Tag Archives: 1940s

Billy Bomber

Lego B25 Mitchell Bomber

Named after Major General William Lendrum “Billy” Mitchell, the North American B-25 Mitchell was one of the most prolific bombers of the Second World War, with almost 10,000 units produced and operating in every theatre of the war. The B-25 saw service until as late as 1979, giving it a four-decade long role in the skies, and this superb Lego version is a by Flickr’s Dornbi fitting tribute. There’s lots more to see at Dornbi’s photostream – click the link above to take off.

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Not a Car

Lego Mitsubishi Zero

But it was made by a car manufacturer, and very probably their most famous product too. This is of course a Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter from the Second World War, and it’s been neatly recreated in Lego form by James C of MOCpages. James’ updated build includes a mini-figure pilot, working landing gear, and custom decals, and there’s more to see on MOCpages via the link above.

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’48 Ford

Lego Ford F1

This is a 1948 Ford F1, and we know that racing cars were a bit agricultural back then but this is ridiculous.

It’s not really anything to do with the highest tier of motorsport of course, rather it’s the predecessor to America’s best selling truck, the Ford F150. This neat Model Team version has been built by Lego-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, and unusually for a static display piece it features a few working functions too, including steering, opening doors and hood, and a dropping tailgate.

There’s more to see of Firas’ latest build at his photostream, and you can check out his interview here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking these words.

Lego Ford F1 Truck

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Fury

Lego M4A2E8 Sherman Tank Fury

2014’s Second World War movie ‘Fury’ was a surprisingly good film. Some big names made up the key cast members, but the real star was the tank around which the story revolved. Named ‘Fury’, the M4A2E8 Sherman was tired and battle-worn even at the start of the story, and was well outclassed by the superior German machinery. But being an American film, the American tank performs some amazing feats, and no doubt will inspire countless builders.

One such builder is previous bloggee Tommy Styrvoky, who has spent three months recreating ‘Fury’ in fully-working form. We’re not quite sure why the tank crew look naked, but other than that Tommy’s tank is visually brilliant. Underneath the model is just as accomplished, with twin Power Functions drive, working suspension, piston engine, remote gun elevation and turret rotation.

There’s lots more to see, including cut-away shots of the tank’s interior and mechanics, at both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link to jump back to Germany in 1945.

Lego Fury Tank RC

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Not a Car…

Lego Mitsubishi Zero

…but probably the most popular plane to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. Lego builders love the Mitsubishi Zero, and they keep finding new ways to recreate Japan’s most famous fighter. This version comes from MOCpages’ James C, and he’s captured the Zero’s iconic shape beautifully. There’s more to see at his MOCpage – click the link above to fly over.

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Forties Ford Fotography

Lego Ford Coup 1940

We’ve featured a lot of large creations at TLCB over the past few weeks, but you don’t need thousands of bricks to make something that could appear here. 1saac W proves this point beautifully with this lovely 1940 Ford Coupe, and it’s got one of the most ingenious grills we’ve found at this scale.

1saac also demonstrates the other crucial factor necessary in getting a creation blogged; excellent photography. Our Elves (and readers) find lots of superb creations that we can’t publicise here because they fail to meet our image standards. It’s really simple to take high quality photographs of your creation though! You can check out 1saac’s via the link above, and you can read some tips on how to photograph your models well by clicking this link to our handy tutorial.

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Not a Car…

Lego German Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern

It is in fact a Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern steam locomotive operated by Deutsche Reichsbahn, and, if we’re being honest, we only know that from the builder’s description. But we are a car blog so European railways of the 1930s are a bit outside of our (admittedly limited) skill set.

This stunning model is the work of previous bloggee, TLCB favourite, and Master MOCer BricksonWheels, and it’s a beautifully thought-out build. With exquisite custom 3D printed wheels and valve train (see the image below), plus two Power Functions XL motors and in-built IR receivers driving it, the Polarstern locomotive demonstrates an incredible attention to detail.

Lego 3D Printed Steam Train Parts

You can read further details of both the build and the real train, and see the full gallery of stunning imagery, at BricksonWheels’ photostream – click here to buy a ticket.

Lego Steam Locomotive BricksonWheels

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Hey Big Boy!*

Lego Union Pacific Big Boy Locomotive

This magnificent creation is the work of previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker aka Bricksonwheels, and it’s something rather special. It’s a Union Pacific ‘Big Boy’ locomotive, and unlike most of Dennis’ builds it’s a relatively small 1:38 scale. But that doesn’t mean it’s a small build; at over a metre long it takes three Power Functions XL motors mounted in the tender to drive it, which is probably the most power any mini-figure has ever had.

Building such a huge locomotive presented Dennis with several building challenges. LEGO don’t make train wheels large enough, so Dennis worked with a friend to design and manufacture unique 3D printed wheels – complete with LEGO-compatible valve gear. A Tamiya RC battery provides the power, connected via an SBrick control module to ensure the battery power remains derestricted, and the train’s lighting is taken care of via a neat Brickstuff LED kit.

Lego Big Boy Steam Train Bricksonwheels

Whilst some way from a completely Lego build, Dennis’ creation shows how exceptional a model can be when LEGO bricks are used alongside specialist components.

If you’re interest in learning more about the Union Pacific build and the components used to create it you can visit the model at Dennis’ Flickr photostream here, where there are also links to the third-party suppliers and where you can see the other amazing creations that Dennis has built.

Lego Union Pacific Big Boy Train Remote Control

*In the voice of your Mom

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Talbot-Lego

Lego 1948 Talbot-Lago T-26 Grand Sport Coupe

This stylish 1948 Talbot-Lago T-26 Grand Sport Coupe comes from previous bloggee Tim Inman of Flickr. A unique car with an interesting history, there’s more to read and see at the link above.

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Bread Sled

Lego International Harvester Metro Van

The Lino Martins‘ bakery knows how to deliver in style. This is a 1940s International Harvester Metro van… with one or two subtle modifications. Pick up a loaf at Lino’s photostream via the link above.

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Forty-Six

Lego '46 Ford Coupe

It’s seems ages since we posted a proper car, and what with it being the main theme of our blog name we probably need to get back to our job description. We blame the Elves. Anyway, one of them did find this today, a rather lovely classic Ford Coupe by serial blogee Senator Chinchilla. There’s lots more to see on Flickr – click the link above to take the trip to ’46.

Lego Classic Ford Coupe

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Mercury Rising

Lego 1946 Mercury Sportsman

This beautiful classic ’46 Mercury Sportsman convertible comes from TLCB favourite, Master MOCer, and Flickr legend Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist. A re-working of a model he built back in 2008, Ralph’s Sportsman has been significantly updated with LEGO’s newer pieces and it reminds us superbly of just how good American cars used to be before they ended up like this.

Lego Mercury Sportsman Convertible

Mercury, created by the Ford Motor Company in the mid 1930s, was killed off during the restructuring of America’s ‘Big Three’ auto manufacturers following the financial crisis in 2011, but by that point its products were little more than appallingly bland re-badged Fords anyway. Mercury’s 1940s offerings were far more interesting – Take a trip back to to 1946 courtesy of Ralph via the link above.

Lego Mercury Sportsman Ralph Savelsberg

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Little Wonders

Lego 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C Freccia d'Oro

You don’t need ten thousand bricks to appear on The Lego Car Blog. Around one hundred is plenty, as proven by Flickr’s Johnni with the lovely 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C Freccia d’ora pictured above, and Robert4168 with his superbly inventive micro-scale ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ pirate ship. See more of each via the links.

Lego Microscale Pirate Ship

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Megamog

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog 401 RC

At the opposite end of the scale from today’s other post is this; an absolutely monstrous Mercedes-Benz Unimog 401. Somewhat simpler on the outside than its modern U400 descendant, the 401 was just as ridiculously hardcore underneath, but is also very probably the slowest vehicle that this site has ever featured, and we’re even including this.

Lego Mercedes Unimog

Tamás Juhász aka Mbmc is the builder and he’s built one hell of a machine. Underneath the simple green bodywork is a full RC drivetrain complete with a remotely operated 2-speed gearbox and some of the toughest looking suspension we’ve ever seen. There’s also a beautifully recreated working 4-cylinder engine, power take-offs front and rear and opening doors and hood.

There’s lots more to see, including images of the incredible chassis, on several of the key creation-sharing platforms; albums and build details on Flickr, Brickshelf and Eurobricks can be reached via the links.

Lego Technic Remote Control Unimog 401

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Surf ‘n Turf

Lego 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible

We thought the Chrysler Town & Country was a horrible American minivan, but it turns out that in 1948 it was something far more interesting. This gorgeous ’48 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible comes from newcomer Velocites, and it features some of the nicest wood and metal work we’ve seen on a Town scale car. There’s more to see at Velocites’ photostream – click the link above to make the jump to ’48.

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