Tag Archives: 2010s

I 4C a Failure

The Alfa Romeo 4C is not a good car. But it is gorgeous, so we still want one, if only to look at it. It’s also one of Alfa Romeo’s many recent failures, partly because the car wasn’t very good, and partly because these days buyers only seem to want an angry German saloon car with a twin-turbo V8, six million horsepower, and no driving feel or real-world relevance whatsoever.

Which is a mighty shame, because it means lightweight, small sports cars like the admittedly mediocre 4C and the thoroughly brilliant Alpine A110 are bombing commercially, and soon all we’ll have is angry German saloons.

This fantastic Model Team Alfa Romeo 4C comes from previous bloggee Noah_L, who has created one the most beautiful (and difficult to replicate) modern automotive shapes to near perfection from fairly basic LEGO parts. In fact the two flex tubes that form the bonnet and grille may be the neatest solution to the 4C’s shape that we have seen yet, and a technique we think we’ll start to see on all sorts of Lego cars in the future.

Noah’s model also includes a detailed interior behind the opening doors and an accurate recreation of the mid-mounted 1750cc turbocharged 4-cylinder engine under the rear hatch, and there are loads more stunning images to view at his Alfa Romeo 4C album on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look, which – to be honest – is all the actual 4C is really for anyway.

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A Greater Godzilla

Here at TLCB we whole-heartedly welcome the addition of Nissan to the LEGO Speed Champions line-up, and hope it leads to a few more partnerships with Japanese auto makers (Honda or Toyota anyone?). However the first officially licensed Nissan set – the 76896 Nissan GT-R NISMO – is not LEGO’s best effort, with more detail derived from decals than actual bricks. Still, if we were 7 we’d absolutely love it.

Cue previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka, now known as SP_LINEUP, who has constructed his own 8-wide Nissan GT-R, and it’s superb. With not a sticker to be seen SP has successfully captured all of the GT-R’s design hallmarks in wonderful accuracy, and his model features opening doors and an opening hood too.

There’s much more of SP’s brilliant Nissan GT-R NISMO to see at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to an altogether better GT-R.

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Lamborghini Centenario | Picture Special

This amazing model is a 1:8 scale replica of Lamborghini’s ultra-limited Centenario hypercar, a V12-engined 760bhp celebration of what would have been their founder’s 100th birthday, sold by invitation only to just forty of the brand’s most discerning (read ‘wealthy’) customers.

Unless you’re one of those forty (let us know if you are!) you’ll probably never even see a Centenario, let alone drive one, but today we can offer you the chance to own one for yourself, as yup – this incredible recreation of Lamborghini’s exclusive hypercar can be built at home from standard LEGO pieces (although the model pictured here is enhanced with some 3D-printed rims and bespoke decals).

It comes from T Lego of Eurobricks, who has replicated not just the Centenario’s wild exterior but has also accurately recreated the engineering within too, and has released instructions so can can create your very own Centenario at home. We suspect this might take the total number built a bit above forty…

The bright blue exterior is superbly accurate and includes an opening hood and engine cover, opening scissor doors (controlled by a HOG mechanism), and a raising rear spoiler (also deployed via HOG).

Inside T Lego’s Centenario he’s created an accurate interior with a working steering wheel controlling the front wheels, and a working 7-speed sequential gearbox, controlled via the centre console. A V12 piston engine is turned via an all-wheel-drive system complete with three differentials, whilst all four wheels also feature clever pushrod inboard suspension, making the model every bit as technically advanced as the real car.

There’s much more of T Lego’s spectacular Technic Supercar to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can read full build details, view a video of the model’s features, and find a link to building instructions so you can build your very own.

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Build-a-Ferrari 488

The worldwide douchebag that is Coronavirus has so far cancelled the first half of the Formula 1 season, the Isle of Man TT, and postponed the Le Mans 24 Hours. But fear not, because you can recreate the world’s greatest race at home thanks to Lasse Delueran and his superb replica of the Ferrari 488 EVO GTE that competed in the 2018 event. Beautifully accurate (and more than a little complicated), Lasse has released building instructions for his model, plus he’s built a host of other Le Mans racers too, so you can build your very own starting grid. Head to Lasse’s photostream via the first link in the text above to see more of the 488 and to find a link to building instructions, and you can check out his other creations via the second.

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ZondaRRRR

The Pagani that sounds like it was named by pirates, the Zonda R was the Zonda’s finale; a track-only, fifteen-run special edition that was effectively a test-bed for what would become the Hyaura. You’re unlikely ever to even see an R, let alone drive one, so 3D supercarBricks has the next best thing in thus stunning brick-built replica. Now updated with a blog-worthy image there’s more to see at 3D’s ‘Pagani’ album on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

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Cockster

We don’t particularly like the Porsche Boxter here at The Lego Car Blog, as they tend to be driven by… well, the title is a clue. Still, it’s a superb drivers car even if the drivers are knobs and one that deserves recognition, which TLCB regular SP_LINEUP (previously known as Simon Przepiorka) has given in Lego form through his excellent 1:24 version. The model includes opening doors, hood, trunk, plus a removable roof, and you can see more at the link.

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The Other Prius

The Prius isn’t the only compact hybrid car from the early 2010s. Based on the same underpinnings, sister firm Lexus released the CT200h back in 2011, a luxury take on the fuel-efficient self-charging hybrid formula. If ‘luxury’ just means having a slightly nicer interior.

The CT200h was memorable only for using Kylie Minogue to promote it, but it worked for previous bloggee Lasse Deleuran who owns a CT in real life and has chosen to recreate it in Miniland scale complete with his roof box and bike rack.

The little Lexus might be a bland box, but don’t underestimate the complexity of replicating it successfully in Lego form. Lasse’s recreation of his own CT200h is almost unfathomably complicated, capturing the car’s shape to near perfection through a multitude of clever building techniques. Our heads hurt just looking at that front fender.

Everything opens too, revealing that slightly nicer interior and even more monumentally complicated brickwork, from the stepped roof to the ingenious tilt applied to the side windows to ensure the model’s proportions accurately reflect those of the real car.

It’s one of the most thoroughly engineered and brilliantly realistic replicas that we’ve ever featured and there’s more of Lasse’s masterpiece to see at his photostream. Click the link above to join us gazing in awe at a Lexus CT200h, which is a sentence that no-one has ever said before.

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Creating Amazing

The current Lexus tagline might be pure marketing waffle, but it does link nicely to today’s creation. This is Lasse D’s stunning Lexus LFA, a model that first appeared here back in 2017. Built as a commissioned piece for Toyota Motor Europe, Lasse has refined his design (as shown by the white version below) and has now made instructions available, so you can build Japan’s amazing supercar for yourself. Head to Eurobricks via this link to see more images, a video of Lasse’s commissioned project, and to find that all important link to instructions!

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Two for Tuesday

It’s a supercar double at The Lego Car Blog today with two builds from the aptly named 3D supercarBricks. Both 3D’s Bugatti Chiron (above) and Koenigsegg Jesko (below) replicate their real-life counterparts superbly, with the Jesko finished by the addition of some excellent custom 3D printed wheels. There’s more to see of each build on Flickr – click the links above to take a look.

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Buy One Get One Free

Nope, we haven’t finally relented and decided to jump on the Black Friday bandwagon, but nevertheless if you’re an owner of the excellent looking 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set then you could own this 2020 Mustang GT500 for free (just not at the same time).

TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has created this superb looking GT500 from the parts only found within the 10265 set, and what’s more he’s working on instructions so that you can build it for yourself too.

In the meantime you can check out all of the images of Firas’ 10265 B-Model on Flickr via the link above, you can learn how Firas creates amazing models such as this one via his Master MOCers interview at TLCB, and you can find out why Mustang owners need at least one other back-up car by clicking here…

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On Wings of Gold

This a Honda Gold Wing GL 1800, and it has – despite quite clearly being a motorcycle – an engine twice the size and with twice the cylinders of the most popular cars in TLCB’s home nation.

The Gold Wing first arrived in 1974, being aimed squarely at the American touring market. In continuous production since, apart from in 2011 when production moved from the U.S. back to Japan, almost 650,000 Gold Wing motorcycles have been built, with the latest versions such as this GL 1800 featuring cruise control, a stereo, a reverse gear and even an airbag.

This brilliant Technic recreation of Honda’s fattest motorcycle comes from Fanylover of Eurobricks and like the real bike it’s packed with features, including a flat-6 piston engine, front and rear suspension, steering, and a two-speed gearbox.

Build details and more images, including photos of the frame construction, can be found at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to go touring.

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Build Your Own LaFerrari

It might be the most stupidly named car of all time (OK, apart from the Mazda Bongo Friendee), but the Ferrari La Ferrari is a properly impressive machine. A V12 engine and a KERS hybrid system deliver 950bhp, whilst active aerodynamics aim to allow the driver to use at least some of that without ending up as a red smear on a barrier somewhere.

Costing over $1 million new and with only 499 made, most of us will never even see a Ferrari LaFerrari, let alone drive one, but thanks to T Lego of Eurobricks you can now build your very own! T Lego first designed his brilliant Technic recreation of the ultra-rate Italian hypercar digitally using Master MOCer Sariel‘s ‘Model Scaler’ software, before creating the model for real.

Packed with functionality, the car features front and rear suspension, working steering with positive caster angle, opening butterfly doors and engine cover, a miniature V12 piston engine (designed by another Master MOCer Crowkillers), and mechanically operated ‘active’ aerodynamics.

There’s a whole lot more to see of T Lego’s Ferrari LaFerrari at the Eurobricks discussion via the link above, where you can also find a video demonstrating the model’s features and the all-important link to building instructions.

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Menace to Society

If there’s a car more likely to go sideways through a bus stop, we’re yet to find it. The morons that drive Ford Mustangs aren’t exactly the fault of the car though, so let’s enjoy it for what it is; an over-powered, under-suspended bargain of power per dollar. This Model Team Mustang GT500 comes from Flickr’s Captain Chinchilla, formally Senator Chinchilla but now part of the witness protection programme or something, and is a rather nice homage to the most crashed car in the history of car meets. Head to Flickr via the link above before someone drives it through a crowd.

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Civ-sick Type R

Honda’s Civic Type R was never a particularly good looking car, but it was fine as hot hatches go we suppose. The latest FK8 version though, is surely one of the most hideous vehicles ever to reach production. Looking like a cross between a badly modified tuner and a child’s drawing, the current Type R makes us want to projectile vomit immediately upon sighting it*. Which is a shame, because it’s a superbly engineered machine underneath the revolting exterior.

Capturing the current FK8 generation Civic’s look in Lego form is therefore an incredibly difficult task. Firstly because it means looking at images of the real car, and no-one* wants to do that, and secondly because recreating its stupid, fussy, ridiculous exterior in brick-form is surely an impossible feat. Not so for TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka though, who not only steeled himself to look at pictures of the real Honda, he’s managed to turn them into an outstanding approximation of the car in Lego.

A wealth of properly clever building techniques have been deployed to recreate the Civic FK8’s shape in Lego form, including more diagonally clipped-on pieces than we think we’ve ever seen at this scale. Head to Simon’s photostream via the link above to take a closer look at how he’s done it – it’s gotta be better than looking at the real thing…

*Except TLCB Elves who, of course, absolutely love it. Which is all the more reason for any sane person to find it a visually offensive abomination.

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The Trouble with Tesla

Tesla. If there’s one car company you cannot criticise on the internet due to frankly fanatical supporters it’s Elon Musk’s electric automotive brand. Here goes…

Tesla were not actually founded by the creator of Paypal back in 2003, but Musk has pretty much led the company ever since, from it’s first car (the Lotus Elise based Roadster) to its position today as the world’s largest electric vehicle manufacturer. This is a simply astonishing achievement, particularly as it’s Tesla that have brought EVs to the mainstream, forcing the established car manufacturers to take EVs seriously. The raft of new EVs about to reach the market are in large part due to Tesla proving the business case.

They’ve also brought a sense of fun to the often staid motor industry, with models that literally spell ‘S3XY’, a drive mode named ‘Ludicrous’, whoopie cushion seats, and host of other mischievous features. Plus the Tesla Model 3 is the safest model ever tested by the Euro NCAP. And yet, would this TLCB writer buy one?…

Nope.

For all Tesla’s technical innovation and engineering brilliance the company’s primary function is to build cars, and they’re shockingly bad at it. Designs that use four times as many parts as they should (making repairs complicated, eye-wateringly expensive and slow), risible paint quality, panel gaps that  you could drive another car through, and chronic unreliability plague Tesla’s range. As the company tries desperately to meet demand (and to make money) the ‘finished’ cars are far from it, recreating the ownership experience of a 1970s British Leyland.

Whether Tesla can, or even wants to, sort these issues out is debatable. However what isn’t is that Mercedes-Benz, the Volkswagen Group, BMW, and many more besides wouldn’t be scrambling to go electric if it weren’t for Musk and what all started with an electrically-powered Elise. Which means when this writer is driving an EV he’ll be able to give a nod of thanks to Tesla, even though his car probably won’t actually be one.

Oh yeh, this neat digitally rendered Tesla Model 3 comes from Robson M of Flickr and there’s more to see at the link!

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