Tag Archives: 1970s

Ferrari Fursday

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

We suppose we could have just waited a day to post this so the title made more sense, but say it with an Essex accent and it’s fine. If you’re an international reader sorry, that reference is probably meaningless…

Anyway, the models! These two superb Speed Champions style Ferraris are the work of Jonathan Elliott of Flickr, and he’s done a thoroughly good job of recreating the mid-’80s Testarossa and mid-’70s 512 BB in 7-wide(ish) form.

If you fancy a closer look click here for more of the Testarossa and here for more of the 512 BB, and if you’re an international reader and you don’t know what an Essex accent sounds like click here and brace yourself count yourself lucky.

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

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Groundhog

Lego Lotus 79

As detailed in yesterday’s post, Ferrari are back on top after a few years in middle of the F1 pack, but there was a time when they barely won anything. And not because they had a bad car either.

Ferrari (and everyone else’s) woe was due to the utter dominance of one car, the pioneering Lotus 79, the first car to make full use of ground effect aerodynamics.

The first Formula 1 car designed using computer design aids, Lotus took downforce to an entirely new level, with the 79 producing 30% more of it than even their own car from the previous year. The suction generated by the 79 at speed was so strong that early cars suffered chassis fatigue and had to be strengthened to allow them to cope with race distances.

Lego Lotus 79 RoscoPC

The strengthening worked, and the cars went even faster in testing. Upon the 79’s debut at the 1978 Belgium Grand Prix Mario Andretti took pole by over a second, and won the race ahead of the next Lotus in second place by ten seconds, with Ferrari in third almost half a minute behind. In fact, so fast were the new Lotuses that Ferrari could only win if the 79s retired.

Lotus finished the season with 50% more points than the next nearest team, securing the 79’s position amongst Formula 1’s most dominant ever designs.

This spectacular homage to one of Formula 1’s greats is the work of previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Luca Rusconi aka RoscoPC. Built eleven years ago, Luca has recently uploaded his model to Flickr, and despite its age Luca’s 79 is still one of the finest Lego F1 replicas you’ll see. Accurate decals, a working V8 engine, steering and suspension are all included, and there’s lots more to see at Luca’s Lotus 79 Flickr album by clicking here.

Lego Lotus 79

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Both Sides of the Curtain

Lego Land Rover UAZ 4x4

Things were frosty between The Soviet Union and the United Kingdom back in the 1970s. Scary infomercials played on television explaining what to do in the event of a nuclear attack (die screaming we suspect), whilst every Bond Villain was an evil Russian.

However, political and economic differences aside, were West and Eastern Europe really so different? Take their approach to off-road workhorses for example. One is a simple, painfully slow, easily repairable vehicle of suspect build quality, designed for the state military but used the world over, and the other is, well… exactly the same.

We reckon that had the designers of the Land Rover Series 1 and UAZ 469 met they probably would have got along great. Perhaps there’s a lesson there… Anyhoo, these too charming mini-figure scale recreations of the Land Rover and UAZ come from Flickr’s Pixel Fox, and you can see more of each, as well as his other previously blogged off-roaders, via the link above.

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Carrera Classic

Lego Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS

You don’t need a million bricks to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. A few hundred will do, especially if they’re yellow, and especially if they’re arranged as exquisitely as this. This gorgeous Legoland style ’70s Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS comes from Flickr’s Peter Blackert (aka Lego911), and it captures the super-rare version of Porsches most famous model beautifully. There’s lots more of the Carrera 2.7 RS to see at Peter’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

 

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KRAZY

Lego KrAZ 255 Truck Remote Control

This is a Ukrainian KrAz 255 6×6 off-road truck, launched in the late 1960s by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. The KrAZ factory actually started out making bridges, then combine harvesters, before moving on to military trucks. Communism meant you built what you were told to…

KrAZ were good at trucks though, and in 1971 they were awarded the Order of Lenin (the highest decoration bestowed by the Soviet Union) for their successes, and their products were exported to several countries around the world.

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union KrAZ are no longer under the control of the state, and – a little weirdly – are supplying vehicles to the Ukrainian army to defend Ukraine from invasion by their old masters Russia.

This superb Model Team style recreation of the Soviet-era KrAZ 255 is the work of xxtruck of Brickshelf, making his TLCB debut. Underneath the realistic exterior is a remotely controlled 6×6 drivetrain, working suspension on all wheels, a detailed engine and interior, and functioning head and tail lights.

There’s lots more of the KrAZ 255 to see via xxtruck’s Brickshelf Gallery – take a look via the link above.

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Forced Induction

Lego Renault RS10 Formula 1 Car RoscoPC

This is a 1979 Renault RS10, and it was the first turbocharged car to ever win a Formula 1 race. It’s been faithfully recreated in Lego form by Master MOCer Luca Rusconi aka RoscoPC, whose recently re-uploaded creations have featured heavily here over the past few months. This is Luca’s first entirely new build, allowing him to take advantage of LEGO’s latest parts to brilliant effect.

Powered by a tiny 1.5 litre twin-turbocharged V6 engine the Renault RS10 produced over 500bhp… when it worked. Which to be honest it didn’t all that much, but when it did the RS10 was phenomenally fast. Renault’s single 1979 win with the new turbo engine forced every other front-running F1 team to hastily begin turbo engine development, and if it weren’t for F1’s constantly changing (and pointless) restrictions banning turbocharged engines by the late-’80s (when they were producing as much as 1,400bhp), we doubt any naturally-aspirated engine would have won an F1 championship again. Of course those same pointless restrictions now mandate the use of 1.6 litre turbocharged V6 engines, so the sport has come full circle…

Lego Renault RS10 Formula 1 Car RoscoPC

Renault never won a Formula 1 Championship with the technology they pioneered though (although they did earn some excellent results), but the RS10 can be credited with completely changing the landscape of F1, ushering in the wonderful insanity of the ’80s turbo-era until forced induction was outlawed in 1989.

There’s more to see of this stunning recreation of one of Formula 1’s most game-changing cars at RoscoPC’s Renault RS10 Flickr album – click the link to make some boost.

Lego Renault RS10

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What’s in the Box?

Lego DAF FA 1600 DF

This big red box is a DAF FA 1600 DF from 1975, and it comes from DAF-building specialist Arian Janssens. A big red box it may be, but it’s a beautifully built one, featuring an astonishing level of detail and a myriad of subtle curves, indentations and slopes. The livery belongs to Houtmotcentrale Rijen (apparently), which means that we have absolutely no idea what’s inside it. See if you can work it out at Arian Janssens’ photostream via the link above.

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Bazinga!

Lego Zinger Van

Apologies for using a well known catch-phrase from the laughter vacuum that is The Big Bang Theory in the title, but it fitted with today’s creation…

This is a ‘Zinger’, a ’70s phenomenon that we’re too young to understand, but apparently it involved shrinking your vehicle to an improbably small size, but leaving the engine and wheels as they were. Oh, and sticking a girl on the roof.

This brick-built example of the trend comes from Flickr’s Lino Martins, and there’s more to see of his rather neat Zinger Van at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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You Can’t Leave Your Hat On

Lego Ferrari 312T RoscoPC

This is Ferrari’s 1975 312T Formula 1 car, recreated in spectacular detail by TLCB favourite and Master MOCer Luca Rusconi aka RoscoPC. Rosco continues to upload his huge back-catalogue of stunning historic racing cars to Flickr, and his latest is one of the most successful single designs ever to race in F1.

Launched in 1975 the Ferrari 312T was the first Formula 1 car to feature a transversely mounted gearbox, with the ‘T’ donating that layout rather than the turbocharger you might expect, the engine being Ferrari’s long-standing naturally aspirated flat-12.

The clever gearbox position gave the 312T superb handling, something that its 312B predecessor wasn’t blessed with, and it delivered immediate results, winning Ferrari’s first F1 title in eleven years. During its long racing life from 1975 to 1980 the 312T won three Drivers and four Constructors World Championships, evolving over this time to take into account the changing regulations. Even losing its characteristic high air-box in 1976 due to an FIA ban on the design didn’t stop it winning.

The 312T was finally replaced in 1981 by the new 126C, Ferrari’s first turbo-charged Formula 1 car, leaving the 312T to be remembered as one of Ferrari’s greatest ever Formula 1 designs, and the car that made World Champions of Nikki Lauda and Jody Scheckter.

There’s much more to see of Luca’s incredible Lego replica of the Ferrari 312T at his Flickr album, and you can read our interview with the builder as part of Season 2 of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

Lego Ferrari 312T RoscoPC

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Chevy Chevelle SS – Picture Special

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

After publishing some weird vehicles yesterday we’re back with something that’s very The Lego Car Blog. This beautifully reconstructed 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle SS is the work of Flickr’s VR workshop, and it is – as you can see from the image montage below – quite brilliantly detailed inside and out.

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

With a highly detailed engine bay and interior, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, VR’s Chevelle is an almost perfect recreation of Chevrolet’s famous early ’70s muscle car. There’s lots more to see at VR workshop’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

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Formula 1 Sucks

Lego Brabham BT46B Fan Car

This is the 1978 Brabham BT46, designed by the legendary Gordon Murray and powered by an Alfa Romeo flat-12 engine, and it was amongst the front runners of the 1978 Formula 1 World Championship, securing a Constructors third place for the Brabham team.

The BT46 won two races in the ’78 season, but its win at the Swedish Grand Prix is one of the most unusual in the sport. You see this is the BT46 ‘B’, a design which raced only once, and which won by over half a minute.

Designed to take on the ‘ground effect’ Lotuses, Murray engineered an engine-powered fan to literally suck the car to the ground. Whilst it was claimed at the time the fan was used to cool the Alfa Romeo flat-12, it became obvious what its true purpose was when the drivers revved the engine, as the BT46B visibly squatted down on the track.

Effectively a reverse hovercraft, the Brabham BT46B dominated the field, which of course meant that like other ingenious developments in Formula 1, it was immediately banned. Because Formula 1 sucks.

The BT46B was never allowed to race in Formula 1 again and Brabham were forced to revert to their non fan-assisted variant, however TLCB regular and Master MOCer Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) remembers one of Formula 1’s cleverest designs with his stunning Lego replica of the one-race-wonder.

Added to his ever growing portfolio of historic racing cars on Flickr, Luca’s BT46B includes working steering, suspension, a flat-12 engine, and – of course – a working fan. There’s lots more to see at Luca’s Flickr Album – click this link if you’re a fan.

Lego Brabham BT46B Fan Car

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Tyrrell P34 | Picture Special

Lego Tyrrell P34

This is not a Hot Wheels car. Nor is it an outlandish concept of what Formula 1 could look like in the future. This is the mid-’70s Tyrrell P34, and it really did look exactly like this.

Designed to minimise the drag caused by the front wheels protruding above the front wing, Tyrrell opted for tiny wheels with specially made Goodyear tyres that could sit behind it. However, tiny wheels meant a tiny contact patch, and therefore less grip, so the wheels were doubled to keep the grip levels on par with its larger-wheel counterparts.

The P34 was revealed in September 1975 to astonished onlookers, many of whom thought it was a publicity stunt, however all six wheels duly hit the track the next month, and following testing the Tyrrell P34 entered the 1976 Formula 1 season.

Lego Tyrrell P34 6-Wheel F1 Car

Solid results followed, including a 1-2 result for Team Tyrrell at the ’76 Swedish Grand Prix – the only time a six-wheeled car has won a Formula 1 race (and probably the only time one ever will, seeing as the FIA outlawed cars with more than four wheels several years later, in another pointless addition to the rule book…).

The P34 remained competitive for a few years, before the advancement of other teams and Tyrrell’s reliance on the specially-made Goodyear tyres led to the team returning to the conventional four-wheel layout in 1978, however such was the P34’s unique design that the retired race car became a collectors item overnight.

This perfect Lego replica of Formula 1’s most innovative race winner is the work of Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) and it recreates the incredible Tyrrell P34 in breathtaking detail. Accurate bodywork is enhanced by a period-correct stickered livery, and like the real car all four front wheels are steered, plus there’s a working V8 engine and suspension too.

There’s lots more of this amazing build to see at Luca’s Tyrell P34 Flickr album by clicking here, and you can read our interview with the builder as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking this link.

Lego Tyrrell P34 6-Wheel F1 Car

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Volkswagen Golf GTI | Picture Special

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

The Volkswagen Golf GTI is one of the all-time great hot hatchbacks. Now in it’s seventh generation there have been roughly five good Golf GTIs, and three really good ones. This is one of the really good ones…

Launched in 1976, two years after the Golf first went on sale, the GTI was the product of a few VW engineers having some fun. In a very German way of course, as having some fun meant staying on late at work.

Still, the product of their inventiveness helped to re-write the rules of quick cars. Powered by a fuel-injected 1.6, and then 1.8 litre engine, the Mark 1 Golf GTI was quicker than the contemporary sports cars of the time, it could fit four people in it, and it didn’t leak when it rained.

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

Now a seriously sought after car, there sadly aren’t many Mark 1 Golf GTIs left, but if you’d like one Damian Plesniak may have the answer.

Featuring a transversely-mounted 4-cylinder engine, accurate McPherson front and twist-beam rear suspension, opening doors, hood, and hatchback with parcel shelf, a detailed interior with a working steering wheel, adjustable seats, and opening glovebox, plus full remote control drive and LED lights, Damian’s Technic Golf GTI is very nearly as well engineered as the real thing.

There are loads more images to see at Damian’s Flickr and Brickshelf albums, and you can read more about the build, as well as watch a video of the Golf GTI in action, at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Lego Technic Volkswagen Golf GTI RC

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Seventies Escape

Lego UFO S.H.A.D.O Interceptor

This TLCB writer wasn’t around in the 1970s, but from the remnants that exist today it seems like it was pretty bleak time in ’70s Britain. Everyone was on strike, nothing worked properly, and everything was brown.

Hence British TV series ‘UFO‘, written by Thunderbirds and Captain Scarlett creator Gerry Anderson, and set in the near future of 1980, UFO offered some escapism from the drudgery of 1970s Britain. At least for a year, as it only lasted from 1970 to 1971.

UFO featured some pretty cool vehicles though, as is Anderson’s hallmark, and this is one of them; the S.H.A.D.O Interceptor, deployed to protect the secret moonbase from where operations against the alien invasion of 1980 could be orchestrated.

This slick mini-figure recreation of the Interceptor comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74, joining his previously featured UFO Command Centre, and was suggested to us by a reader. There’s more to see at Andrea’s photostream – click the link above to escape for yourself.

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Orange Crush

Lego Technic Zil 130

Another day, another find, another Elven catastrophe to tidy up. Following this week’s earlier Elf squashing our workforce has been in a cautious but nevertheless vengeful mood.

And so one of the week’s earlier victims found itself at the controls of a vehicle capable of exacting a hit-and-run based revenge. With the Elves it doesn’t really matter if the perpetrator of a previous act is actually present when the revenge is served, just as long as someone gets squished. And squished they were.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

The vehicle in question is this absolutely wonderful ZiL 130 MMZ 555 tipper truck, in perfectly-suited Porsche 911 GT3 orange, as built by previous bloggee Samolot. In a convenient metaphor for the communist economy that spawned it, the Zil was the ideal tool for crushing the people, or in this case, Elves.

Remote control drive with a remotely controlled four speed gearbox, and a novel linear actuator based steering system give this ZiL 130 a surprising turn of speed, certainly enough to catch out a few slower Elves, whilst all-wheel suspension allowed the truck to roll over them with ease. Unrelated to the smushing, but a cool feature nonetheless, Samolot’s Zil 130 also includes a remotely controlled dumping mechanism powered by a Medium Motor, taking the total motor-count to four.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

Opening doors, a working steering wheel, and an opening hood all feature too, and Samolot has included a level of detail that’s now becoming typical with many Technic builds that moves the theme ever closer to Model Team in terms of aesthetics.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Samolot’s superb ZiL 130 dump truck via Brickshelf, MOCpages and the Eurobricks forum, plus you watch all the working features in action courtesy of the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

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