Tag Archives: Construction

Rope & Bucket

Today’s post sounds like an English pub, but it is in fact a fully operational recreation of the Caterpillar 7295 rope excavator, as built by Ivan_M in a spectacular 1:40 scale.

Inside Ivan’s model are six Power Functions motors that drive the tracks, superstructure rotation, and the winches that lift, extend, and open the bucket.

It’s a complicated movement but one that Ivan has managed to replicate beautifully, with his model demonstrating some of the most impressive action on video you’ll see today. Ok, we can’t guarantee that – the internet’s a big place – but it’s nevertheless properly good.

There’s more to see of Ivan’s stunning Caterpillar 7295 rope excavator on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum, plus you can watch that impressive action in the ace video below!

YouTube Video

Brick Built Bucket

LEGO’s new Technic 42131 App-Controlled CAT D11 Bulldozer set revealed here earlier in the week is a spectacular (and spectacularly expensive) way to push LEGO pieces around your floor.

Of course the online Lego Community has been building super-sized RC bulldozers for some time, and this magnificent Liebherr PR 776 by Flickr’s Dawid Szmandra is one of the best we’ve seen yet.

With four motors, a Mindstorms EV3 for control, and perhaps the best brick-built bucket we’ve ever seen, Dawid’s creation gives LEGO’s 42131 set a run for its (considerable amount of) money, and it’s a creation you can build for yourself as he’s made building instructions available too.

There’s more of the build to see at Dawid’s ‘Liebherr PR 776’ album on Flickr, where a links to building instructions and even to the custom decals can also be found.

YouTube Video

Technic 42131 App-Controlled CAT D11 Bulldozer | Set Preview

Household pets and TLCB Elves don’t usually get on. From October 2021 however, we expect they might share a common nemesis; this is the brand new LEGO Technic 42131 App-Controlled CAT D11 Bulldozer. All 3,854 pieces of it.

Measuring 57cm in length and 37cm wide, 42131 brings the Caterpillar brand into LEGO’s burgeoning array of official partnerships – alongside equipment manufacturers such as Volvo, Claas, and Liebherr.

Four ‘Powered UP’ motors and a Control+ hub enable the set to be controlled via your mobile phone, with the huge yellow tracks, blade elevation and tilt, and ripper height all powered and remotely operable.

Those yellow tracks are new for 2021 too, making their debut on 42131, and featuring a tightening/loosening mechanism that we expect will make them highly sought after for builders’ own tracked creations.

A working piston engine complete with details such as brick built turbo-chargers, realistic (and – we must admit – rather excellent looking) decals, and a high level of visual exterior detailing including rails, ladders, exhausts, and lights, make for very impressive looking set, and one we expect will become mighty popular.

Aimed at ages 18+, the new LEGO Technic 42131 App-Controlled CAT D11 Bulldozer is expected to cost around £420, which – much to the relief of our Elves – is comfortably outside TLCB’s budget. If it’s within yours you can get your hands on all 3,854 pieces from October 2021, and your cat will never be able to relax again.

B-Grade

So often Technic’s B-Model, road graders like this Volvo G990 are the vehicles that give almost everything else we post a place to exist in the first place. So here to shine a light on their significance is Eric Trax, and this brilliant, er… 42114 B-Model…

OK, a B-Model this Volvo G990 may be, but it doesn’t feel compromised for it. Utilising around 90% of the parts from the 42114 6×6 Volvo Articulated Hauler set, Eric’s alternate redeploys the Control+ motors, control unit and app to give his grader remote control drive, steering, a three-speed automatic gearbox, and to power the main blade’s elevation.

The model features a few mechanical functions too, including a working piston engine, manually controlled ripper, and a seven-position blade angle. Best of all, Eric has released instructions for his road grader so you can build it for yourself if you own the 42114 set, and there’s more of Eric’s Volvo G990 B-Model to see on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum. Click the links above to earn yourself a B Grade.

YouTube Video

Not a Television

Looking around at the archaic electrical equipment in TLCB Towers, you’d think Hitachi only make televisions and – long long ago – VCRs (although that’s the only way we can let the Elves watch Transformers cartoons).

In reality though, the Japanese multinational conglomerate makes pretty much everything. Planes, trains, car systems, defence systems, ATMs, servers, escalators, elevators, air conditioners,  medical equipment, and – as shown here – giant construction machines.

This is a brick-built version of the Hitachi ZW 180 PL, a fifteen ton versatile wheel loader used for all manner of digging, pushing, and loading tasks. It comes from regular bloggee Damian Z., features some rather cunning building techniques throughout, plus a working (kinda) bucket arm too.

There’s more of the build to see at Damian’s ‘Hitachi ZW 180 PL Wheel Loader’ album on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

Technic 42114 6×6 Volvo Articulated Hauler | Review

It’s review time here at The Lego Car Blog, as we add another LEGO set to the by now pretty huge Review Library! This set review comes from one of our readers, who dons the Reviewing Anorak (which may or may not be a real thing) and takes on the enormous remote controlled LEGO Technic 42114 6×6 Volvo Articulated Hauler. Wojtek Hildebrandt is the reader in question, and so good is his review that TLCB Team are frankly a little worried for their jobs. That’s not true of course, as they don’t get paid… Anyway, over to Wojtek!

LEGO has a long-standing tradition of recreating dominantly yellow construction equipment in Technic sets. This is rather a grateful theme for construction blocks after all – simple shapes and function over form. Recently these have mostly been Volvo licensed vehicles; wheel loaders, excavators, and haulers with different degrees of motorisation – from full (as in 42030 loader) via optional (to power 42053 excavator pneumatics) to none (for endless knob spinning fun with 42081 concept loader). The time has come for a fully remote-controlled articulated hauler – a Volvo A60H with the Control+ app.

Beauty is in the eye of the behauler.
First, let’s have a look from the outside. This is a looker, at least for a construction machine. We can see it already on the box cover, where the hauler is put in some blurred quarry environment. It fits well, but then the same image is sometimes used without the background, which makes the chassis twist look weird, like doing some unlikely stunt.

Speaking of weird: LEGO’s previous attempt to minify a Volvo hauler – the B model for 42030 – had it all wrong (even with the number of wheels), but if you’re generous enough, you can say it was a tribute to vintage, skeletal Technic sets. If so, then 42114 is more from a bloodline of Model Team or recent adult Creator sets, even if it uses mostly Technic parts. Of course, the pins and holes are there and some proportions and colors are off, but both overall shape and some neat details are very true.

Let’s start from the business end; the dump body – we’ll call it the body from now on – has a complex shape with clever usage of tapered panels (which are flat on both sides, unlike straight panels) and very few empty spaces. I guess you couldn’t haul sand in it, but it should be perfect for some beans or potatoes. Or lemons to match the colour. The driver’s cab is correctly centred and surrounded by a proper, orange safety railing as well as accurate big mirrors. There is a slightly surprising mudguard serving as a dashboard, my favorite seat made of a single curved panel 3x5x3 (which seems to fit the same purpose regardless of model scale), and a warning beacon on the roof that twists slightly to turn the Control+ hub on or off.

Further to the front, we have one of the best-looking parts – a nicely sculpted bonnet. The impression is improved by a few stickers, but even without them all the angles and curves feel just right, even if they’re not entirely true to the original, e.g. with headlights. One curved panel covers the limits of the other and everything works together nicely. It’s wobbly during construction but becomes solid enough eventually. The front bumper on the other hand is no match for a durable look of the original, but to me, it doesn’t harm the overall impression too much.

Green energy
Now we get to the hardware. Both real-life and miniature versions of the Volvo hauler are powered by six cylinders. In full scale, they are six, famously green inline cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For the set, they are 6 AA/R6 batteries. Which one is “greener” energy depends probably on whether your batteries are rechargeable and if so – how you recharge them. Continue reading

Micro Construction

Tiny, and yet totally identifiable, Flickr’s KosBrick shows that just a few dozen parts can create models with amazing recognition. It’s like looking at large scale Lego models, only from very far away… Head to Kos’s photostream via the link above for more really tiny construction.

Not all Mercedes are Posh

It may come a surprise to some of our readers, but not all Mercedes-Benzes are posh. Far from it in Europe in fact, where not only can you buy a compact Mercedes-Benz with a 1.5litre Renault diesel engine, the three-pointed star is a common sight in construction zones, fruit markets, and scrap merchants, where almost unfathomably battered Mercedes vans and trucks are put to work until they’re sent to the banger track.

Our European readers will therefore be very familiar with a vehicle such as this one, a Mercedes-Benz Vario crew-cab truck loaded with a variety of contructiony things in the bed, and with a cab full of old tabloid newspapers, drinks cans, and other assorted detritus.

This one comes from regular bloggee Damian Z. (aka Thietmaier), and it could only be more realistic if the cab included old tabloid newspapers, drinks cans, and other assorted detritus. Damian has both built and presented his Vario superbly, and there’s lots more to see of it, plus a mini-excavator, compressor, and a dump truck too, on Flickr via the link.

My Other Piece of Earthmoving Equipment is Also a Volvo

Not our snappiest title. Still, we don’t mind, because this 42114 B-Model from Marek Markiewicz (aka M_Longer) is absolutely marvellous.

Built only from the parts found within the official LEGO Technic 42114 Volvo Articulated Hauler set, and utilising its Control+ app profile, Marek’s wheel dozer is packed with motorised functionality and looks so good it doesn’t appear like an alternate at all.

Three motors provide all-wheel-drive, articulated steering, and blade elevation, whilst a gearbox  not only provides three forward or reverse speeds, it also connects power to the rotating cooling fans and working six-cylinder piston engine when the model is either driving or positioning the blade.

It’s a superb model, and one you can build for yourself as Marek has produced instructions for his Volvo Wheel Dozer 42114 alternate too.

Full details including that link to building instructions can be found at the Eurobricks forum here, you can watch this brilliant B-Model in action via the excellent video below, plus you can find an alternate alternate for the 42114 Volvo Hauler set via a similarly titled past post by clicking these words.

YouTube Video

Double Dutch

This is a Mercedes-Benz Actros and Nooteboom step-frame trailer, as operated by Dutch heavy haulage Mammoet. This one is hauling a Liebherr wheel loader, with all three models the work of TLCB favourite Ralph Savelsberg, and there’s more to see of the truck, trailer and load on Flickr via the link.

A Giant Red Digger

Things TLCB Elves like; Things with Guns. Things with Racing Stripes. Megan Fox (although she’s equipped with neither). Giant Red Diggers. Today is therefore a good day.

This Giant Red Digger is the work of previous bloggee Levihathan, and it’s a Poclain HC 300 – or rather a 2,000 piece remote controlled fully working replica of a Poclain HC 300.

There are no less than six motors, two bluetooth hubs, dual differential tracked drive, a V12 piston engine, and some suspiciously metallic looking linear actuators.

An extensive gallery of imagery is available to view, showing the construction, inner mechanics, and the amazing reach of the excavating arm. Head to Levihathan’s ‘Poclain HC 300’ album  via the link above for more Giant Red Digger goodness.

Whirligigs & Thingamabobs

Things (amongst many) that TLCB staff are not very good at; Fashion. Displays of emotion. Star Wars. Snack self-control. Reality television. Construction machinery.

Cue TLCB Regular Damian Z (aka Thietmaier), and some construction machinery. Sigh.

This is, apparently, a DitchWitch RT75 trencher/cable plowing machine, but if we were told it was a spaghetti extractor we’d probably have believed it. However it is also absolutely excellent, being constructed superbly from an array of ingenious building techniques with Damian’s trademark amazing attention to detail.

Fortunately for this TLCB Writer there’s also a wonderfully realistic Mercedes-Benz Unimog U1250 truck and trailer to accompany it, and all three are packed with lifelike detailing and playable functions that belie their small scale.

There’s much more to see of Damian’s WitchDitch RT75, Unimog U1250, and cable-reel trailer on Flickr via the link above, plus you can check out a previous construction machine of his about which we also know nothing by clicking here.

Mini Mechanics

The creations we feature here at The Lego Car Blog can – at times – become a bit ‘aesthetics over everything’. That’s entirely our fault, as we want images that look cool on a screen and that our readers want to share, but building with Lego is about much more than just that.

This Technic mini mobile crane by SaperPL is an example, as whilst it does look rather nice, its real beauty is in the proper mechanical engineering packed inside.

Despite its small size, SaperPL’s crane includes working steering on three axles, with the forth non-steered axle driving a little piston engine under the cab, extending stabiliser legs, and a crane boom that can rotate 360 degrees, elevate, extend and winch, all via hand-powered knobs and cogs.

It’s exactly what Technic should be about and it’s well worth your click, particularly as SaperPL has made free building instructions available, which earns him a hundred TLCB points.

There’s more to see at Eurobricks via the link above, plus you can watch all of the excellent mechanical features in action via the splendid video below.

YouTube Video

Ditch Witch

From a science fictiony machine about which we know absolutely nothing to real world machine about which we know absolutely nothing. Yay!

This is a Witch Ditch JT520 and we genuinely have no idea at all what it’s for. Luckily the trailer it’s on is being pulled by a Ford F-150 crew cab pick-up, so blogging points are redeemed!

The Ford F-150, twin-axle trailer, and the aforementioned mystery contraption are all the work of Damian Z (aka Theitmaier), each is wonderfully detailed, and there’s more to see of all three models on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look.

Pumping on Your Stereo

We’re not sure who even uses the word ‘stereo’ any more. Meaning a sound coming from two places, Liebherr have applied it to their L518 wheel loader because – weirdly – it has two steering mechanisms.

Cleverly combining both a steered rear axle and an articulated centre pivot, the L518 Stereo can swivel about in small spaces like a pair of Elves on a hoverboard.

This neat Technic recreation of the L518 Stereo comes from Jundis of Eurobricks, who has replicated not only the cunning ‘stereo’ steering but also a mechanically controlled arm with an interchangeable fork/bucket, pendular rear suspension, and a working piston engine.

It’s the kind of good old-fashioned mechanical engineering that we love, and there’s more to see of Jundis’ Liebherr L518 wheel loader at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to pump on your stereo.

*Today’s title song. Obviously.