Tag Archives: Lego

Flame Grille

A flame paint-job is worth at least 150bhp, according to TLCB maths. That puts it right up there with a supercharger, side pipes and nitrous in TLCB’s list of go-faster things.

Laszlo Torma’s Speed Champions ‘57 Chevy is therefore very powerful indeed, being equipped with at least two of the above.

A brilliant brick-built grille and a pair of appropriately cool looking mini-figures complete the build, and there’s more to see of Laszlo’s flaming Chevy – including a link to building instructions – on Flickr via the link above.

Fantastic Ford

The Lego Car Blog Elves are having a great day today. Previous bloggee Jakub Marcisz is back with this lovely Classic Ford F100 pick-up, which not only looks fantastic, there’s a complete Power Functions remote control drivetrain underneath too.

The Elves therefore, are riding around in the back. A few have inevitably been run over, but for the most part it’s good clean fun.

Jakub’s model conceals its remote controlness well, with the only clue visible being if the brown box is removed from the bed, and the model also features opening doors (revealing a beautifully constructed interior), dropping tailgate, opening hood, LED lights, working suspension, and a high/low gearbox.

It’s a top quality build that’s worth a closer look, and you can do just that via Jakub’s photostream at the link above, where more imagery and a link to a YouTube video can also be found.

Venom (Unverified)

Several cars currently claim to be the fastest ever produced. The race for the highest top speed has brought about some incredible machines, but it’s also reached a fairly pointless level, as a whole pit crew, the hiring of a desert, plus bespoke tyres, fuel, and fluids are all required. If TLCB were in charge of the record, a car’s run would only stand if it was filled up on the M32, just outside Bristol, and driven by an elderly lady plucked at random from a nearby bowls club.

Hennessey somewhat understandably chose not to take this approach, going the whole pit-crew-desert-bespoke route when they beat the Bugatti Veyron’s record last decade, reaching an official top speed of 270mph in what was basically a Lotus Exige with an LS in it.

Bugatti have since upped their game but – not counting SSC’s recent slightly embarrassing and completely unverified claim – no production car has yet hit a verified 300mph.

Hennessey aim to do so imminently though, with this; the 1,800bhp Venom F5.

Built in England (as most American supercar icons seem to be), and powered by a hugely reworked Chevrolet LS (as most American supercar icons seem to be), just twenty-four Venom F5s are due to be produced, each costing $2.1m, and each capable (if Hennessey’s maths are proved correct) of a record-breaking 301mph top speed.

We’ll find out if the claims are true when the Venom F5 records a verified run, so until then we’re happy to focus on a rather smaller version, as built in 1:8 scale by previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens.

With all-wheel-suspension, a V8 engine, working scissor doors, functioning steering, and an 8-speed sequential gearbox, Jeroen’s Technic Venom F5 is certainly every bit as impressive as an on-paper top speed of 301mph.

You can also build Jeroen’s model for yourself, as it’s constructed mostly from the various green pieces (and variously green pieces) from the 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 set, with instructions available at Jeroen’s website.

There’s more to see – including the complete gallery and full build details – at both Flickr and Eurobricks – Click the links above, grab your pit crew and some bespoke tyres, and probably possibly maybe hit 301mph!

The Other Ferrari

This is not a Ferrari.

The only legitimate son of Enzo, Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari was an engineer at his father’s company until he died in 1956, aged just 24, from muscular dystrophy.

Until his death, Dino had been working on a new 1.5 litre DOHC V6 engine with Vittorio Jano, who had joined Ferrari from Lancia.

Encouraged by Dino, Jano developed the new V6 engine, and upon Dino’s death Enzo Ferrari decided to create a new marque named after his son to take the engine racing.

The ’Dino’ F2 team raced the following year, with the engine subsequently developed for road cars which bore the ‘Dino’ name, including the Dino 246 by Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott pictured here, plus the Lancia Stratos and Fiat Dino Coupe and Spider.

Sadly Dino never saw the engine he pushed for race, and Jano never saw his engine fitted to a Ferrari. He lost his own son as Enzo had, and a year later in 1965 he took his own life.

Enzo finally brought Dino and Jano’s engine in-house for use in Ferrari-branded road cars in 1976, discontinuing the ‘Dino’ marque.

After twenty years, Enzo had allowed his son’s engine home.

Fifty Shades of Bley

Ok, one shade (this isn’t the 42115 Lamborghini Sian set), but certainly fifty types of bley.

Blueish-grey (hence ‘bley’) replaced LEGO’s ‘light grey’ colour in around 2005 for reasons we don’t understand, and The Brick Artisan has embraced the hue wholly with his ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’, which looks a bit like a spacey airport luggage tractor.

Said rover not only contains a whole lot of bley, it features a delightfully elaborate and possibly radioactive load too, as this Classic Spaceman apparently heads to the Classic Space recycling centre. Our Earth-based equivalent of this trip is only to transport TLCB’s broken electrical devices and old pieces of wood (although we do also use a Rover), so this trip looks far more exciting!

There’s more to see of The Brick Artisan’s ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’ on Flickr, where – if you have sufficient bley – you can recreate it for yourself as building instructions are available. Click the link above to make the jump!

Rope & Bucket


Today’s post sounds like an English pub, but it is in fact a fully operational recreation of the Caterpillar 7295 rope excavator, as built by Ivan_M in a spectacular 1:40 scale.

Inside Ivan’s model are six Power Functions motors that drive the tracks, superstructure rotation, and the winches that lift, extend, and open the bucket.

It’s a complicated movement but one that Ivan has managed to replicate beautifully, with his model demonstrating some of the most impressive action on video you’ll see today. Ok, we can’t guarantee that – the internet’s a big place – but it’s nevertheless properly good.

There’s more to see of Ivan’s stunning Caterpillar 7295 rope excavator on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum, plus you can watch that impressive action in the ace video below!

YouTube Video

Dananananana Bateman!

This is a Bateman Assault Bridge Carrier, an experimental tank-bridge-laying-combo based on the excellently-named ‘Medium Dragon’ Mk.1 artillery tractor that was trialled by the British Royal Engineers in 1926.

It’s one of the more obscure vehicles to appear here then, and it’s been recreated brilliantly by Tarix819 of Eurobricks in a colossal 1:8 scale.

Weighing almost 10kgs, Tarix’s creation features two coil-sprung tracks, each with its own mechanical tensioner and independently powered by an SBrick and three XL motors.

A working V8 engine lives within the armour, and a functioning searchlight is able to light up the obstacle ahead in need of crossing.

And cross an obstacle the Bateman can, as Tarix’s model can deploy the huge bridge mounted on the top of machine. The real Assault Bridge Carrier relied on hand-powered winches (which are also recreated here), but Tarix’s build utilises a Power Functions Medium Motor to complete the model’s suite of remote control functionality.

It’s a monumentally impressive piece of Lego engineering and you can see how Tarix has done it at the Eurobricks discussion form here, and via the brilliant video below.

YouTube Video

Kosmic Kitty

Is it us or is Hello Kitty everywhere? Well now the Japanese humanoid feline is in space too, thanks to Alec Hole. Your thoughts on this development will probably depend upon younger family members’ obsession with the anthropomorphised cat, but – if you can cope – there’s more of Alec’s ‘Hello Kitty Speeder’ to see on Flickr via the link above.

We Are United

This incredible creation is a Boeing 777-(200), as flown by United Airlines, and built over the course of eleven months by Freezeur21 of Flickr.

Constructed in mini-figure scale (which sounds small but makes this massive), Freezeur’s 777 features opening doors, accurate landing gear (which somehow supports the model’s enormous weight), and some properly brilliant decals.

So good is the result you’d be hard-pressed to know this is Lego at first glance, but it is and you can check out more stunning images of Freezeur’s United Airlines Boeing 777-(200) at his photostream. Click the link above to climb on board.

Playing Golf

In the opinion of this TLCB Writer, walking (or riding) around a park in silly trousers is not a sport. Still, when Volkswagen’s naming department decided to choose sports as the theme for their new cars in the 1970s, golf was one of the games they selected, alongside ‘Derby’ and ‘Polo’.

Eight generations later and the Golf is still going strong, and previous bloggee SP_LINEUP has built no less than four of them, all recreated beautifully in small-scale brick form.

There’s more to see of each, including a tasty-looking Mk1 and a 2000s-era R32, at SP’s photostream. Grab your clubs and head to the green via the link above.

Cyber Gull

As if cyberpunk cars weren’t cool enough*, this one has gull-wing doors! Finn Roberts owns the mind behind it, and there’s more to see of this 7-wide concept (and Finn’s other cyberpunk vehicles) on Flickr.

*Is the nerdiest sentence we’ve written for a while.

5-Tons of Pain!

This is the M1083 6×6 ‘Medium Tactical Vehicle’, an Austrian-designed 5-ton military truck produced by Oshkosh for the U.S military.

Built by Flickr’s Evan M, this superb Lego recreation of the M1083 in desert camo spec not only does an excellent job of capturing the truck, and features both working steering and suspension, it also includes 5 tons of exciting exploding things in the load bed.

Talking of ‘capturing the truck’, a few of the real trucks and a great many tons of U.S exploding things are likely now in the hands of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Which makes the war to oust them seem rather pointless. Still, you can capture your own M1083 at Evan’s photostream via the link above!

Ruby Ruby Ruby Ruby*

This splendid 1935 Austin Ruby was found by one of our Elves today, and it features more ingenious (and somewhat sketchy) building techniques than we think we’ve ever seen on one model before.

A stretched rubber band forms the grille, angles are created via the half-attachment of pieces, and the running board/rear wheel arch is attached with string!

Whilst it wouldn’t exactly pass LEGO’s requirements for robustness, the resulting model looks absolutely lovely, and there’s more to see at the photostream of Owen Meschter, who owns the mind behind it.

Click the link above and try not to knock any pieces off…

*Ah-ah-ah-ah-ah-aaah. Today’s title song. Obviously.

LEGO 76240 Batmobile Tumbler | Set Preview

It’s been thirteen years since Christopher Nolan’s ‘The Dark Knight’ re-set the bar for Batman movies. It’s also been thirteen years since the best Batmobile of all time crashed onto screens, and seven since LEGO’s own 76023 Tumbler set first crashed across bedroom floors.

Time therefore for an update, which LEGO have revealed today in the form of the new 76240 Batmobile Tumbler.

76240 looks fairly similar to the first set to recreate the Tumbler, because… well, it is, but the new version includes 200 more pieces for a total parts count of over 2,000. It also features the awesome tyres first released with the 42054 Technic Claas Xerion 5000 – although we’re not actually sure they’re that accurate for the Tumbler – along with LEGO’s new all-black marketing for their adult sets, which is rather appropriate for ‘The Dark Knight’.

The ’18+’ bit is probably just marketing guff though, allowing adults to feel more comfortable purchasing a toy / justifying it to a perplexed partner. “Honestly Barbara, this isn’t for kids. It’s a sophisticated interlocking building system!” “OK, just buy the damn thing. (Sigh….)”.

Nevertheless – and unlike the Batman films that followed ‘The Dark Knight’ trilogy – 76240 looks a good update to bring the Tumbler back to Batman fans in LEGO form, and the new set will be available to buy for around $230/£170 when it reaches stores later this year.

Brick Built Bucket

LEGO’s new Technic 42131 App-Controlled CAT D11 Bulldozer set revealed here earlier in the week is a spectacular (and spectacularly expensive) way to push LEGO pieces around your floor.

Of course the online Lego Community has been building super-sized RC bulldozers for some time, and this magnificent Liebherr PR 776 by Flickr’s Dawid Szmandra is one of the best we’ve seen yet.

With four motors, a Mindstorms EV3 for control, and perhaps the best brick-built bucket we’ve ever seen, Dawid’s creation gives LEGO’s 42131 set a run for its (considerable amount of) money, and it’s a creation you can build for yourself as he’s made building instructions available too.

There’s more of the build to see at Dawid’s ‘Liebherr PR 776’ album on Flickr, where a links to building instructions and even to the custom decals can also be found.

YouTube Video