Tag Archives: mini-figure

Did You Drive Your Car Tonight Mr. Belfort?

A recent post here at TLCB was less than complimentary about the new Lamborghini ‘Countach’. We weren’t that complimentary about the original either, but – in its early form at least – the 1970s Gandini design was an absolute masterpiece.

Not so by the 1980s, when the Countach had become considerably fatter and more overblown, losing its striking lines and spectacular angles under a preposterously excessive bodykit. Which of course suited the decade it found itself in perfectly.

Cue previous bloggee Jerry Builds Bricks, who has recreated the ’80s Countach wonderfully in Speed Champions form, building his Lego version in ‘Wolf of Wall Street’ spec, which is about as ’80s as it gets.

Take some over-strength pills and crash it into everything on the way home via the link above!

Time Loop

The DeLorean-based time machine from the ‘Back to the Future’ movie franchise has been built so many times in Lego form it ironically feels like we’re in a time loop.

Still, there’s always time for another, particularly when it looks as good as this one.

Flickr’s Jerry Builds Bricks is the latest creator to have a crack at Doc Brown’s flying DMC-12, producing the rather excellent Lego version pictured here.

Take a look via the link above, or alternatively travel back in time to our post charting the remarkable story of the real car here, which features more cocaine than you might expect…

Iraqi Attacky

Iraq. It seems to be known more as war than an actual country where people live, work, and study.

But it is a country, and a beautiful one at that, despite the seemingly endless shenanigans it continually endures, whether that’s at the hands of despotic dictators, western invaders, or the cancer within it.

Still, one bastion of Iraqi freedom lies in the north, where the Kurdish Pershmerga resisted Saddam Hussain, were instrumental in the (probably temporary) defeat of of Islamic State, and, for complicated reasons, are sworn enemies of Turkey.

For even more complicated reasons, despite their sacrifice, the Peshmerga have since been largely abandoned by the west, but they have at least been left with some cool hardware with which to defend their territory.

This neat Peshmerga-issue Humvee comes from Evan M of Flickr, who has equipped it with a variety of equipment, chief among which is an enormous TOW missile mounted on the roof, which could probably reduce most things to a smoking crater if required.

Head to Northern Iraq courtesy of Evan’s photostream via the link above. The bits the aren’t smoking craters really are lovely.

Countach (Kinda)

Surprising supercar revelation of the day; the legendary Lamborghini Countach was… rubbish.

But, it did look utterly mad, and as such has transcended its rubbishness over the years to become a highly regarded classic.

Cue Lamborghini, the masters of the special edition cash-in, bringing the nameplate back with yet another ultra-limited run design.

Based on the also-ultra-limited Sian FKP 37, the new Countach features a V12 hybrid set-up, producing around 800bhp. Only 34bhp of that total comes from electricity though, so the ‘hybrid’ bit is probably more of a marketing gimmick than real performance enhancement. Which sums the whole car to be honest.

As you might be able to tell, we’re not fans of the 2021 ‘Countach’, but we won’t hold that against Flickr’s Lazlo Torma, who has recreated it beautifully in Speed Champions scale.

There’s more to see of Lazlo’s 2021 Countach – including building instructions – via the link above, plus you can check out a Lego version of the rubbish (but in our eyes infinitely better) original Countach by clicking here.

Sea Stallion

Military things, like cars, are often named after exciting or deadly animals. Unless they’re from the Soviet Union of course, in which case an array of numbers and letters was sufficient.

Cue the Sikorsky RH-53D ‘Sea Stallion’, so called because ‘Sea Horse’ was already taken by another Sikorsky aircraft, but mostly because ‘Stallion’ sounds far more masculine.

The RH-35D was operated by the U.S Navy Marines from 1975 until 1997, primarily for mine clearing and heavy lifting, and it’s been recreated in incredible detail in Lego form by previous bloggee [Maks].

At 1:40 scale, [Maks]’s Sea Stallion measures 80cm across, and took almost a year to complete, with his spectacular attention to detail further enhanced by some beautifully authentic decals.

There’s a whole lot more of the Sikorsky RH-35D to see at [Maks]’s ‘RH-53D Sea Stallion’ Flickr album, including imagery showing those enormous rotor blades cleverly folded, and you can take a look via the link above. Just don’t call it a horse.

Snow Patrol

‘Hibernia’s icy grip (hah!) on the online Lego Community shows no signs of thawing (hah!). The fictional ice planet has generated all manner of marvellous creations, and the latest comes from Dane Erland, here making their TLCB debut.

Dane’s Hibernia mobile base is reminiscent of an overland camper usually found in far warmer climbs spotting cheetahs and whatnot, and it’s packed with cool (hah!) details, including brick-built suspension, brakes, differentials and driveshafts underneath, and a superb cabin and accommodation/research unit on top.

You can check out Dane’s creation along with a flurry (hah!) of other Hibernia builds at his photostream – click the link above to slide (hah!) on over, whilst this TLCB writer tries to freeze (hah!) thinking about snow-based puns. They. just. Won’t. Stop.

*Today’s (lovely) title song.

Rundhauber

TLCB debutant Nick Kleinfelder was suggested to us by a reader, and we’re glad he was, because he’s working on an expansive ’80s train layout filled with beautifully detailed vehicles like this one.

Apparently these Mercedes-Benz ’round bonnet’ trucks were still popular in Europe in the ’80s, which this TLCB Writer is too young to vouch for. What he can confidently confirm though, is they’re very popular today crawling impossibly slowly up Asian mountainside roads pulling improbably enormous loads of illegally logged timber.

Which is both mightily impressive and exceedingly sad. Still, this one isn’t doing that, rather it’s being used for ‘Raiffeisen’ according to Nick, and whilst we have absolutely no idea what that means, it’s definitely better than illegally destroying the rainforest.

There’s more of Nick’s lovely round bonnet Mercedes truck to see at his photostream, and you can check out both it and Nick’s other creations via the link in the text above.

We’d Still Like a Pontiac

We miss Pontiac. Sure they were part of the raging dumpster fire that was General Motors by mid-1990’s, and they created atrocities like this (and this. And this)*, but they also built some of America’s coolest cars.

From Solstice to the Firebird Trans-Am, there are a few Pontiacs we’d be proud to have in TLCB Towers car park, but none more so than this; the ’68 GTO.

Produced from 1963 to 1974 (and again as rebadged Holden in the mid-’00s), the GTO is credited with popularising the muscle car genre in the late ’60s. With a choice of V8 engines, a range of rubbish gearboxes (two-speed automatic anyone?), and also sold by GM’s other brands (see the Chevrolet Chevelle, Oldsmobile Cutlass, and Buick Special), there was a GTO for everyone.

This neat Speed Champions recreation of Pontiac’s finest hour comes from yelo_bricks of Flickr, making their TLCB debut. Both built and presented beautifully, there’s more to see at yelo’s ‘1986 Pontiac GTO’ album – click the link above to take a look at all the images.

*No we hadn’t forgotten the Aztek. We like the Aztek. And so should you.

Vicuna

The vicuna, the smallest species of camel, stands no taller than a metre and weighs less than 50kg. That’s your random fact of the day and you’re welcome.

Cue today’s post, which is – we think – the smallest camel (Trophy) creation we’ve featured, standing only four studs wide and weighing, er… we don’t know. Not a lot.

It comes from Jan Woznika, instructions are available, and there’s more of the build to see at his ‘Land Rover Defender Camel Trophy’ album by clicking here.

Tudor Taxi

TLCB’s historical accuracy is pretty flakey, but even we know this isn’t what Henry VIII used to get to whichever beheading event was on that week. This stupendous build is Ford Model A, nicknamed the ‘Tudor’ because it had two doors. Lots of cars probably had two doors at the time, but as 90% of all the cars on the roads were Fords, they got the ‘Tudor’ moniker. This one comes from TLCB favourite _Tiler, who has captured the late ’20s sedan wonderfully, constructing it atop a Fabuland old-timey chassis. Hail a ride in 1930’s New York via the link above!

Duped

This delightful hover-courier (which looks rather like a floating coal scuttle) has us perplexed here at TLCB, being simultaneously Town and Duplo themed. Towplo? Whatever it is it’s ace, and there’s more to see courtesy of the excellently-named Dwarlin Forkbeard here.

HMS Texas

This is ‘HMS Redoubtable’, an Imperial Guard ship by Flickr’s Elephant-Knight, and it has absolutely definitely got more guns than you. Even if you live in Texas.

Despite Texas having the highest number of guns (and the highest number of gun deaths – go-figure?), even a Texan is unlikely to match Redoubtable’s three gun decks and one hundred and twelve separate guns. That’s even more weaponry than is carried at an average ‘MAGA’ rally.

At over fifty inches long (that’s over 160 studs) and nearly forty inches tall, Elephant’s ship is impressive in far more ways than just than its gun tally, and there’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular ship eleven-months-in-the-making at Elephant-Knight’s photostream.

Join the one hundred and twelve gun salute via the link above.

Flame Grille

A flame paint-job is worth at least 150bhp, according to TLCB maths. That puts it right up there with a supercharger, side pipes and nitrous in TLCB’s list of go-faster things.

Laszlo Torma’s Speed Champions ‘57 Chevy is therefore very powerful indeed, being equipped with at least two of the above.

A brilliant brick-built grille and a pair of appropriately cool looking mini-figures complete the build, and there’s more to see of Laszlo’s flaming Chevy – including a link to building instructions – on Flickr via the link above.

Fifty Shades of Bley

Ok, one shade (this isn’t the 42115 Lamborghini Sian set), but certainly fifty types of bley.

Blueish-grey (hence ‘bley’) replaced LEGO’s ‘light grey’ colour in around 2005 for reasons we don’t understand, and The Brick Artisan has embraced the hue wholly with his ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’, which looks a bit like a spacey airport luggage tractor.

Said rover not only contains a whole lot of bley, it features a delightfully elaborate and possibly radioactive load too, as this Classic Spaceman apparently heads to the Classic Space recycling centre. Our Earth-based equivalent of this trip is only to transport TLCB’s broken electrical devices and old pieces of wood (although we do also use a Rover), so this trip looks far more exciting!

There’s more to see of The Brick Artisan’s ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’ on Flickr, where – if you have sufficient bley – you can recreate it for yourself as building instructions are available. Click the link above to make the jump!

Kosmic Kitty

Is it us or is Hello Kitty everywhere? Well now the Japanese humanoid feline is in space too, thanks to Alec Hole. Your thoughts on this development will probably depend upon younger family members’ obsession with the anthropomorphised cat, but – if you can cope – there’s more of Alec’s ‘Hello Kitty Speeder’ to see on Flickr via the link above.