Tag Archives: mini-figure

Re-iMaersked

LEGO have had a few promotional partnerships over the years, many of which appeared long before branded sets became commonplace in the line-up.

One such promotional set was 1985’s 1552 Maersk line Truck and Trailer, which – thanks to certain peculiar fringes of the Lego community – is now worth a silly amount of money. But only to those same peculiar fringes of the Lego community, so we’re happy to ignore both it and them.

Still, Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg decided to reimagine the 1552 set and has made it rather more appealing to boot, using modern parts and techniques to update the over-priced oddity.

ReiMaersk yourself in one of LEGO’s first branded partnerships at Ralph’s ‘1552 Reimagined’ album via the link above.

Got Wood?

Yes we do today. A lot of it. Cue a default title that still makes us snigger – because we’re children, and a car called a Willys, which also makes us snigger – because we’re children.

Previous bloggee 1saac W. is the cause of the phallus-based sniggering with his beautiful recreation of the 1948 Willys-Overland Station Wagon, and there’s more to see of 1saac’s Woodie (snigger) on Flickr via the link.

Three Speed

Flickr’s ace ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ group doesn’t include many cars. Or any at all in fact, being a) a group for speeder bikes, and b) having a far greater discipline in sticking to the title than we do.

Still, our tangental approach to blogging cars does means that ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ current ‘Let’s Get Tropical’ building contest is appearing here, with three excellent speeder bikes to kick off the competition!

First up (above) is Julius Kanand‘s ‘Checkpoint 13’, in which a delightfully funky speeder navigates a suitably tropical beach-based course.

Today’s second Speeder Bike build comes from one of the contest judges Dan Ko, so it’s not technically an entry, but it does epitomise the 2021 competition beautifully, being a simple brick-built bike of just a handful of pieces, the likes of which anyone with a few LEGO bricks can create at home.

The final of today’s three speeder bike creations continues the simplicity, with aide k utilising the stickers from an official LEGO set, some trans-blue tiles, and a few red and white bricks to create the superbly dynamic scene above.

There are loads more brilliant speeder bikes to see at the ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ group via the link above, and if you’d like to check out the current ‘Let’s Get Tropical’ competition and maybe enter a bike yourself you can find full contest details by clicking these words. There are even prizes on offer provided by a proper Lego blog that understands sci-fi and everything!

Modular Building

LEGO’s brilliant line-up of modular buildings have been a roaring success, but they’re not really TLCB fodder. This awesome Neo-Classic Space ‘T-ATV’ by Flickr’s SweStar is though, and it’s ‘modular building’ too. Sort of.

A superb tracked chassis can carry an assortment of spacey things atop it, including a cabin that doubles as a spaceship, a pair of containers for important spacey-looking devices, and there’s even a mini-figure jet-suit arrangement concealed in the back!

Each module can stand alone as a thoroughly good build, and add them all together and you have a model with such great playability that this TLCB Writer could happily spend an entire afternoon swooshing and tracking and doing other suitably spacey stuff with it.

Whilst he does that you can see more of SweStar’s brilliant build at his ‘T-ATV’ album on Flickr – click the link above for more modular building.

Panzer III

Designed by Daimler-Benz, this the Panzer III Sd.Kfz 141, the German military’s primary medium battle tank built to take on the formidable Soviet T-34 during the Second World War. It was powered by a 300bhp Maybach V12 giving it a top speed of just over 20mph, which wasn’t fast (but then it did weigh around twenty-two tons), and it was armed with either a 37mm, 50mm, or 75mm gun, depending on specification.

Around 5,700 Panzer IIIs were built between 1939 and 1943, seeing service in Poland, the Soviet Union, France, North Africa, the Netherlands, and Italy – amongst other theatres of war. This superb Lego version of the Sd.Kfz 141 comes from previous bloggee Rebla, who has recreated the design brilliantly, including a rotating turret, elevating cannon, and a crew of custom mini-figures.

Rebla has presented his model beautifully too, and there’s more to see at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to all the imagery.

Black Horse

There are two wonderful exceptionsbut most non-red Ferraris are owned by horrible ‘influencer’ types, whose personalities are so vacuous the most interesting thing about them is the wrap on their car. Which usually looks ghastly.

Not so here though, as K MP‘s lightly modified Ferrari 458 Italia looks mega in black and gold, wearing a brick-built Vorsteiner bodykit which in real life looks pretty decent too.

Suggested by a reader there’s more to see of K MP’s Speed Champions Vortsteiner 458 on Flickr via the link, and if we’ve offended any influencer types reading this who’ve wrapped their car, sorry – but it probably does look ghastly.

Not a Carrrrgh!

Aarrrgh, this be a fine vessel. She be a twenty-four gun barque, plain to the eye yet a beauty where it counts, from her Harrrry Potter wand rigging to her 12-pounderrr cannons. She be captained by Sebeus I and you can request to join her crew on Flickrrrr.

Horse Truck

Surprisingly we don’t think we’ve ever blogged a horse truck here at TLCB (and we’re reluctant to go into the Archives to check properly as there are rumours of a feral band of TLCB Elves inhabiting them).

Today doesn’t change that though, despite the title, as this lovely Dodge M-37 truck is not a horse truck per say, rather it’s here as ground support for [Maks] previously blogged UH-34D Seahorse U.S Navy helicopter.

That means no attractive horsey girls called Arabella, but still an ace scene that would have been commonplace in the 1960s U.S Navy. There’s more to see of [Maks] Dodge M-37 truck and superb Sikorsky Seahorse on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

Motocross | Picture Special

Riding a dirt bike on the road is the preserve of annoying scallies. However riding one in the dirt where they are meant to be is excellent in every way.

Cue Luis Baixinho, who has created this absolutely wonderful (and huge) motocross track, complete with starting gate, spectators, jumps, streams, rocks and various other motocross staples.

Spanning two 32×32 baseplates Luis’ vignette manages to convey the sand, mud and ruts created by the dirt bikes beautifully – we can almost smell the exhaust fumes and hear the BNEEEEEERRRR-ing.

There are loads more images to see at Luis’ ‘Motocross’ album on Flickr and you can join in the two-wheeled fun via the link above!

Not a Car

‘Aren’t you supposed to be a bloody car blog?!’ some of you might be wondering. And you’d have a point. But there is a car (kinda) coming. Until then here’s a spaceship, which – whilst not a car in any way – is pretty awesome. Tommaso Ferrarese (aka frombol) is the builder, whose Neo-Classic Space creation is packed with building techniques so cunning you could brush your teeth with them. See more of this incredible build on Flickr via the link.

Life on Mars*

NASA’s ‘Perseverance‘ rover is currently relaying some truly magical images back to Earth from the surface of Mars, where it has been for over a month.

Perseverance’s mission is to look for the building blocks that support life, either in Mars’ distant past, or for a human colonisation future. Fast forward an undetermined number of years and – if BobDeQuatre is correct – Perseverance found what it was looking for.

This is the Mars Corporation ‘Poseidon Mobile Water Extractor’, which uses a powerful microwave generator and magnetic field to raise water to the surface to support the planet’s colony. Or something. To be honest we’re a bit hazy on the science, but that doesn’t matter when it looks this cool!

A detailed microwave/magnetron/robotic arm thingumy is carried between a pair of articulated and suspended bogies, whilst a crew of two control the water extraction from the cockpit up front.

There’s lots more to see of Bob’s impressive ‘Poseidon Mobile Water Extractor’ via his album on Flickr at the link above, plus you can see one of his (and Mars Corp.’s) other machines by clicking here.

*Today’s title song, naturally.

Fnaaaaaaaooow!

We have no idea what this ‘Skitter’ by Flickr’s Oscar Cederwall is or does, but it looks like it goes ‘Fnaaaaaaaooow!’, and as we have the minds of children that’s good enough for us. See more at the link!

Bull Fight

If you’re seven (or a TLCB Elf), then citrus-coloured Lamborghinis are the best thing ever. This post is for you!

Built by The G Brix of Flickr, these two awesome Speed Champions Lamborghini Murcielagos appeal to the seven year old in all of us (which isn’t hard to find in the psyche of the average TLCB writer).

Coming in standard (yellow) and SV (orange) flavours, G Brix’s models deploy some brilliant building techniques to successfully recreate the Murcielago’s distinctive hexagonal shapes, plus there are detailed engine bays under opening covers and each car can fit a pair of mini-figures side-by-side.

Pander to your inner seven year (or your actual seven year old if you are in fact seven) via The G Brix’s photostream.

That’s No Ordinary Rabbit!

This is not a car. But it does have wheels. Although not in this picture. OK, we’re not doing well here, but as this model features a decal of a harmless little bunny on the back it means we can publish this link to a killer rabbit, and that’s a good enough reason for us.

Ted Andes is the builder behind this ‘Nousagi Reconnaissance Think Tank’, which features a gatling gun, chainsaw, and grappling hook, for all that ‘reconnaissance’ it’ll be doing…

There’s more of Ted’s mech to see at his photostream, including an image of it in wheeled-mode, close-ups of the cockpit, and the varied weaponry it’s armed with. Click the link above to head into the cave of Caerbannog

Dutch Rudder

Rolling coal‘ is for idiots. Aside from blasting a load of carcinogenic particulates into the air as some sort of moronic ‘anti-environment’ protest, plumes of black smoke actually signify wasted fuel, ergo less power. Which is why we don’t use steam engines any more.

That said, we do still like a good steam engine (which is possibly the saddest sentence in the English language), and so too does TLCB debutant Jebbo, who has built three unfathomably beautiful Dutch steam tugs from our favourite plastic bricks.

Each model is an exquisitely detailed replica of a real steam tug boat, of which two are apparently still running on coal.

Amazing attention to detail and ingenious building techniques are in abundance and there’s more to see of Jebbo’s ‘Furie’, ‘Hercules’, and ‘Noordzee’ steam tug boats at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the link above to roll coal the right way.