Tag Archives: Lego

Cyberpunk 2077

The news about Cyberpunk 2077 seems to suggest that it is incredible to behold, but underneath the visual splendour it’s actually unusable rubbish. Kinda like a Lamborghini Countach. Or an Instagram influencer.

However, it does look spectacular, helped by the brilliant artists behind its ‘Night City’ setting. A megacity in a free state, independent from government control and inhabited by Keanu Reeves for some reason, Night City also includes this; the Quadra Turbo-R V-Tech.

Whilst it sounds like a kid’s laptop, it is visually awesome, managing to look both like a 1980s supercar and a concept from the near future.

This stunning recreation of the V-Tech Speak’n’Spell superbly captures the Cyberpunk 2077 aesthetic, and it comes from Hasan Kabalak who has deployed some brilliant building techniques to create it.

Custom decals add to the impact and there’s more of Hasan’s creation to see at his Flickr album, which includes outdoor shots, build steps, and close-ups of some of the outstanding details to be found within it.

Click the link above to jump into Night City in 2077.

The Countach Conundrum

Crap cars come in all shapes and sizes. This is one of them.

The Lamborghini Countach was like nothing else on earth when in arrived in 1974. It was almost un-drivable, miserable to be in, but it looked fantastic. And then the ’80s came around…

The era of excess threw everything it had at Bertone’s pioneering design, and by ‘everything’ we mean ‘a butt-ton of plastic’.

Widened arches, sills, bumpers, and an enormous yet aerodynamically pointless rear wing turned the Countach into some sort of caricature of itself, ruining the original design and making the car even less usable than it was before.

You’d have to be an obnoxious tasteless moron to like the ’80s Countach, so outlandish, over the top, and borderline unusable had it become. Which is why this TLCB writer absolutely loves it.

It’s this version of Lamborghini’s icon that was suggested to us by a reader, who has photographed his finished build of Rastacoco’s Countach LP5000 QV, which is available on Rebrickable with downloadable instructions.

Rastacoco’s design replicates the ’80s Countach superbly, with the model including opening scissor doors, a detailed interior, and the most perfectly replicated exterior we’ve seen built in brick form yet.

Images of Rastacoco’s model in black, white and red can be found at Bricksafe, with full details, building instructions, and the images supplied by a reader used in this post available on Rebrickable here.

Forbidden Flatness

Porsche are perhaps the best known manufacturer to use flat engines, despite the fact that these days most of their cars are powered by Volkswagen Group Vs or Inlines. However Ferrari too once powered their cars by boxer engines, the first of which was this; the Berlinetta Boxer.

Ferrari’s first mid-engined twelve-cylinder road car, just over two-thousand Berlinetta Boxers were produced between 1973 and ’84 before the Testarossa picked up the flat-twelve mantle, although none were officially imported into the Unites States as Enzo Ferrari thought the flat-twelve was too much for U.S. 55mph speed limits and increasing emissions regulations.

This excellent Technic recreation of the ‘BB’ comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Competition Winner  James Tillson, whose model includes working suspension, steering, pop-up headlights, plus opening doors and rear clamshell, under which is – of course – a functioning 12-cylinder piston engine.

There’s much more of James’ superb Ferrari Berlinetta Boxer to see at his photostream, including a photo of the flat-twelve engine. Click the link above to take a closer look. Even if you’re in the U.S.

Be One of the Good Guys

It’s Classic Space which – out of all of the space themes – is remembered most fondly by subsequent generations. Perennially smiling, the mini-figures of Classic Space held no weapons, and placed science and knowledge above fear and power.

In contrast, the bullying Spyrius militants – who used violence and weaponry in an attempt to steal what they wanted – were no more than a flash in the pan, fading away as quickly as they arrived and proceeded to smash everything up.

In completely unrelated news there’s a Presidential Inauguration today, which is going ahead despite the arrival of a bunch of bullying militants – who used violence and weaponry in an attempt to steal what they wanted – and proceeded to smash everything up.

We believe in the power of voting for the good guys, and you can do just that at LEGO Ideas, where LEGO are holding a ballot to celebrate their 90th Anniversary, in which you can vote to bring back one of many beloved popular classic themes. And Time Cruisers for some reason.

TLCB’s vote will always go to the good guys, themes of which include Imperial Soldiers, M-Tron, Forestmen, Space Police, and – of course – Classic Space. You can vote for the return of your favourite theme via LEGO Ideas, and you can see more of the excellent Classic Space ‘Exo-Planet Surveyor’ by Flickr’s Pascal that’s featured in this post by clicking here.

Lotus 18 | Picture Special

This beautiful creation is a Lotus 18, and it’s one of the most wonderful racing cars ever made.

Succeeding Colin Chapman’s Lotus 16 (what happened to 17?), the 18 was designed to compete in both Formula 1 and Formula 2, and was powered by a little Coventry Climax 4-cylinder engine, first in 2500cc and then 1500cc sizes when Formula 1 reduced the engine limit.

The 18 gave Lotus’ their first Formula 1 win, plus two-time World Champion Jim Clark his first Grand Prix drive, before he and Innes Ireland took Lotus to the Constructors Runner-up spot in the 1960 World Championship.

However it wasn’t just Team Lotus who raced the 18, with Rob Walker Racing leasing a car to be driven by a new hotshot driver by the name of Stirling Moss.

Moss won the 1960 Monaco Grand Prix for Rob Walker Racing, the first time a privateer team had ever one a Formula 1 race, with only two teams managing it since.

Moss went on to take another win later in the season, although the Lotus 18’s campaign was marred by Moss’s injury at Spa-Francorchamps which put him out for most of the championship, and fellow Lotus 18 driver Alan Stacey’s death at the same track, after the 26 year old driver hit a bird.

Moss returned to racing though, continuing to campaign the Lotus 18 successfully for Rob Walker Racing in 1961, winning another two races and taking third in the World Championship behind the two Ferrari drivers.

The Lotus 18 was quite an important car then. It gave not only Lotus, but several future racing greats their early wins, their first Formula 1 drives, and – sadly in Alan Stacy’s case – their last drive too.

This unfathomably good recreation of the Lotus 18 comes from Andre Pinto, whose stunning replica of Sir Stirling Moss’s 1960 race-winner is one of the finest historic racing cars that this site has ever featured.

Beautiful detailing and attention to detail is evident everywhere you look, and there’s lots more to see at both the Eurobricks discussion forum and at Andre’s ‘Lotus 18 Stirling Moss‘ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look at one of the most important Formula 1 cars ever made.

Two Horse Race

There was something of a kerfuffle in TLCB Towers today. In a not uncommon event, two TLCB Elves had returned with a model each – in this case a pair of Speed Champions classic Ferraris – and immediately fought over whose was best. For newcomers to this corner of the internet, ‘fought’ in the case of the Elves usually means extreme physical violence.

Fortunately for the Elven duo both of their finds were blogworthy and thus each received a meal token, so the violence – as is so often the way – wasn’t really necessary. Jonathan Elliott‘s wonderful Ferrari GTB/4 (above) and barneius‘ magnificent Ferrari 288 GTO (below) can be found on Flickr. Click the links above to pick your favourite. Just don’t tell the Elves which one it is.

Box Clever

Japan has two car markets; one for ‘normal’ cars like Corollas, Crowns and suchlike, and the other – the kei class – for vehicles such as these two.

Designed to ensure that car ownership in Japan’s tight streets and congested cities doesn’t completely break the road network, kei cars must measure less than 3.4m in length, 1.48m in width, and have an engine no bigger than 660cc (if powered by an internal combustion engine).

Denoted by their yellow number plates, kei cars benefit from lower taxation than regular cars, but they must comply with reduced speed limits too. Although that’s probably so they don’t fall over.

Over one in three cars sold in Japan are in the kei class, and the specs can be wild, with turbocharging, all-wheel-drive, and even convertible sports cars available.

Most kei cars however, look like these two; a box measuring exactly 3.4m long and 1.48m wide, precisely maximising the interior space within the permitted exterior dimensions.

The Daihatsu Move Canbus and the Honda N-Box Slash pictured here are both the work of Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg, who has constructed them in his trademark Miniland style.

Each packs as much detail as possible into a tiny package, which is appropriate, and there’s more of each build to see at Ralph’s photostream. Click the link above to see what’s inside the box.

Lamborghini SC18 Alston | Picture Special

Lamborghini have built more special editions than your Mom’s had KFC Bargain Buckets. This is another one that no-one in TLCB Office had heard of, the SC18 Alston.

Based on an Aventador, just one SC18 Alston was built to fulfil a single (and very bespoke) customer order, engineered under the supervision of Lamborghini’s motorsports division. Parts from the Huracan Super Trofio EVO and Centenario were used, alongside several parts unique to the car.

The result was another one-off Lamborghini, and – with such limited information available – a nightmare for anyone trying to recreate it from LEGO bricks.

That’s hasn’t stopped Noah_L though, who has not only managed to recreate the SC18 Alston, he’s absolutely nailed it.

Using building techniques that look like they required a degree in quantum mechanics, Noah has successfully replicated the SC18’s wild exterior to perfection, even gradually increasing the model’s width by a single stud down the length of the car. Scissor doors, a detailed engine bay under an opening engine cover, and a realistic interior complete the build.

An extensive gallery of stunning imagery is available to view on Flickr, and you can see more of Noah’s beautifully presented Lamborghini SC18 Alston by clicking here.

Outrider

This is a YT-2400 Outrider from the Star Wars universe, which we definitely knew for ourselves and aren’t simply quoting the builder in an effort to appear knowledgeable about sci-fi.

Built by aido k, the model uses around 4,000 pieces and weighs in at 5kg, which includes a neat lighting system to illuminate the engine.

There’s more superb imagery of the Outrider to see at aido’s album on Flickr – click the link above to something something dark side.

We’ve Got Gas

We’ve got gas today, courtesy of Dan the Fan, who is here making his TLCB debut.

It won’t be long before finding gas might be rather tricky, as gas stations – so integral to society for almost a century – are about to enter a period of mass extinction.

Ultimately that’s a good thing, but it’ll be shame for the many family-owned businesses that will close, and – sometimes – the gas stations themselves disappearing, as occasionally they can be quite interesting.

Dan the Fan’s in one such interesting gas station, complete with some rather excellent ‘Shell’ lettering, a gas pump, kiosk, elevated tank, billboard, and some cool-looking mini-figure bikers.

There’s more to see at Dan’s ‘Gas Station’ album on Flickr – click the link above to get gas.

Drive Angry

Despite the presence of Amber Heard, 2011’s ‘Drive Angry’ is a properly awful movie. She does take up about 4/5 of the movie poster though, so we suspect those marketing it knew that themselves.

Kirill Mazurov (aka desert752) is driving angry too, having built this ‘Angry Racer’ to compete in a BuWizz contest, only for it to be cancelled as a casualty of Coronavirus.

Nonetheless, contest or not Kirill has a produced a great creation, with Power Functions motors hooked up to a BuWizz bluetooth battery that delivers eight times the power of LEGO’s own system.

All that power in such a lightweight model makes the ‘Angry Racer’ a little… drifty, and you can see more at both Flickr and Eurobricks, where a video of Kirill’s creation driving in anger can be viewed and a link to building instructions can be found so you can drive angry for yourself.

Click the links above to take a look whilst we continue Googling Amber Heard…

Can-Am Classic

This unusually-hued creation is a 1970s Can-Am racer, from a time when huge V8s and top motorsport teams combined to create some of the coolest racing cars on earth.

Can-Am ran from the mid-’60s to the mid-’80s, with McLaren, Porsche, Lola and others fielding some wild creations, many of which pioneered turbo-charging, downforce, and even – in the case of the Chaparral 2J – using a snowmobile engine to suck the car to ground, years before Brabham did the same in Formula 1.

This generic mid-’70s Can-Am racer comes from Flickr’s michaelablinger, who has captured the aesthetic of the time brilliantly, further enhancing his model with period-correct decals from Michelin, NGK, Magneti Marelli and others.

A detailed cockpit, realistic chassis including a V8 engine and brick-built ‘suspension’, opening doors and removable rear bodywork all feature, and there are lots more images to see at Michael’s photostream.

Head to the racetrack c1974 via the link above.

Carrying Cars

We have a happy Elf today, with not one but five finds! Kinda. The bumper haul is courtesy of Thomas Selander and his neat Town-scale Mercedes-Benz car transporter, complete with four 4-wide cars on board. Whilst we decide how many meal tokens this is worth you can check out more of Thomas’ build at his photostream via the link above.

Floating Fuel

The future is electric. The UK has banned the sale of new cars that aren’t zero emissions from 2030, Tesla have become (amazingly) the world’s most valuable car company, and Norway’s new car registrations are over 50% EV.

That message hasn’t reached Dallen Powell though, whose marvellous hover freighter is not only transporting some kind of mystery fuel, it’s also still powered by burning fossilised dinosaurs, as denoted by the four exhaust stacks.

Dallen’s alternative future may still be a polluted one, but damn; it looks so cool! Superb parts usage adds to the whimsy, including a balustrade for steps, picket fence for a grille, and a brilliant brick-built Octan logo.

There’s more of to see of Dallen’s dirty sci-fi at his photostream – click the link above to float on over!

East Coast Style

You don’t need a million bricks and a friend at (or to work for) The Brothers Brick to be appear on a great Lego blog. OK, you do, but you don’t need those things to appear here! A few well selected pieces, excellent presentation, and talent will be just fine, as proven here by Tim Henderson and his lovely ‘East Coast Style’ ’32 Ford hot rod. Based on a real car built in the late ’50s, Tim’s build captures the look superbly and there’s more to see at his photostreamplus you can see what we look for in the models that we feature via our Submission Guidelines page here.