Tag Archives: Lego

I Owe You a 10 Second Car

‘The Fast & The Furious’ has a lot to answer for. Terrible dialogue, questionable physics, and finding a way (any way*) to keep characters going throughout the series (however absurd) are standard action-movie faux-pas, but the film franchise has had a larger and more irritating impact on the minds of internet commenters.

What? The new Supra doesn’t have a 2JZ? Not a Supra! What? The new Supra doesn’t have 1,000bhp from the factory? Not a Supra! What? The new Supra shares parts with BMW? Not a Supra!

OK internet commenters, here goes; The A80 Supra is not the fastest most awesomest car ever made. It was fairly fat cruiser for fairly fat people, with an engine that you could also get in a Toyota station wagon. Putting ‘NOS’ in it won’t give it 1,000bhp, and to get that power you’d need the world’s laggiest single-shot turbo, making the car borderline undrivable on the street.

Right, now that’s cleared up, here’s the fastest most awesomest car ever made, with ‘NOS’ and 1,000bhp.

Brian O’Conner’s modified A80 Toyota Supra Targa has become possibly the most revered movie car of all time, setting the stage for a dozen mostly terrible ‘Fast & Furious’ sequels, blasting fourth-generation Supra values into the stratosphere, and creating an unsurmountable barrier of hype for any future cars wearing the nameplate.

This glorious recreation of O’Conner’s A80 Supra brings the iconic movie car to life in full ‘Technic Supercar’ specification, with working suspension, gearbox, steering, and a replica 2JZ engine.

More importantly builder spiderbrick has faithfully replicated the slightly weird livery, bodykit, roll cage, nitrous system, and huge rear wing found on the movie car to such perfection that we can almost hear Dominic Toretto breathing the word ‘family‘ for the six-hundredth time for no discernible reason.

There’s loads more of Spider’s ‘The Fast & the Furious’ Toyota Supra A80 to see at his Brickshelf album, including a link to a video showing the model’s features, plus engine and chassis images. Click the link above to live your life a 1/4 mile at a time…

*Bad guy turns good? Check. Back from the dead? Check. Bad guy turns good again? Check.

Red Racer

The 2021 Formula 1 season is about to begin, in which some tiny sports car manufacturers (Aston Martin, Alpine, McLaren, Alfa Romeo and Ferrari) will fight over second place behind Mercedes-AMG.

Of course for three of the five teams above, it’s literally just the brand name stuck on the side of the car, which the team itself has nothing whatsoever to do with. Which might be part of the problem.

We’d go back to the more interesting (and sponsorship free) old days, where manufacturers built the cars they raced and the rules were lax enough to allow them to make what they were good at.

Regular bloggee Tim Henderson is enabling the time travel, and there’s more to see of his ‘Vintage Formula 1’ creation via the album of the same name by clicking here.

Steam Rollin’ Rollin’ Rollin’*

It’s been over a hundred years since steam rollers were built, and yet in TLCB’s home nation we still call road rollers ‘steam rollers’ over a century later. No we don’t know why either. Anyway, this one is a steam roller, being effectively a giant kettle with a big metal drum attached to the front, powered by burning lumps of fossilised wood.

It comes from previous bloggee Nikolaus Lowe, who has done a tremendous job building this beautiful and fully functional Model Team/Technic c1910 steam roller, complete with working rope steering, rear ripper, drivetrain pistons and valve gear, and even the weird centrifugal spinning thingy that steam-powered vehicles always seem to have, the purpose of which remains a mystery.

A wealth of superb imagery is available to view at Nikolaus’ ‘Steam Roller’ album on Flickr, where you can also find details on how to vote for this model to become an official LEGO set. Click the link above to go rollin’.

*Today’s loosely related title song!

Koenigsegg Jesko | Picture Special

A new supercar company seems to start every week, announcing something with a million horsepower and a top speed of 400mph, before immediately going into liquidation never having built a thing. However there is one exception; Koenigsegg.

Now twenty years old, Koenigsegg have built some of the most exciting hypercars of the modern era, including this, the 1,300bhp Jesko.

This spectacular Technic replica of the Koenigsegg Jesko comes from Pvdb of Eurobricks, and – like the real world car – it’s one of the finest examples of its class.

The beautifully replicated bodywork includes Koenigsegg’s patented dyhedral doors that swivel skywards to open, opening rear clamshell and front trunk, and an adjustable rear wing.

Pvdb’s creation also features the Jesko’s unique front and rear ‘triplex’ (three damper) suspension, along with Hand of God steering, and a mid-mounted piston engine hooked up to an six-speed (plus natural and reverse) sequential paddle shift gearbox, operated via levers in the cabin.

It’s all superbly executed and demonstrates how real a Technic supercar can get if – as in this case – you spend over a year refining the engineering.

There are more images of Pvdb’s incredible Technic Koenigsegg Jesko to see at the Eurobricks forum, where you can join the discussion and await the upcoming video that’s currently in progress. Click on the link above to make the jump to one of the best Technic supercars of 2021 so far.

Blue Bulldog

We round off a busy day here at TLCB Towers with this, TLCB debutant eastpole77‘s charming vintage Lanz Eilbulldog tractor. Inventive parts use, clever building techniques, and excellent presentation are all present and there’s more of eastpole77’s creation to see via the link above.

Carrying Cars

LEGO’s range of officially-licensed Creator sets keeps on growing, and they’re mostly ace. But for collectors with limited shelf space, storing this growing range of vehicles may be a problem. Flickr’s Arian Janssens has the answer though, with this superb DAF FA 2500 car transporter, capable of storing eight LEGO Creator Expert sets.

Pictured here transporting the 10248 Ferrari F40, 10262 Aston Martin DB5 ‘Goldfinger’, 10252 Volkswagen Beetle, 10242 Mini Cooper, and 10265 Ford Mustang (with room for three more), Arian’s DAF looks the perfect place to stack up some sets.

There’s much more to see at Arian’s ‘DAF FA 2500 DHS Car Transporter’ album on Flickr, and you can do just that by clicking these words.

The Future was Electric

This is a BMW i3, one of the first dedicated electric cars from a mainstream manufacturer, and one of the weirdest too.

Launched in 2013 the i3 brought the arrival of BMW’s ‘i’ sub-brand (‘i’ because German car brands have zero imagination and if in doubt, stick an ‘i’ in front of it), and it was quite unlike any of BMW’s other products. A suicide-doored B-Seg MPV-style hatchback, the i3 was powered by either an electric motor, or an electric motor backed up by a motorcycle engine generator.

Despite this oddity the i3 was mostly well received, and sales have climbed every year since launch as electrification has become increasingly accepted, although they still haven’t topped more than 40,000 annually. However the i3’s strangeness – and its moderate success – mean there will be no replacement.

These days you don’t need an electric car to be deliberately weird; a regular car that happens to be electric is the order of the day, thus there is no place in BMW’s line-up for a suicide-doored B-Seg MPV-style hatchback.

Nor is there a place for an EV sub-brand like ‘i’, as the UK and many other European countries implement new car combustion-engine bans from as little as four years’ time. By then, if you’re not selling EVs, you’re not selling anything. Which also means of course, that technically the electric i3 with its little range-extending petrol-powered motorcycle engine, will also be banned.

Still, it was fun while it lasted, and Rolands Kirpis has paid tribute to BMW’s first EV with this rather excellent Model Team recreation of the i3, complete with a brilliantly detailed interior, opening hatchback, front trunk, and even the weird suicide doors too.

There’s much more for the model to see at Rolands’ ‘BMW i3’ album, where several top quality images are available to view. Click the link above to take a look at BMW’s past vision of an electrified future.

Snow Beast

Febrovery’s barrage of sci-fi has ceased, allowing our Elves to change gears. The first to return to TLCB Towers duly took no notice of this whatsoever though, and brought back a sci-fi truck. Still, at least some Elves got run over…

Yes this hefty-looking ‘Snow Beast’ by Flickr’s Bongobert is fully remote controlled, with its pendular-suspended axles driven by Power Functions motors hidden within. The Elf at the controls of course used this feature to smush some colleagues into the office carpet, as has become customary.

Whilst we get the carpet cleaner out you can head out onto the frozen wastes of Hibernia via Bongobert’s photostream, and we’ll be back soon with a car. Yes really.

Febrovery Finale

It’s the last day of Febrovery, meaning our Elves will cease bringing back sci-fi nonsense and we can re-start blogging cars! Before then though, we have three (excellent) Febrovery creations to share, about each of which we know absolutely nothing. We’re counting the hours until it’s cars again…

First up is a Febrovery entrant that is at least relatable to our humdrum transport here on Earth, being a space school bus by Flickr’s Tyler (aka Legohaulic). A diverse list of alien children are present for the trip to space school and there’s more to see at Tyler’s photostream via the link.

The second creation in our Febrovery Finale come from regular bloggee Horcik Designs, whose space tanker merges Neo-Classic Space and Octan to brilliant effect. Twenty four wheels make it exactly six times better than anything in TLCB office car park and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump to Neo-Classic Space.

Ah ‘Ice Planet 2002′, when years starting with a ’20’ seemed super futuristic. This funky looking rover by Carter pays tribute to the oft-forgotten vintage theme, and includes the coolest wheels seen since your Mum fitted spinners to her mobility scooter. There’s more of Carter’s ‘Ice Scout’ to see on Flickr – click the link above to check it out.

In a Car Built For Two

The Smart Fortwo is brilliant.

The result of an unlikely collaboration between Mercedes-Benz and watch-maker Swatch, the original Fortwo launched in the late 1990s and it was a triumph of packaging. A little turbocharged three-cylinder was mounted under the boot floor, the ingenious Tridion safety cell was a visible part of the car’s exterior, and it was short enough that you could park end-on to the curb. It even qualified for Kei car status in Japan.

The Fortwo quickly became the must-have European fashion accessory, before – as with all must-have fashion accessories – becoming yesterday’s news. Sales dwindled, as European consumers decided to copy America for some reason and discerned that enormous SUVs are actually the most appropriate vehicle for crowded city streets. We’re genuinely worried for the future of humanity sometimes…

There are a few cities (such as Rome) where Smart Fortwos are literally everywhere, but these days the car only lives on as a small-selling EV, which everyone ignores from behind the wheel of enormous SUVs.

This neat Technic recreation of the second generation Fortwo comes from Matthew Terentev (aka osterum), and it’s packed with clever functionality. There’s working front and rear suspension, steering via both HOG and the (fur-wrapped) steering wheel, a three-cylinder piston engine hooked up the rear wheels, opening doors, and even a fold-flat passenger seat as per the real car.

There’s loads more of Matthew’s Technic Fortwo to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks – click the links above to take a look, whilst we ponder a car that should have transformed urban driving, if only we’d all been Smart enough to realise it.

Vintage Velocity

An Elf wandered into the office this morning. It had tyre tracks down its middle and was jabbering dejectedly. Sigh.

A shuffle out to the corridor revealed several more cartoonishly tyre-tracked Elves and the cause, overturned in the corner, wheels spinning furiously.

With the delighted culprit apprehended we can take a closer look at their weapon of choice, and it’s a rather wonderful thing.

Built by Lego-building legend Sariel, this is a fully remote controlled 1931 Mercedes-Benz SSKL, powered by two LEGO Buggy Motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, delivering up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system.  That explains the tyre tracks then.

A Servo Motor steers the front wheels (and turns the steering wheel), which are suspended via wishbones and torsion bars, whilst the rear is suspended via a live axle.

There’s lots more of Sariel’s creation to see at his ‘Mercedes-Benz SSKL’ album on Flickr, plus you can watch the model in action via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video

Roving Large

We like large off-road trucks here at TLCB, so imagine how cool we think a large off-road truck is that lives in space! That’s right; less cool – but as sci-fi is all the Elves will bring back at the moment for some reason, here’s a large off-road truck that lives in space. However, it is – as you can see here – rather awesome…

Built by Flickr’s martin.with.bricks, this enormous 10×10 Neo-Classic Space carrier measures almost 60cm long, features two space containers (which are like regular containers, only in space), and includes a wonderfully detailed cabin. Part of the ‘Febrovery’ monthly bandwagon, there’s more of Martin’s brilliant creation to see at his ‘Space Rover’ album – click the link above to take a look.

Repeatedly Roving

As this year’s Febrovery contest draws to a close we have a few more lunar rovers to share with you, mostly because it’s all TLCB Elves will bring back into the office at the moment. We’ll have to do something about that*, but until then here are two more (admittedly great) sci-fi builds.

First up is Andreas Lenander‘s ‘MW-2P’, a spacey mono-wheel that looks perfect for couples married more than a few years. Roll into Andreas’ photostream via the link to see more.

Today’s second lunar rover looks equally fun, coming from ‘Rob‘ (who must have the most straightforward Flickr handle ever), and he’s applied some wonderful photo editing to bring his rover to life. Click the link above to blast across the surface of some far-away planet!

*We may well hi-jack Febrovery in ’22. Not all Rovers are in space…

Hot Rov

We are, as has been well documented here, completely useless at blogging sci-fi. However this sci-fi creation is also a hot rod! Which means that today we’re useless at blogging hot rods too. Thanks TFDesigns.

There’s more to see of TFDesigns (aka Frost)’s Neo-Classic Space ‘RoverRod’ on Flickr, where a wide range of other Febrovery creations can also be found. Click the link above to make the jump.

[Hoonitruck]

Ken Block’s wild twin-turbo ‘Hoonitruck’ has appeared on these pages before, but today we bring you a rather smaller recreation of the Gymkhana icon. This one is the work of ianying616, who has captured the aesthetic of the drift-happy movie star brilliantly in Model Team form.  There’s a detailed interior, full roll cage, a realistic* engine, plus opening doors and hood, and there’s more to see of ianying’s build at his photostream via the link.

*Although not the right engine. V8’s are over.