Tag Archives: Chevy

Flame Grille

A flame paint-job is worth at least 150bhp, according to TLCB maths. That puts it right up there with a supercharger, side pipes and nitrous in TLCB’s list of go-faster things.

Laszlo Torma’s Speed Champions ‘57 Chevy is therefore very powerful indeed, being equipped with at least two of the above.

A brilliant brick-built grille and a pair of appropriately cool looking mini-figures complete the build, and there’s more to see of Laszlo’s flaming Chevy – including a link to building instructions – on Flickr via the link above.

Off-Road at Any Speed

The 1961 Chevrolet Corvair was a brilliantly interesting car. Designed to take on Volkswagen, the Corvair was powered by a rear-mounted air-cooled flat-6 engine, which even came with the option of turbo-charging (the first production car in the world to do so).

Unfortunately however, the Corvair also featured a significant design flaw; the suspension tried to kill you.

The bean-counters at GM omitted anti-sway bars to save cost, which – when combined with that rear-mounted flat-6 engine and swing-axle suspension – caused the wheel camber to vary drastically when cornering. This created a car with wildly unpredictable handling, and therefore one that crashed a lot.

In 1965 attorney Ralph Nader published a book on the Corvair titled ‘Unsafe at Any Speed’, and Corvair sales plummeted. Of course GM did the default ‘evil corporation’ thing and attempted to smear Nader rather than fix the car, before conceding and equipping the Corvair with independent suspension.

The damage had been done though, and the Corvair carries a crashy reputation to this day. Cue Flickr’s Volker Brodkorb, who has fixed his Corvair station wagon’s handling issues by, well… turning it into an off-road monster truck.

OK, if anything the handling would be even worse, but look how cool it is! Volker’s model is in fact based on a real Corvair monster truck, which has got the Elves very excited. There’s more to see of Volker’s version via the link above, and you can check out a video of the real-life monster truck on which Volker’s model is based by clicking this link, where – amazingly – no one is killed at all.

Sportvan Delux

The ’60s was an era full of wildly optimistic names. This is a 1965 Chevrolet Sportvan Delux, which Chevy’s marketing department must have spent literally minutes working on, before going outside to smoke a pack of cigarettes or three.

Still, it looks cool, particularly with a trio of surfboards on the roof. Flickr’s Tim Henderson is the builder and there’s more to see of his wonderfully built but stupidly named creation via the link above.

And surely no-one would be silly enough to give something a name as utterly pointless as ‘Sportvan’ these days

Champagne Chevy Nova*

We like rusty cars here at The Lego Car Blog. The staff car park features several. Although in those cases the rust is due to neglect, age, and general decrepitness rather than some kind of rat-rod based badassery.

So too is Tim Henderson’s ‘barn find’ ’68 Chevy Nova, although unlike the office Rover 200 it somehow manages to look seriously cool as well as neglected, old, and decrepit.

A cunning deployment of mini-figure seats form the doors, an array of browns convey years of oxidisation, and there’s more of Tim’s ‘barn find’ Nova to see at his photostream here.

*Today’s magnificent title song.

Death Proof

“This car is a hundred percent death proof. Only to get the benefit of it, honey, you really need to be sitting in my seat.”

Death Proof isn’t one of Tarantino’s best works (but the bar is unfathomably high), however it’s undoubtedly his best vehicular work.

Stuntman Mike’s 1970 Chevrolet Nova appears in Lego form courtesy of Jonathan Elliott, and you can see more at his photostream. Just make sure you don’t sit in the passenger seat.

Express Gass

Talking of big boring boxes, here’s a Chevrolet Express Conversion Van. No amount of tinted windows and stickers down the sides could make us want to ride in this hateful pile of American misery, but Ralph has made his (excellent) Miniland recreation of the Chevy Express rather more exciting by the addition of a tow hitch, meaning his beige box of bricks can tow an altogether more interesting Chevy…

Hooked up to the Express is a trailer carrying this magnificent ’57 Bel Air ‘gasser’, complete with a supercharger poking through the hood and a flame paint job, both of which have got the Elves very animated. A cast of unique-looking characters is on hand to make sure she’s runnin’ right and there’s more to see of the Bel Air gasser (and the Express van we suppose) at Ralph’s photostream – click here to make the jump!

10-Second C-10

We have no idea whether this ’67 Chevy C-10 dragster could do a ten second quarter mile in real life, but it sure looks like it can. The flames alone have got to be worth with at least second by TLCB maths.

Built by Flickr’s Brick Flag neat detailing and superb custom decals are in abundance, and there’s more to see at his ‘Chevy C-10’ album – click the link for a the best ten seconds your life.

Everyones’ First Car

We’re pretty sure that whatever you first car was, it probably came inside a box like this. This is Rolling Bricks‘ Matchbox 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air, a wonderful homage to the famous toy maker’s 1980s vehicles (and packaging), recreated beautifully in Lego form.

Stacked red, yellow, white and blue plates replicate Matchbox’s iconic classic livery beautifully, and he’s even built the hole thingy that enabled the boxes to hang from those weird metal poles in the toy store, so you could slide them all out to find the one you wanted.

There’s much more to see of Rolling Bricks’ glorious Matchbox Chevy at his Flickr album, where you can also find building instructions should you wish to recreate the cars of your youth yourself. Click the link above to head to the toy store.

Chevy C10

Not all American pick-up trucks are pointlessly-enormous, over-engined yet under-engineered projections of machismo. This is the Chevrolet C10, a compact and utilitarian vehicle for actually picking stuff up and moving it about. Which is probably why Chevrolet don’t make it anymore. No matter, Simon Przepiorka has remembered the C10, and he’s added a few tasteful mods too. See more of his excellent 8-wide recreation of the 1970s Chevy on Flickr via the link.

Back in Black

Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott has appeared here numerous times over the years with his excellent small-scale vehicles. Fellow builder JohnniD has too, but has since departed Flickr for pastures new. To pay homage to his old building buddy Jonathan has reworked one of Johnni’s classic designs, this lovely ’49 Chevrolet Pick-Up, and re-published the results. Clever techniques and superbly recognisable design cues are visible in abundance and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

The Fake Prince of Bel-Air

The ’50s Chevrolet Bel Air is a regular here at TLCB. A favourite in the classic car scene it’s become an icon of its era, more than the sum of its parts and possibly a bit over-hyped. Not that car fans ever do that (cough Toyota Supra A80 cough). However it’s not the only great-looking Chevy from the period, as the Bel Air had a smaller, slightly more affordable brother.

Always in the Bel Air’s shadow the Chevrolet 210 was just as pretty if slightly less glamorous, and it too could be had with the same ‘Blue Flame’ I6 and V8 powerplants. And a two-speed automatic transmission, Seriously, two. Shortage of gears aside we rather like the 210. It was comprehensively outsold by its larger Bel Air sibling too, so it’s more of a rarity these days.

This 1:18 Model Team recreation of the ’57 Chevrolet 210 4-Door Hardtop comes from TLCB debutant Tenderlok who has done an excellent job of replicating the classic Chevy in Lego form, helped by the application of a lot of custom chrome. Head to Eurobricks via the link above for more images of Tenderlok’s build and a full description.

334,000-Piece Life-Size Chevrolet Silverado

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Yup, LEGO have done it again! The latest in a series of life-size replicas (which included a fully drivable Bugatti Chiron don’t forget!), LEGO have added Chevrolet to their list of real-world vehicles built from bricks.

This is the new 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 ‘Trail Boss’ pick-up truck. Well, the one on the left is. The one on the right that looks slightly lower-res is in fact a 334,000 piece full-size LEGO replica of Chevy’s new mid-size truck.

Built by a team of eighteen Master Builders the LEGO Chevy took over 2,000 hours to assemble, measures 20 feet long, 8 feet wide and 6 feet high (exactly the same as the real Silverado), and weighs over 1.5 tons.

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Commissioned as part of Chevrolet’s tie-up with Warner Brothers Pictures (the guys behind the upcoming The LEGO Movie 2), the brick-built Silverado is currently on display at the Detroit North American Auto Show alongside its more metallic counterparts.

Readers in Detroit (or visiting the Auto Show from further afield) will be able to see the life-size LEGO pick-up at the Chevrolet stand until January 27th, where there’s also a truck-load of LEGO bricks available to play with. For the rest of us not near Detroit but wondering how a 334,000-brick pick-up truck is built, take a look at the video below…

YouTube Video

The Prince of Bel Air*

Lego '55 Chevrolet Bel Air

Chevrolet, the unfortunate makers of this, this and this, used to be cool. Admittedly that was a long long time ago, but cool they were. Today’s creation comes from the peak of Chevrolet’s history, the glorious ’55 Bel Air.

This brilliant recreation of one of the finest cars ever to come out of America is the work of TLCB Master MOCer Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist and not only does it look gorgeous, Ralph’s classic Bel Air features opening doors, hood and trunk, with a detailed engine and interior too. There’s more to see at Ralph’s photostream – jump back in time to ’55 via the link above.

*Today’s title song. Of course. Rap along at home!

Chevy Chevelle SS – Picture Special

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

After publishing some weird vehicles yesterday we’re back with something that’s very The Lego Car Blog. This beautifully reconstructed 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle SS is the work of Flickr’s VR workshop, and it is – as you can see from the image montage below – quite brilliantly detailed inside and out.

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

With a highly detailed engine bay and interior, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, VR’s Chevelle is an almost perfect recreation of Chevrolet’s famous early ’70s muscle car. There’s lots more to see at VR workshop’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Chevy Chevelle 1972 SS

Suburgatory

Lego Chevrolet Suburban

Things we don’t like here at TLCB; Mosquitoes, Kim Jong-Un, everything will.i.am has done since ‘Where is the Love?’, and the Chevrolet bloody Suburban.

Built to take drug dealers, stockbrokers’ housewives, and mildly successful rappers through the electronic gates of their gaudy mock-Edwardian mansions, the Suburban is a plasticky truck-based environmental catastrophe for people that think luxury is determined only by size.*

Lego Chevrolet Suburban

It’s safe to say that neither the Suburban, nor the Cadillac Escalade with which it shares its hateful platform, are products targeted at TLCB Team. Which puts us in a bit of quandary today, as this incredible Lego creation very much is.

With Power Functions remote control, opening everything, and one of the most accurate and realistically detailed exteriors and interiors that we’ve ever seen, this incredible model by Flickr’s dgustafsson1317 is everything we look for in a blog-worthy build. It’s just a shame the subject matter is a Chevrolet Suburban.

We’ll move on now before we get a nose bleed, but you can see more of dgustafsson1317’s Chevy on Flickr at the link above, where there is a suitably enormous album available.

Lego Chevrolet Suburban

*Which makes your Mom very luxurious.