Tag Archives: mini-figure

Stranger Vans

Lego Chevrolet Van Stranger Things Netflix

Normally amongst the most mundane vehicles on the roads, vans don’t often appear here at The Lego Car Blog. Today though, we have two, and they’re strange ones at that.

First up is an admittedly boring 1980s Chevrolet G-Series panel van, although it has been wonderfully recreated in 6-wide mini-figure scale. However it’s a van which stars in the Netflix sci-fi series ‘Stranger Things’ and it really does do something strange. Click the link to find out what, and you can see more of the superb model pictured above courtesy of Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74) by clicking here.

Today’s second van doesn’t do anything out of the ordinary but it was, for America at least, a strange vehicle. This mid-’60s Chevrolet ‘forward control’ van mounted the driver and controls right at the front of the chassis, leaving more space in the back for carrying things. Common in Europe and Asia, this design never really took off in the ‘states, which is a shame as we think Chevrolet’s 1960s efforts looked pretty cool. This one comes from Tim Henderson of Flickr, it’s also built in 6-wide mini-figure scale, and there’s more of it to see at Tim’s photostream by clicking here.

Lego Chevrolet Van

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Space Truckin’

Lego Space Truck

Today’s creation is huge, very well travelled, and is a frequent visitor of truck-stops. Just like your Mom.

Built by Robert Heim it’s called ‘Space Truck 2’, and unlike your Mom it looks seriously cool. Join the convoy in space via the link to Flickr above.

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Mini Minecraft

Lego Mining Excavator

Lego mining excavators usually appear here in huge fully remote controlled form. Not so today, as Michael A’s mining excavator is – being mini-figure scale – rather smaller. Surprisingly though, Michael’s build still features a fully functional arm and bucket, thanks to the inclusion of several mini linear actuators from the Technic range that can be hand-cranked via the wheels hidden throughout the build. It’s a neat trick and one we’d like to see more of in Town scale creations. There’s more to see of Michael’s working Town-scale mining excavator at his photostream – click here to take a look!

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Phwoosh!

Lego Vic Viper

No sooner does one Lego-building monthly bandwagon end than another begins. ‘Ma.Ktober’ is instantly replaced by ‘Novvember’, but because we’re incompetent we’re posting this entry on December 1st…

That does mean we nearly made it through the whole thing without getting dragged in, but if we’re going to get sucked into a spinning vortex of nerdiness it may as well be by something as cool as this.

It’s called the Lone Eagle, it comes from Flickr’s F@bz, and it features more ingenuous building techniques than would normally be found in a whole month of spacey nonsense. Click the link above to head to F@bz’ photostream to check it out.

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Obscurimus Prime

Lego Concept Racer

No, we’re not sure what this is either, but we like primary colours! Clever building techniques have been used in abundance to create whatever this is, and you can place your guesses at Tammo S.’s photostream by clicking here.

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Watch This!*

Lego '65 Ford Mustang

After years watching from afar we’ve finally got the Ford Mustang in Europe. This is – on the one hand – quite cool, however on the other we’re wondering how long before we copy America completely and European Mustangs start doing things like this. And this. And this. And this

It’s probably better if we stick to a classic Mustang, which – thanks to Eric Teo of Flickr and his excellent 7-wide Speed Champions-esque creation – we can. Eric’s ‘stang is a 1965 convertible with enough room for three mini-figures and, being a classic, it probably won’t do this.

See more by heading over to Eric’s photostream via the link above. Carefully…

Lego Ford Mustang 1965

*The words uttered by every bro moments before they inevitably do this.

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I Get Around

Lego Surf Mech

Round round get around, I get around, yeah
(Get around round round I get around, ooh-ooh) I get around
From town to town (get around round round I get around)
I’ve a real cool mech (get around round round I get around)
I’m drivin’ real good tech (get around round round I get around)

I’m gettin’ bugged drivin’ up and down the same old road
I gotta mech with a van, it’s a wicked load
My buddies and me putting tracks in the street
Yeah, the bad guys runnin’ cos they can’t take the heat

The wise words of The Beach Boys there, slightly altered by the morons here at TLCB Towers to vaguely fit with today’s creation. Ok, we butchered a classic, but is was either that or we’d have to use this again. Anyway, the build; it’s a surfer-van-mech of course, from deep within the obscure mind of Dvd of Flickr. We’ve not really got any more to say than that, so it’s probably best if you check it our for yourselves at Dvd’s photostream. Head to the beach via the link above!

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Mini-Figure Mini-Digger

Lego Hitachi ZX75US-5B Excavator

Founded over a century ago, Hitachi – perhaps most well known for televisions and hi-fis – make pretty much everything. Consumer electronics, ATMs, power stations, computer servers, trains, elevators, air-conditioners, tanks, construction equipment and much more besides. It’s one of the latter we have today, built by Y Akimeshi of Flickr in Hitachi’s signature orange. It’s a ZX75US-5B 7-ton excavator in mini-figure scale, complete with tracks, a rotating superstructure and a very neat brick-built arm. There’s more to see at Akimeshi’s photostream – click the link above if you dig it.

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M-POD

Lego M-Tron Mech Pod

Ever wondered how LEGO’s early space explorers transported their equipment to new worlds? Flickr’s Tim Goddard has, building this awesome M-Tron hanger-pod to deploy a mech to the surface of an uncolonised planet. Tim’s mech is now ready to do whatever it is an M-Tron mech does, and there’s more to see of his ingenious design via the link above.

*Tenuous link to today’s related track.

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To Battle!

Lego Military 4x4

Contrary to the opinions of that weirdo on the outskirts of your town addicted to Call of Duty and who’s hoarding tins and ammo, war is not cool. However, often the vehicles used to wage it really are. Inspired by the multitude of armoured trucks in use around the world, Flickr’s Andrew Somers has designed his own and it’s just as cool as many of its real-world counterparts. It’s also beautifully built and photographed, and absolutely packed with ingenious building techniques, including four opening doors, working steering, and a few non-LEGO accessories courtesy of third-party mini-figure arms-dealers Brickarms. Head to Andrew’s photostream via the link above to see more. And stop hoarding cans.

Lego Military 4x4

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In Space, No-One Can Hear You Gasp

Lego Sci-Fi Base

Being a car blog we’re regularly flummoxed by sci-fi builds, and even though today is no exception the whole TLCB office gasped in unison at this utterly incredible spacebase from TLCB debutant Marco den Besten. Based loosely on the designs from the Tiberian Sun video games, Marco’s enormous creation includes spacecraft, mechs, rovers, hangers, and a whole load of motorised movement. Part of a huge construction for the Legoworld Utrecht show there’s much more to see at Marco’s Flickr album. Click the link above to join the gasping.

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The Unknown Off-Roader

Lego ARO 244

Today’s post is a car that we’d never heard of, despite more than 300,000 being produced over nearly forty years and it being sold in over one hundred countries. Back to school for TLCB Team…

This is the ARO 24-Series, a Romanian 4×4 launched in 1969 and sold, after many revisions, right up until 2006 when the company finally folded in rather weird circumstances.

ARO began by building a relicensed version of the Soviet GAZ-69 military 4×4 in the late-1950s before designing their own vehicles such as the 24. The 24-Series was a huge export success; over 90% of production was exported before 1989, with the model also built in Portugal and Italy.

After thirty-five years of production the Romanian government decided to sell ARO to an American businessman who planned to import the 24-Series to the US. He managed to convince 200 dealers to pay $75,000 each for franchise rights, and then pressured them to send more money for vehicles. The dealers refused insisting they pay on delivery, and the venture collapsed.

The Romanian government then learned that the buyer had sold the tooling and assets, and that the documents used to purchase ARO were falsified. They sued in 2006 and the import company fired all its employees, sold its headquarters and disappeared. It was a strange ending to a rather good car, one that was an unusual communist success story killed by capitalist greed.

Today’s creation depicts a second generation 24-Series and has been superbly built by previous bloggee Pixel Fox of Flickr. There’s more to see of his excellent Romanian 4×4 by clicking here, and you can discover his ever-expanding back-catalogue of brilliant mini-figure scale off-roaders by visiting the full album here.

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Fwooooosh!

Lego Wipeout Racer

A picture says a thousand words, but this image says just one, and that word is ‘Fwooooosh!’. In fact we don’t think any picture has ever said the word ‘Fwooooosh!’ better than this one. It comes from Nick Trotta of Flickr, who has created this brilliant Wipeout-esque space racer in glorious fwooooshishness. There’s much more to see at via the Flickr album by clicking here.

Lego Wipeout Racer

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And Now for Something…

Lego Sci-Fi Airport Service

Completely Different. We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves today, but they’ve brought back some properly weird creations over the weekend. Of course we’re a car blog, so we’ll only be blogging those that closely match our title subject. First up, here’s a giant hovering airport tug thingumy!

Built by Flickr’s Vince Toulouse, this ‘Airport Service’ is constructed from a variety of unusual pieces that originated in some of LEGO’s weirdest (and long-forgotten) themes. A Fabuland caravan, rubber Technic bumpers, and a gate from LEGO’s Track System (which we have zero memory of ever existing) all make appearances, and there’s more to see of how they all fit together via the link above.

Lego MaK Camel

OK, so we’re wildly off-topic today. We may as well continue with this, a bi-pedal walking tank arrangement by Flickr’s Chris Perron. Named the CAMEL, Chris’ creation also features some ingenious parts usage including pieces from Bionicle, Technic steering racks, and of course that biosphere cockpit. See more at the link!

Lego Speeder Bike

Next up we have a huge engine with a mini-figure perched on top. Built by previous bloggee David Roberts it’s apparently a ‘Proboscis’ speeder bike, and a championship-winning one at that. We have no idea what championship that may be, but we’re betting it would be fun to watch. Head to Flickr via the link above to see more.

Lego Sky-Fi Aircraft

The final creation of today’s four mini-figure scale oddities is an aircraft called the ‘F11-Locust’ built by Sylon-tw of Flickr. Designed in the ‘Sky-Fi’ genre, a sub-theme of a sub-theme of which we know absolutely nothing, it’s a fine way to wrap up today’s four-part special.

There’s more to see of Sylon’s Locust at his photostream via the link above, you can check out each of today’s creations via their respective links in the text, and we’ll be back soon – hopefully when someone somewhere builds a bloody car.

Until next time…

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HEMTT

Lego Oshkosh HEMTT M978A4

The Oshkosh Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) is one of the world’s most versatile vehicles. In use by around sixteen militaries worldwide over 27,000 have been produced since the early 1980s, performing roles as diverse missile launching, fire fighting, towing, and simply carrying cargo. Powered by a variety of engines whatever its purpose the HEMTT can climb slopes of over 60% and ford water up to 1.2m deep.

This particular HEMTT is an M978A4 Fuel Servicing Truck, or ‘tanker’ to the rest of us. and it comes from Evan M of Flickr who has recreated the huge 8×8 truck brilliantly in mini-figure scale. Evan’s model features a whole host of neat playable features and there’s more to see of his Oshkosh HEMTT via the link above.

Lego Oshkosh HEMTT M978A4

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