Tag Archives: mini-figure

Flame Grille

A flame paint-job is worth at least 150bhp, according to TLCB maths. That puts it right up there with a supercharger, side pipes and nitrous in TLCB’s list of go-faster things.

Laszlo Torma’s Speed Champions ‘57 Chevy is therefore very powerful indeed, being equipped with at least two of the above.

A brilliant brick-built grille and a pair of appropriately cool looking mini-figures complete the build, and there’s more to see of Laszlo’s flaming Chevy – including a link to building instructions – on Flickr via the link above.

Fifty Shades of Bley

Ok, one shade (this isn’t the 42115 Lamborghini Sian set), but certainly fifty types of bley.

Blueish-grey (hence ‘bley’) replaced LEGO’s ‘light grey’ colour in around 2005 for reasons we don’t understand, and The Brick Artisan has embraced the hue wholly with his ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’, which looks a bit like a spacey airport luggage tractor.

Said rover not only contains a whole lot of bley, it features a delightfully elaborate and possibly radioactive load too, as this Classic Spaceman apparently heads to the Classic Space recycling centre. Our Earth-based equivalent of this trip is only to transport TLCB’s broken electrical devices and old pieces of wood (although we do also use a Rover), so this trip looks far more exciting!

There’s more to see of The Brick Artisan’s ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’ on Flickr, where – if you have sufficient bley – you can recreate it for yourself as building instructions are available. Click the link above to make the jump!

Kosmic Kitty

Is it us or is Hello Kitty everywhere? Well now the Japanese humanoid feline is in space too, thanks to Alec Hole. Your thoughts on this development will probably depend upon younger family members’ obsession with the anthropomorphised cat, but – if you can cope – there’s more of Alec’s ‘Hello Kitty Speeder’ to see on Flickr via the link above.

We Are United

This incredible creation is a Boeing 777-(200), as flown by United Airlines, and built over the course of eleven months by Freezeur21 of Flickr.

Constructed in mini-figure scale (which sounds small but makes this massive), Freezeur’s 777 features opening doors, accurate landing gear (which somehow supports the model’s enormous weight), and some properly brilliant decals.

So good is the result you’d be hard-pressed to know this is Lego at first glance, but it is and you can check out more stunning images of Freezeur’s United Airlines Boeing 777-(200) at his photostream. Click the link above to climb on board.

5-Tons of Pain!

This is the M1083 6×6 ‘Medium Tactical Vehicle’, an Austrian-designed 5-ton military truck produced by Oshkosh for the U.S military.

Built by Flickr’s Evan M, this superb Lego recreation of the M1083 in desert camo spec not only does an excellent job of capturing the truck, and features both working steering and suspension, it also includes 5 tons of exciting exploding things in the load bed.

Talking of ‘capturing the truck’, a few of the real trucks and a great many tons of U.S exploding things are likely now in the hands of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Which makes the war to oust them seem rather pointless. Still, you can capture your own M1083 at Evan’s photostream via the link above!

Hall of Armour

The ‘Hall of Armour’ might sound like somewhere in ‘Game of Thrones’ where witchcraft, disembowelling, and incest take place (which is most places in ‘Game of Thrones’), but in this case it’s far more exciting.

Tony Stark (aka Iron Man)’s ‘Hall of Armour’ – effectively the coolest basement ever – contains his tools, equipment, flying mech suits, robotic arms, and – being easily the best Marvel superhero – a few tasty cars too.

This is our favourite, his flame-decalled hot rod roadster, as recreated wonderfully in Speed Champions scale by KosBrick of Flickr.

KosBrick has captured the hot rod from the movie beautifully, plus he’s constructed a variety of items found in Tony Starks ‘Hall of Armour’ too, which are – in place of witchcraft, disembowelling and incest – much more interesting from an engineering perspective.

You can build these for yourself thanks to the building instructions released alongside the stunning imagery, and there’s more to see of KosBrick’s ‘Hall of Armour’ on Flickr. Click the link above to check it out.

White Angles

Back when this TLCB Writer was a boy, LEGO bricks came in exactly three angles; Right, 45°, and Somewhere (half-way?) in Between.

Not so today, where a myriad of wedges are available in numerous widths, lengths, and thicknesses, and it seems previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has deployed every single one of them in his recreation of Lamborghini’s ultra limited-run Reventon.

Inspired by a fellow previous bloggee The G Brix and constructed in 8-wide Speed Champions scale, Fabrice’s Reventon captures the angular aesthetic of the real car brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his collection of wedges here.

Skull and Crossplane

Americans, like TLCB Elves, are excited by decals. There’s the Pontiac Firebird’s Giant Flaming Bird motif, the Ford Mustang’s twin stripes, aircraft with teeth, and many more besides.

Despite this clear appreciation for decal work, that most American of cars – the Chevrolet Corvette – isn’t really famous for any stickers at all.

Fortunately László Torma is here to correct this, by equipping the unloved LS1 crossplane-engined C4 Corvette (see, the title does make sense!) with a giant skull on the hood.

You can also build both the aforementioned skull and the car wearing it at home, as László has made building instructions for his C4 Corvette ‘Skull Edition’ available. Go on, get a boner via the link above!

Cars of Futures’ Past

For reasons unknown, movies depicting cars of the future always seem to choose 1976 as a start point. Still, as the results are sometimes as good as these cyberpunk concepts by Finn Roberts we’re cool with that.

Based on the conceptual designs of Syd Mead – and a Lancia Stratos – Finn’s concepts capture the retro-futuristic nature of cyberpunk film brilliantly, and are part of his wide ranging ‘Cyberpunk’ Flickr album.

There’s more to see of Finn’s two cyberpunk concept cars featured here on Flickr, where a range of other brick-built retro-future machinery can also be found. Take a look via the link above.

Build-a-Countach

Lamborghini have just revealed the new Countach, celebrating 50 years since the original first appeared in concept form and re-wrote the supercar rule book. In looks only of course, as the actual car, when it arrived in 1974, was rather rubbish.

Still, how a car drives is irrelevant when it’s a poster on your bedroom wall, and the Countach fulfilled the bedroom poster brief better than any car before it, or since.

Which makes us rather disappointed that Lamborghini’s ‘new’ Countach looks mostly like every other Lamborghini, and is yet another ultra-limited special edition (just 112 units will be made) costing $2m a piece.

Not that it matters what we think of course, because the new Countach is already sold out.

No, we’ll stick with the old one produced from 1974 until 1990 (by which time it had grown to look rather silly), despite it being a pretty bad car – even by 1970s supercar standards.

Cue Flickr’s barneius, who has recreated one the later (silly) original Countaches – the extravagantly-titled ‘LP5000 Quattrovalvole’ – beautifully in Speed Champions scale.

Clever build techniques are matched by an even cleverer use of black stickers, and there’s more of barneius’s build to see, plus a link to building instructions, at his ‘Lamborghini Countach’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump.

Longer than Expected*

McLaren seem to have a new limited run special edition every week, which means this TLCB Writer has all but lost interest in them. However there is one limited run special edition McLaren that is worth noticing; the, 3-seater, 5 metre long hybrid Speedtail.

Powered by the same 4.0 litre as most other McLarens, the Speedtail also features a parallel ‘self charging’ Hybrid set-up, much like the far more humdrum Toyota hybrids tootling about cities in their millions. Except the Speedtail’s hybrid system delivers over 1,000bhp.

It also looks like nothing else on the road, in part thanks to its enormous length*, which is greater even than a Range Rover.

Capturing this remarkable car in 8-wide Speed Champions form is The G Brix of Flickr, who has done such an excellent job this could be an official LEGO set, with space for three mini-figures inside, and front wheel covers that remain fixed even as the wheels behind them spin, just like the real car.

There’s more to see of G’s McLaren Speedtail on Flickr, click the link above to make the jump.

*That’s what she said.

Giant Balls (of Gas)

It’s some time in the future, and the Earth is completely depleted of helium. Clearly such a situation has massive ramifications, and the balloon-animal industry, vital to so many, have apparently take matters into their own highly-skilled balloon-bending hands.

Sending equipment to the Jupiter’s moon Europa, the inflatable contortionists are mining the satellite for its precious precious helium, returning the gas to Earth via transport ships, and – before that – these enormous gas-rovers.

With twelve-wheel-drive, a crew of five, and eight huge gas-filled balls, the gas-rovers are impressive machines, at least in the minds of Jon & Catherine Stead, whose backstory we have completely butchered for the purpose of this silliness.

We could have gone with either a testicle or enhanced-boobs theme though, so count yourself lucky Steads!

Anyway, their Europa gas-rover is a properly good build, with LED lighting, incredible brick-built wheels, and an ace five-person cockpit, where – presumably – the crew all talk in squeaky voices.

Head over to Jon and Catherine’s excellent ‘Helium Transporter’ album on Flickr to see more, and request a balloon giraffe.

Cosmic Cocktail

All the best racing sponsors are selling something that’s bad for you. Cigarettes, beer, cigarettes, energy drinks, and cigarettes were the mainstay of motorsport advertising, before doctors pointed out that it might not be a great idea to promote things that killed people.

These days tobacco companies are effectively banned from motorsport sponsorship (although Scuderia Ferrari are always willing to cash a ginormous cheque), however purveyors of alcohol are still permitted to hawk their wares to racing fans.

The upside of this is some of the coolest liveries in motorsport are still seen today, and – accordingly to David Roberts at least – will continue to be seen for some time yet.

This is David’s ‘Martin I’s Racer’, with a livery that looks a lot like the one used by a certain gin and vermouth-based cocktail company.

Further details and a backstory of drinking puns can be found at David’s photostream – grab yourself a mixer and head to the bar, er… we mean ‘galactic racing circuit’ via the link above.

Emirates Airbus A380 | Picture Special

Some Lego builders’ user names are just right. This is BigPlanes’ Emirates Airlines Airbus A380 Superjumbo, and it is really, really big.

With a wingspan of 7ft, BigPlanes’ recreation of the world’s largest passenger plane is a constructed in an almost unbelievable mini-figure scale, and uses no hidden supports, metal framework, or glue.

What it does use is tens of thousands of LEGO pieces, several electric motors, and a whole lot of LED lights to faithfully replicate Emirates’ flagship airliner, including both decks, a four-pilot cockpit, working flaps and tail control surfaces, retractable landing gear, and even powered engines.

Each class of travel is accurately represented too, from First (which features a bar, lounge, and even a waterfall fountain), through Business (with fold flat seats and individual screens), to Premium Economy (where passengers’ benefit from their knees not being a structural element of the seat in front), and finally Economy (basically a cattle-truck).

Beautiful spiral staircases link the two decks, which also include luxury bathrooms in First (and holes in the floor for Economy), galley kitchens, and even crew sleeping accommodation.

A monumental undertaking a year in the making, BigPlanes’ phenomenal determination and skill has resulted in surely one of the finest Lego creations ever built. Buy your ticket to fly Emirates at his astonishing ‘LEGO Emirates Airbus A380’ album on Flickr, where forty incredible images are available to view. It’s probably worth spending a little extra to upgrade to Premium Economy though…

Got the Horn

We’ve got the Horn. Well, it is the morning.

Get your minds out of the gutter, this is the Rhino ‘High Occupancy Reconnaissance Nexus’, or ‘H.O.R.N’ for short. And because the cartoon TV show from which it came really liked acronyms.

An anonymous tanker truck on the outside, the H.O.R.N was packing a lot more underneath than first appeared.

This awesome Lego recreation of the H.O.R.N by Flickr’s Flashback Bricks replicates the ability of the Hasbro toy from the TV series brilliantly, expanding to reveal M.A.S.K’s mobile command base and the sonic tank hidden inside, which enabled M.A.S.K operatives to keep it up without outside support for up to two weeks.

There’s more to see of Flashback’s H.O.R.N at his photostream via the link above, and if you fancy another appendage-filled post try this one for size!