become an official LEGO set, is a staple feature in bad car chase movies, in which cars seem to happily jump over them with no effect whatsoever on their suspension, nor the driver’s spine. The reality of course would be somewhat different, but we think even TLCB’s Rover 200 could manage to jump the Somerset Bridge in Bermuda, what with its mighty hand-operated lifting section measuring… 32 inches.

The reason for the tiny measurement is the raising portion only needs to be wide enough to let the masts of sailboats pass through, as depicted here in this lovely recreation of the Somerset Bridge, complete with sailing boat and an array of bridge traffic, by Flickr’s dicken liu. Head to Bermuda for a tiny erection via the link above!

Harbour Star

Since 1888, crossing Hong Kong’s spectacular Victoria Harbour has been a cheap and wonderful journey, thanks to the delightful Star Ferries. Some of the current ships have been in operation since the 1950s, although since retro-fitted with modern power, and whatever turmoil an increasingly despotic Chinese government inflicts upon the once autonomous region, the Star Ferries have remained a much needed constant.

This beautiful replica of the ‘Solar Star’ – that first sailed in 1958 and is still in use today – comes from Yama Jason, who has captured the iconic Star Ferry shape superbly in brick form. Lovely detailing and some very clever techniques make this worth a closer look, and there’s more of the model to see on Flickr. Click the link above to head from Kowloon to Hong Kong Island for just 20c.

A Pirate’s Life for Me

Today’s creation is not a car, which means we’re well out of our depth. But, despite not knowing which way the wind is blowing, even we can see just how swell this magnificent 72-gun pirate galleon by Flickr’s Robert4168/Garmadon is.

To parrot a few stats from Robert, the ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ measures 165 studs from rudder to bowsprit, 58 studs crossbeam, 170 studs tall, is crewed by 36 mini-figures (including obligatory skeletons), and features over 85 LED lights from third-party specialists Lightailing.

Robert’s voyage to complete the ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ took three years, and the finished model is now up for sale, with much more of this piratical masterpiece available to view at his photostream. Sea dogs, buccaneers, freebooters, hearties and swashbucklers set sail via the link above!

*One hundred doubloons if you can spy all the piratical puns.

Das Boot

15,000 pieces, 4½ years, and 1.8 metres. A few of the astonishing statistics associated with Ciamosław Ciamek‘s breathtaking 1:38 scale Second World War U-Boat.

Constructed in six sections, each with a removable sides to reveal the spectacular detail within, Ciamosław’s incredible mini-figure scale replica of a German ‘Typ VII C U-Boot’ accurately recreates the control room, front and rear messes, bow, engine rooms, and stern, all of which were designed digitally before being built from thousands of LEGO pieces.

A crew of dozens of mini-figures are shown throughout the interior of the boat, many operating the equipment, engines, and weaponry, whilst others are off-shift in the mess.

It’s a jaw-dropping creation, with hundreds of images across two albums required to capture the model’s scale and complexity, and you can check out the first of these on Flickr via the link in the text above. Click it, sit back, and take in the most amazing World War 2 creation you’re likely to see in 2022…

Barracuda Redux

The 6285 Black Seas Barracuda is probably one of the greatest LEGO sets ever released. Launched back in 1989 with just under a thousand pieces, 6285 is a high watermark for LEGO’s Pirates range that the company is yet to better. But that hasn’t stopped SuperSick.

Loosely based on the original set, SuperSick’s Black Seas Barracuda Redux adds a host of smooth techniques and piece upgrades, plus an additional twelve cannons, to create very possibly our favourite pirate ship ever. In fact, apart from the flags flying in the wrong direction (sailing basics SuperSick!), it could be the perfect ship.

Join the piratical adventure at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

Sundance


TLCB’s luxury yacht, paid for by the riches that blogging Lego brings, doesn’t get mentioned much here. We like our privacy, and it’s hard enough keeping the multitude of attractive girls away as it is, without them knowing about the boat.

Ted Andes has no such qualms however, uploading this rather wonderful Technic yacht ‘Sundancer’ to Flickr.

A mini-figure cabin, keel, rudder, plus marvellous fabric sails fashioned from the LEGO Carousel set’s canopy create a boat very nearly as beautiful as TLCB’s, and you’re welcome on board via the link above. Ted’s of course, not ours.

*Today’s excellent title song.

Coaster Noordborg

This is the Noordborg, a 49 metre coaster built for the Dutch shipping company Wagenborg in the 1960s. Well, this one isn’t, being 1.25 metres long and built by Eurobricks’ Jebbo, but it’s every bit as wonderful as the real thing.

1:40 scale makes Jebbo’s coaster approximately mini-figure scale, with it requiring 26,000 LEGO pieces to create.

Spectacular detail is everywhere, and there’s more to see of Jebbo’s beautiful brick-built boat at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click here to climb aboard.

Kirov Your Enemies Close

This is a Kirov-Class Cruiser, built between 1933 and 1944 for the Soviet Union and deployed on the Black Sea during the Second World War.

The largest ships operated by the Soviet Navy post the Russian Civil War, the Kirov-Class ships featured technology from a variety of nations, with the design being Italian, the radar systems American and British, the boilers British, and the aircraft catapults German.

All of which were countries that the Soviet Union was either at war with or directly hostile to during the time the Kirov-Class ships were in service. It’s a funny world.

This spectacular recreation of a Kirov-Class Cruiser comes from Kirill Simerzin of Flickr, who has replicated the real ship beautifully, from the Italian propeller on the bottom to the American radar systems at the top.

There’s more of the build to see at Kirill’s photostream – click the link above to keep your enemies close…

HMS Texas

This is ‘HMS Redoubtable’, an Imperial Guard ship by Flickr’s Elephant-Knight, and it has absolutely definitely got more guns than you. Even if you live in Texas.

Despite Texas having the highest number of guns (and the highest number of gun deaths – go-figure?), even a Texan is unlikely to match Redoubtable’s three gun decks and one hundred and twelve separate guns. That’s even more weaponry than is carried at an average ‘MAGA’ rally.

At over fifty inches long (that’s over 160 studs) and nearly forty inches tall, Elephant’s ship is impressive in far more ways than just than its gun tally, and there’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular ship eleven-months-in-the-making at Elephant-Knight’s photostream.

Join the one hundred and twelve gun salute via the link above.

Forced (Perspective) Landing

This mini-figure is having an eventful day. Luckily the water is mill-pond calm and his stricken aircraft is sending out its own distress flare. Let’s hope the ship in the distance spots it! Grant Davis is the builder and there’s more to see here.

Not a Car

But we rather like boats. They fetch tasty things out of the sea, take us to exotic places, and bring us pretty much everything from where it’s made to where it needs to be.

This one is a research vessel, itself the noblest of purposes, Luis Pena is the builder, and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look.

Not a Carrrrgh!

Aarrrgh, this be a fine vessel. She be a twenty-four gun barque, plain to the eye yet a beauty where it counts, from her Harrrry Potter wand rigging to her 12-pounderrr cannons. She be captained by Sebeus I and you can request to join her crew on Flickrrrr.

Canal Blockage

We don’t often feature micro-scale creations here at TLCB, let alone whatever scale this is. Micro-micro-micro-scale?

This is the Ever Given container ship, here measuring just six studs in length, the life-size version of which is currently blocking the Suez Canal.

At 400m (1,300ft) long, the Ever Given is one of the largest ships in the world, able to carry over 20,000 shipping containers. These are all currently wedged between the banks of the Suez – blocking the hundreds of other ships that were transiting the canal at the time – and creating the world’s largest homage to Austin Powers in a baggage cart.

Whilst the Egyptian authorities attempt to clear their canal blockage you can check out this micro-micro-micro-scale version courtesy of yu chris‘ on Flickr, plus you can read a bit more about why the Suez Canal is so important here.

Dutch Rudder

Rolling coal‘ is for idiots. Aside from blasting a load of carcinogenic particulates into the air as some sort of moronic ‘anti-environment’ protest, plumes of black smoke actually signify wasted fuel, ergo less power. Which is why we don’t use steam engines any more.

That said, we do still like a good steam engine (which is possibly the saddest sentence in the English language), and so too does TLCB debutant Jebbo, who has built three unfathomably beautiful Dutch steam tugs from our favourite plastic bricks.

Each model is an exquisitely detailed replica of a real steam tug boat, of which two are apparently still running on coal.

Amazing attention to detail and ingenious building techniques are in abundance and there’s more to see of Jebbo’s ‘Furie’, ‘Hercules’, and ‘Noordzee’ steam tug boats at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the link above to roll coal the right way.