Tag Archives: Lego

The Estate is Dead

Volvo, once the estate car manufacturer, now produce more SUV/crossover models than estate cars.

Because everyone produces more SUV/crossover models than anything else these days, and unless a car projects an image that you’re about to go hang-gliding off a mountain, consumers aren’t interested in it.

Still, at least Volvo’s SUV/crossovers looks slightly interesting, unlike the vast majority of their rivals, as shown here by TLCB debutant Peter Zieske and his excellent 1:16 scale recreation of the Volvo XC40 R-Design.

Peter’s model is presented beautifully and there’s more to see of his Model Team XC40 at his album on Flickr. Click the link above to drive to a mountain to go hang-gliding, or whatever it is that SUV/crossovers are supposed to be for.

Hooker

This is a Volvo FH ‘hooklift’ truck, as built by Volvo Trucks employee and previous bloggee Sebeus I.

Sebeus’s Model Team recreation of the latest version of FH-series includes Power Functions drive and steering, flashing warning lights, and motorised lifting axle and hooklift mechanisms.

There’s more to see at Sebeus’s ‘Volvo FH’ album on Flickr, at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and via the video below.

YouTube Video

Got Wood?

Yes we do today. A lot of it. Cue a default title that still makes us snigger – because we’re children, and a car called a Willys, which also makes us snigger – because we’re children.

Previous bloggee 1saac W. is the cause of the phallus-based sniggering with his beautiful recreation of the 1948 Willys-Overland Station Wagon, and there’s more to see of 1saac’s Woodie (snigger) on Flickr via the link.

Three Speed

Flickr’s ace ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ group doesn’t include many cars. Or any at all in fact, being a) a group for speeder bikes, and b) having a far greater discipline in sticking to the title than we do.

Still, our tangental approach to blogging cars does means that ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ current ‘Let’s Get Tropical’ building contest is appearing here, with three excellent speeder bikes to kick off the competition!

First up (above) is Julius Kanand‘s ‘Checkpoint 13’, in which a delightfully funky speeder navigates a suitably tropical beach-based course.

Today’s second Speeder Bike build comes from one of the contest judges Dan Ko, so it’s not technically an entry, but it does epitomise the 2021 competition beautifully, being a simple brick-built bike of just a handful of pieces, the likes of which anyone with a few LEGO bricks can create at home.

The final of today’s three speeder bike creations continues the simplicity, with aide k utilising the stickers from an official LEGO set, some trans-blue tiles, and a few red and white bricks to create the superbly dynamic scene above.

There are loads more brilliant speeder bikes to see at the ‘Lego Speeder Bikes’ group via the link above, and if you’d like to check out the current ‘Let’s Get Tropical’ competition and maybe enter a bike yourself you can find full contest details by clicking these words. There are even prizes on offer provided by a proper Lego blog that understands sci-fi and everything!

SuperGreat

Unlike today’s other off-road truck post, this one certainly doesn’t have a bland name. The Mitsubishi Fuso SuperGreat FX 6×6 is an off-road military tow truck, depicted here in Technic Japanese Self Defence Force form.

All six wheels are driven by a Medium Motor, the steering is powered by a combination of a  Medium and a Micro Motor, whilst the crane rotation, elevation, extension, and outriggers are all controlled manually.

Leaf-spring suspension features too and there’s more to see courtesy of LXF (Brickshelf) / syclone (Eurobricks) via the links.

Heavy Metal

This is some heavy metal. The Ural 43206 features the usual terrible Soviet name, but otherwise it’s a most excellent heavy-duty off-road truck.

This Model Team recreation of the Ural 43206 is equally excellent, and it comes from previous bloggee Krzysztof Cytacki (aka dirtzonemaster).

Featuring a full remote control drivetrain, Krysztof’s model deploys two XL Motors to drive all four wheels, with impressive suspension on both axles, and a Power Functions IR receiver mounted in the cab.

Of course as anyone who’s put XL Motor torque through a LEGO UV-joint will know, off-roading with a driveline made from plastic can cause a few issues, usually in the form of a UV-joint exploding.

This isn’t something that will afflict Krzysztof’s Ural however, as he’s replaced the LEGO UV-joints in his model with custom metal ones, allowing for proper off-road ability.

A canvas load cover, opening tailgate, and detailed cab complete the build, and there’s more to see of Krzysztof’s metal-enhanced Ural 43206 off-road truck at both Flickr and via the video below, which includes a suitably metallic soundtrack. Click the links to take a look!

YouTube Video

Bookstore Cafe

Ah, the cafe in the bookstore; the place to go to meet attractive hipster girls whilst trying to look intelligent. “Yes I did enjoy ‘Infinite Jest’, although I found it strayed towards a wandering narrative in places… Can I buy you a coffee?”

Cue seb71‘s ‘cafe racer’ style motorcycle, which is pictured here on its own but forms part of some rather lovely bookends (see, it all makes sense).

Built for a challenge on a French forum (which if he isn’t French makes this so hipster it hurts), Seb’s motorcycle captures the ‘cafe racer’ style superbly, and there’s more to see of both it and the bookends of which it is part on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look, and if you’re reading this in a bookstore cafe you can pretend you’re exploring the romanticism of classical transportation in France if you’re asked, before buying that attractive hipster girl a coffee.

Champagne Chevy Nova*

We like rusty cars here at The Lego Car Blog. The staff car park features several. Although in those cases the rust is due to neglect, age, and general decrepitness rather than some kind of rat-rod based badassery.

So too is Tim Henderson’s ‘barn find’ ’68 Chevy Nova, although unlike the office Rover 200 it somehow manages to look seriously cool as well as neglected, old, and decrepit.

A cunning deployment of mini-figure seats form the doors, an array of browns convey years of oxidisation, and there’s more of Tim’s ‘barn find’ Nova to see at his photostream here.

*Today’s magnificent title song.

Whirligigs & Thingamabobs

Things (amongst many) that TLCB staff are not very good at; Fashion. Displays of emotion. Star Wars. Snack self-control. Reality television. Construction machinery.

Cue TLCB Regular Damian Z (aka Thietmaier), and some construction machinery. Sigh.

This is, apparently, a DitchWitch RT75 trencher/cable plowing machine, but if we were told it was a spaghetti extractor we’d probably have believed it. However it is also absolutely excellent, being constructed superbly from an array of ingenious building techniques with Damian’s trademark amazing attention to detail.

Fortunately for this TLCB Writer there’s also a wonderfully realistic Mercedes-Benz Unimog U1250 truck and trailer to accompany it, and all three are packed with lifelike detailing and playable functions that belie their small scale.

There’s much more to see of Damian’s WitchDitch RT75, Unimog U1250, and cable-reel trailer on Flickr via the link above, plus you can check out a previous construction machine of his about which we also know nothing by clicking here.

Man-ic Monday

From the world’s biggest land vehicle to one of the littlest, and the official World Record holder for the smallest road-legal production car ever made.

The Peel P50 was built for just a few years in the early 1960s, capitalising on the demand for small cheap cars that could be driven on a motorcycle license. A few companies made a great success from this need, albeit not for ever, Peel… didn’t.

Ingenious though the P50 was, a car with 28mph top speed designed for city use, but coming from the Isle of Man (a small mostly rural island off the coast of England with no cities) had (very) limited appeal, and just fifty units were produced.

Around half survive today, and they’re worth a ridiculous amount of money, with one recently fetching $176,000 at auction.

Cue John Carpenter of Eurobricks, who has built one that’s far more attainable, and it’s not even that much smaller than the real thing!

There’s working steering, suspension front and rear, an authentic single-cylinder engine driven by the rear wheel, an opening and locking door, and even a working handbrake.

There’s lots more to see of John’s Peel P50 at the Eurobricks forum, including build details and a video of the working functions in action. Head to the Isle of Man c1964 via the link above! (Just be prepared for the villagers to point and laugh.)

Towering Inferno

This is the NASA ‘Launch Umbilical Tower’, designed to send the world’s most powerful machine – the Saturn V rocket – into space, and carried by the world’s heaviest land vehicle.

LEGO’s enormous 92176 NASA Saturn V set has allowed space fans to conduct their own bedroom-based lunar missions, but the ‘blast-off’ bit (in this writer’s opinion, the coolest bit) requires a few additional accessories not supplied by LEGO…

Fortunately Janotechnic of Eurobricks – here making his TLCB debut – has the answer, not only building this incredible 1:110 scale Technic Nasa Crawler and Launch Umbilical Tower, but doing so from three official LEGO Technic sets; the 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator, the 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, and the 42098 Car Transporter.

That expansive parts supply has enabled Jano to equip his B-B-B-Model with a huge array of motorised functions, including drive and steering, crane rotation, retractable support swing-arms, and even a working lift within the tower!

It’s an incredible creation and one that (in simplified form below) you can build for yourself, as building instructions are available. There’s more of Jano’s amazing NASA Crawler and Tower to see – including a video of the model’s motorised and mechanical functions – at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above and prepare to blast-off!

Contain This

Most of what’s around you (unless you’re reading this on your phone in a field) got to where it is via a shipping container. They might just be big metal boxes, but the entire global economy hinges on their transportation (cue headlines when said transportation stops). This Detroit Diesel-powered Skoda Xena is pulling two such monuments to global capitalism, which Martin Nespor has recreated brilliantly in brick form. A neat three-axle trailer with lifting axles and an extending rear overhand follows the Skoda, which itself features Power Functions and SBrick bluetooth remote control. Excellent custom decals complete the build and there’s more to see at Martin’s ‘Container Semi-Trailer’ album on Flickr; click here to take a look.

Modular Building

LEGO’s brilliant line-up of modular buildings have been a roaring success, but they’re not really TLCB fodder. This awesome Neo-Classic Space ‘T-ATV’ by Flickr’s SweStar is though, and it’s ‘modular building’ too. Sort of.

A superb tracked chassis can carry an assortment of spacey things atop it, including a cabin that doubles as a spaceship, a pair of containers for important spacey-looking devices, and there’s even a mini-figure jet-suit arrangement concealed in the back!

Each module can stand alone as a thoroughly good build, and add them all together and you have a model with such great playability that this TLCB Writer could happily spend an entire afternoon swooshing and tracking and doing other suitably spacey stuff with it.

Whilst he does that you can see more of SweStar’s brilliant build at his ‘T-ATV’ album on Flickr – click the link above for more modular building.

My Other Tracked Vehicle is an Excavator

We’re not sure that this title really works as a bumper sticker, but as this snow groomer by Dyens Creations doesn’t have a bumper it’s moot anyway. Dyen’s creation is indeed constructed from another tracked vehicle though, being built entirely from the parts found within the Technic 42121 Heavy Duty Excavator set. There’s an adjustable elevating blade, a rotating and extending crane, and an attachable ice grinding thingumy too. Building instructions are available and there’s more of Dyen’s snow groomer B-Model to see on Flickr, at Eurobricks, and via the video below.

YouTube Video

Easter Bunny

We often find it easy to forget the story of Easter (which is usually about a rabbit laying chocolate eggs or something), so here at The Lego Car Blog we’re publishing a mechanised bunny rabbit exo-suit. We’re not sure what that achieves. Anyway, there’s more to see of Simon Liu‘s ‘Bunnies Rise Up!’ on Flickr via the second link, or click the first for an alternative easter story featuring a rigged trial, murder, and with a major twist at the ending.