Tag Archives: 1970s

Floatus

Lego Lotus Esprit Submarine James Bond

James Bond might be a dark and moody character these days (as he was in the books too), but there was a time when spying was a little more… extravagant.

The height of 007 ridiculousness was the late ’70s, when Bond went into space, spent more time on one-liners than actually secret agenting, and – in 1977’s ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ – drove a sports car underwater.

It was a ludicrous scene, but one that cemented both Bond and Lotus into vehicular film royalty. Bond’s Lotus Esprit S1, modified by Q-branch, featured some rather ingenious optional extras, and – as Q always somehow seemed to manage – they were exactly what was required for the mission. What luck eh?

This brilliant recreation of the iconic movie car/submarine was suggested to us by a reader and comes from Luis Pena of Flickr. Luis’ ‘Wet Nellie’ as it was called (stop sniggering at the back!) includes all the cunning features of Q’s finest creation and there’s more to see on Flickr. Dive in via the link above.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Put an LS in it

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

The internet’s answer to literally any engine-related question, ‘Put an LS in it‘ seems to be the default setting for most YouTube commenters, and – although it pains us to say it – not without good reason.

Compact, plentiful, powerful, and even available off-the-shelf new in ‘crate’ form, General Motors’ iconic V8 has been in use since 1996, powering everything in their line-up from sports cars to trucks.

The LS has since found its way into a myriad of other vehicles, often thanks to the fact that whilst the engine was good many of the cars in which it was originally fitted were complete crap, making it readily available for pocket-money in breakers yards.

Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka has built a car that could be based on any number from the depths of YouTube, and it looks – well – awesome! Simon’s classic ’70s Datsun 240Z features a wide-arch kit, custom aero, and – of course – the obligatory LS V8-swap under the hood.

There’s much more to see of Simon’s transplanted 240Z on Flickr – click the link above to put an LS in it…

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Brown ’77

Lego Ford Granada Mk1

After berating old fat Fords yesterday, here’s, er… an old fat Ford. And we absolutely love it. This is a Ford Granada, a hugely successful car for Ford of Europe in the 1970s and ’80s. Built in Germany and the UK the Granada sold in the hundreds of thousands in a bewildering variety of engines, trim levels and body styles across three generations.

However as Granadas got older (and rustier) they, like all things, became near worthless. This meant they found a new calling on the banger track, where they were (and still are) highly prized for their speed and strength, and thus have been obliterated in terrifyingly vast numbers. When the handful left are worth a fortune in a few years time we’ll look back and wonder how we let it happen…

Here’s one Granada that won’t end its days on the track, a gloriously brown Mark 1 estate complete with a seventies beige interior and a roof-rack for family holidays to the seaside. It’s the work of Mateusz Waldowski of Flickr and there’s much more to see of this superb creation at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Ford Granada Mk1

Tagged , , , , ,

Un Petit DS

Lego Technic Citroen DS

DS. The answer to the question ‘I’d like to buy a Citroen, but can I pay more money for one?’ which literally no-one has asked ever. Citroen’s modern reinvention of the DS nameplate, which is now a stand-alone brand, is – frankly – complete bollocks. But it wasn’t always like that.

This is the Citroen DS19, launched in the mid-1950s it looked like nothing else on earth, and it is very probably the car that was, and always will be, farthest ahead of its time.

With headlights that swivelled with the front wheels, disc brakes, a clutch-less automatic transmission, power steering, and incredible hydro-pneumatic self-levelling independent suspension, the DS19 was a technological marvel.

To build one in small-scale Technic therefore, is not an easy feat. However previous bloggee Anto of Eurobricks has done just that, and his little Technic DS looks as wonderfully, unfathomably, complicated as the real thing.

Squeezed inside the reasonable Technic approximation of the DS19’s remarkable shape is a fully functioning pneumatic suspension system, allowing Anto’s model to raise and lower itself as per the real car, plus of course, it can suspend the car from bumps in the usual way that suspension does.

In addition there’s also working steering which, like the real DS19, is linked to the swivelling headlights,  opening doors, hood and trunk-lid, and even a basic interior. How Anto has fitted all that inside we don’t know but you can try to figure it out for yourself via the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Click the link above to jump to the full gallery of images, build details, and a video of Anto’s Technic Citroen DS in action.

Lego Citroen DS

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

My Other Car’s a Porsche

Lego Technic Lancia Stratos

We were very excited when we previewed LEGO’s 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, and then a bit disappointed by it. Which is a shame, because it’ll still rightly go down as one of the greatest Technic sets released so far.

Nevertheless 42056 is a set that many builders can improve upon, and that’s arguably what newcomer pleasedontspammebro of Flickr has done with this excellent mid-’70s Lancia Stratos Stradale HF B-Model built entirely from the pieces found within the set.

Underneath the well-proportioned exterior which includes opening doors and front and rear clamshells is a working drivetrain consisting of a transversely mounted V6 engine, 5-speed gearbox, all-wheel suspension and functioning steering.

Suggested by a reader there’s more to see of the Lancia B-Model on Flickr via the link above, where you can also find a link to instructions so can build your very own Stratos from your 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set.

Alternatively you can take a look at an Audi R8 B-Model featured here previously, but whichever you chose to repurpose your 42056 set for, make sure you dismantle it the right way…

Lego Technic 42056 B-Model Lancia Stratos

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

1970 Porsche 917K | Picture Special

Lego Technic Porsche 917K Le Mans 1970

The year is 1970, and Porsche need to win some races. Their new 917 endurance racer proved hugely unstable in 1969, with downforce still a relatively new phenomenon harnessing it was still largely experimental.

Cue chief engineer John Horsman, and an unlikely revelation caused by the splattering of bugs on the Porsche’s bodywork. John noticed that the 917’s tail was clean from insects, meaning that air wasn’t reaching it. A hasty modification with some aluminium sheets was made to the cars, and the 917 was transformed.

Lego Porsche 917 Gulf Racing

The newly modified 917K won all but one race in the 1970 endurance championship, taking first and second at Le Mans and, along with the Porcshe 908, relegating Ferrari to fourth place.

The 917 was run by serval works and part-works teams in the early 1970s, and it dominated sports car racing. The most famous of these are perhaps the Gulf Racing cars, thanks largely to Steve McQueen and his 1971 film ‘Le Mans’.

It’s this car that Technic building legend Sariel has chosen to recreate in Lego form, and he’s done so brilliantly.

Lego Porsche 917 Gulf Racing

Underneath the incredible bodywork (which includes wonderful period-correct decals) are no less than four LEGO RC Buggy Motors, with two third-party BuWizz 2.0 bricks controlling a pair each. This gives Sariel’s Porsche 917K both amazing speed and the ability to be controlled remotely via a bluetooth device.

Sariel’s 917 also features fully-independent double-wishbone suspension both front and rear, dihedral opening doors, and remote control steering that turns the steering wheel in the authentically detailed cockpit too.

Lego Porsche 917K Gulf Racing

It’s one of the finest Technic supercars of 2018 and one that is definitely worth a closer look. An extensive gallery of images is available to view at Sariel’s Porsche 917K Flickr album and you watch a video of the model in action and join the discussion courtesy of the Eurobricks forum.

See more of Sariel’s astonishing Technic recreation of the greatest endurance racer of the 1970s via the links above, and you can watch the original trailer for the 1971 movie ‘Le Mans’ by clicking here.

Lego Porsche 917 Sariel

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Black Beetle

Lego Volkswagen Beetle

Volkswagen, following the need to pay some huge fines, are having a bit of a model cull at present. In the for the chop are pretty much all of their three-door cars, including the Scirocco (boo) and the New New Beetle (meh). Still, that makes room for even more SUVs (sigh)…

With the Volkswagen Group’s line-up becoming ever more boring by the minute we’re going back to more interesting times, before dieselgate, greedy shareholders, and every customer needing a truck to take their kids to school.

This is the original Beetle, commissioned by Hitler, designed by Ferdinand Porsche, and becoming the world’s most successful car design ever.

This superb Model Team style Beetle comes from previous bloggee Lennart C, who has built one of the toughest cars to recreate from LEGO ever brilliantly, including a wonderfully detailed interior and an authentically replicated flat-4 engine.

There’s more to see of Lennart’s beautiful bug via the link above, and you can see LEGO’s own officially-licensed Volkswagen Beetle set by clicking here.

Lego Volkswagen Beetle

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Deeper Purple

Lego Toyota Celica TA22

The purple theme continues here at TLCB with this, Simon Przepiorka‘s wonderful Speed Champions style modified ’77 Toyota Celica TA22.

Simon’s creation is based on a real modified Celica running a Honda F22C engine, and he’s captured the car brilliantly in Lego form. Head over to Flickr via the link above to check out all the pics and find a link to the real car.

Lego Toyota Celica TA22

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Kuro Kin

Lego Datsun 240Z Kuro Kin

Simon Przepiorka’s brilliant 8-wide Speed Champions Datsun 240Z design has appeared here before, but so good is his latest iteration (and so well photographed too) we didn’t think you’d mind the update.

Lego Datsun 240Z Kuro Kin

Newly built in black and gold, Simon’s ‘Kuro Kin’ 240Z looks very much like our sort of car, even though our research into what ‘Kuro Kin’ actually means only turned up a Singaporean restaurant. The title will remain a mystery then, but you can see more of Simon’s stunning Speed Champions creation at his photostream – click here to take a peek.

Lego Datsun 240Z Kuro Kin

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Redneck’s Ride

Lego Chevrolet C/K Pick-Up

We’re fast-forwarding forty years from our previous post to bring you another sort of truck, which is… er, at the other end of the class spectrum. Built by TLCB favourite Pixel Fox, this mid-’70s Chevrolet C/K pick-up shows us there’s nothing more highbrow than getting drunk in a swamp and blowing stuff up. Join the fun on Flickr at the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Godzilla’s Grandfather

Lego Nissan Skyline GTR

Nissan’s GTR hasn’t always been a 600bhp all-wheel-drive supercar killer. In fact the GTR started life simply as the sporty variant in the humble Skyline range of mid-size sedans. Powered by a 160bhp two-litre inline-6 the original 1970s Skyline GTR was quick enough in its day and it became a successful racing car in Japan and beyond.

This lovely Speed Champions style creation depicts the second generation Skyline GTR built from 1973, of which just 197 were made before the oil crisis put an end to production and the GTR nameplate was hibernated until 1989.

Legomasino is the builder behind it and he’s recreated the 1974 Nissan/Datsun Skyline GTR beautifully. Head over to Flickr via the link above to see more of Legomasino’s superb images.

Lego Datsun Skyline GTR

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

2,733

Lego Porsche 911

Jonathan Elliott’s brilliant Porsche 911 design has appeared here before, but a shot showing it in three variants – including a gorgeous new Singer-esque commissioned piece – was too good to pass up! Plus today’s title gives us a tenuous link to this. See more on Flickr by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Wings (Part I)

Lego Datsun 240Z Drift

Drifting, as we learned earlier this week, has been around for some time. Today’s favoured drift weapons are 1990s Japanese cars, being relatively cheap (although the drift tax is now causing values to rocket), rear drive, and – most importantly in the modern drift scene – cool.

We’d prefer this though. It’s a glorious 1970s Datsun 240Z, one of the prettiest cars to come out of Japan, and one of the prettiest cars to come from the ’70s too. Flickr’s Simon Przepiorka is the builder as he’s fully driftized (what – it’s a word!) his 240Z with the addition of a wide-arch kit, what looks like a front-mounted intercooler, and an enormous rear wing.

Why drift cars need rear wings we don’t know, seeing as they’re going too slow to generate any downforce, they’re sideways so the air isn’t flowing it in a straight line, and surely downforce (and therefore grip) is the opposite of what helps cars to break traction anyway.

If you know drop us a note in comments, but we strongly suspect it’s to do with that ‘cool’ thing mentioned above. Anyway, Simon’s lovely Speed Champions scale be-winged Datsun 240Z can be found on Flickr – click the link above to get sideways.

Lego Nissan 240Z Drift

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Class of ’71

Lego Speed Champions Seventies Supercars

Not to rub Jonathan Elliott’s nose in it, but 1971 was a long time before this TLCB writer was born. Nevertheless he’s still able to determine the make and model all four of Jonathan’s brilliant Speed Champions scale seventies supercars, so well do they recreate their real-world counterparts. See if you can guess all four and then head to Jonathan’s photostream to get your score!

Tagged , , , ,

Superfront

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This is Marion 204-M Superfront cable-operated mining shovel, and it’s massive. First built in 1974 by the Marion Power Shovel Company (who also built NASA’s enormous crawler transporters), the 204-M Superfront used electrically driven cables to drive its huge bucket arm and had a working weight in excess of 700 tons. Built for around twelve years the 204-M worked in open mines all over the world, with the last still operating in Asia decades later.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This incredible fully functioning Lego replica of the Marion 204-M Superfront was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr and it comes from Beat Felber who has recreated the machine in astonishing detail. Powered by eight Power Functions motors and controlled via bluetooth thanks to three third-party SBricks, Beat’s 204-M Superfront uses an XL Motor to drive each track whilst two L Motors can slew the entire superstructure independently. A pair of XL Motors power each of the cable drums and the bucket angle and bucket door are electronically powered by another two motors, giving Beat’s model as much articulation as the real Marion 204-M.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

There’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular model at Beat Felber’s Marion 204-M Superfront Flickr album, plus you can read our 5 star review of the SBrick bluetooth controller that makes creations like this possible by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: