Tag Archives: mini-figure

Indestructible Car

Lego Toyota Hilux

Famously unkillable, Toyota’s Hilux pick-up is now in its eighth generation. This is a fourth gen, pictured here somewhere on Namibia’s Skeleton Coast (probably), and beautifully recreated in Lego form by previous bloggee and Town-scale off-road wizard Pixel Fox. There’s more to see of his excellent 6-wide Hilux on Flickr via the link, where you can also find a wealth of other brilliantly replicated off-roaders.

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Cool Caravanning

Lego 1956 Pontiac Catalina

If you’re going to tow a shed with wheels behind you to a field where you have to crap in a bucket, you may as well do it in something cool. This 1956 Pontiac Catalina certainly fulfils that brief, and the dinky caravan in tow doesn’t look too bad either. See more of both courtesy of LegoEng on Flickr.

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Not a Car

Lego Crane Train

But probably the nicest crane-train thingumy we’ve ever seen. Plus we like trains, and we like cranes, so it’s appearing here. Dario Minisini is the builder and there’s more to see of this lovely mini-figure scale build on Flickr.

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You Don’t Frighten Us English Pig-Dogs!

Lego Galleon Battle

I don’t wanna talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food-trough wiper! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries!

Much like the aforementioned medieval altercation, it looks like the French have got the better of us English-types in Sebeus I‘s galleon battle. There’s more to see of this beautifully epic scene on Flickr – click the link above to join the fray.

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A Little Pick-Me-Up

Lego Town Pick-Up Truck

It’s a been a small-scale day here at TLCB, proving that you don’t need NASA’s budget and more bricks than a LEGOLand theme park to build something blogworthy. Our final post of the day comes from Flickr’s de-marco and it’s entitled simply ‘Blue Pickup’. Neat building techniques abound and you can see more of de-marco’s lovely 5-wide truck at his photostream via the link above.

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Grand Theft Lego

Ever wondered what would happen if the wholesomeness of LEGO met the debauchery of Grand Theft Auto? Well thanks to digital media wizards Nukazooka you can wonder no more! The Lego Car Blog Elves are watching this madness on loop…

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Pit Stop

Lego Scuderia Ferrari F1 Pit Stop

Two seconds. And Scuderia Ferrari have changed four wheels and tyres. That’s less time than it took you to read this sentence.

Suggested by a reader this neat pit stop scene showing the world’s fastest mini-figure pit crew at work comes from Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74, and there’s more to see on Flickr. But be quick!

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Not A Car…

Lego Nakajima Ki-84Eagle-eyed readers of this blog post will have noticed that this is not a car. It is in fact a Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ World War 2 fighter, as flown by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in the last three years of the war. One of the fastest, most formidably armed, and highest flying fighters of the time, the Nakajima Ki-84 was a feared adversary.

Over 3,500 Ki-84’s were produced between 1943 and 1945, although towards the end of the conflict the crippling effects of the war on production meant that defects rose dramatically and quality dropped. After the Allied victory several Ki-84’s were captured, with Indonesia the People’s Republic of China operating the aircraft within their own air forces, and America using two for evaluation.

Lego Ki-84 Hayate Fighter

Today just one Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ fighter survives, an ex-U.S evaluation aircraft now located in the Chiran Peace Museum in Japan. However thanks to previous bloggee and military-building specialist Daniel Siskind we now have double the number of Ki-84’s available to view.

Daniel’s superb mini-figure scale recreation of Japan’s fastest Second World War fighter is a beautifully detailed build and includes authentically replicated Imperial Japanese roundels and tail markings, as well as a custom IJA airman mini-figure shown in the first image above. See more of Daniel’s Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ fighter and its custom mini-figure pilot on Flickr by clicking here.

Lego Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate

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Lego Star Wars 75192 UCS Millennium Falcon – Set Preview

Lego Star Wars 75192 UCS Millennium Falcon

This, ladies and gentlemen… who are we kidding – just gentlemen, is the largest LEGO set ever made. Ever.

At more than 7,500 pieces the 75192 Ultimate Collector Series Star Wars Millennium Falcon contains over 2,500 bricks more than its predecessor, and sets a new high for just how expensive a LEGO set can go.

Lego 75192 Millennium Falcon Preview

Priced at $800, yes eight hundred, 75192 is a set of truly astounding detailing, with a complete interior, several new printed components, and the largest box LEGO have ever used. It’s so large in fact that it comes with a handle and wheels so you can get it home.

Lego 75192 UCS Millennium Falcon

The 75912 UCS Millennium Falcon set also includes nine mini-figures that span both the original and new movies (so you can watch Han Solo age in mini-figure form), along with a selection of the odd-looking droids and aliens that make up the Star Wars universe, and of which we know absolutely nothing.

75192 Millennium Falcon Biggest Lego Set Ever

If you have $800 sloshing around your bank and you’d like to get your hands on 75912’s wheeled box the set is available to LEGO VIP members from September 14th, with general release following thereafter.

Over to LEGO for the full 75192 Ultimate Collector Series Millennium Falcon press release;

75192 Millennium Falcon™

Ages 16+. 7,541 pieces.
US $799.99 – CA $899.99 – DE 799.99€ – UK £649.99 – DK 6999.00 DKK
*Euro pricing varies by country. Please visit shop.LEGO.com for regional pricing.

Travel the LEGO® galaxy in the ultimate Millennium Falcon!

Welcome to the largest, most detailed LEGO® Star Wars Millennium Falcon model we’ve ever created — in fact, with over 7,500 pieces it is the biggest LEGO model ever sold! This amazing LEGO interpretation of Han Solo’s unforgettable Corellian freighter has all the details that Star Wars fans of any age could wish for, including intricate exterior detailing, upper and lower quad laser cannons, landing legs, lowering boarding ramp and a 4-minifigure cockpit with detachable canopy. Remove individual hull plates to reveal the highly detailed main hold, rear compartment and gunnery station. This amazing model also features interchangeable sensor dishes and crew, so you decide whether to play out classic LEGO Star Wars adventures with Han, Leia, Chewbacca and C-3PO, or enter the world of Episode VII and VIII with older Han, Rey, Finn and BB-8!

  • Includes 4 classic crew minifigures: Han Solo, Chewbacca, Princess Leia and C-3PO.
  • Also includes 3 Episode VII/VIII crew minifigures: Older Han Solo, Rey and Finn.
  • Figures include a BB-8 droid, 2 buildable Porgs and a buildable Mynock.
  • Exterior features include intricately detailed and removable hull panels, a lowering boarding ramp, concealed blaster cannon, 4-minifigure cockpit with detachable canopy, interchangeable round/rectangular sensor dishes, upper and lower quad laser cannons, and 7 landing legs.
  • Main hold features a seating area, Dejarik holographic game, combat remote training helmet, engineering station with turning minifigure seat and a doorway build with passageway decoration.
  • Rear compartment features the engine room with hyperdrive and console, 2 doorways, hidden floor compartment, 2 escape pod hatches, engineering console and an access ladder to the gunnery station.
  • Gunnery station features a minifigure gunner’s seat and detachable hull panel with fully rotating quad laser cannon. An additional quad laser cannon is also mounted on the underside.
  • Also includes an informational fact plaque.
  • Features a new cockpit canopy element.
  • Classic crew weapons include Han’s blaster pistol and Chewbacca’s stud-firing bowcaster.
  • Episode VII/VIII crew weapons include Han’s blaster, Rey’s small silver blaster and Finn’s medium blaster rifle.
  • Change out the features and crew characters to switch between classic and Episode VII/VIII versions of the Millennium Falcon!
  • Open individual hull panels to access the detailed interior while retaining the overall exterior appearance.
  • Slide the panel to reveal the concealed blaster cannon.
  • Turn classic Leia’s and Han’s head to reveal their breathing mask decoration.
  • Makes the perfect intergalactic toy or flagship display model.
  • Measures over 8” (21cm) high, 33” (84cm) long and 22” (56cm) wide.

Available for sale directly through LEGO® beginning
October 1, 2017 via shop.LEGO.com, LEGO® Stores or via phone.

75192 Millennium Falcon Biggest Lego Set Ever

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Like a Wheel Within a Wheel

Lego Sci-Fi VW

Round
Like a circle in a spiral
Like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning
On an ever-spinning reel
Like a snowball down a mountain
Or a carnival balloon
Like a carousel that’s turning
Running rings around the moon
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping
Past the minutes of its face
And the world is like an apple
Whirling silently in space
Like the circles that you find
In the windmills of your mind

A couple of Elves got into a supply closet today and knocked over some ultra-strong floor cleaner, so things have got a bit trippy. We’ll open a few windows so that normal service can resume, but in the meantime you can check out Robert Heim‘s ‘VW Kübelkäfer’ on Flickr via the link above. Oh, and here’s today’s title track

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British Racing Mean

Lego Ferrari 312 & Brabham BT24 Formula 1 1967

The pig-nosed driver of this Ferrari 312 isn’t taking any prisoners with that move. Under Bernie Ecclestone’s helm Formula 1 would see said combatant confined to the pits for ‘causing a collision’, but this is 1967, and rules were for sissies.

The car the Ferrari has swiped has appeared here at TLCB before, a Brabham BT24, and it’s now pictured alongside the latest build by Flickr’s Pixel Junkie in this wonderfully nostalgic Formula 1 scene.

It’s Brabham that went on to win the 1967 Formula 1 World Championship, despite having a slower car than the Lotus of the time, whilst Ferrari finished a lowly fifth. Ferrari may have lost the battle in ’67, but it is they who won the war, with Brabham fading into history whilst the prancing horse has gone on to win almost twice as many titles as any other team.

Being British we prefer the outcome in ’67 though, so we’ll leave this post with a picture of the Brabham BT24 rightfully back in front of the Ferrari 312, and you can us find at Pixel Junkie’s photostream feeling patriotic.

Lego Formula 1 1967 Ferrari vs Brabham

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Power to the Pixel

Lego Ferrari 512s Longtail 1970

One of the most common comments we receive here at The Lego Car Blog, along with ‘Can I have instructions?’ and ‘Send nudes’, is ‘why don’t you feature more digital creations?’.

Well in answer, we’re a blog about Lego models, and a digital creation is not a Lego model. It’s a picture of one. However, every so often a digital creation comes along that is worth flexing our rules for… this is one such time.

This wonderful Speed Champions style 1970 Ferrari 512S Longtail was discovered on Flickr and it comes from TLCB newcomer Alan Guerzoni. Alan has faithfully replicated Ferrari’s glorious Le Mans racer beautifully in digital bricks, and he’s gone a step further by designing and adding period-correct decals to the render – something he’d have been unable to do if the model was build from real pieces.

We’d still rather Alan’s Ferrari 512S was constructed using actual LEGO though, and fortunately it can be – awesome decals included – thanks to the LEGO Ideas platform, where the Ferrari is currently available to support in Alan’s quest to see it become an official LEGO set.

With LEGO already partnered with Ferrari and the 512S Longtail slotting neatly in the Speed Champions line-up we think it stands a very good chance of making the cut. There are more images to see at Alan’s Flickr photostream via the link above, and you like what you see you can cast your vote on LEGO Ideas by clicking here.

Lego Ferrari 512s Longtail 1970

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Monkeying Around in the Arctic

Tammo S.‘s colourful sci-fi hovercraft has run into some problems in the snow. Indeed snowflakes from the crash-landing still spatter its windscreen. Fortunately the pilot has found a nicely-shaped chunk of Lego ice floe to land on. He’s come prepared with a cooking stove and tools to fix the fault too. If he really gets stuck, he can always shelter in the well appointed cockpit that has been provided with lots to read and unusually, a potted plant.

Click here to see more details. Alternatively, as it’s sci-fi on The Lego Car Blog, click here for today’s tenuous link to British pop music.

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Once Upon a Time in the West

Lego Western Train Robbery

Yes it’s no use saying that you don’t know nothing
It’s still gonna get you if you don’t do something
Sitting on a fence that’s a dangerous course
Oh, you could even catch a bullet from the peace-keeping force
Even the hero gets a bullet in the chest
Oh yeah, once upon a time in the west

Our obscure British music theme continues here at The Lego Car Blog. If that’s not your thing (and if it isn’t, take a long look at yourself), perhaps try this alternative. Oh, the model! This superb Western train robbery scene comes from Flickr’s markus19840420 (there must be a lot of Markuses on Flickr) and there’s more to see by clicking here.

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In the Bank

Lego Brooklands 1935

It’s time for some history here at TLCB, because we are – at heart – complete nerds.

The world’s first purpose-built racetrack (or what’s left of it) lies not far from TLCB Towers. The Brooklands race circuit opened in 1907, built partly for manufacturers of the newly emerging auto-industry to test their cars, and partly because driving really quickly is bloody good fun.

Measuring just under 3 miles long the Brooklands track was built from uncoated concrete banking, which in places reached 30ft high, and was simply unimaginably steep, far steeper than any modern banked circuit. With no safety barrier at the top and cars routinely getting airborne over the bumpy concrete the spectacle was incredible, and crowds topped a quarter of a million in the circuit’s hay-day.

The outbreak of the First World War saw Brooklands requisitioned by the War Office, as the site also included an aerodrome, becoming the UK’s largest aircraft manufacturing centre by 1918. The end of the war saw motor racing return the the track, alongside the continuation of aircraft manufacturing, but when Hitler decided that Germany hadn’t quite finished with Europe yet motor racing at the track ceased for good.

During the Second World War the Brooklands site became the hub of Hawker fighter and Wellington bomber manufacturing, amongst other aircraft, and the track’s survival as a piece of British heritage sadly, but necessarily, came second to the war effort. Trees were planted on the track to disguise it from German bombers, and whole sections ripped up to expand the runways.

By the end of the war the track was in a poor state, and the site was sold to Vickers-Armstrong to continue operations as an aircraft factory, at one time laying claim to being the largest aircraft hanger in the world. However as the UK’s aircraft manufacturing industry declined the Brooklands site was gradually sold off, becoming a business park, a supermarket, and the Mercedes-Benz World driving instruction track.

Today not much of the original circuit remains, but what does is managed by the Brooklands Museum, who are endeavouring to preserve possibly the most important motor racing, aeronautical and war-time manufacturing site in the world. A recent heritage grant aims to return both the aero-buildings and the famous Finishing Straight to their former glory, and a section of the incredible concrete banking is still standing. You can even take a car on it if you’re feeling brave.

If you’re in the UK and you get the chance to visit the Brooklands Museum we highly recommend it, but for our readers further afield you can get an idea of the insanity of the vintage racing that once took place there courtesy of this lovely scene recreating Brooklands circa-1935 by Flickr’s Redfern. There’s more to see of his 1930s Maserati, its racing counterpart, and his wonderfully recreated Brooklands banking his photostream. Click the link above to step back in time.

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