Tag Archives: Wrecker

Just Add String

The LEGO Technic 42098 Car Transporter is a fine set, and it’s also spawned a variety of alternative builds that have appeared here at TLCB, including hook-lift container trucks, buses, and… er, other car transporters, and this might be our favourite yet.

With ‘HOG’ steering, a 6-cylinder engine, opening doors and hood, rear lift, boom extension, elevation and rotation, working out-riggers, and a lockable winch, Dyen’s rotator tow truck would make an excellent set in its own right, and yet it’s constructed entirely from the parts found within the 42098 set.

Well, apart from some string for the winch, but everyone has string at home so that’s alright.

There’s more to see of Dyen’s superb 42098 B-Model at both Flickr and the Eurobricks discussion forum, where a link to building instructions can also be found.

Click the links to take a look, and maybe convert the pieces from your own 42098 set into this rotator tow truck too. Just add string.

LEGO Technic 42128 Heavy-Duty Tow Truck | Set Preview

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been busy! Fired over the LEGO Company HQ’s perimeter wall by way of the office catapult, it’s been just a day since we revealed the brand new LEGO Technic LEGO Technic 42126 Ford F-150 Raptor set. Hot the heels of that Elf comes another, and it’s brought back quite a model; this is the brand new for 2021 LEGO Technic 42128 Heavy-Duty Tow Truck.

With over 2,000 pieces 42128 pays homage to various American heavy-duty trucks, sits at the top of the new-for-2021 Technic line-up*, and – most excitingly – it features pneumatics!

More interestingly, unlike some other recent pneumatic sets, 42128 is unmotorised, with its pair of pneumatic cylinders fed compressed air via a hand pump like the good ol’ days. These lift and extend the crane boom, whilst the pair of winches, crane rotation, rear lift, and stabiliser legs are all mechanically operated by hand. Which is awesome.

Not only that, there’s a miniature working inline-6 engine upfront, working steering, and a functioning lift on the first of the truck’s three axles.

It all looks wonderfully mechanical, and that’s despite 42128 continuing LEGO’s trend of adding ever more visual realism to Technic sets, which are now at almost Model Team levels of detail. The 42128 Heavy-Duty Tow Truck certainly contains heaps of exterior detailing, including fuel tanks, exhaust stacks, air filters, and a brick-built grille.

Less positive are the stickers though, which are surely some of the worst that LEGO has ever stuck on a Technic model. Still, you can always leave those off.

The new Technic 42128 Heavy-Duty Tow Truck set will reach stores in August of 2021 aimed at ages 11+, and is expected to cost around $150/£140 when it does so. Excited? We sure are. Although we’ll probably leave those decals unstuck.

*Or is it?… Tune in tomorrow for something even larger.

Little Tow

This pleasingly-coloured classic tow truck was found by one of our Elves on Flickr today, and the only thing detracting from its perfection is that it’s pictured here towing what looks like a Toyota AE86, an impossibility because – as we all know – Corollas never break down.

Otherwise TLCB regular de-marco has nailed it, and you can recreate his ‘Old Tow Truck’ for yourself as instructions are available. Head to de-marco’s photostream via the link above for more.

SuperGreat

Unlike today’s other off-road truck post, this one certainly doesn’t have a bland name. The Mitsubishi Fuso SuperGreat FX 6×6 is an off-road military tow truck, depicted here in Technic Japanese Self Defence Force form.

All six wheels are driven by a Medium Motor, the steering is powered by a combination of a  Medium and a Micro Motor, whilst the crane rotation, elevation, extension, and outriggers are all controlled manually.

Leaf-spring suspension features too and there’s more to see courtesy of LXF (Brickshelf) / syclone (Eurobricks) via the links.

My Other Truck’s a Crane

LEGO’s seemingly endless supply of yellow Technic cranes continues with the new 42108 set released this year. Whilst the yellow eight-wheeled crane formula has been done to death, the 42108 set does include instructions for a more interesting B-Model, that being a heavy duty forklift that’s far more original than the main model it shares its pieces with.

However you guys are using TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition to do even better, first with the brilliant 42108 roll-off container truck published here last month, and now with this; newcomer oficinadelegodoandre‘s excellent rotator tow-truck, also built only from the parts found within the 42108 set.

A fully working rotating crane complete with a linear-actuator operated boom lift and working winch is the centrepiece of Andre’s alternate, whilst functioning stabilisers plus front and rear axle steering feature too.

There’s more to see at Andre’s ‘42108 B-Model’ album on Flickr via the link above, and you can read the competition rules and find out more about the prizes by clicking here!

War Wreckin’

The U.S military operates vehicles in some pretty inhospitable places. Currently most of these places are dust-filled ovens, putting the machinery in use under intense strain. And, let’s face it, they are American vehicles so they will break.

Unfortunately the local recovery services in such places are unlikely to be willing to help out, and – even if they were – an Abrams tank is probably a bit beyond their ability. Fortunately the U.S military has these ready to rescue their broken vehicles; the M936 6×6 Wrecker.

Built by TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg this mini-figure scale replica of the M936 may not be in ‘dust-filled oven’ camouflage but it is mightily accurate in all other respects. A working rotating crane, detachable stabilisers, and wonderful detailing are all included and there’s more to see at Ralph’s M936 Wrecker album on Flickr by clicking here.

Wreckin’ War

Breaking down in a war zone has gotta be pretty rubbish. Fortunately most militaries are prepared for such eventualities, deploying vehicles like this snappily named MK36NGE wrecker to recover their broken equipment. This cunningly created Lego version comes from Flickr’s joopatkleppie, who has included some excellent desert camouflage and recently expired Jeep to complete the scene. See more at the link above.

Tow Two

Every so often a creation arrives here at The Lego Car Blog Towers that makes us all go ‘…woah!’. This is one of those times. This beautifully presented model is Lucio Switch’s ‘Tow Truck MkII’ and it’s ridiculously brilliant.

As you’d expect for a model of this size (c10K parts and weighing 12.5 kgs) Lucio’s tow truck is motorised and remotely controlled, but before we even start looking at the electric functions there’s a host of non-motorised features to detail. These include all-wheel suspension (independent up front and live-axle at the rear), a fully suspended and pneumatically tilting cab complete with opening and locking doors, pneumatically suspended seats, and a V8 piston engine underneath. Storage lockers open on each side of the truck and five sets of Power Functions LEDs light the head and tail lights.

Which leads us nicely to the motorised functions, all of which are driven by LEGO’s Power Functions system with three on-board batteries hooked up to four third-party SBricks, allowing programable bluetooth control.

Nineteen separate Power Functions motors are present in Lucio’s model, with four XL motors powering the 8×4 drivetrain and three Servos turning the front two steering axles. Next are eight Medium motors, the first of which drives the pneumatic compressor that operates the aforementioned tilting cab and suspended seats.

The remaining seven Medium motors power the rotation and extension of the two enormous front outriggers, the extension of the two rear outriggers, the towing arm, and the rotation of the crane boom, whilst four Large motors power the crane lift, boom extension, and the two independent winches.

The four SBricks allow all of that functionality to be programmed neatly onto a smartphone from which the truck can be controlled remotely via bluetooth (take a look at the video below to see this in action), as otherwise you’d need a very large joystick controller indeed!

It’s one of the most outstandingly impressive Technic creations of 2019 and furthermore Lucio has presented his model beautifully, with superb high quality images and an excellent video demonstrating the truck’s functions. You can watch that video below, and you can see all the images at Lucio’s ‘Tow Truck MkII’ Flickr album here, join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum here, and read full details at Lucio’s own website by clicking here.

YouTube Video

Technic Towing

Huge, ungainly, and a regular picking up truckers. No, it’s not your Mom, but this enormous fully remote controlled Technic Kenworth tow truck by TLCB debutant Anatolich.

With twelve Power Functions motors, a 70cm length plus another 70cm of boom, and a 5kg weight, Anatolich’s Kenworth is one of the largest models of the year so far.

Those motors power a range of functions, with four taking care of the 8×4 drive, a Servo the steering, and the axle lift, outriggers, boom lift, boom extension, two winches and towing fork powered by a motor each.

If that wasn’t enough there’s also a V8 engine, working suspension, and no less than ten openable doors and compartments.

There’s lots more to see of Anatolich’s hugely impressive creation at both Eurobricks and on Flickr. Click on the links above to call for a tow.

Mack Daddy

Lego Mack LMSW 6x4 Wrecker

This utterly wonderful vehicle is a 1940s Mack LMSW 6×4 wrecker, as used by both civilian towing companies and the British and Canadian military during the Second World War. The LMSW was powered by a 10-litre 6-cylinder petrol engine driving the two rear axles, with a Garwood single and later double crane (as shown here) mounted above them, each of which was capable of lifting 8 tons. The fiendishly complicated-looking booms and stabilisers are actually very simple, using steel wires to winch into position without the need for hydraulics and other complications.

Lego Mack LMSW 6x4 Wrecker SBrick

This stunning Model Team creation comes from Flickr’s Dirk Klijn and he’s recreated the classic Mack absolutely beautifully. Underneath the unbelievably realistic and superbly detailed exterior is a fully remote controlled drive train, with a combination of XL and Servo motors plus a third-party SBrick bluetooth controller allowing the model to be driven via the SBrick app on a mobile phone.

Dirk’s model is one of the finest Lego trucks you’ll find anywhere and there’s more to see of his Mack LMSW on Flickr. Head over to the Mack’s Flickr album via the link in the text above for all of the superb images.

Lego Mack LMSW RC SBrick

Vintage Tow

Lego 1950s Tow Truck

This glorious 1950s tow truck by Flickr’s Redfern1950s is already making us feel like a slightly classier blog. Despite the sombre paint job and rusty chain it’s just so cool. There’s more to see at Red’s photostream – click the link above if you love this as much as we do.

Lego 1950s Tow Truck

Train Crane

Lego Bangor & Aroostook Crane

We don’t often post railway-related builds here at The Lego Car Blog, but when we do they’re good. As demonstrated here by William Dumond‘s beautifully recreated Town-scale Bangor & Aroostook BAR X127 wrecker. Clever building techniques are in evidence throughout the build, and it functions too. See more on Flickr via the link above.

Towing on Tour

Lego Technic Military Tow Truck

When you’re in middle of an Iraqi desert with mechanical trouble you can’t just call the AA. Luckily Ivan M has just the tool to help. Built to recover seriously heavy military hardware, Ivan’s military heavy duty tow truck features a V8 engine, working steering, all-wheel suspension, a rotating and raising crane, and a functioning winch. If your armoured car has broken down give him a call on either Flickr or Eurobricks.

Kenworth Kaizen

Lego Kenworth K100 Wrecker

Kaizen. The philosophy of continual small improvements first pioneered in Japan by Toyota, is now a worldwide business practice. And thanks to the inherent characteristics of the LEGO brick, it’s a process that builders can apply too.

First featured on this site way back in 2013, Dennis Bosman (aka LegoTrucks) has recently updated his stunning Kenowrth K100 wrecker with a myriad of small improvements.

Lego Kenworth K100 Wrecker

From grey to chrome, standard to dark green, and studs to smooth, LEGO’s continual product development has allowed Dennis to take advantage of an expanding variety of bricks to refresh his beautiful Model Team Kenworth wrecker.

There’s more to see on Flickr, and you can check out our interview with Dennis as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

Lego Kenworth K100 Wrecker

Big Tow

Lego MAN TGX Tow Truck

Heavy duty tow trucks such as this huge MAN TGX spend most of their time at the side of the road waiting for a trucker in need*. This brilliant Model Team TGX wrecker is an updated build by previous bloggee Nanko Klein Paste, and it’s packed with detail inside and out, with everything that a stricken truck could require. There’s also twin-axle working steering, multiple opening compartments and a working under-lift too. There’s lots more to see on Flickr – click the link above to call for a tow.

Lego MAN Heavy Duty Wrecker

*Just like your Mom