Tag Archives: 1970s

Beet This

If you’re a rad So-Cal surfer dude, there is literally nothing cooler than a slammed Volkswagen Beetle with a roof-rack. This TLCB Writer is definitely not a rad So-Cal surfer dude, but despite his doughy Northern European composition, he still thinks this slammed Volkswagen Beetle with a roof-rack is pretty cool. Flickr’s RGB900 is the rad So-Cal surfer dude* behind it and there’s more to see via the link.

*Radical surfness not guaranteed.

Hook*

TLCB’s thought for the day; 1970s trucks all looked like toys. This primary-coloured block of magnificence is a classic DAF NAT 2800 hook-lift truck, as created by previous bloggee Arian Janssens, and it proves said thought wonderfully. Check it out on Flickr via the link, and then come back here later to learn other gems such as ‘Why Pandas are Pointless’ and ‘How the Pontiac Aztek is be the Most Underrated Car of all Time’.

*Today’s deeply catchy title song.

Sun & Moon

The seventies were weird. Inflation trebled, gas prices skyrocketed, everyone was on strike, and vans were adorned with murals for some reason.

The first three items on the list are making an inglorious resurgence in 2022, so we’re expecting the return of mural-adorned vans is imminent too. Flickr’s 1saac W. is one step ahead with this pair of wonderfully ’70s Dodge Street vans, each adorned with a celestial mural.

Head back to the 1970s via the link above, or just stick around for a bit, as the decade appears to returning for all of us.

Flight of the Phantom

It’s Halloween, the season of pumpkins, candy, spooky household ornaments, girls wearing literally nothing, and tenuous TLCB links.

TLCB Towers doesn’t feature any of the first things, so we’ll try to make up for it with the last one on the list, beginning with this; the McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II.

Constructed by Flickr’s Juliusz D., this incredible recreation of the U.S military’s 1960s long-range supersonic fighter-bomber captures the aircraft in Vietnam War livery, as flown from the USS Constellation aircraft carrier in 1972.

With working flaps, folding wing tips, retractable landing gear, an opening cockpit, and a variety of scary weaponry, Juliusz’s Phantom is spookily accurate. Top quality decals and beautiful presentation make this a ghost that’s worth a closer look, and there’s lots more to see at Juliusz’s ‘McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II’ album. Click the link to go ghost hunting.

Zuk but Nysa

This is a ZSD Nysa 522, a Polish communistical van based on the FSC Zuk, only a little nicer (hence our terrifically amusing title!). The Zuk was itself based on an FSO, which was based on a GAZ, making the Nysa the last link in effectively one long chain of Iron Curtain automotive misery.

Said Iron Curtain meant the Nysa 522 remained in production – unbelievably – until 1994, by which time the newly democratic Polish government could elect to import vans that weren’t based on the design of a Russian passenger car from the 1940s.

This lovely Model Team recreation of the ZSD Nysa 522 comes from previous bloggee and weird-Eastern-European-communist-era-specialist Legostalgie, who has captured its characterful styling beautifully. There are opening doors, including a clever sliding one on the passenger side, a detailed engine, and a lifelike interior, and there’s much more to see at Legostalgie’s ‘Nysa 522’ album on Flickr, where a link to building instructions can also be found.

Click the link above to take a look, and the link above that to see all of the weird-Eastern-European-communist-era vehicles from Legostalgie that have appeared here at The Lego Car Blog to date. All are fantastic, but we think this one is even a little Nysa…

Welcome to Russia!

The news this week contained the exciting announcement that four peoples’ republics, previously under the oppression of the Ukrainian Neo-Nazi regime, decided  – through definitely-not-rigged-in-any-way-referendums – to join the Russian Federation!

A concert in Moscow’s Red Square celebrated President Putin’s signing of the republics into becoming Russian territory, with many in attendance stating they were kindly bused in for free by the Russian authorities, with a few so in awe and wonder they seemed not even to know why they were there!

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re joining in the celebrations marking the return of the Soviet Union by busing in our own Soviet Union, er… bus, courtesy of previous bloggee Samolot.

This Kavz 3270 was built from the 1970s until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and was based on the GAZ-53 truck. Samolot’s Technic recreation captures the Soviet-era bus brilliantly, with remote control drive, steering, 4-speed gearbox, and a rotating destination board all controlled by a LEGO Mindstorms robotic brain, plus there’s working suspension, a V8 engine, and opening doors too.

There’s lots more to see of Samolot’s lovely Kavz 3270 bus at Bricksafe and via the Eurobricks forum, where you can also watch a video all the motorised features in action, including the neat rotating destination board above the cab.

Come to think of it, Russian buses will be able to add four new locations to their boards now, because when President Putin wields pen, it definitely makes something so, and certainly negates any words such as ‘sham’, ‘in violation of the United Nations Charter’, and ‘illegal under international law’.

For information on Russia’s annexation, whoops; we mean ‘liberation’ of Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, take a look at these pages from United Nations, Amnesty International, or Wikpedia.

Porsche-Assisted Pedal

Even for Porsche, this spoiler is ridiculous…

Back in 1979, French cyclist Jean-Claude Rude attempted to break the bicycle speed record of 127mph / 204kph. This meant a rather special bike, and also something to cut through the air ahead of it.

Martini Racing duly offered to modify one of their 800bhp Porsche 935 Turbos, fitting it with a custom air-deflecting casing behind the cabin. This TLCB Writer isn’t sure that an 800bhp Porsche was strictly necessary, but it’s better to be sure we suppose.

Unfortunately for Jean-Claude, whilst the Porsche 935 was up to the job, his bike’s rear inner tube was not, exploding during the record run. Now every cyclist knows that you always carry a spare, but seemingly Jean-Claude didn’t and that was the end of the record attempt.

Sadly, before he could try again, Jean-Claude Rude was killed by the wake of a train he was racing against, aged just 25.

Flickr’s HCKP13 pays homage to both Jean-Claude Rude and the magnificently weird modified Porsche 935 Turbo used to smooth the air ahead of him with this excellent Lego recreation of the failed record attempt. There’s more to see at HCKP13’s photostream, and you can join the 1979 record attempt via the link above. Just remember to bring a spare inner tube…

My Other Car’s a Camaro

How many models can the LEGO Icons 10304 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 make? Lots, according to Tomáš Novák, who has already appeared here with his Chevrolet C10 pick-up 10304 alternate, constructed within days of the set’s release.

Tomáš has now converted his C10 truck, itself converted from the 10304 set, into this lovely early Porsche 911, which features opening doors, engine cover and front trunk, working steering, and a rather natty two-tone stripe necessitated by the source parts of the 10304 set.

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see of Tomáš’ 10304 B-Model at both Eurobricks and Flickr.

Ute Beaut

The sedan-based pick-up known as the ‘Coupe Utility’ is an icon of Australian motoring. Built by all of Australia’s indigenous manufacturers, and with a few others importing to Australia too, they were hugely popular in decades past.

But with Australian motor manufacturing having ceased in recent years, the Australian ‘Ute’ has almost died out, although the body type lives on (in a smaller form) in South America.

Flickr’s chris.elliott.art remembers the golden age of the Aussie ute however, with this ace ‘1971 Aussie Turbo Coupe Utility’.

Based on no particular model, but somehow looking like all of them, Chris’ ute captures the Australian motoring icon brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his superbly presented creation at his Flickr album. Click the link above to visit Australia some time in the early ’70s.

Tinder Lies

This is a Dino 246, the late-’60s to mid-’70s Ferrari-that-wasn’t-a-Ferrari.

The Dino 206 and 246 compared favourably with the Porsche 911 and other sports cars of the time, but the 2.0 and 2.4 litre V6 Fiat engines fitted were considered too entry-level for the main Ferrari brand, despite Ferrari upping the horsepower figure by 20bhp.

By ‘upping the horsepower figure’ we do mean that literally; Ferrari’s number may have been 20bhp higher than Fiat’s, but the engine was identical. It’s the ’60s motoring equivalent of adding a few inches to your height on Tinder…

Despite the outright lies we do rather like the Dino, and time has been kind to it, with a quick search revealing the Dinos for sale today are all listed as ‘Ferraris’. And they probably have an extra 20bhp in the performance figures too.

This lovely Speed Champions recreation of the not-quite-a-Ferrari comes from Flickr’s Thomas Gion, who has captured the Dino 246 GT beautifully. There’s more to see at Thomas’ ‘1969 “Ferrari” Dino 246 GT’ album‘ on Flickr – take a look via the link above whilst this TLCB Writer makes a minor amendment his Tinder profile.

The Big Purple One*

The recently launched Speed Champions 76094 Dodge Charger R/T set continues LEGO’s welcome foray into real-world classic cars. Taking the purple Challenger from that set and upsizing it is Flickr’s Joey Klusnick, who has replicated the iconic 1970’s muscle car in ‘Miniland’ scale, making his model perfect for the streets of a Legoland theme park. It’d sure be a quality street** with Joey’s Challenger parked on it. Click the link above to rummage through the box for a taste.***

*Non UK readers; you’ll have no idea what we’re on about.

**As above.

***That’s enough now (Ed.)

Zuk Me

This is an FSC Zuk, a Polish one-ton truck based on an FSO based on a GAZ from the ’50s. And we love it. Because it’s crap.

Like pretty much everything from behind the Iron Curtain, the Zuk was cheap, simple, and produced for far longer than it should have been. It’s TLCB of trucks.

This lovely Model Team recreation of the FSC Zuk in curtain-sided flatbed form comes from Soviet specialist Legostalgie of Flickr, who has captured the Polish workhorse beautifully. Expert detailing and some rather clever building techniques make this one of our favourite vehicles of the year so far, and there’s lots more of it to see at Legostalgie’s photostream – Click the link to make the jump.

Seasprite

This is a Kaman SH-2 Seasprite, a U.S Navy ship-based anti-submarine and search & rescue helicopter. Introduced in 1963, the Seasprite saw service in the Vietnam and Gulf Wars, and flew until 1993 with the U.S Navy, as well as being operated in small numbers by a several other nations.

This excellent (and rather wonderfully liveried) SH-2 Seasprite is the work of Robson M (aka BrickDesigners), who has captured both it and the rather exciting looking weaponry slung underneath beautifully.

Top quality building techniques and presentation abound, and there’s more to see of the SH-2, including its folding landing gear, opening doors, and cartoonesque missiles, at Robson’s photostream. Click the link above to get airborne.

Gascort

A beige 1970s economy estate car might not be the most exciting genre of vehicle, but we do like the mundane here at The Lego Car Blog. TLCB Elves however, are more… er, ‘basic’ in what they like. Think ‘six year old’. Or the ‘Fast & Furious franchise’.

Cue Sergio Batista‘s Ford Escort Mk1 estate, somewhat repurposed as a ‘gasser’ style hot rod. Sergio has built an unmodified Escort estate too, in delightful ’70s tedium, but for some reason the Elves seem to prefer this one…

There’s more to see at his photostream, where you can find both the Elves’ preferred variant (this one) and ours (standard ’70s monotony). Click the link above to make the jump!

Seventies Cycling

Peugeot, like many car manufacturers, didn’t begin by making cars. The company’s earliest products were saw blades and coffee and pepper grinders, but it was the bicycles that followed that made the business famous.

A decline in cycling interest post-war forced the company to refocus on automobile production, but a resurgence in the 1960s, as the bicycle transitioned from a transportation method to a leisure activity, created a new market for Peugeot’s pedal-powered products.

The company capitalised on this, producing road and race bikes that became world famous, and demonstrated their leadership in the world’s toughest (and Frenchiest) cycle race; the Tour de France, winning the event in ’75 and ’77.

This lovely 6-wide recreation of Peugeot’s 1970s Tour de France support car, complete with boot-mounted bicycles, comes from previous bloggee PalBenglat, who has captured both the ’70s Peugeot 504 and the vintage building style of LEGO at the time wonderfully.

Clever techniques and excellent presentation are evident throughout the build, and there’s more of the classic Peugeot to see at Pal’s photostream. Click the link above to put on your jersey and head into the French mountains c1975.