Tag Archives: 2010s

Box Fresh

This is a Siemens E-House, a prefabricated electrical substation used for power distribution, pictured here sitting atop an incredible previously-blogged MAN TGX truck and 10-axle Broshuis trailer, as built by TLCB Master MOCer Dennis Bosman.

Dennis recently started work for Siemens after an absence of fifteen years, and created this amazing load for his ‘Van der Vlist’ liveried heavy-haulage truck, and his Siemens colleagues.

You can check out the E-House, and the spectacular truck that’s carrying it, at Dennis’ refreshed ‘MAN TGX “Van der Vlist”‘ album by clicking here, plus you can click the link above read Dennis’ Master MOCers interview here at The Lego Car Blog to learn how he builds dazzling creations such as this.

Ghost Protocol

Swedish hypercar manufacturer Koenigsegg have the coolest logo of any car brand. No prancing horse, raging bull, leaping cat, or angry snake here, because Koenigsegg use a ghost.

The spooky symbol isn’t some nod to the occult, but rather has its heritage in the building in which the cars are built; an ex-Swedish Air Force hanger, the squadron of whose jets were adorned with a little ghost motif.

Koenigsegg’s 2010s hypercar, the 1,500bhp plug-in hybrid Regera, took the ghosting a little further, with the addition of the $280,000 ‘Ghost Pack’. We thought this might be neon-lighting and a spectral paint job, but it in fact consisted of additional aerodynamic pieces to increase downforce by around 20%, meaning this is one ghost that definitely won’t leave the ground.

This spectacular brick-built replica of the Regera Ghost Pack by Flickr’s 3D supercarBricks uses a few 3D-printed parts to maximise the accuracy of those aero-enhancing extras, plus features opening clamshells, a wild orange interior, and opening scissor doors too.

It’s also – unlike every other image that purportedly captures a ghost – photographed beautifully, and there’s much more to see at 3D’s photostream. Click the link above to ghost on over.

Application Accepted

From one of Ford’s most boring ever vehicles to one of their most exciting, the Ford GT wowed even Ford employees when was unveiled in 2015, having been developed in secret within the company by just twelve individuals.

Such was the the hype surrounding the car that customers had to be selected to buy it (TLCB’s application was rejected for some reason…), which means only a very few will ever get behind the wheel.

But no matter, because this brilliant Lego recreation of the Ford supercar by Flickr’s Leo 1 is thoroughly attainable, as Leo has made building instructions available. You’ll need to be skilled though, as there look to be some properly trick techniques used to replicate the GT’s wild shape.

There’s more of the GT to see at Leo’s photostream via the link above, where a link to purchase building instructions can also be found – no application necessary.

Rim Job

This is a Porsche 918 Spyder, a mid-2010s plug-in hybrid hypercar powered by the combination of a 4.6 litre V8 and two electric motors for a total output of 875bhp. And 12 miles of electric range. Which we suspect most 918 owners use about as much as the Brothers Brick do the gym.

Pointless green virtue signalling aside, the Porsche 918 is a seriously impressive car, as is this superb Model Team recreation by Flickr’s 3D supercarBricks, who has captured the 918 brilliantly in brick from.

3D’s 918 model includes an opening front trunk, removable engine cover, and some excellent 3D-printed rims, which accurately portray the items fitted to the real car and further enhance the model’s realism.

A wealth of imagery is available to view, and you can take a closer look at the both 918 and the 3D-printed rims upon which it rolls via the link in the text above.

Super Thursday

Technic Supercars have long been the pinnacle of the Technic line-up. Containing working steering, suspension, engine and gearbox, they’re as close as it’s possible to get to the engineering of real-world cars in Lego form.

They’re also a favourite build amongst advanced Lego car designers, and we’ve featured dozens of incredible Technic Supercars here at The Lego Car Blog over the years. Two more take their places in the Archives today, each being a fantastic example of the Technic Supercar form.

The first, in a rather splendid orange, is IA creations‘ ‘Apricus V8’, a fictional super sports car in the mould of the Dodge Viper, McLaren-Mercedes SLS and various Aston Martins according to the builder.

The slick bodywork certainly captures the aesthetic of the real-world cars that inspired the build, and under it lies a complete Technic Supercar chassis, with working steering, adjustable double-wishbone suspension, a paddle-shift sequential gearbox, and a V8 engine. There’s also a deployable rear wing, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, and there’s more to see of IA creations’ superb supercar concept on Eurobricks via the link above.

Our second Technic supercar comes from previous bloggee Pvdb, and replicates one of the greatest hypercars of recent times; the McLaren P1.

Launched in 2013, and sold out within two months, the P1 was McLaren’s first Hybrid hypercar, with over 900bhp and an electric-only range of… er, 6 miles. But still, that wasn’t exactly the point of the electric motor, which added 180bhp to the twin-turbo V8’s already substantial 737.

Constructed in 1:10 scale, Pvdb’s McLaren includes steering, adjustable suspension (complete with a ‘track’ model that also deploys the rear spoiler), scissor doors, and an eight-speed gearbox (one more than the real thing!), authentically operated via steering wheel paddles.

It’s a masterclass in Technic Supercars one of which can see more at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to take a closer look, and if you’re thinking of having a go at Technic Supercar building yourself, we might just have a competition later in the year that’ll be of interest…

Not a WRX

Subaru don’t just make the WRX. In fact they’ve made all sorts of weird things, from trains and planes, to wind turbines and generators.

From a vehicular perspective Subaru’s products vary widely too, some of which are rather further from the WRX than you might think.

This is one of them, the dinky Sambar micro-truck. A ‘kei’ car in Japan also badged as the Daihatsu Hijet and Toyota Pixis, the Sambar first launched in the ’60s, and today is on its tenth generation, powered by a 660cc engine and available in a variety of body-styles.

This is the pick-up variant, as built rather nicely by Joey Klusnick in Miniland style, replicating a Sambar owned by his local model shop. There’s more to see at Joey’s Flickr album, where his model is pictured alongside its real world counterpart.

Click the link above for a Subaru that’s not driven by an irritating bro with a blow-off valve.

Fake Tan

This glorious vehicle is a brick-built recreation of Jeep’s Wrangler ‘Africa Concept’. Designed for overland expeditions, and reinforcing that – to many Americans – Africa is not a continent but a country, Jeep’s 2015 one-off looked the business on 17″ steel wheels shod with 35″ tyres, and featured fox shocks plus a 2.8 litre diesel engine that made it far more appropriate for long distances than most domestic Jeeps.

This ace Lego version of the Jeep Wrangler ‘Africa Concept’ is the work of regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott, who has captured it beautifully in tan bricks. Except he hasn’t, as not all the pieces required were available in tan, so he built it in grey then photoshopped it. Still, it allowed us to write a clever title, and you can check out Jonathan’s fake tan at his photosteam via the link above. It’ll still be more real than anything you see on Instagram today.

Pagani Huayra | Picture Special

This is the Pagani Huayra, an AMG V12-engined, limited production hypercar built by Pagani between 2011 and 2021, and reserved only for the quite fantastically wealthy.

Despite the sizeable riches that accumulate from blogging about Lego, even we can’t afford a real Huayra, thus the version we have here today is more suitable for our budget.

Built by langko, this incredible Technic recreation of the iconic Italian hypercar captures the real deal as perfectly as is possible from plastic bricks, with the astounding looks matched by an astonishing breadth of working features.

There are no motors, with langko instead deploying their considerable talents to create a benchmark Technic ‘Supercar’, complete with a working V12 engine, all-wheel cantilever suspension, a 7-speed sequential gearbox, functioning steering with connected aero flaps, an adjustable nose-lift, opening gull-wing doors, front and rear clamshells, and luggage compartments, plus adjustable seats inside a spectacularly detailed interior.

It’s one of the finest Technic Supercars we’ve seen yet, and doubtless one of the most impressive creations of 2022 so far, with much more to see at the Eurobricks forum and the full gallery of stunning images available to view on Bricksafe. Join us in taking a closer look via the links.

The Ferrari The Ferrari

Almost a decade on, the Ferrari LaFerrari is still the stupidest name ever given to a car. And yes, we have heard of the Mazda Bongo Friendee.

Powered by a 6.3 litre V12 with Hybrid KERS producing almost 1,000bhp, the Ferrari The Ferrari did have the performance to back up being named twice though.

This stunning 1:16 Model Team replica of the Ferrari The LaFerrari Ferrari is the work of previous bloggee Noah_L, and features opening butterfly doors, front trunk and engine cover, along with some of the finest presentation you’ll see anywhere in the online Lego community.

Noah has made building instructions available too, so you can recreate your own spectacular Ferrari LaFerrari The Ferrari model at home. Click on the link above to find the complete image gallery, along with build details and the link to building instructions.

Green Eyed Monster

Everything is green or eco these days. Even when it’s not. Which is both kinda great, and a bit depressing, as companies seem to only decide to go green when they can market it for extra $$$.

Which makes the lime green Ford Focus RS second generation rather refreshing, as the only thing green about it was the paint. Powered by a Volvo-derived inline-5 turbo producing 300bhp (all of which was sent to the front wheels only – which must’ve been terrifying), the RS could dispatch the 0-60mph dash in under six seconds, with the RS500 version even quicker still.

Fast internal combustion engined cars like the Focus RS are now in their final years, with the latest fast Fords switching to electric propulsion (which is absolutely a good thing. Just don’t believe that EVs are ‘good’ for the environment. We’re back to greenwashing again…), so the second generation Focus RS will either become outlawed and worthless or a certified classic.

We’d bet on the latter though, so if you’re lucky enough to have one hold on to it. For those of us that don’t, here’s SP_LINEUP‘s fantastic Lego version, which features more ingenious building techniques than models five times the size. And it’s exceedingly green.

There’s more to see of SP’s Ford Focus RS at his photostream, take a closer look via the link above.

Supercar Senna

The McLaren Senna has appeared in LEGO form a few times, from the official 75892 Speed Champions and 42123 Technic sets, to a full-size display version. However there hasn’t yet been a Senna in our favourite form; a Technic Supercar.

Jordan Langerak has fixed this omission in spectacular style, with this incredible Technic replica of McLaren’s limited run hypercar.

Working suspension, a paddle-shift gearbox linked to the V8 engine, functioning steering, butterfly doors, and – perhaps most impressively – mechanical ‘active’ aero all feature, and make Jordan’s Senna one of the finest Technic Supercars of recent times.

There’s more to see of the build via Jordan’s ‘Lego Technic McLaren Senna’ album on Flickr, which includes extensive imagery and a link to a video of the model’s impressive features in action. Take a look via the link above.

White Angles

Back when this TLCB Writer was a boy, LEGO bricks came in exactly three angles; Right, 45°, and Somewhere (half-way?) in Between.

Not so today, where a myriad of wedges are available in numerous widths, lengths, and thicknesses, and it seems previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has deployed every single one of them in his recreation of Lamborghini’s ultra limited-run Reventon.

Inspired by a fellow previous bloggee The G Brix and constructed in 8-wide Speed Champions scale, Fabrice’s Reventon captures the angular aesthetic of the real car brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his collection of wedges here.

Another McLaren

McLaren have launched so many near-identical models over the last few years that we’d forgotten about this one. Which is ridiculous, as the P1 was the brand’s flagship hybrid hypercar  from 2013 to 2015.

Powered by McLaren’s familiar 3.8 litre twin- turbo V8 plus a 180bhp electric motor, the P1 produced a huge >900bhp and could reach a limited top speed of 217mph. It could also drive as a pure EV for… 6 miles. Which is pretty pointless.

Still, better that than no miles right? Er… no, probably not. Which might be one of the reasons we forgot about it.

Still, previous bloggee 3D supercarBricks has remembered the P1, recreating it superbly complete with opening butterfly doors and a deployable rear spoiler.

There’s more to see at 3D’s photostream via the link, and you can check out LEGO’s rather larger version of a recent McLaren by clicking hereIt might well be different McLaren model, but they all look the same to us…

Topless Summer

It’s summer here at TLCB and it’s HOT. Elves are scattered everywhere panting, and the office ‘air conditioner’ (a fan gaffa-taped to a window ledge) is just moving hot air about like the one in the back of an oven, ensuring everything is equally cooked.

Those of you reading this in sunnier climes than the UK (that’s all of you) will be wondering what all the fuss is about, but this TLCB Writer is well-travelled and no-where gets hot like the UK. Thank the high humidity, limited air conditioning, and buildings designed to keep in, not out, for that.

It also might explain why the British buy more convertibles than the French, Germans, Italians, and Spanish. Put together. Thus we have two here today, and they’re both… um, a bit crap.

The Dodge Viper was basically a truck engine shoved in a kids’ plastic toy, and was predictably rubbish as a result. But on the other hand, it was a truck engine shoved in a kids’ plastic toy, and it was therefore excellent. This superb Speed Champions scale Dodge Viper convertible was suggested by a reader, and it comes from previous bloggee RGB900 who has nailed the 1990s American icon in 6-wide form.

Equally iconic (and rubbish) was the modern Volkswagen Beetle convertible; a bubble-shaped Golf with a pram roof stuck on the back that predictably became the must-have accessory for people that knew nothing about cars.

Fashion is fickle though, and without any substance whatsoever the modern Beetle is now dead, and its customers have all moved on to Mini convertibles. SP_LINEUP hasn’t forgotten it though, creating this excellent brick-built version that was also suggested by a reader.

There’s more to see of each convertible on Flickr via the links, and if you’re wondering why we haven’t featured good drop-tops instead of a kids’ toy and VW pram, just be thankful we didn’t find one of these to post. See, the British do stupid things when it gets hot.

Gives You Wings

The 2021 Formula 1 season is about to begin, with the team reveals arriving thick and fast. TLCB – with our finger on the pulse as usual – are bringing you a car from 2011…

Of course what colour sponsorship the teams have this year won’t change the fact that they’ll be fighting for second place, and we’ll be watching Formula-1-driver-cum-irritating-eco-warrior Lewis Hamilton cruise to an 8th World Championship in the dominant Mercedes-AMG.

However it wasn’t always Mercedes-Benz who ruled Formula 1. In fact there have been several teams that have dominated the sport for a period, including Williams (remember that!), McLaren, Ferrari*, and – just before the current AMG-whitewash – Red Bull.

From 2010 to 2014 Red Bull and Sebastian Vettel won four consecutive World Championships, in part due to this car; the fabulous Adrian Newey designed ‘blown diffuser’ RB7, that used exhaust gasses to create downforce even when the engine was coasting. Not bad for a soft drinks company.

This brilliant recreation of the title-winning Red Bull RB7 comes from Noah_L of Flickr, who has not only built and photographed his RB7 absolutely beautifully, he’s endowed it with some of the most realistic (and complicated) decals we’ve ever seen on a Lego model, even down to the ‘Pirelli P Zero’ labels on the tyres.

It’s a wonderfully accurate build, with removable rear bodywork, a highly detailed engine, and spindly ‘suspension’, and there are loads more stunning images to see at Noah’s ‘Red Bull RB7’ album.

Click the link to head to a time before Mercedes-Benz domination, taking the knee, spectator-less venues, and Lewis Hamilton tweeting that we need to do more for the environment from inside his private jet.

*We know the link isn’t to a dominant early 2000s Ferrari, because surprisingly the Archives reveal we’ve never blogged a Scuderia Ferrari from the Schumacher-era. However we will take any opportunity to remind people that Ferrari are scumbags… Here’s the link again.