Tag Archives: mobile crane

Three-Way

This is a Hako Multicar, a common sight on European city streets, and with a fairly rubbish name until you realise how literal it is. The only surviving nameplate from the East German IFA, Multicar have been building small versatile platforms for over eighty years, with everything from floor buffers to armoured military vehicles emerging from their German factory.

However, even a single Multicar model can be multiple, er… cars, as proven here by this superb Technic Multicar 4×4 built by Sthrom (aka Blaz62). Like Multicar’s real vehicles, Sthrom’s creation is capable of switching between several purposes, with a single chassis and cab able to be equipped with multiple attachments.

Sthrom’s Multicar chassis is filled with proper Technic functionality, including all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, and all-wheel-drive with locking differentials, hooked up to an in-line 4-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cab. The front of the cab is fitted with a multi-purpose mount, allowing a range of equipment to be attached, whilst at the rear and even broader range of machinery can be added.

Sthrom’s model can be deployed to three different uses, with a mobile crane/cherry picker (often seen deployed for street light repair), a container truck/skip lorry, and a snowplough with grit spreader. Each attachment includes a wealth of realistic functionality, all operating mechanically via hand-operated linear actuators, levers, and bevel gears.

It all adds up to being one of our favourite Technic creations of the year, and there’s loads more to see of the Sthrom’s Hako Multicar, including the chassis and each attachment separately, at Bricksafe, the Eurobricks forum, and via the excellent demonstration video below.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

LEGO Technic 2020 | Set Previews!

And now, later than billed, it’s the all new 2020 Technic line-up! OK, we’re well into 2020 now (and have already previewed the new 42109 Top Gear Rally Car and 42110 Land Rover Defender sets), but one of our Elves got caught at The LEGO Company’s HQ and securing its release was harder than removing a U.S President from office. We wouldn’t have minded (we have lot of Elves) but it had some great intel…

42101 Buggy

This intel in fact, the new 42101 Buggy aimed at aged 7+ and featuring 117 pieces. 42101 looks like a modern reinterpretation of the classic (and awesome) 8818 Dune Buggy set from 1993. It’s not as good as the 1993 version obviously, which had a single-cylinder piston engine, but it does feature steering and rear suspension, making it a worthwhile entry point into the Technic range. Expect to pay around $12/£9 in stores.

42102 Mini Claas Xerion

The second entry point into the 2020 Technic range brings back the familiar green and red we’ve come to know from one of LEGO’s official partnerships. The original 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 set is – we think – one of the best Technic sets of all time, and the 130 piece 42102 set resembles a tiny (like, really really tiny) version of the 2017 flagship. Accurate decals, working steering, and a lawn mower thingy that rotates as the model is pushed along make the Mini Claas Xerion a neat set for ages 7+, and like the Technic Buggy above it’s available for pocket money. Good stuff.

42103 Dragster

Uh oh, the Pull-Backs. The Scrappy-Dos of Technic, we haven’t yet been impressed by any of these. However 2020 looks like it might be the exception, because we rather like this one! Featuring nothing but a pull-back motor (boo), the new 42103 Dragster set displays the usual extensive stickerage we’ve come to expect from these sets but it looks… well, really rather good. Aimed at ages 7+, 42103 includes 225 pieces, a ‘Christmas tree’ light, and a wheelie-bar. Could 2020 be the first year of decent pull-back sets?

42104 Race Truck 

No. Because back to form, here’s the 42104 Race Truck. With 227 pieces – all of which can be put to better use elsewhere – a plethora of stickers, and a pointless start/finish gantry thing, 42104 includes literally nothing that a Technic set should do. Oh, the bonnet opens, does that count? Next…

42105 Catamaran 

Breaking momentarily away from the Pull-Backs comes 42105, one of LEGO’s most unusual Technic sets ever, although perhaps 2016’s 42074 Racing Yacht proved there is a market for Technic sailing boats. With 404 parts including a pair of new two-piece hulls and those huge sails, 42105 features complete mechanical controls for the rudders, hydrofoils and sails and can be re-built into a more traditional powerboat should you wish to deploy those sail pieces elsewhere. It also floats(!), which immediately makes it cooler than any other set in this line-up (because who doesn’t like a good bath toy?). Aimed at ages 8+ expect to pay around $40/£35 for 42105, and for bath time to become much more interesting.

42106 Stunt Show

42106 pulls us back from bath time fun to, well… pull-back fun, but it could have good play value. Not much else mind. The 42106 Stunt Show includes three models in one; a pick-up truck, trailer/ramp, and a motorcycle, each looking fairly terrible despite the flame decals. The trailer features mechanically operated legs to turn it into a ramp and the truck includes steering, but that’s all. Which is nowhere near enough for a set costing $50/£45. Admittedly jumping the bike through the flaming hoop does look rather fun, but not $50 of fun, and we suspect even the Elves would tire of it quickly. We’ll be leaving this one on the shelf…

42108 Mobile Crane

The final set of H1 2020 is the largest of the line-up (not withstanding the officially licensed 42110 Land Rover Defender and 42109 Top Gear Rally Car sets revealed here at the end of 2019), the near 1,300 piece 42108 Mobile Crane. Forgive us for not being particularly excited by this one, because it does look like a reasonable set. It’s just that LEGO have released countless eight-wheel mobile cranes over the years and they’re all becoming much the same.

42108 does feature a wealth of mechanical operations, with eight-wheel steering, boom elevation, rotation and extension all via hand-powered mechanisms, a working winch with a ratchet to allow it to lift loads, and four functioning stabilisers. However despite the increase in detail that we’ve come to expect from modern Technic sets and enhanced realism thanks to a few well-judged decals, 42108 is an utterly unmemorable product. It’s also priced at around $95/£85 which – particularly as it includes no B-Model – is rather a lot.

We’ll go sailing on 42105 instead…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Magnificent Erection

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

Huib van der Hart’s erection is so big it can’t be photographed. Thankfully he has managed to capture it in a more compact state, but even then it’s still absolutely massive. We’re talking about Huib’s unbelievable 1:16 scale Liebherr LTM 1750 mobile crane in BKV livery; all 18 wheels of it.

Huib’s model is – as you can see here – astonishingly well detailed, but that’s only half the build. Underneath that amazing exterior is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain, with six XL Motors providing drive, seven Servo motors steering all nine axles, and a third-party SBrick providing control via bluetooth. There are also working LED lights throughout plus – of course – this model can get much, much bigger.

There’s a lot more to see of this incredible build at Huib’s Flickr photostream – click the link to make the jump, and ask him if he can try to get it up for a photo.

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hand Job

Lego Technic Crane

Casual readers of TLCB would be forgiven for thinking that this site only likes motorised remote control Technic creations. However whilst we certainly do appreciate a decent Power Functions model, there’s something charming about a good old-fashioned hand-cranked creation.

Newcomer jwarner’s mobile crane is just that, with no less than six hand-powered functions, including four-axle steering, boom extension and raising/lowering, winch operation, superstructure rotation, and working outriggers.

There’s more to see of jwarner’s build at both Flickr and Eurobricks. Click the links to make use of idle hands.

Tagged , , , ,

LEGO Technic H2 2018 | Set Previews

Lego Technic 42081 Volvo Concept

It’s that time of year again! With LEGO’s H2 Technic sets on the horizon the survivors from our crack team of Elves – sent to infiltrate The LEGO Company’s HQ – have returned to TLCB Towers with this summer’s bounty. So without further ado, here are the brand new Technic sets due to reach stores on August 1st!

42081 Volvo Autonomous Loader

OK, let’s get the weird one out of the way first. This is a Volvo autonomous loader concept and it is, frankly, one of the oddest Technic sets to appear in recent times. Continuing LEGO’s successful line of officially-licensed vehicles the new concept loader joins the previous (and excellent) Volvo Technic sets, but differs in that it isn’t a replica of a real-life Volvo at all. This makes it – in our eyes at least – utterly pointless.

Like many of LEGO’s recent Technic sets 42081 straddles the Model Team and Technic themes, bringing increased visual realism to functional models (only 42081 can’t be visually realistic because there is no real-world equivalent). All-wheel-steering, a mechanically raising and tipping bucket, and – for reasons we simply don’t understand – a model of a quadcopter drone are all included.

Expected to cost around $140 there are probably better ways to obtain 1,167 yellow and black pieces for your collection…

Lego Technic 42080 Forester

42080 Forest Harvester

This is more like it. Aimed at ages 10+ LEGO’s new 1,000-peice 42080 Forest Harvester set is the first to include Power Functions 2.0 (which may also mean the possibility of App control). We’ll have to wait until we get our hands on the new components to test out the upgrades, but the fact that the set also includes new pneumatics is cause for celebration!

We expect 42080 to use the new system to drive a pneumatic compressor that powers both the raising/lowering of the arm and the grabby/rolly/cutty thingumy on the end of it (which also looks to feature some new spiky round bricks). Mechanical functions are likely to include centre articulation and working steering, plus a little workbench and brick-built chainsaw are thrown in (somewhat unnecessarily) for good measure too.

We expect the brightly-coloured 42080 Forest Harvester set to cost around $150 when it reaches shelves later this year, which makes it $150 better value than that Volvo…

Lego Technic 42079 Forklift

42079 Forklift Truck

A staple feature throughout Technic’s long history, we’ve lost count of the number of forklift trucks in LEGO’s back-catalogue. The new set does appear to be one of the best though, and it could very well be the sweet-spot in the H2 Technic range. With Hand-of-God rear-wheel steering, a tilting fork, and an interesting-looking rope-activated lift mechanism, 42079 includes just enough mechanically-operated functionality to be interesting.

We think it looks rather nice too, with well-judged Model Team detailing, a few stickers teamed with a nice colour choice, and a bonus mystery barrel containing something dangerous. Aimed at ages 9+ 42079 is constructed from just under 600 pieces and is expected to cost around $70 when it reaches stores in August 2018.

https://thelegocarblog.com/2014/03/04/fork-off/

42082 Rough Terrain Crane

Now for the big one. This is 42082, LEGO’s 4,000+ piece, $300 flagship, and it’s massive. With the highest piece-count of any Technic set to date, plus Power Functions, 42082 is set to lift (hah!) the top tier of LEGO Technic even further towards engineering for adults.

An enormous extending boom (and it really is huge – the picture above shows it in its most compact setting), superstructure slew, boom raising/lowering and winch control are all driven electronically by LEGO’s Power Functions system, plus there are working outriggers, steering, and a V8 piston engine.

As with all of the new Technic sets 42082 will include instructions for a B-model, and it also features a wealth of stickers (each new set seems to include decals denoting the set no.) as part of a trend towards increasing the visual realism of Technic.

So there you have it, LEGO’s new-for-H2 2018 Technic sets. It’s quite a construction-heavy line-up, and one that we think is largely a decent effort. Apart from that pointless Volvo. Of course, the Volvo isn’t LEGO’s only officially-licensed new Technic set due for release later this year…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Super Grover*

Lego Grove GMK 6400 Crane Remote Control

This is a fully operable, fully remote controlled replica of Grove GMK 6400 mobile crane, and it is spectacular. Built by ShineYu aka Yu Kee Liu it’s one of the largest, most detailed, and most authentically recreated vehicles that we have ever seen.

Lego Grove GMK 6400 Crane Remote Control

Other than the 82mm tyres and some very neat decals, ShineYu’s Grove GMK is built entirely from our favourite Danish plastic, which makes it all the more impressive that it can drive (with multiple driven and steered axles) and that the GMK 6400’s truly enormous three-stage rotating boom is fully operable, powered by LEGO’s own Power Functions components.

Lego Grove GMK 6400 Crane Remote Control

ShineYu has published an extensive gallery of images detailing his remote controlled Grove GMK 6400 to both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum, where you can see that incredible boom in its raised position. They’re the only links to a giant erection on the whole of the internet that are safe to click! Take a look and be amazed.

*Today’s title-related link, extolling the greatness of the letter ‘G’. You don’t get that at The Brothers Brick…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Little Erection

Lego Technic Mobile Crane

It’s not size that matters but what you can do with it, and Eurobricks’ Paave can do a lot. This diddy Technic mobile crane might be considerably smaller than pretty much any other Technic creation we’ve blogged, but it’s got more squeezed inside it than your Mom’s corset.

The rotating superstructure, elevating and extending boom, hoist, steering and outriggers are all functional via hand-powered mechanics, and Paave has managed to ensure his model looks pretty good too. It’s just the sort of thing we’d like to see from an entry-level Technic set and there’s more to see on Eurobricks via the link above or via Brickshelf here.

Tagged , , , , ,

Get It Up

Lego Liebherr Mobile Crane

Nick Barrett’s got a big one. It might not look it here, but this 15-wide Liebherr LTM 1130 mobile crane can grow to almost six feet tall! A four part extending boom is the key to such impressive length, utilising reels of string and a full-length ratchet mechanism (no linear actuators here). The entire superstructure can turn too, allowing the boom to slew left and right whilst the control cab can tilt to enable the driver to look along his huge appendage.

Working suspension on all five axles provides a smooth ride, and helps to keep the boom up when the going gets rough, a V8 piston engine is turned via axle 4, whilst steering on axles 1, 2 and 5 allows the crane to get into tighter positions. That’s quite a list, as Nick’s build is packed with playable features, and you can see more – including photos of the Liebherr in its fully-extended glory – at his MOCpage. Click the link to get it up!

Lego Liebherr Mobile Crane

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Micro Crane

g-crane

We love a good crane here at The Lego Car Blog. After supercars, cranes are one of the types of model that we seem to blog the most. Be they teeny tiny or monstrous, cranes are a favourite topic. Today’s crane comes from TLCB regular Galaktek. Many of the working features that you’d expect to see in a big Technic MOC have been included in this elegant 4-wide model. It also comes with its own back-up truck, which you can see in Galaktek’s Photostream.

Tagged , , , , ,

Big Erection

Lego Liebherr Remote Control Crane

TLCB favourite ShineYu is back, and this time he’s brought a truly massive erection – an enormous, fully RC, and fully working, Liebherr LTM 1350 all-terrain crane.

Measuring almost a meter long and weighing over 10KG, ShineYu’s creation is of genuinely epic proportions, so much so that photographing it must’ve been a real challenge (we’ve even relaxed our ‘exclude any clutter from shot‘ rule to accommodate it!).

The model is driven by four XL Motors with two Medium Motors controlling the four steering axels. A further Medium Motor rotates the crane turnable whilst another two XLs take care of the boom elevation and extension. A final two XL Motors power the lifting winch. All of that power means that ShineYu’s LTM can lift a load of up to 2KG to 2 meters using unmodified official LEGO parts.

You can all the details of this incredible build at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where there’s also an extensive image gallery and a link to a video of the crane in action.

 Lego remote Control Liebherr Mobile Crane

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: