Tag Archives: Ship

Not a Car

Lego Medieval Ship

We’re not sure what’s got into the Elves but they seem to like boats at the moment. No matter, because this medieval ship by Flickr’s Gabriel Thomson is gorgeous, especially the clever brick-built hull. See more at Gabriel’s photostream by clicking here, whilst we issue a ‘find a bloody car you idiots’ directive…

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The Great Caribbean Battle

Lego Pirate Ships

From 1989 to 1993 the waters of the Caribbean Sea were a turbulent place to sail. A battle was raging, between a band of pirates led by the blood-thirsty one-legged, one-handed and one-eyed Captain Redbeard (making him something of a Monty Python sketch), and Governor Broadside’s Imperial Soldiers (later the Imperial Guard) whose mighty forts and fleet fought piratical activity across the region.

Previous bloggee Versteinert MOC has captured the time brilliantly, with this ingenious homage to LEGO’s classic Pirates line. Recreated in cutesy-sort-of-mini-figure scale are three of the theme’s greatest sets, 6285 Black Seas Barracuda, 6286 Skull’s Eye Schooner, and 6274 Caribbean Clipper, all fighting it out in what looks like an outdoor swimming pool.

There’s much more to see of the miniaturised nautical battle at Versteinert’s Flickr album – pick a side and join the fight via the link!

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Sky Sailing

Lego Air Ship

One of our Elves returned to TLCB Towers today with this, prompting an ‘uh oh’ (or words that mean ‘uh oh’ which aren’t suitable for type) to ripple around the office. Mark of Falworth’s ‘Bellonatus’ is clearly a work of Lego art, bursting with incredible detailing, ingenious build techniques, and glorious presentation. But… we are so out of our depth with models like this.

Is it Steam Punk? Sky-Fi? Pirates? Probably none of those, but we’ve still included them all in the tags to be safe. Whatever this is, it is definately worth a closer look – and you can do just that at Mark’s photostream. Click on the link to head to the skies.

Lego Air Ship

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Googly-Eyed Bastard

Lego Ekranoplan

Today’s, er… amusingly named creation comes from Tammo S of Flickr, and whilst we’ve used Sci-Fi in the tags, there is more truth in this remarkable design than meets the googly-eye.

Developed by the Soviets during the cold war, Ekranoplan ground effect vehicles occupied a weird space between ship, hovercraft and aircraft, whilst being none of them. The mightiest of these, and one that remained secret from the West for years, was the Lun Class Ekranoplan. It measured over 70m in length and was powered by eight Kuznetsof turbojets producing a combined 28,000lbf of thrust, enabling it to travel at almost 350mph for over 1,000 miles, skimming at just 10ft above the water.

Tammo S’s ground effect vehicle is slightly jazzier than the secret Soviet monster, and looks to be a great way to travel if you’re a LEGO mini-figure! Head over to Flickr via the link above to see more of Tammo’s fictional version of one of the world’s weirdest vehicles.

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The Search for Red Rackham’s Treasure

Lego Tintin Sirius

The Lego Car Blog’s offices don’t have a classy desk area with those little brass plaques and fancy green desk lights. We do have a mostly-stocked beer fridge and a shrine to Megan Fox behind the photocopier though, and not many workplaces can say that.

However, if we did have a fancy desk area we’d love to place this in it. This beautiful creation is a mini-figure scale replica of the Sirius ship used by Tintin in the search for Red Rackham’s treasure, and it’s ludicrously pretty. Built by previous bloggee Stefan Johansson there are gorgeous details and ingenious building techniques in abundance, and there’s much more of Stefan’s wonderfully photographed vessel to see on Flickr. Click the link above to hoist anchor.

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Esmeralda

Lego Steam Corvette

Nope, not that Spanish exchange girl from your youth that you always wish you’d kept in touch with, but this rather neat steam corvette sailing under Chilean colours.

Built for the Chilean Navy by a British shipyard in the 1850s this Esmeralda is one of several Chilean warships to carry the name, and was sunk in the Battle of Iquique in Chile’s defeat to Peru and Bolivia in 1879. We know so little about about South American conflicts that our narrative ends there, but the model of the lost ship itself is nevertheless beautiful. Flickr’s Luis Peña is the builder behind it and there’s more to see of his gorgeous recreation of the Esmeralda via the link above.

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Finnians Shipyard

Lego Finnians Shipyard

OK, this is clearly not a car. But it is gorgeous, and contains so many wonderful Town scale vehicles it’s sure worth publicising here at The Lego Car Blog. Built by previous bloggee Konajra this is ‘Finnians Shipyard’ that forms part of a much larger – and ridiculously impressive – ‘Brickton Harbour‘ build, which contains even more brilliant boats, buildings and vehicles.

Back to Finnians and underneath that utterly brilliant roof is a beautiful ship under construction, whilst outside are a neat forklift, a superbly detailed electrician’s truck and a magnificent beam crane. Inside the ship-builder is fully detailed and includes some excellent highly realistic lighting thanks to the guys at Brickstuff.

Lego Finnians Shipyard

There’s much more to see of Konajra’s spellbinding creation on Flickr here and you can see more the wider build via the first link.

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Last of the Steam Tugs

Lego Saturn Steam Tug

This is the ‘Saturn’, a 1908 German steam tug which saw active duty right up until 1979. That made it the very last serving steam tug in Germany and earned it a place in the Rostock Shipping Museum, where it still resides today. This gorgeous 1:40-scale replica of the last steam tug comes from Flickr’s koffiemoc who has recreated the little ship beautifully in Lego form. There are lots more images to see – including highlights of the brilliant detailing and ‘how to’ pictures of the hull construction – at koffiemoc’s photostream. Steam ahead via the link above.

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Secrets of the Abyss

Lego Pirate Ship Kraken

This is not a car. But it is a pirate ship being attacked by a gigantic sea monster, and that’s good enough for us. W Navarre owns the mind behind it and there’s more to see of this terrifying encounter on Flickr.

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I Can’t Contain Myself

Lego Container Ship

All the best things arrive in boxes. Fish fingers, LEGO sets, TLCB Elves. OK, maybe not the last one (and cages aren’t really boxes anyway), but pretty much everything else cool in the world will have reached you this way, even if it’s not packaged in a box itself.

Enormous container ships like this one are the vehicles that move almost every material good around around the world, without which we’d be stuck with having only what our local economies produce, and we dread to think what that would mean for TLCB Towers.

This spectacular Lego container ship by Flickr’s Jussi Koskinen was built as a commissioned piece for an advertisement and it includes over seven hundred 2×4 stud containers, stored both above deck and inside the incredible curved hull. The model totals a huge 112 studs in length and there’s more to see of Jussi’s vessel courtesy of his Flickr photostream. Click the link above to open the box.

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Not a Car

Lego Tug Boat

This beautiful Lego tug boat is not a car, but for reasons unknown this TLCB writer quite like tug boats, and thus it’s appearing here! Built as a commissioned piece by Arjan Oude Kotte it’s an example of exceptional Lego model-making, and there are more superb images to see at Arjan’s album on Flickr. Tug yourself off at the link above.

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Ocean Custodian

Lego RV Calypso Research Boat

Built by TLCB debutant Luis Pena, this is a 1:100 scale replica of the research vessel ‘Calypso’, complete with a helicopter and ‘diving saucer’ submersible vehicle.

The Calypso was originally a US-built wooden-hulled British minesweeper that served in the Mediterranean during the Second World War. Following the Allied victory the ship returned to US hands before being recommissioned as a Maltese ferry.

Within a year however, British millionaire Thomas Loel Guinness purchased the ship and gave it to the diving pioneer, film-maker, conservationist and adventurer Jacques-Yves Cousteau for use as a marine research vessel, a role the Calypso fulfilled for five decades. During an incredible half-century of oceanic exploration Cousteau and the Calypso made numerous discoveries, including the wreck of the HMHS Brittanic sunk during the First World War, the ability of marine mammals to use echolocation, and halted the dumping of radioactive waste in the Mediterranean Sea.

In 1996, almost fifty years after it entered service with Cousteau, the RV Calypso was accidentally rammed by a barge in Singapore and it sunk in the harbour. A week later the ship was raised and transferred to a shipyard, however Jacques-Yves Cousteau died the following year of a heart attack aged 87, and the Calypso was left to rot as various parties fought over the boat’s ownership, its restoration, and unpaid bills.

Today the ship, which has featured in film, documentaries, song, and even has a namesake in Star Trek, is still quietly dissolving in a shipyard in France, a victim of mankind’s inability to put progress over profit. However Cousteau’s legacy remains almost unfathomably huge, and continues to today via the environmental protection foundation that he created which now numbers over 300,000 members.

This beautiful homage to a ship which as done probably more than any other can be found in greater detail at Luis’ photostream on Flickr, and includes both above and below the waterline versions (each pictured here). There’s more to see via the link above, and you can read more about the Cousteau Society that continues Jacques-Yves’ work today by clicking here.

Lego RV Calypso Research Boat

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You Don’t Frighten Us English Pig-Dogs!

Lego Galleon Battle

I don’t wanna talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food-trough wiper! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries!

Much like the aforementioned medieval altercation, it looks like the French have got the better of us English-types in Sebeus I‘s galleon battle. There’s more to see of this beautifully epic scene on Flickr – click the link above to join the fray.

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I’m on a Boat

Lego AMELS 180 Superyacht Driftwood

Ok, this writer isn’t on a boat. He’s on a wheelie chair in the crumbling hovel that is TLCB Towers. But it’s nice to dream.

Flickr’s Edwin Korstanje (aka VFRacingTeam) makes dreaming slightly easier with his incredible commissioned replica of the AMELS 180 Superyacht ‘Driftwood’. Built over two months from 14,000 LEGO pieces, Edwin’s 1:53 model of the 180 foot ship measures over a metre long, and both Edwin and his daughter had a tour of the real yacht as part of the commission.

There’s more to see of this spectacular commissioned build on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum, you can read our interview with Edwin as part of the Master MOCers series via the link above, and if you’re over 18 you can watch today’s title track video here (strongest possible language warning!).

Lego AMELS 180 Superyacht Driftwood

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Building the Panama Canal – 2000451 Set Preview

LEGO Education Panama Canal Set

One of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, the Panama Canal opened just over 100 years ago, taking over 30 years to complete and costing an estimated 28,000 people their lives. Started by the French in the 1880s, the project was completed by America in 1914, whereupon it completely transformed the worldwide shipping industry. No longer did vessels have to navigate the lengthy and dangerous Cape Horn – the tip of South America – instead able to cut straight through the centre of the Americas.

LEGO Education Panama Canal Set

To date almost 1 million ships have passed through the canal, each taking around seven hours to traverse the 77km mix of channels and artificial lakes, and the three huge sets of locks.

It’s these locks that are the defining characteristic of the canal, allowing the water and the ships that float upon it to rise and fall with the land in order to cross from one side of the continent to the other.

So important is the Panama Canal and the locks that allow it to function that their width and length has become the determining factor for shipbuilding, with ships built specifically to the largest size that is able to fit through them, known as ‘Panamax’.

Today though, we have a set of locks that are rather smaller. This wonderful new set comes from LEGO Education, and it recreates the third set of locks of the Panama Canal.

Constructed from over 1,180 pieces, the 2000451 El Canal de Panama set is built in five sections (plus a few micro-scale ships), allowing five children (or adults!) to contribute to the finished model simultaneously. Each section contains a set of gears and mechanically operated lock gates, allowing the ‘water’ to rise and fall as the gates are opened and closed. We’ve seen similar mechanisms in paper or card form, but not yet in LEGO, and it seems to work beautifully – making this set a great learning aid for the those wishing to understand both mechanics and hydrodynamics.

Originally destined just for sale in Panama, the LEGO Education 2000451 El Canal de Panama set is now available with worldwide shipping (we do hope this means that some sets will travel through the real world counterpart!), and can be bought via the Panama STEM website.

If you’d like to get your hands on this unique limited edition set click on the link below to visit Panama STEM, and you can watch the Lego locks in action on YouTube by clicking here.

Click here for the Panama STEM LEGO Education site 

 

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