Tag Archives: mini-figure

Shadowy Seas

The Lego Car Blog is not the best place to find intricate techniques for realistic castle walls, thatched roofs, or ocean waves. This is because the aforementioned items rarely appear on vehicular creations, and if they did we wouldn’t know how to talk about them. A flat-plane crank V8 or the subtleties between super and turbo-charging – yes, the finer points on lifelike rock-work – not so much.

Except today, where here at The Lego Car Blog is the most spell-bindingly beautiful – and somewhat haunting – brick-built landscape we’re sure you’ll see in brick form. Constructed from over 50,000 pieces, this is Huynh Khang and Ky Duy Phong’s ‘Kraken Shadowy’ pirate ship, and the astonishingly real ocean beneath it.

A literal sea of transparent 1×2 bricks and plates, layered over a rolling base varying in hue and elevation, Huynh Khang and Ky Duy Phong’s creation is perhaps the finest example of a brick-built ocean it’s possible to conceive. Jagged rocks stretch out of the waves like a hand from the depths, looking perilously close to the wonderful mini-figure-crewed pirate ship navigating the waters around them.

Beautifully lit, photographed and presented, there’s a whole lot more to see of the ship – and the spectacular ocean it sails upon – at Khang Huynh’s ‘Kraken Shadowy’ album. Click the link above to jump into the ocean.

Yellow Bull

We like big yellow bulldozers here at The Lego Car Blog. Because we’re eight. This one is a Komatsu D65EX-18, as built (superbly) by Flickr’s Y Akimeshi in mini-figure scale. Clever techniques and top quality presentation are evident throughout, and there’re more to see via the link above if you’re eight too.

Supernova

Whilst both part of the General Motors empire, America’s Chevy ‘Nova’ was rather different to the Vauxhall one we got… Still, we have the cool one today, courtesy of IBrickedItUp and this neat recreation of the third generation Chevrolet Nova SS in Speed Champions scale. Racing stripes and an unnecessary hood bulge add to the image (again, somewhat different to what we got…), and there’s more to see via the link!

Torcher

This is the ‘Torcher’, a curiously branded steampunk tank arrangement about which we know nothing. However had we not have blogged this giant flamethrower tank thingy, the Elves would’ve have started a riot. Plus, let’s be honest, it is really cool. Previous bloggee Markus Ronge is the owner of this ‘Torcher Octan Heavy Snow Tank’, and you can find out what it’s for (and view some rather stunning imagery) at his Flickr album of the same name. Click the link above to torch some snow or something!

Flying to JFK

America’s ‘Air Force One’ has been flying Presidents since 1945. Beginning as a converted C-54 Skymaster transport plane during the Second World War, the distinctive Raymond Loewy-designed livery we know today first appeared in 1962 with this; ‘SAM 26000’, one of three Boeing 707s used for presidential transport throughout the ’60s and ’70s.

This spectacular replica of SAM 26000 is the work of the appropriately-named BigPlanes of Flickr, who has recreated the presidential Boeing 707, as used by John F. Kennedy prior to his assassination in 1963, in jaw-dropping detail.

A complete mini-figure scale interior and cockpit are contained within the astonishingly life-like exterior, which includes working flaps and retractable landing gear, and forty spectacular images are available to view at BigPlanes’ ‘LEGO Air Force One 707 SAM 26000’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to fly like JFK in 1962, or here to see BigPlanes’ recreation of the current Air Force One in operation today, which may or may not include some references to a considerably less impressive president.

Only Two More Sleeps!

There are only two more sleeps ’til Christmas! Which means we’re locking the doors to TLCB Towers, frantically buying presents we forgot about, and readying ourselves for drunken family arguments.

We’ll be back in a few days, but if you need to get your Lego fix in the meantime, you can find a few places that are open all-year-round below!

  • All our past posts are available in the Archives, where you can search for pretty much anything and something will probably turn up.
  • Our Review Library contains over one-hundred LEGO set, book, and third-party product reviews.
  • The world’s best Lego vehicle builders have been interviewed right here at TLCB! (Incriminating pictures work wonders for motivation.) Find them all by clicking here!
  • Proper Lego blogs, and a lot more besides, can be found in the Directory.

We’d recommend switching off from the internet for the festive period though. The important things will be much closer to home : )

Have a very Merry Christmas

TLCB Team

P.S. The amusing image used above comes courtesy of previous bloggee Sylon_tw, who has captured Santa a very long way from home (that, or the penguins are). Fingers crossed he can get his sleigh going again before tomorrow night!

Monsters of Rock

Rock Raiders, the most phallically-symbolled of all LEGO’s themes, probably wasn’t one of their all-time greats. Something to do with finding energy crystals, as per about six other themes from the time, LEGO’s 1999 effort featured a rock monster, a turquoise-and-brown colour scheme, and a Playstation video game, before it quietly died a year later to be forgotten by everyone.

Except, that is, for Ghalad of Flickr, who has digitally reimagined an almost unfeasibly big Rock Raiders machine from over 13,000 virtual bricks.

Ghalad’s 6×6 mining behemoth features a huge rotating rock-cutting laser, gun turrets to ward off rock monsters, two enormous arm-mounted drills for munching through rock, and a towing crane for, er… something else that’s probably rock related.

It also takes the Thundercougarfalconbird approach to naming, being titled after two underground animals, and there’s more to see of Ghalad’s titanic Rock Raiders ‘Badger Mole’ at his photostream. Click the link above to rock out.

Insert Out-of-Fuel DeLorean Here

This steam locomotive might look familiar to you… Built by Rogers Locomotive and Machine works in the 1890s, locomotive ‘No.3’ was a coal and later oil-fired steam locomotive used for various steam locomotive things; hauling freight, transporting passengers, and constructing various railroads across California during the early 20th century.

After three decades of service Locomotive No.3’s owners, the Sierra Railway Company, went bankrupt during the Great Depression, and it was laid up for fifteen years in a siding. The locomotive somehow dodged being melted down for the war effort, and after the Second World War ended it was acquired for film use, whereupon ‘No.3’ began a career that saw it star in around forty movies and TV shows, including ‘High Noon’, TLCB favourite ‘The Great Race’, and – perhaps most famously – ‘Back to the Future, Part III‘.

Restored in the 2010s, Locomotive No.3 is still running today, and thus may yet add even more stardust to an already incredible legacy. This wonderful recreation by firefabric of Eurobricks captures probably the world’s most seen steam train beautifully, and it includes a LEGO Powered-Up motor and LED lights hidden inside.

There’s much to more of the model to see, including full build details, at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you can step into one of almost forty movie sets via the link in the text above.

Parallelogram

The parallelogram; a shape that confuses physicists, NASA, MIT, and the entire TLCB Office. But not David Roberts, who has somehow formed this rather Philip K. Dick-ish hovercar from the unfeasible shape, even infusing the sides with number ‘4’s for added impossibility.

Such mind-bending brick-work is well beyond our comprehension here at TLCB, so it’s best you jump straight to David’s photostream before we think any harder and hurt ourselves. Prepare your brain and click here to join in the confusion.

Bwushhhhh!

If ever there was in image that went ‘Bwushhhhh!’, this is it. Constructed by keiichi kamei, this fantastic ‘Spinner’ police hovercar take-off captures life on the streets of Blade Runner’s dystopian Los Angeles brilliantly. Thirty-eight LED lights add to the ambiance and there’s more of this superb scene to see at keiichi’s photostream. Click the link above to take off.

Mammoth Extension

Ah, a mobile crane, which means you’ll be expecting TLCB to make erection jokes. But no! We’ve grown up, and are rising above it. Yup, we’re stiffly sticking to sensibility today, as Ralph Savelsberg‘s Town-scale Mammoet-liveried Liebherr LTM-1350 is a properly well-constructed piece of equipment, with an impressive rotating superstructure, extending stabilisers, and a meaty hook well-hung from the two-piece boom. There’s more to see at Ralph’s ‘Mammoet Mobile Crane’ album, and you can take a look at the full package via the link above!

M-Tron and On and On…

LEGO’s vintage space theme M-Tron is still going strong. Not with LEGO themselves of course, but within the Lego Community, who are taking the theme to scales never imagined back in the early 1990s.

This is Havoc’s ‘M-Tron Crawler’, a frankly ridiculously-sized twelve wheel mobile command centre complete with over a dozen magnetised cargo pieces, including several vehicles that back in 1993 could have been LEGO M-Tron sets in their own right.

Three magnetised cranes can hoist the various spacey accompaniments onto the Crawler’s roof, whilst a cargo bay at the rear can transport the assortment of smaller vehicles within.

The complete Crawler looks like every LEGO space fan from 1993’s dream – if only they had the pieces – and there’s a whole heap more to see at Havoc’s ‘Crawler’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump!

Grand Prix ’64

The year is 2064, and the Formula 1 has gone from strength to strength! The ’64 season features an amazing 42 races , 36 of which are in the United States, wherein the best drivers in the world (and Nicholas Latifi) battle to discover who the FIA’s Race Director will deem worthy of becoming World Champion!

Yuki Studona is hoping the fresh engines being fitted to his Octan Racing car in the final pitstop of the ’64 U.S. Grand Prix will give him the win, and he’ll be able to carry that momentum into next week’s ’64 U.S.A Grand Prix before the season wraps up in the Unites States in two weeks’ time.

Join the F1 fans at the ’64 U.S. Grand Prix and cheer on Yuki courtesy of lokiloki29 via the link above!

Communist Cream Creepiness

The Halloween tenuousness continues here at The Lego Car Blog, with this rather excellent communistical sedan. Rendered in cream by newcomer Kirill Petrov, the ‘Somekon-30.59’ is reminiscent of various GAZ, ZIL, and Volga models from behind the iron curtain, all of which were scary. Kirill’s photostream features a variety of fictional communist vehicles hailing from invented communist countries, and there’s more to see of his terrifying alternate reality on Flickr via the link above. At least the return of Soviet oppression is only fiction of course. Oh wait…

Front Loaded

Flickr’s Rubblemaker appears to have had something on his mind* when he built this Neo-Classic Space galactic racer. Two enormous rounded engines dominate the design, their curves falling gently downwards as if gravity is softly tugging at them. Which is nonsense of course – there’s no gravity in space.

This enormous pair no doubt aids the pilot’s success on the Galactic Racing Circuit, and there’s more to see of them, and the Neo-Classic spacecraft they’re attached to, at Rubble’s photostream. Click the link above for more front-loaded racing.

*Or we do.