Category Archives: Technic

Civic Duty

Lego Technic Honda Civic EG

Ah, the humble Honda Civic. Built in TLCB’s home nation, and once – even if not any more – the byword for advanced yet reliable hatchbackery.

The Civic has since been overtaken by the Korean brands here in Europe, but early examples are still a reasonably regular sight on the roads due to their legendary reliability. It’s an even more common sight on the banger track, as early Civics are worth about £5 and they can take a serious amount of punishment before heading to the great carpark in the sky.

America is where the Honda Civic was really successful though, where – despite it being basically the same car as the one we have in Europe – the little Japanese hatch has trodden a very different path in the annuls of automotive history.

Today early Stateside Civics seem to all have one thing in common; modifications. Bad modifications. Here at TLCB we’re not really sure why this is, seeing as gas, cars, and insurance are so cheap in the ‘States why not just buy a faster car in the first place?

Lego Honda Civic

The upshot of this is that finding an original unmodified early Civic is like trying to find an educated climate change denier – it’s virtually impossible. Which is a shame, as the late ’80s and early ’90s Civics were great little cars when left as Honda intended.

If you’re reading this in America and have a hankering for an unmolested slice of early ’90s Honda pie, get on Craigslist, find 78 year old Mavis who’s recently given up driving, and buy her Civic. It’ll be a classic one day. Probably.

Alternatively though, you could build your own, which is exactly what TLCB regular Nico71 has done. Based on the ’90s fifth generation (EG) Civic hatch, Nico’s creation is gloriously simple looking. It’s not simple inside though, as a full RC Power Functions drivetrain and rear suspension system have been squeezed in.

It’s quite a feat of packaging and handily Nico has taken photos that show how it’s all been done. You can see all of the images of Nico’s little Technic Honda, inside and out, via Brickshelf – click the link above to make the jump to ’91.

Lego Technic RC Honda Civic

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Crawler Grabber

Lego Technic RC Tracked Grab

This weird-looking device is apparently a Crawler-Grabber, and we suppose it is, seeing as it both crawls and grabs. It’s the work of TLCB favourite Nico71, and it can lift a TLCB Elf surprisingly high into the air before dropping it into the toilet. Don’t worry, we didn’t press the flush.

Controlled remotely via LEGO’s Power Functions system, Nico’s creation is able to drive, skid steer, and elevate and extend the boom. It looks a bit like one of those RC bomb disposal robots and as such we may well put it to use removing Elf droppings from the Cage Room. Whilst we get cleaning you can see more on Brickshelf – click here to grab a look.

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Lego Technic RC Mecalac MTX

Suggested by a reader, and looking like a cross between and ant and an elephant, this Mecalac MTX articulated excavator is one of the weirdest (and ugliest) vehicles we’ve featured in some time.

However, much like the real Mecalac, this remote controlled replica by newcomer proran of Eurobricks is a very clever bit of kit. No fewer than five Power Functions motors, five linear actuators, and three IR receivers control everything from the drive and articulated steering to the outriggers, 360 degree slew, four-section independent boom elevation, and bucket articulation.

You can see how all of that works at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where there are also digital renders of the mechanics and a video of the MTX in action.

Lego Technic RC Mecalac MTX

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Dig This

Lego Technic RC Excavator

We were going to start this post by stating that good things come in eights, but we ran out of ideas after hot dog buns, pirate gold, and octopus tentacles. No matter, because this superb remote control Technic excavator from Brickshelf’s pipasseyoyo can add another group of eight to the list, as it has eight Power Functions motors packed inside.

Controlling everything from the boom elevation, superstructure rotation, stabilisers, blade, and bucket, this excavator is a real showcase for what LEGO motors can do when in the right hands. There’s a huge gallery of images available, plus a link to a video of those eight motors in action, at pipasseyoyo’s Brickshelf account – click the link above if you dig it.

Lego Technic RC Excavator

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A Soviet Smasher


It’s been a fairly calm week at The Lego Car Blog Towers. You can therefore imagine our dismay, as we stumbled down the steps into our luxury penthouse editorial suite and found smushed Elves embedded in the Axminster. It could only mean one thing: the Elves had found a Technic Power Functions model.

This particular creation was discovered on MOCpages. It’s been built by Piotr K and features working 6×6 drive, suspension and gears. Weighing just over 2.5kg, it’s slightly lighter than the 1950s original.  Sadly that weight of bricks can smush even the largest of our workforce. Whilst we’re cleaning up, click this link to MOCpages to see more photos and a video of the machine in action.

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Two Technic Trucks


A successful raiding party of Elves has returned from the Eurobricks forums with not one but two Technic lorries. First up is an RC Isuzu NPR from Shineyu. This little gem is a real contrast to the massive front loader from the same builder, which we featured earlier in the week. Fortunately its small size meant that there was nowhere near the same scale of Elf carnage as on Monday.

In the meantime, there was no Elf carnage at all caused by Razor‘s Scania R500 6×4, as his Power Functions pieces are deployed in another MOC. Nonetheless, this lorry looks great and takes advantage of some of the new Technic panels in blue to get a smooth cab. Click the links in the text to see more of each vehicle.


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Trucking Down to Dakar


Well, Buenos Aires to be truthful. The Lego Car Blog Elves love visiting Sariel’s Lego workshop at It’s the home of great Technic builds and there’s often hamster food lying around for our workers to steal to supplement their rations.

Sariel’s latest creation is this bright and brilliant Dakar Truck, based on a Tatra T815 4×4. It uses Lego’s bright, lime green, of which Sariel is apparently a big fan, plus loads of custom stickers. Twin Lego RC motors power the truck to 12kph, giving occasional cornering problems, as you can see in the video below.

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We’re Going to Need a Bigger Bucket…


…and actuators and tyres and pretty much everything else too. This beast of machine comes from Hong Kong based builder Shineyu and was discovered by our Elves on the Eurobricks Technic forum. It’s on such a massive scale that normal Technic tyres have had to be replaced with non-Lego RC car ones. The linear actuators are built from scratch, as is the bucket: 42030‘s is just too small.  Click the link in the text to see more photos, including comparisons with standard Lego parts and click below to see the machine in action.

N.B.  You’re probably wondering why a TLCB post featuring a piece of large, Power Functions construction equipment contains no references to chaos, smushings, Elf fights and the other usual stuff.  Well you’ve been reading this blog for long enough to expect that this all happened as usual but on a far, far larger scale.  Right, we’re off to browse eBay for a bulk buy of compressed air canisters for Mr. Airhorn and stain remover for the office carpet.

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Toyota Land Cruiser Prado – Picture Special

Lego Technic Toyota Land Cruiser Prado RC

The best 4×4 in the world is not a Land Rover. Or a Jeep. Or a Hummer (and if you were thinking of suggesting that last one go back to school). It’s this, Toyota’s ubiquitous Land Cruiser Prado. Now quite a rare beast in TLCB’s home nation, having lost favour to far more efficient – but far less capable – cross-overs, the Land Cruiser is still the 4×4 of choice for most of the world.

Lego Technic Toyota Prado 4x4 Remote Control

This awesome remote control Technic recreation of Toyota’s iconic 4×4 is the work of KevinMoo, and it’s a really trick bit of kit. There’s four-wheel-drive complete with remotely locking differentials, independent front and live axel rear suspension, working steering, gearbox, head and tail lights, and opening doors and tailgate, plus Kevin’s Prado can be operated remotely via a bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick control unit.

There’s a whole lot more to see of this brilliant build at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to take a trip into the rough stuff.

Lego Remote Control Toyota Land Cruiser Prado 4x4

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Back in Black

Lego Technic Ford 5 Window Coupe Hot Rod

This lovely Ford 5-Window Coupe hot rod was discovered on Brickshelf by one of our Elves. It comes from newcomer TeddyMagenta, and besides looking the part it’s got a working piston engine, 4-speed gearbox, functioning steering, front and rear suspension, and opening doors and boot-lid. There’s lots more to see of this excellent build at Teddy’s Brickshelf gallery – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Ford Hot Rod

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To Protect and Serve…

Lego Technic Trophy Truck Police

Mr. Airhorn has done sterling work over the years*. Much feared by our Elven workforce, this humble combination of plastic trumpet and compressed gas has been the dominating force in restoring order and emptying TLCB Towers of Elves when needed.

Now, thanks to a reader, we think we can add another tool to our armoury. This gloriously insane Technic trophy truck comes from 1711902090 of Brickshelf, and it’s everything an Elf would look for in a vehicle with which to cause wanton destruction. Remote control, large-travel suspension, monster V6 engine with supercharger… But this creation isn’t for the Elves, thanks to what’s printed on each side;


The Elves fear any authority, and that six-letter words gives us all the excuses we need to commandeer this machine for our own purposes. Namely chasing our smelly little workforce out of the office when we’ve had enough of them.

We’re pretty sure that the Elves can’t read, so there’s little danger of them learning about our new weapon here at Whilst we give it a go this afternoon you can check out all of the images of 1711902090’s magnificent model on Brickshelf via the link above.

*Like here. And here. And here, here, here, here and here. And here.

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Dropped D21

Lego Technic Nissan D21 Remote Control

No sooner had we published a reader review of LEGO’s infamous buggy motor than two Elves returned to TLCB Towers with a Buggy Motor powered creation. Maybe they can read after all? The first of their Buggy Motor propelled finds you can view below, the second is this; Filsawgood’s brilliant 1991 Nissan D21 Hardbody pick-up.

Like today’s other blogged model Filsawgood’s D21 uses the combination of a Buggy Motor driving the rear wheels, a Servo for steering, and a third-party SBrick for control via bluetooth device, plus there’s all-wheel suspension and custom stickers.

The D21 hardbody is also a damn cool antidote for our deep-rooted loathing of the pick-up truck genre at the hands of hateful crap like the Dodge Ram. You can see more of Filsawgood’s glorious early ’90s Nissan at both Flickr and Eurobricks – click the links for the full gallery, build details, and a video of the truck in action.

Lego Datsun Nissan D21 Hardbody Pick-Up

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Lego Technic RC Drift Car

Entitled simply ‘SBrick Powered Streetcar’, Horcik Designs’ latest creation extols the virtues of one of LEGO’s most sought after pieces, the 5292 ‘Buggy’ Motor. Linked to a third-party SBrick, a LEGO LiPo battery, and a Servo Motor for steering, the aforementioned motor gives Horcik’s car a rapid turn of speed, and makes it capable of drifts on a shiny floor too.

There are 3D printed wheels, custom decals and cut LEGO tyres alongside that non-LEGO control unit, and there’s more to see at Horcik’s photostream here or via the Eurobricks forum here. Get sideways at the links.

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8845 Redux

Lego Technic 8845 Redux

Technic, this writer’s favourite theme, used to look a bit weird. Its focus was on functions, not aesthetics (perhaps the opposite of where we are today), and it was all the better for it. But what if some of those early Technic sets could be updated with today’s smoother construction methods?

Handily MOCpages’ Nils O has decided to find out, rebuilding 1981’s 8845 Dune Buggy set using the latest studless pieces, and the the result is… well, still a bit weird to be honest. Nevertheless, it’s an area of building we’d like to see more often, and Nils’ buggy features all the charm of the original but updated for the current age.

There’s more to see of Nils’ 8845 Redux on MOCpages via the link above, and you can read his review of the original 1981 Technic set as part of the Review My Set Competition by clicking here.

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Lego Technic Remote Control 4x4 Crawler

Another day and another Elf successfully returns to TLCB Towers. Today’s find is the work of Stari89, and it’s quite a cleverly engineered creation. Featuring remote control all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering, a flat-4 ‘boxer’ engine, live axle suspension, and opening gull-wing doors, Stari’s stealthy black ‘Trial Crawler’ includes as many features as LEGO’s own version. There’s lots more to see, including some great chassis photos, via Eurobricks and Brickshelf.

Lego Technic 4x4 Crawler

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