Category Archives: Technic

2-4-1

The LEGO Technic 42128 Heavy Duty Tow-Truck is big, heavy, and able to take a hefty load. Just like your Mom. With more than two-thousand pieces – including pneumatics – 42128 is also a rich source of parts for creating a B-Model, with two great truck alternates featured here so far.

Newcomer Repkovsky has gone better though – literally – having reconstructed his 42128 set into not one but two B-Models, which are able to be built simultaneously.

The first is a rather excellent material handler, complete with a two-stage pneumatic boom, a linear-actuator operated grab, working outriggers, steering, and a raising cabin.

The material handler has a vehicle to extract a load from/deposit a load into too, with Repkovsky’s second alternate being a neat tipper truck, which itself features working steering, a piston engine, and a linear-actuator operated tipping bed.

The pair are a brilliantly clever use of pieces, and there’s more of each alternate to see at both Bricksafe and the Eurobricks forum, where a video and a link to building instructions can also be found. Click the link above to claim your 2-4-1!

I Don’t Want To Be a Lumberjack Any More

The LEGO Technic 42139 All-Terrain Vehicle revealed here earlier this year looks rather good, with loads of working features and more unusual source material than LEGO’s typical mid-size sets. Plus there’s a chainsaw.

But what if you don’t want to be a lumberjack? Latvian builder TGBDZ may have the answer, having turned their 42139 ATV set into this rather jazzy front loader.

Articulated steering, a pendular rear axle, a working piston engine, and a mechanical boom/bucket all feature, and you can build TGBDZ’s alternate for yourself as instructions are available, with more to see at the Eurobricks forum. Hang up your chainsaw via the link above.

Newnimog

Making not only their TLCB debut, but their MOCing debut too, today’s creation publicises a newcomer to the online Lego community via a well-trodden path; the Mercedes-Benz Unimog.

We’ve featured dozens of brick-built Unimogs here over the years, and TLCB debutant Rajesh Sriram (aka Voldemort87) adds another to the roster, with his excellent fully RC truck trial version of the famous off-road truck.

PoweredUp motors deliver the all-wheel drive, steering, and high/low gearbox, whilst the cabin tilts, there’s a working piston engine, and all-wheel suspension too.

There’s more to see of Rajesh’s first published MOC at both Eurobricks and Flickr, and you can take a look via the links above.

 

Picking an Alternate

The new LEGO Technic 42144 Material Handler is an impressive looking set. But it’s also really pricey, so – like anything expensive – it’s best to get maximum use out of it. At least, that’s the approach this writer takes with TLCB Executive Washroom & Sauna.

Cue M_longer, who has repurposed the pieces from the aforementioned set to create this neat cherry picker truck. A pneumatic hoist with a rotating turntable, working steering, and mechanical stabilisers feature, plus building instructions are available, so other owners of 42144 can both handle material and pick cherries too.

There’s more to see of M_longer’s 42144 alternate at Eurobricks and Bricksafe, and you can pick your way over via the links in the text above.

Knuckle Dragger

This astounding creation is a Volvo FH16 750, and it’s one of the finest Technic creations of the year so far.

Packed with working functions, it took builder blaz62 over two years to complete, with a remote control 8×6 drivetrain linked to an inline-6 engine that resides under a fully suspended cab, all-wheel suspension, LED lights, working front, middle and rear outriggers, and an incredible three-stage folding ‘knuckle boom’ crane.

Based on the Palfinger PK 165.002 TEC 7 crane (ah yes, that one. Ed.), blaz62’s amazing feat of engineering can unfurl (via much knob twiddling) to reveal a three-stage first boom, with a further second two-stage jib and third single-stage jib thereafter. It offers 360° of rotation, a 400g payload, and a reach longer than a 1983 Monty Python sketch.

Building instructions are available and there’s much more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum and Blaz62’s ‘Volvo FH16’ Bricksafe album.

Bricky E-ish

The future of racing is electric. Because the future of everything is electric, unless we can sort hydrogen out.

Formula E is the FIA’s flagship electric racing series, in which unsuccessful Formula 1 departees drive, um… not particularly quickly around giant carparks. Oh. At least the cars look cool.

Cue R. Skittle‘s ‘Formula e Concept’ – suggested to us by a reader – which looks a lot more like a traditional racing car than the wild current Formula E car. However with twin BuWizz batteries and motors, it might also have performance more in line with a traditional racing car than a Formula E car too.

A Power Functions servo motor provides the steering, there’s clever independent pushrod suspension, and – apparently – torque vectoring for a drift mode! If this is the future of electric racing sign us up!

Join the electric revolution at R. Skittle’s Flickr album via the link above.

Scandi Grey

Scandinavian design is very ‘in’ right now. Grey, white, with a dash of a calming colour like blue, it’s the default for every upper-middle class redecoration. Here at The Lego Car Blog we don’t follow such fads though, which is why TLCB Towers hasn’t been redecorated since the late ’80s. That, and our redecoration budget stretches to a roll of duct tape and some blu-tack.

Representing Scandinavian design minimalism beautifully however, is MCD‘s 2022 Volvo FH500 truck, which utilises the aforementioned nordic colour palette to great effect. MCD’s monochrome tractor unit successfully blends Technic and System bricks to capture the real truck, whilst a Maersk Sealand container sits atop an excellent three-axle trailer behind.

There’s more of the MCD’s build to see at the Eurobricks forum, and you can sit in a monochrome chair drinking a coffee from an exquisitely designed cup, enjoying 18 hours of daylight via the link in the text above.

Long Bottom Dump

Like ‘Wankel‘, ‘Bottom dump’ amuses us here at TLCB. Because we’re children.

Cue DamianPLE (aka damjan97PL)’s ‘Long Nose Truck with Bottom Dump Trailer’, created from the Technic 42128 Heavy Duty Tow Truck. The front of the truck will be recognisable to anyone with the set, with Damian converting the tow truck into a sleeper cab to pull his ‘bottom dump’ (snigger) trailer.

A suite of Power Functions motors power the truck’s drive and steering, as well as the trailer’s support legs and lower gate dumping mechanism.

There’s more to see – including a video of Damian having a dump (snigger) – at the Eurobricks forum, where a link to building instructions can also be found, plus you can jump to all the images on Bricksafe. Click the links above to take a look, and maybe have a dump yourself.

Star 69*

It’s been while since the last Elf-smushing, and the Elven discoverer of today’s creation was doubtless excited to reinstate the tradition with its remote control find.

Unfortunately for the aforementioned mythical worker, TLCB Master MOCer Nico71’s fantastic Technic Wester Star 6900 Twinsteer truck was too ponderous to mow down any of its Elven brethren, as evidenced when this TLCB Writer watched it trundling about the office in forlorn pursuit, much to annoyance of its driver.

But our Elves can occasionally display a degree of ingenuity…

Cue today’s Elf, which gave up using the Western Star’s Control+ powered remote control drive and steering, and instead deployed the motorised winch mounted behind the cab. Hooking it to a cage in which a couple of Elves were residing, it hauled the metal box onto the back of the truck, before driving off much to the terror of the Elves trapped inside.

We’re not actually sure where the kidnapped Elves have been taken, but they and their captor can’t have gone far. Besides, we have plenty of Elves.

Anyway, whilst we go and search TLCB Towers for a remote control Technic truck with a cage of kidnapped workers on board, you can see more of Nico’s excellent Western Star 6900 Twinsteer truck, complete with remote control drive and twin-axle steering, a motorised winch, working suspension, and a 6-cylinder engine, at his Brickshelf gallery.

Click the link above to see all the imagery and to find a link to building instructions, plus you can watch the Western Star in action (hauling a diesel pump rather than a cage full of kidnapped Elves) by clicking here.

*Today’s excellent title song.

The World’s Fastest Tractor

This is the JCB Fastrac Two, a modified version of the company’s high-power all-wheel-drive Fastrac agricultural tractor, and it holds the Guinness World Record for world’s fastest tractor. Which could be a little like claiming to be the world’s tallest midget, but the Fastrac Two really is fast, reaching over 150mph. Sowing that barley will take minutes.

This Technic recreation of the record-breaking tractor comes from JLiu15 of Flickr, and is complete with remote control drive and steering, a six cylinder engine, and authentic decals from the record-setting run. There’s more of the build to see at JLui15’s ‘JCB Fastrac Two’ album and the Eurobricks forum, where further imagery and a link to building instructions can be found; take a look via the links above whilst this TLCB Writer registers to be the world’s smallest giant.

EuroVan

This is the Volkswagen EuroVan, or the T4 Transporter to most of the world, produced from the early-’90s to the early-’00s, and available as a van, passenger vehicle, kombi, chassis-cab, pick-up and camper.

This one, being called a ‘EuroVan’, is the North American version, where the T4 Transporter was sold from 1992 and 2003, almost exclusively with VR6-power. In Europe we could get a 1.9 naturally-aspirated diesel with 60bhp, so really we think the ‘states should’ve got that one…

Anyway, this EuroVan comes from previous bloggee Danifill, who has recreated the ’90s Volkswagen brilliantly in Technic form. There’s remote control drive and steering via a BuWizz bluetooth brick, independent front and live axle rear suspension, working head and tail lights, and brick built VR6 engine under the opening hood.

There’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum – make the jump to all the details, imagery, and a video of the van in action via the link in the text above.

My Other John Deere is a Tractor

We love B-Model building here at The Lego Car Blog. It’s LEGO in its purest form, as even a limited quantity of pieces can generate infinite creative possibilities. Cue Thirdwigg, who has repurposed the parts from the LEGO Technic 42136 John Deere 9620R Tractor set to create this articulated dump truck. Working steering and a tipping bucket provide the Technic functions, and there’s more to see of Thirdwigg’s alternate – including building instructions – on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum.

Bean Machine

Trucks transport all sorts of things. Cheddar, smoothie makers, edam, garden furniture, camembert, desk lamps, mozzarella, brie…

Sorry, we got stuck in an infinite cheese loop. But as you (usually) can’t see what most trucks are carrying, it could well be hardened cow juice as much as anything else.

Not today though, as despite the cheesy colouring of Vladimir Drozd’s excellent Scania T143 truck, we’re 99% certain it’s hauling beans. Because it says ‘Bean Cargo Inc.’ on the side. And there’s a picture of a bean.

Despite the lack of cheese, Vladimir’s Scania is lovely build, with top-quality detailing, life-like decals, and a beautifully hidden remote control drivetrain within, powering the drive, steering, and the trailer’s tipping body.

Up to to 2kgs of bulk cargo (in this case almost definitely beans) can be transported and tipped, and there’s lots more to see of Vladimir’s superb creation at his ‘Scania T143’ Flickr album and via the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Take a look via the links above, whilst we go and make a cheese sandwich.

Stick it to ’em

The Lego Car Blog regularly chastises LEGO for their increasing and often unnecessary use of stickers in sets. Said sticky pictures have been dubiously deployed to create details that should be constructed from actual LEGO pieces, until that is, they inevitably peel off and you’re left with no details at all. We hate them.

So here’s a creation covered in a veritable butt-ton of stickers…

No, we’re not consistent. But nuno_g_teixeira’s be-stickered recreation of the 1981 Monte Carlo rally-winning Renault 5 Turbo is glorious.

Underneath the beautifully accurate decals, custom 3D-printed wheels, steering wheel and Recaro seats applied by Nuno is Lachlan Cameron’s brilliant Technic Renault 5 Turbo road car that appeared here last month.

Nuno’s fantastic rallyfication of Lachlan’s design replicates the rally-winning Renault in spectacular detail, largely thanks to the incredible period-correct livery of which you can see more at Lachlan’s photostream. Maybe stickers are alright after all…

Super Thursday

Technic Supercars have long been the pinnacle of the Technic line-up. Containing working steering, suspension, engine and gearbox, they’re as close as it’s possible to get to the engineering of real-world cars in Lego form.

They’re also a favourite build amongst advanced Lego car designers, and we’ve featured dozens of incredible Technic Supercars here at The Lego Car Blog over the years. Two more take their places in the Archives today, each being a fantastic example of the Technic Supercar form.

The first, in a rather splendid orange, is IA creations‘ ‘Apricus V8’, a fictional super sports car in the mould of the Dodge Viper, McLaren-Mercedes SLS and various Aston Martins according to the builder.

The slick bodywork certainly captures the aesthetic of the real-world cars that inspired the build, and under it lies a complete Technic Supercar chassis, with working steering, adjustable double-wishbone suspension, a paddle-shift sequential gearbox, and a V8 engine. There’s also a deployable rear wing, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, and there’s more to see of IA creations’ superb supercar concept on Eurobricks via the link above.

Our second Technic supercar comes from previous bloggee Pvdb, and replicates one of the greatest hypercars of recent times; the McLaren P1.

Launched in 2013, and sold out within two months, the P1 was McLaren’s first Hybrid hypercar, with over 900bhp and an electric-only range of… er, 6 miles. But still, that wasn’t exactly the point of the electric motor, which added 180bhp to the twin-turbo V8’s already substantial 737.

Constructed in 1:10 scale, Pvdb’s McLaren includes steering, adjustable suspension (complete with a ‘track’ model that also deploys the rear spoiler), scissor doors, and an eight-speed gearbox (one more than the real thing!), authentically operated via steering wheel paddles.

It’s a masterclass in Technic Supercars one of which can see more at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to take a closer look, and if you’re thinking of having a go at Technic Supercar building yourself, we might just have a competition later in the year that’ll be of interest…