Category Archives: Technic

Lean on Me

Lego RC Trike

Weird electric city vehicles seem to pop up all the time in concept form tasked with easing urban congestion and cutting pollution. And then no-one ever builds one because, frankly, consumers would rather sit traffic breathing polluted air in a giant SUV.

Still, one day maybe these things will take off, but until then we’ll make do with previous bloggee Nico71‘s BuWizz-powered leaning tricycle. Similar to Toyota’s limited production i-Road concept, or those weird three-wheeled Piaggio scooter thingies, Nico’s concept can actively lean into corners to keep it stable, and with up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system from the BuWizz bluetooth brick, it probably needs that function.

It’s not our usual fodder here at The Lego Car Blog, but it’s a rather cleverly engineered build and one that we’ll probably all be driving in real life at some point. See more on Brickshelf via the link above.

Lego RC Trike

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Grab an Elf

Lego Technic John Deere 648L Skidder

It’s a tough life being a The Lego Car Blog Elf. You spend all day dodging dogs and seagulls in the hope of finding a Lego creation worth blogging so that you’ll get fed, and then whilst you’re asleep in the cage room one of your colleagues drives in a remote control tractor with a giant mechanical claw on the back, picks you up and dunks you in the toilet.

Still, they bring it upon themselves. The vehicle responsible is this rather impressive fully remote controlled Technic John Deere 648L by Brickshelf’s pipasseyoyo, complete with twin L motor drive, articulated steering via two mini linear actuators, a remotely raising/lowering front mounted blade, raising, rotating and opening claw, and an inline-6 piston engine.

It’s a lovely bit of kit and there’s more to see of pipasseyoyo’s build via Brickshelf, where there is also a link to a video of the model in action. Click the link above to take a look.

Lego Technic John Deere 648L Skidder

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Back of the Bus

Lego Technic RC School Bus

It’s Valentines Day here at The Lego Car Blog Towers, but with only the Elves bringing us anything we may as well get straight down to some tenuously-linked Lego models!

This is ArsMan064‘s Technic school bus, which on the face of it has nothing to do with the day of love whatsoever, but the humble school bus has probably had more teenage bodily fluids secreted into it than any other vehicle. Gross.

It’s powered by a Medium Motor with a Servo for steering, and another Medium motor opens the cabin door electrically. There’s nifty leaf-sprung suspension and LED lights too. Relive your high-school conquests/regrets via Eurobricks at the link above.

Lego Technic RC School Bus

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Kiss My RS

Lego Technic Ford Focus RS

Ford’s current 345bhp all-wheel-drive Focus RS has gained worldwide recognition for being, well… mental. Now sold in the U.S, Ford are showing their traditional customer base that you don’t need five litres and eight cylinders to make a performance car.

However the RS has actually existed in all three generations of Focus, with the previous version being fitted with a glorious five-cylinder turbo engine from Volvo, then under Ford’s ownership, making 300bhp.

If that wasn’t enough power you could get your hands on one of just five-hundred RS500 versions, which upped boost to unleash a monstrous 345bhp (the same as the current car), but with all of that going through only the front wheels. Wet roundabouts must have been fun…

This spectacular Technic replica of Ford’s second generation Focus RS500 comes from previous bloggee Dugald Cameron and it’s absolutely packed with working functions. A five-cylinder inline engine sits under the hood linked to a six-speed gearbox, all wheels are independently suspended, and the car can be steered both by the steering wheel, which is also adjustable, and via a ‘Hand-of-God’ mechanism. A pneumatic e-brake is also fitted, the seats are fully adjustable, and the doors, hood and hatchback all open.

A huge gallery of images is available to view via Dugald’s Focus RS500 Flickr album and you can read more about the build and watch a video of the Focus RS’s features at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

Lego Technic Ford Focus RS

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Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots

Lego RC Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots

Regular readers of this little corner of the internet will know that our mythical Elven workforce is often spectacularly violent. Frankly we wouldn’t put up with them if it weren’t for the fact that TLCB Elves can sneak into places that we can’t, we only have to pay them in meal tokens and Smarties, and – if we’re honest – we have a strong aversion to manual labour. It’s better if we send the Elves out and sit in a nice comfy chair…

Anyhoo, this Elven love of violence is rarely matched in the creations they bring back (although they often find a way), but today one of our smelly little workers discovered a pair of creations that’s almost as violent as they are.

This wonderful pair of remote control Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em style Technic robots is the work of R. Skittle of Flickr, and not only can his creations remotely drive around, they can really punch one another too! Both arms have a remotely controlled action that aims to dislodge their opponents’ head, so you can ‘knock his block off’.

We like this idea very much and thus we’re going to conduct some ‘research’ with a couple of ‘volunteer’ Elves. Whilst we see who’s the better boxer, Elf or Robot, you can see more of R. Skittles’ robots on Flickr via the link above, where you can also find a link to Lego Ideas so you can vote for the concept to become an official LEGO set. Still not convinced? Take a look at the video below!

YouTube Video

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Little Erection

Lego Technic Mobile Crane

It’s not size that matters but what you can do with it, and Eurobricks’ Paave can do a lot. This diddy Technic mobile crane might be considerably smaller than pretty much any other Technic creation we’ve blogged, but it’s got more squeezed inside it than your Mom’s corset.

The rotating superstructure, elevating and extending boom, hoist, steering and outriggers are all functional via hand-powered mechanics, and Paave has managed to ensure his model looks pretty good too. It’s just the sort of thing we’d like to see from an entry-level Technic set and there’s more to see on Eurobricks via the link above or via Brickshelf here.

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Technic Snail

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

The Citroen 2CV, affectionately (and unaffectionately) known as ‘ the tin snail’ owing to its looks and glacial speed, is one one of the world’s most important cars. Yes, you did read that right.

Designed in the 1930s, Citroen’s Car-for-the-People was intended for France’s numerous rural workers who were largely still dependent upon the horse for transportation. Reliable, fuel efficient, easy to maintain, and above all cheap, the 2CV was engineered to mobilise an entire population class. And then Hitler decided to be ‘a bit of a dick’.

The German invasion and the subsequent commandeering of French factories to build stuff for blowing up the British meant production for the innovative and much-needed 2CV never started. Fearful of the Nazi’s stealing the design, Citroen hid their 2CV prototypes across France in the hope they would remain undetected (some of which are still being unearthed today).

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

The Allied victory in 1945 left behind a ruined France, but thankfully for Citroen an undetected cache of 2CV prototypes. Three years later, and a decade after the car was first engineered, the 2CV finally reached production.

As much as Europe’s poor workers needed cheap reliable transportation before World War 2, they really needed it afterwards, and the little Citroen was a huge success. Half the price of Germany’s ‘People’s Car’ – the Volkswagen Beetle, the 2CV sold almost 4 million units in a production run that spanned five decades and nine different countries.

When Citroen 2CV production finally ceased in 1990 the car had become a bit of a joke, but for much of its life the 2CV was the most important car in Europe, and is surely one of the greatest car designs ever created.

Lego Technic Citroen 2CV

This fitting tribute to one of France’s icons of motoring comes from previous bloggee and Technic building legend Nico71 who has recreated the simplicity of Citroen’s engineering beautifully. The 2CV’s legendary leading and trailing arm suspension (designed so a peasant could carry eggs unbroken across a ploughed field) has been faithfully reproduced in Lego form, plus there’s working steering and the doors, hood and trunk all open.

There’s lots more of Nico71’s brilliant Technic 2cv to see via Brickshelf, plus you watch a video of the model on YouTube by clicking here.

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Back in Black

Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS Remote Control

LEGO’s 42056 official Porsche 911 GT3 RS set is a spectacular flagship for the Technic range. It’s just a shame it’s mostly spectacularly priced, rather than spectacularly engineered. Here’s what 42056 could have been, Paave‘s brilliant medium scale 911 GT3 RS.

Inspired by the official set, only downsized, Paave’s black GT3 features independent suspension, opening doors, hood and engine cover, adjustable seats, and – in lieu of the set’s (mostly hidden) flat-6 piston engine – a suite of Power Functions remote control goodness.

An on-board LiPo battery powers twin L Motor drive whilst a Servo motor allows for precise steering, all cunningly hidden away underneath the realistic bodywork. There’s more to see of Paave’s remote control Porsche 911 GT3 RS at the Eurobricks forum – take a look via the link above.

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Cat’s Claw

Lego CAT 434E Remote Control Backhoe

Digging cats. It normally means they’re doing something horrible in your garden. Not today though, because this CAT 434E backhoe is something rather wonderful.

Built by Zbiczasty of Brickshelf it’s near a perfect functioning replica of Caterpillar’s real 4×4 backhoe, complete with no less than fourteen working functions.

The all-wheel-drive is remotely controlled, including remotely operable pneumatic differential locks, pendular front suspension, and three steering modes (front, all, and crab), exactly as per LEGO’s own brilliant 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 tractor set.

Lego CAT 434E Remote Control Backhoe

Of course there’s a working front loader – also powered by remotely controlled pneumatics – with both bucket and boom movement, and a fiendishly complicated pneumatic backhoe with five different movements from elevation to slewing.

Finally there are pneumatic stabiliser legs mounted at the rear and a suite of LED lights. It’s a remarkable machine and one of the most realistically engineered Lego creations that we’ve ever come across.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Zbiczasty’s Caterpillar 434E backhoe at the Brickshelf gallery via the link above, but the only way to really appreciate how well this model works is to watch it in action – check out the video below to see just how good it is.

YouTube Video

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Perfect Pajero

Lego Technic Mitsubishi Pajero

This little red box is a 1980s 3-door Mitsubishi Pajero, and we want one. Launched long before the SUV/crossover craze arrived, the humble Pajero came from a time when Japanese off-roaders ruled, and they really could go off-road. This made them horrible to drive on-road of course, but back in the ’80s if you bought a Pajero there was probably a good chance that you did actually want to take it away from the black stuff.

Lego Technic Mitsubishi Pajero

This brilliant Technic recreation of one of the finest ’80s 4x4s comes from Kevin Moo of Eurobricks, and not only does it look absolutely spot-on it’s packing some neat functionality too, with remote control drive and steering, LED head and tail lights, working suspension, and an opening hood, doors and tailgate. There’s lots more to see of Kevin’s remote controlled Mitsubishi Pajero model at the Eurobricks discussion forum – Click the link above to make a jump to 1982.

Lego Technic Mitsubishi Pajero

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Centenarian

Lego Technic RC Lamborghini Centenario

This is a Lamborghini Centenario, Lamborghini’s birthday present to, er… itself. Whatever, the world is better place for mental Lamborginis, and the Centenario is surely one of their most mental efforts to date.

Just forty Centenarios were produced from 2016-17 to celebrate the would-be 100th birthday of the company’s founder Ferruccio Lamborghini, with each car costing a ridiculous $2.2million. Powered by a version of the Lamborghini’s familiar 6.5 litre V12 producing 770bhp, the all-carbon Centenario is no faster than the Aventador upon which it’s based, but it is vastly more expensive, and it seems in world of limited-production supercars that a high price is almost as celebrated as a high top speed.

Not here at The Lego Car Blog though, so we’ll move on quickly from Lamborghini’s extravagant gift to itself in favour of this, Lachlan Cameron’s spectacular remote control Technic version. Controlled by two SBrick bluetooth receivers, with remote control steering and drive, electrically opening doors, a V12 piston engine, functioning gearbox, LED head and tail lights, and some trick in-board independent suspension, Lachlan’s model is a work engineering mastery.

There’s lots more to see of Lachlan’s Technic Lamborghini Centenario at his photostream plus you can read further details and join the discussion via the Eurobricks forum. Click the links to join the birthday party.

Lego Technic RC Lamborghini Centenario

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The Yellow Brick Road

Lego Technic ZIL 4327 Trial Truck

We’re not going to post a link that that hateful song* here, but it does make for a suitably tenuous title. This is a ZIL 4327 trial truck, designed to go anywhere. Truck trial motorsport is similar to motorcycle trials riding, in that a motorised vehicle must get as far along a fiendishly difficult obstacle course as possible with the fewest faults. Only in truck trial the competitors are trying to do it in a vehicle that weighs tons.

Lego truck trial miniaturises this unusual form of motorsport and sends its tiny competitors out into the forests of Europe armed only with a remote control and a battery pack. You could do worse than follow this bright yellow ZIL 4327 by ArsMan064 though, which like its full-size counterparts can go almost anywhere the road ends.

Drive comes from an XL Motor whilst three Medium Motors power the steering, winch and two-speed gearbox. With all-wheel-drive and huge ground clearance thanks to its long-travel suspension ArsMan’s ZIL is a wonderfully capable machine.

Click the link above to follow the yellow bricks off-road (see what we did there!) via the Eurobricks forum.

*Oh go on then. Click at your peril.

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Ultimate Ferrari 458 Spider

Lego Technic Ferrari 456 Spider

We’ve publicised loads of Lego Ferrari 458 Italias over the years (like this one, this one, this one, this one, and this one). The Lego Community isn’t short of 458s then, but this beautiful Technic Supercar made us all stop and take notice.

Built by previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens it’s a commission piece in 1:10 scale, and not only does it look fantastic, it’s packed with working technical features too.

Independent suspension on all wheels, working steering with Ackerman geometry, a mid-mounted V8 piston engine connected to a functioning sequential gearbox, opening doors, hood and trunk, and the 458 Spider’s party-piece folding hardtop roof are all present.

Jeroen’s has photographed his Ferrari 458 Spider superbly and it’s available to view on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum – take a look via the links above.

Lego Technic Ferrari 456 Spider

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Enormous Erection

Lego Technic Liebherr LR 11000 Remote Control

Even your Mom hasn’t seen one this big.

This is a Liebherr LR 11000 crane, and it’s seven and half meters tall in its full configuration (or 2.5 metres when indoors so it fits!). Built in 1:24 scale, this brick-built behemoth weighs 27kg, including 5kg of lead ballast. Other than that lead weight, some string, and a few 3D-printed pulleys, the entire model is completely constructed from standard LEGO pieces. Which makes it even more astonishing that this enormous replica works.

Lego Technic Liebherr LR 11000 Remote Control

Dawid Szmandra is the engineering genius behind the build, and yes this 27kg Lego creation really does work. With four Mindstorms EV3 processors, nine motors, seven light sensors and a touch sensor, this incredible creation can do everything that the real Liebherr LR 11000 can do. Only at one twenty-fourth the scale. Which is still massive.

Lego Technic Liebherr LR 11000 Remote Control

The drive to the tracks comes from two EV3 Medium Motors, whilst another can rotate the entire superstructure. Five Large Motors plus another Medium power the six separate winches, whilst the sensors can measure the load and winching distance.

The result is a crane, built entirely from little plastic bricks remember, that can lift a chair. There’s only one way fully appreciate what this incredible creation can do and that’s to view it in action. Join us watching in amazement via the video below, and you can see all the images of Dawid’s unbelievable model at his Flickr photostream and via the Eurobricks discussion forum.

YouTube Video

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Toyota Hilux – Picture Special

Lego Toyota Hilux 4x4

Toyota’s legendary Hilux is now in its eighth generation, and it’s more impressive than ever. But we’d rather have this one, a glorious mid-’80s fourth gen. Still seen all around the world in the most inhospitable climates, the ’80s Hilux has become something of a cult car, helped no doubt by BBC Top Gear’s unsuccessful attempts to destroy one.

Lego Technic Toyota Hilux 4x4

Which makes it a little strange that we don’t see more Hiluxes recreated in LEGO form. However today, after three years of engineering, we do have a LEGO Hilux to share, courtesy of Technic wizard Egor Karshiev (aka rm8).

Egor’s N40 series Toyota Hilux looks absolutely spot-on, even including the famous ‘TOYOTA’ script on the tailgate. Underneath the accurate Technic bodywork Egor has installed a wealth of superb off-roading goodies, allowing his model Hilux to do everything the real one can. Only in miniature obviously…

Lego Technic Toyota Hilux 4x4 RC

An XL motor provides power to all four wheels via differentials on each axle, both of which are solid and fitted with three or four link suspension. Remotely controlled steering is provided by a Servo motor, LEDs illuminate the headlights, and a third-party SBrick bluetooth receiver allows the model to be controlled via a mobile phone.

Finally the entire pick-up bed is removable, and the doors, hood and tailgate all open, revealing an engine bay and a detailed five-seat interior.

Lego Technic Toyota Hilux 4x4 RC

Egor has built both stock and ‘adventure’ versions of his remote control Hilux and has photographed them brilliantly both in-studio and in some awesome outdoor shots. There are lots more images available of both the stock and adventure versions on Flickr via the links above, you can read full build details at Egor’s MOCpage, and you can join in the discussion at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here.

Finally of course, no Technic model can be considered a proper remote control off-roader without a suitably cool video. Take at look at the Hilux in action below…

YouTube Video:

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