Tag Archives: New

Lego Technic H2 2017 – Set Previews!

Lego Technic 42068 Airport Fire Truck

Yup, after a few days away from TLCB keyboard we’re back! We’d been waiting for a crack team of Elves to return from a secret mission infiltrating The Lego Company headquarters, and we’re pleased to announce that some of them have returned safely!

The lucky returnees are enjoying the fame and glory associated with bringing back the clearest images yet of LEGO’s summer Technic releases, and the fact that there are no alsatians for them to evade in the grounds of TLCB Towers.

So, on to the first new set!

42068 – Airport Rescue

LEGO’s first new addition to the Technic range is this, 42068, and we feel like we’ve seen it before. Yes, it does bear a striking resemblance to 8454 from the bad-old days of Technic, but on closer inspection it’s a far more realistic attempt at an airport firetruck than was made in 2003.

With no Power Functions or Pneumatic System, 42068 relies on good ol’ fashioned mechanics to enable its working functions. Front and rear steering and a manually raising and extending boom are the key features, and the set employs a wealth of stickerage to liven up what is basically a panelled box sat atop six wheels. Next.

Lego Technic 42069 Extreme Explorer

42069 – Extreme Explorer

Are LEGO running out of new ideas for Technic vehicles? If 42069 is anything to go by, probably. Loosely based on a tracked arctic exploration vehicle, the Extreme Explorer drops into the 2017 Technic line-up right at the top, being aimed at ages 11+, and the box – intriguingly – has no upper age limit. That stops us having to make excuses to long-suffering partners at least!

With a few unusual purple panels and four separate independently sprung tracks, 42069 looks like a set that’ll be snapped up by those wishing to increase their parts stock, but we’re not sure how well it stacks up in its own right.

In addition to those suspended tracks there’s front axle steering, gull-wing doors, flashy stickers (not shown on the box above) and a working winch. There also looks to be a gearbox too, although we’re not convinced that this is the conventional sort, and it may be more to do with suspension settings or all-track-drive capabilities.

42069 will reach stores in the second half of 2017 and will be priced towards the top end of the Technic line-up, but with no pneumatics or Power Functions components it could offer a decent piece count for the price.

Lego Technic 42070 6x6

42070 – 6×6 All Terrain Tow Truck

This is more like it! With over 1,800 pieces and Power Functions remote control, 42070 becomes the flagship set in the 2017 line-up when it arrives later in the year.

Just like your Mom, this thing is massive, with those six suspended wheels running on the same tyres as the brilliant 42054 Claas Xerion tractor set.

We expect 42070 to include full remote control drive and steering, working support legs at the sides and rear, and a gearbox to transfer the motorised power to a remotely operable crane and winch.

We’ll see if we’re right when 42070 lands later on this year, but expect it to be expensive!

There you have it, the 2017 Technic line-up is now complete, plus rumour has it that combining these sets allows you to build a modern take on the very first LEGO Technic supercar set too.

We’ll bring you further set news later on in the year, and in the meantime you can check out all the official LEGO sets that have been reviewed here at The Lego Car Blog so far by visiting the enormous Set Review Library.

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2017 LEGO Technic Preview!

Lego Technic 42066 Jet 2017

Yes it’s that time of year again, when a crack team of Elves ‘volunteer’ to be fired over the perimeter wall of The Lego Company’s HQ, tasked with bringing back the brand new Technic sets due for release next year. Elves that manage to successfully navigate the maze of air-conditioning ducts and dodge the guard dogs return as heroes, by which we mean they get fed, and we get to reveal LEGO’s newest Technic sets before they hit the shelves in the new year. On to the sets!

42066 – Air Race Jet

Pictured above, the LEGO Technic 42066 Air Race Jet puts the Technic line-up’s on/off relationship with aircraft back into the ‘on’ position. Clearly based on a well-known military aircraft, 42066 covers up its death-from-above intentions with some jazzy stickers, but they look passable if nothing more than that. The set features working elevators and tail rudders, folding landing gear, and an opening cockpit, and will sit in the middle of the 2017 Technic range when it’s launched early next year.

Lego Technic 42065 Tracked Racer RC

42065 – RC Tracked Racer

We have absolutely no idea what this is. None. Built purely for play value rather than a demonstration of technical engineering, 42065 does – admittedly – look like a hoot to drive with twin Medium motors and skid-steering. We’ll leave that to someone else though, as its aesthetics are about as appealing as the Elves that make up our workforce. Next.

Lego Technic 42062 Container Yard

42062 – Container Yard

This is more like it. 42062 is the first double-vehicle set of 2017, and it looks like a lovely way to introduce Technic to builders stepping up from City and other simpler themes. The neat articulated truck features working steering whilst the heavy-duty forklift includes rear-wheel-steering and a mechanically operable boom lift and grab. Good stuff.

Lego Technic 42060 Roadwork Crew

42060 – Roadwork Crew

2017’s other multi-vehicle set also sits towards the bottom of the Technic range and it too looks like a good introduction to more complex building. The truck features working steering and a tipping load bed, whilst the excavator includes a mechanically operable shovel. Both vehicles feature a few stickers and more visual detailing than Technic sets of old, and should be priced well within pocket-money ownership.

Lego Technic 42058 & 42059

42058 – Stunt Bike  &  42059 – Stunt Truck

Pull-back motors. Nothing else. Next…

 Lego Technic 42057 Ultralight Helicopter

42057 – Ultralight Helicopter

An unusual vehicular streak seems to be running through the 2017 Technic line-up, as a second aircraft joins the range. The 42057 Ultralight Helicopter actually looks more like a gyrocopter to us, but as we assume both the main and tail rotors are connected to the inline two-cylinder engine 42057 is indeed technically a helicopter. More stickers abound and the tail fin steering, controlled via a hot rod style pitman arm, looks novel. Expect 42057 to be priced under $20 when it arrives in stores next year.

Lego Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer

42064 – Ocean Explorer

Things are starting to get really weird now. This attractive looking ship, complete with a helicopter and submersible, looks more like a City set rather than something from the Technic line. And it may as well be, as so far as we can tell it does nothing more than the equivalent City set would. If it wasn’t for the superb-looking BMW R 1200 GS Adventure set revealed here earlier in the month we’d be wondering what the hell’s happened…

Lego Technic 42061 Telehandler

42061 – Telehandler

Finally, some redemption. 42061 is a long way from being the best Technic set ever made, but it is probably the best non-licensed Technic set of the 2017 H1 line-up. All-wheel steering, a mechanically extending boom, and a tilting bucket all feature, and its simple construction should mean 42061 is reasonably priced too.

So there you have it, all nine 2017 Technic sets due to reach stores in the new year. Aside from some decent starter sets in 42060 and 42062 we’re somewhat underwhelmed, although there are three empty spaces in the 2017 range due to be filled later in the year. At least there’s that brilliant BMW…

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Lego Technic 42063 – BMW R 1200 GS Adventure – Set Preview

Lego Technic 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Review

Apparently there was an election today, but whatever the new leader of the free world decides to do / build / blow-up, we’ve found something that’s going to make 2017 just a little bit better; LEGO have brought another vehicle manufacturer into their officially licensed line-up!

Joining Volkswagen, Mercedes-BenzFerrari, Porsche, McLaren, Volvo, Caterham and others, BMW Motorrad (BMW’s bike division) have become the latest LEGO Group partner with the arrival of the new 42063 BMW Motorrad R 1200 GS Adventure Technic set.

Lego Technic 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Motorbike

Constructed from 603 pieces, the BMW R 1200 GS Adventure celebrates forty years since the Technic line launched, way back in 1977. The model features working telelever front suspension and swing-arm rear, functioning steering, BMW’s 2-cylinder boxer engine with shaft drive, custom BMW decals, bespoke tyres, and a mystery new piece unique to the 42063 set. It’s also the first LEGO set to feature the company’s new app-based 3D instructions.

LEGO’s Technic 42063 BMW Motorrad R 1200 GS Adventure set will launch in 2017, and we’re going to make a bold call and say that it looks like it could be the best motorcycle that LEGO have ever produced. We can’t wait!

Lego 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure bike

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Lego Caterham Seven 620R – 21307 Set Preview

Lego 21307 Caterham Seven Review

It’s finally here! After sending a crack team of commando Elves into The LEGO Company headquarters we are delighted to reveal the latest release from LEGO’s Ideas programme, the officially-licensed 21307 Caterham Seven 620R!

Designed by Carl Greatrix, and first featured here over 2 years ago, the design was picked up and backed by Caterham themselves, and in March of this year we revealed it had been chosen as the next official fan-designed LEGO set.

Joining the authorised sets from Ferrari, Ford, McLaren, Porsche, Mini, Volkswagen, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo and others, LEGO’s latest real-world replica looks every bit as good as we hoped it would.

Aimed at ages 12+ we’re expecting around 700 pieces from the set when it goes on sale later in the year, and it’s one set we can’t wait to review! Congratulations to Carl, who has seen his design go from a usual Flickr upload to an official LEGO set, and we’ll bring you more news on 21307 later in 2016!

Lego 21307 Caterham 7 Review

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8860 Redux

Lego 8860 Car Chassis New Crowkillers

Our set review of LEGO’s 1980 Technic 8860 Car Chassis is one of the site’s most popular pages of all time. And for good reason. 8860 is the genesis of Technic Supercars and took the whole concept of large LEGO sets in an entirely new (and brilliant) direction, without which we probably wouldn’t have 2016’s Technic Porsche 911 GT3. OK, perhaps that’s not a great example, but we’d certainly miss 8880, 8448 and many of the sets that followed.

Just thinking about 8860 gets much of TLCB office so wistful and nostalgic it’s like mentioning food rationing to your grandparents. Paul Boratko (aka Crowkillers) hasn’t helped productivity here today then with his wonderful modern interpretation of LEGO’s 1980 icon.

Built using the latest studless Technic parts Paul’s 8860 redux is instantly recognisable, yet upgrades the venerable old set in every key area. Working steering, all-wheel suspension, adjustable seats, and a functioning gearbox hooked up to a flat-6 engine all feature, alongside modern tyres and LEGO’s latest parts designs.

It’s a creation that’s well worth further investigation, and you can do so at Paul’s MOCpage or via the Eurobricks discussion forum here. You can also read our interview with Paul in Master MOCers Series 1 here, and you can check out our review of the original 8860 Technic set from 1980 via the Set Review Library.

Lego Technic 8860 Redux

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Kickstart Your Creation

Lego The One Brick Remote Control

Regular readers of The Lego Car Blog will know how popular LEGO’s Power Functions components have become – barely a day goes by without a model appearing here that utilises them. However, good as LEGO’s efforts are, there is room for improvement. Firstly the infrared control mechanism can falter in bright sunlight, and secondly power and variability of control is limited.

Third-party designer Roni Leben and his team think that they have the answer with this, the BuWizz integrated remote control and battery. Performing the job of a battery box and two IR receivers, the BuWizz is a totally LEGO-compatible product that brings bluetooth control, micro-USB charging and variable speed options to LEGO’s Power Functions motors. Plus it does all this whilst providing eight times more power than LEGO’s own set-up.

BuWizz RC Battery for Lego

Controllable via Apple or Android devices the BuWizz offers a similar solution to the previously seen SBrick bluetooth control unit, but with the added benefits of a rechargeable on-board battery and a much greater power density than LEGO’s own battery unit.

The BuWizz remote control and battery brick is not yet available, however you can help make it happen! A Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign is live now, with a target of $50,000 required to bring the product to market.

You can find out more about the BuWizz brick, watch a video of it in action, and back the project to help bring it to market via the BuWizz Kickstarter Page – Click the link below to get involved!

BuWizz Kickstarter Page

Lego BuWizz Remote Control

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LEGO Technic 42056 – Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set Preview

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

IT’S HERE! LEGO Technic’s incredible 1:8 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, scooped here earlier in the year, has been officially unveiled!

Officially licensed by Porsche, 42056 is one of the largest and most complex sets ever released by the Technic line, featuring over 2,700 pieces and aimed at ages 16+.

Unlike the first spy-shots of this set, the final production version drops its camouflage paint-work as we expected and now wears a gloriously bright orange hue. 42056 also debuts several new pieces not seen before, rides on unique replica Porsche wheels and wears authentic Porsche decals throughout.

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

The building process has been designed to mirror the way the real car is manufactured, which is an interesting variation from the usual Technic construction process, and each model contains a collectors’ book and an individual serial number, which means we fully expect many of these sets will sit forever unopened in the hands of speculators (boo).

That’s a shame, because 42056 contains some fabulous engineering which has raised the bar in terms of what can be expected from an official LEGO product.

Alongside the usual working steering, suspension and piston engine there is a functioning double-clutch gearbox complete with steering-wheel mounted paddles, just like the PDK transmission used on the real car – something our in-house engineers cautiously hoped for when they dissected the very first teaser image of this set back in January. With four speeds operable from the steering wheel we’re expecting some rubberised or elasticated witchcraft from LEGO’s design department, and it could be the most inventive function added to an official LEGO set in decades.

Opening doors, engine lid, glovebox and trunk all feature, as does Porsche branded luggage and a fully detailed interior with racing seats.

Available from June this year, we’re already saving up to get our hands on 42056 (unless anyone at LEGO is willing to give us a copy!), and we anticipate an RRP of around $300/£250.

Lego 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set

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Kit Car

Lego Caterham 7 Set

Carl Greatrix’s incredible replicas of the Caterham Super Seven have featured here at TLCB several times in the last year (here, here, here and here), as we’ve supported the LEGO Ideas campaign to turn his model into an official LEGO set.

Well Carl’s hard work has paid off, as over 10,000 of you got behind the project to take it to the next stage of the review process, and LEGO have just announced that the Caterham Super Seven will become the next official LEGO set created via the Ideas platform.

Lego Ideas

We’re super excited about getting our hands on a Super Seven, and this also means that LEGO can add Caterham to their ever expanding list of official manufacturer sets, alongside Ferrari, McLaren, Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen and Volvo.

You can read LEGO’s press release announcing the new Caterham Super Seven set via LEGO Ideas here,  or via the video below, and a super congratulations to Carl from all of us here at TLCB!

YouTube Video:

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LEGO Releases its First Disabled Mini-Figure!

Lego City Wheelchair

LEGO is a wonderfully inclusive toy. Even back when mini-figures were mostly male, all yellow, and always smiling, the humble plastic bricks crossed gender, age and cultural boundaries beautifully.

In recent years The Lego Company has taken a more balanced approach to the different ethnicities and genders that make up society, with their little mini-figures becoming more diverse and, much like any real-world community, far more interesting as a result.

However there was an omission in their current mini-figure range, but one that has now been rectified, as LEGO release their first-ever mini-figure wheelchair! We cannot applaud this move enough – a huge well done to LEGO, and also to the groups that petitioned LEGO in order to raise the issue of disabled mini-figure representation.

The new mini-figure wheelchair is due to be released in the second half of the year as part of the new LEGO City line-up and who knows, maybe with LEGO’s partnership with Marvel we could see a certain X-Men character in mini-figure form too.

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Technic Porsche 911 42056 – Set Preview

Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set 42056 Review

We were a little underwhelmed with LEGO’s 2016 Technic line-up when we released details back at the end of 2015. However, there was hope that better sets were to come; there was a gap in the numbering sequence. A hole in the range. A supercar shaped hole. And, as it turns out, a Porsche 911 shaped hole…

Yup, LEGO are bringing their first fully authorised official supercar set to market later this year! Expanding on their relationship with Porsche that was first developed for the Speed Champions line (alongside McLaren and Ferrari), and joining the official Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, MINI and Volvo partnerships, LEGO are set to release a spectacular Technic replica of Porsche’s legendary 911, and it looks i.n.c.r.e.d.i.b.l.e.

Set 42056 was revealed at the 2016 Nuremberg Toy Fair today, and it could well be the most amazing Technic flagship in LEGO’s history; a fully detailed replica of – we think – Porsche’s brutal 911 GT3 RS super car complete with (again – we think…) a working paddle-shift transmission!

There is no word on pricing or piece-count, and we expect the test-car camouflage to be replaced with a road car or racing livery before the set is finalised for production, but despite the unknowns we are properly excited by the prospect of LEGO’s latest partnership. It could also open the doors for further potential manufacturer-backed sets, as car companies begin to recognise the power such synergies can have on their brand’s future desirability.

You can see more unofficial images of the new 2016 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS at Gizmodo, who first broke the news story, or via the photographer’s Flickr page here. And if that wasn’t enough 42056 is due to be joined by a truly enormous bucket-wheel excavator and a large, motorised, and thoroughly excellent official Claas tractor too.

LEGO Technic is looking better than ever…

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42048 Race Kart Review

New for 2016, and looking like it means business….

Lego Technic 42048 Go Kart

…meet the LEGO Technic 42048 Race Kart in all its orange-and-purple glory.

First impressions are very positive – this is, by a long way, the most realistic and best looking Go-Kart style set there’s been in the Technic line. Price is pretty reasonable too, at £25 for 345 pieces.

Being a smaller set, it has an instruction book for the B-model as well, which is always a plus.

Building it is not too taxing but there’s some interesting stuff here. For the first time in a long time, there’s a proper gearbox, doing what a gearbox is supposed to do; bringing the noise! (a bit). It’s usefully compact as well; the input shaft being the rear axle itself. This does mean there’s no diff and the rear wheels are locked together though. Elsewhere, those new curved panels do a great job of styling it and, in a highly radical change from the norm, it’s got a proper floor. Whatever next!

Lots of those newish ‘pin with pin hole’ connectors, that’s what’s next. The designer is clearly very fond of these. Can’t say I blame him; whatever did we do way back in 2014 without them?

Moving forward from the superbly detailed single cylinder engine atop its 2-speed gearbox, we have a brilliantly designed seat, nice chunky steering wheel, a novel steering system that you actually operate with the actual steering wheel(!), all riding on four well chosen wheels with the lowest profile tyres I’ve seen in LEGO.

Clearly, unlike last year’s 42022 Hot Rod, the designer has seen a real Go-Kart rather than having it described to him over the ‘phone…

This set is looking more and more like a winner….

And then you steer it. On full lock, the front wheels will deviate a maximum of 11 degrees from the straight ahead. 11 degrees. The mechanism is compact, quick-acting, strong and precise, but seriously…. 11 degrees. Most cars will turn around in about 2 times their own length. A little thing like this; maybe 3 or so. Or in this case, 7. It needs 7 times it’s own length to turn around. Sheesh. With that and the solid axle, oversteer is right off the menu. Understeer is all you’ll get; something this can ill afford…

It’s not all bad news. There’s that gearbox; the lower gear of which allows the engine to spin at 2x wheel speed, the styling is superb, but if there is ONE thing you want a Go-Kart to do, it’s to steer properly. And this just doesn’t. For comparison purposes, I measured the angle of the ancient 854’s front wheels on full lock – a realistic 35 degrees. In every other respect 42048 is a better model, but because of this one flaw 854 is still a better Go-Kart.

Maybe we’ll have better luck with the B-model :

images

Eurgh! Maybe not. It’s a ‘track car’ apparently. Perhaps the designer had a KTM X-Bow described to him over the ‘phone… It does steer better than the main model, though. Slightly.

There are many good things about this set. The styling. The engine detailing. A proper gearbox. That seat. The fact that it looks good with or without the stickers. Everything in its rightful place and looking all Go-Karty. It’s good value for money. It’s a superb looking model. If it steered like 854 it would get a 10. It barely steers at all. 7/10

Buy the LEGO Technic 42048 Race Kart set

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2016 LEGO Technic Sets Preview

Lego Technic 42048 Go Kart

It’s that time of year again! A crack team of Elves was dispatched a couple of weeks ago into LEGO’s closely guarded HQ, and those successful at avoiding German shepherds have been returning to TLCB Towers over the past few days. We now have the complete range of Technic sets for the first half of 2016, so without further ado, we can bring you the brand new 2016 LEGO Technic line-up!

42048 Go Kart

An interesting colour choice for LEGO’s first 2016 set, and also one that sets the tone for 2016’s use of stickers; 42048 uses a lot of them. Underneath that be-stickered body is a model that we rather like, and one with some excellent proper Technic functions too. Working steering and a rear-wheel driven single-cylinder engine feature in 42048, which contains approximately 350 parts and will retail for an estimated price of £25/$30. A thumbs up from TLCB.

Lego Technic 42044 Display Team Jet

42044 Display Team Jet

On to the smallest set in the 2016 line-up; the circa-115 piece Display Team Jet. Again there are lots of stickers in evidence, but this time there’s not much substance underneath them. Retractable landing gear is the only working function here. Still, 42044 will be cheap at around $15. Next…

Lego Technic 42045 Hydroplane Racer

42045 Hydroplane Racer

There hasn’t been a Technic boat for some time (that we can remember anyway), so the 2016 Hydroplane Racer is a welcome return for anyone into water-borne vehicles. 42045 features even more stickers than its entry-level counterparts, although they do look rather nice to this reviewer’s eyes, and includes just under 200 pieces. Amongst these are a working straight-4 engine which is turned by a pair of hidden wheels underneath the bodywork. Expect 42045 to retail for around £15/$20 when it’s launched next year.

Lego Technic 42046 Getaway Racer Lego Technic 42047 Police Intercepter

42046 Getaway Racer & 42047 Police Intercepter

We’ve not much to say about LEGO’s new pull-back racers because, well – they look like this. More stickers and nothing else to see, although 42046 and 42047 can be combined to create something that is – somewhat unbelievably – even more hideous than the two individual models above. Each will have an RRP of £15/$20 and contain 170-ish pieces. Moving swiftly on…

Lego Technic 42049 Mine Loader

42049 Mine Loader

On to the bigger stuff… This peculiar looking device is a mining loader, built for travelling the subterranean roads in the world’s deep mines. 42049 contains nearly 500 pieces, including a huge turntable for central articulation, a two-cylinder engine (which seems rather small), and a manually controlled grasping clamp, meaning it has both adequate mechanical functionality and play value. Expect 42049 to cost around £30/$40 when it reaches stores early in 2016.

Lego Technic 42050 Drag Racer

42050 Drag Racer

If TLCB seems a little underwhelmed by LEGO’s 2016 Technic offerings so far it’s because, er… we are. But our mood changes a bit with this; the brilliant-looking 42050 Drag Racer! Designed to resemble the ‘Funny Car’ silhouette drag racers that light up the tarmac at strips across the U.S, 42050 is the most exciting mid-size Technic set to be launched in ages. With circa-650 pieces – including some lovely new blue panels – a huge working V8 engine, lifting bodywork and working steering, 42050 is something of a supercar-lite. There’s a traditional drag racer B-Model too, which is actually rather good itself. £60/$70 is our estimate, and this is one model we hope to add to our Set Review Library next year!

Lego Technic 42052 Heavy Lift Helicopter

42052 Heavy Lift Helicopter

The final set for 2016 sits at the top of the Technic tree; the 1,042 piece Heavy Lift Helicopter. Featuring Power Functions motorisation, co-axial rotors, a working winch and retractible landing gear, 42052 leads the 2016 range with functionality. The orange and white colour scheme looks rather nice we think, and is further enhanced with (you’ve guessed it) lots of stickerage. The new Heavy Lift Helicopter will reach stores in early 2016, with a heavy price to match; you’ll need to save up over £100/$120 to lift this set home.

Overall 2016 looks a bit of a mixed bag, much like 2015, but just like this year we can expect the really cool stuff to arrive in the second half of the year… did someone say ‘new supercar?’…

You can read our reviews of some of the sets in 2015 Technic line-up by visiting the Set Review Library – click here to see what our experts made of this year’s official LEGO Technic products.

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42043 Mercedes-Benz Arocs Review

Lego Technic 42043 Mercedes-Benz Review

It’s time for another TLCB Set Review! But this time it’s one of our readers – the winner of TLCB Summer Building CompetitionThomas Graafland, who has picked up the Reviewer’s Pen. Thomas has got his hands on LEGO’s 2015 Technic flagship set, the 42043 Mercedes-Benz Arocs, and he’s joined us to explain all…

Browsing on Flickr a while ago I noticed this neat looking Mercedes truck displayed at a Lego fair.
Thinking at first that this was a MOC I was quite shocked that this was actually an official set. The second big shock was the €170 price tag. Normally there would be no chance of me spending that much on a single set, but being a fan of both trucks and LEGO, I knew this was THE set for me.

The box is as per usual with big Technic sets: large and decorated showing the model and the systems used; in this case both Power Functions and Pneumatics V2, and the cover folds open to reveal the model’s functions and some specifications of the real truck.

The box feels heavy, which is always a good sign. Inside are lots of plastic bags, each numbered from 1 to 6, except the one containing the pneumatic parts. The battery box is not in a bag and just slides around in the box between the plastic bags. Instructions are in a single book of 470 pages and the instructions booklet is packed in plastic too, so no folded pages.

The building process is lots of fun. You start off with the chassis, working from the front to the rear. Then comes the cabin, next the crane, and you finish with the bed. The building is very straight-forward, until you reach the crane, which requires some intensive studying of the instructions to get the tubing through the turntable right. It’s not like the instructions give you no clues on how to do it, but it does require a bit of extra attention. The finished truck is not huge, being similar to the 8285/8258 in terms of size. It is heavier, though!

The trucks cabin looks very neat and it definitely looks just like the real deal. The overall shape of the cabin is very smooth, and the cab doesn’t lack detail either. All mirrors, lights, horns and whatnot are present, showing that LEGO went quite some attention to getting the cabin right. I personally really am a fan of the way they did the front grill. I do think it would’ve looked better if the middle part of the grill would’ve been angled too, though, because it just looks a little odd to have only angled the lowest part. The doors open up, to reveal a very, very basic interior. The white colour of the cab looks very clean, but it doesn’t really stand out, which is quite a shame – it doesn’t do justice to that good looking cabin. The ever-boring dark bluish grey doesn’t help making it exciting either.

Steering is done with the two orange beacons on top of the cabin. The steering system works very well, but you have exactly zero grip on those slippery round beacons. There is some slack with the gears too, which only makes steering more difficult. The two front axles steer and turning feels very smooth thanks to the different steering locks on the two axles.

The truck features live-axle suspension all-around. The suspension is a bit on the hard side, but it works very well apart from that. One big downside of the suspension is that the truck sits really high on its wheels. This would’ve been no problem if the suspension travel was as big the gap between the wheels and fenders, but unfortunately it isn’t. Even when fully compressed, there is still about 2 studs room above the wheels and I feel that lowering the truck would actually have been quite possible. However, the suspension will be a very good base to re-use for Model Team MOCs.

Lego Technic 42043 Mercedes Truck

The drivetrain is simple and smooth. The two rear axles drive the engine, which is hidden underneath the cabin. The inline six turns at reasonable speed and especially at higher speeds it makes that nice rattling sound. It’s bit of a pity that it can’t be seen from outside while driving it around, because it is completely hidden by the cab. The cabin folds forward neatly, but even then you can only see the first four cylinders. With some effort you can see the fifth one under the battery box, but the sixth cylinder is completely invisible underneath the crane.

The battery box is hidden very neatly in the rear part of the cabin and is easily replaced. The Power Functions L-motor that drives all the functions resides somewhere in the middle of the chassis and has no trouble driving any of the functions. The gearbox that is driven by the L-motor uses the new driving rings and gears and it drives four functions in total; Continue reading

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FORZA LEGO!

Welcome to TLCB’s almost timely review of the latest in a short line of Creator Expert car models…

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Looks nice, doesn’t it? Usually in these reviews I open by rambling on a bit about personal experiences with the car in question, but since I’m not a millionaire that won’t happen this time.

Much.

Y’see, I have had the pleasure of inspecting this fine beast up close and in the plastic (the panels are glassfibre!). All you have to do is visit your friendly neighbourhood Supercar dealer. These places are almost always staffed by knowledgeable enthusiasts who sell what they sell because they love it. If they have the time, they’ll happily share it with you, a fellow enthusiast. Just try not to touch the cars they’ve spent ages polishing… Generally, they’re happy to entertain respectful sightseers and you’ll encounter none of the snootiness you might get from the classic boys…

The Ferrari F40 is an amazing thing, and hardly a people’s car like the other Lego Creator sets… except it is. It’s a thing that’s a joy to see (and hear) whether you own it or not. Three cheers for those who do and share them with the world by driving them around! If you ever see one behind you, wind down the window and hope he gives it the berries when he comes fanging past!

So, if you can’t get a real one, is 10248 the next best thing?

At £70 for 1158 pieces it’s better value, certainly… better value than the Mini even, with 80 more pieces for a fiver less. Considering the likely cost of the Ferrari licence, LEGO are being pretty generous here.

The box seems smallish, same size as the Mini’s I think, but it’s simple and uncluttered design is very appealing – it’s just a shame it’s got those destroy-box-here tabs to open it up. Inside, there’s two sets of numbered bags full of mostly small pieces – there’s a lot of detail here – a small sticker sheet that if you’re lucky won’t be crumpled and the single perfect bound instruction book that’s fast becoming the norm in larger sets. And a brick separator, because you can never have too many of those…

Instructions are pretty clear, so long as you realize Lego’s inconsistent representations of dark grey and black result in what could be black parts in the early stages actually being dark grey… Another minor niggle is the usually-helpful highlighting of parts just added occasionally obscures some parts already there, which can create confusion.

No biggie. It’s a fun thing to build, with very little repetition and like the Mini and Camper before it, plenty of interesting techniques and details along the way. I especially like the way they did those NACA ducts on the bonnet and sides. Here’s a fun fact: the duct was developed in 1945 as a way of allowing cooling air in with a minimal disruption to airflow, by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in the US (NACA eventually became NASA when it’s remit expanded just a bit).

I’m a riot at parties…

As for the rest of it, it’s mostly very good, starting with the engine.

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The heart of any Ferrari, of course, and this has had plenty of attention lavished on it. The 2.85L turbocharged V8 isn’t the prettiest Ferrari engine but it ain’t exactly a diesel either… LEGO have done a great job of this, right down to the pistols used as manifold outlets that you can barely even see once it’s in the car.

The interior is simpler to build, mostly because (entirely accurately) there’s very little in it. What’s there is nicely done, although it would be good if the steering wheel’s rake was fixed instead of relying on a pin’s friction to hold it at the right angle. And good luck getting the tiny Prancing Horse sticker on the 1×1 round tile in the centre of the steering wheel! They probably should have printed that…

They probably shouldn’t have printed the rear pillars. This is the only area that lets it down somewhat. Apparently the genius responsible for the camper’s front and the Mini’s A pillar is yet to retire… One issue I have with this solution is the fact that printing in red on a black part results in a darker shade of red, a point that’s not evident from the pictures on the box but does stand out on the model. Also, because the side window / pillar is one big part, the side window lifts up with the rear cover. Any MOCer worth his salt would have bricked this part properly, as LEGO themselves did with the rest of it.

While we’re having a moan, do you ever wish that LEGO would stop unnecessarily redesigning parts? I’m talking here about the 1×6 arches used over the rear wheels that have an awkward little step that isn’t there if you use a couple of older, smoothly curving ones instead. It looks a lot better if you do.

I am now done moaning. I’m not even going to complain about the stickered ducts over the rear wheels, simply because there isn’t a better way that I can see to do this with an opening engine cover in the space available.

The front end is more successful, capturing the form of the F40 in bricks accurately and well. The pop-up headlights are quite neat (you have to lever them up individually yourself using a thin gap at the front – luckily they’ve provided the brick separator you’ll need for this!). The shape of the bonnet is excellent and there’s even a bit of detail under it, including a spanner (what are they trying to tell us about Italian reliability?). While you’re in there you might notice the multicoloured structure of the bonnet’s underside – the only place where the hidden BOLOCsness of this model becomes evident.

And then there’s that windscreen… Manna from heaven for MOCers, surely! Just so long as the car you build with it is red… There’s a slightly surprising omission here, since with a 1×4 black brick right below it at the same angle, a simple substitution provides somewhere to place a wiper. After all, they’ve thought of everything else, including door mirrors that are actually attached to the doors. Hooray!

Despite a couple of visual hiccups, the model as a whole does look pretty good:

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All the panels that should open, do, which we always like to see. The engine cover pivots on an axle so there’s no friction – you’ll need the handy stick provided to hold it up. I guess Ferrari must have done the same.

Aside from opening stuff and peering at detail, there’s no playability here, as with the other cars in this theme, but I’m pretty sure any attempt at stuffing mechanics in would ruin it.

Like the Camper and Mini before it, it exists for display and it looks good enough to do that; it’s one visual flaw not quite enough to detract from the whole.

If you have petrol in your veins you’ll like it. 8/10.

Buy the LEGO Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 set

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Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Set Preview

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Today might have been Clarkson, Hammond and May’s last episode of Top Gear, but LEGO have gone a very long way to cheering up TLCB office…

This is the new 10248 Creator set, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Following on from the 10220 Volkswagen Camper and 10242 Mini Cooper sets, LEGO have teamed up with Ferrari once more to bring us a stunning brick-built recreation of possibly the greatest car ever made.

Ferrari’s F40 was launched way back in the late 1980s to triumphant acclaim and it became the definitive supercar of the era. Powered by a small 2.9 litre twin turbo-charged V8 shrouded within kevlar and carbon fibre bodywork, the 201mph F40 was the fastest and most expensive Ferrari ever built.

Production lasted just 5 years, during which time around 1,300 units were manufactured. This means that today the F40 is a little too pricey for most of us, but luckily LEGO have the answer…

LEGO’s 10248 Ferrari F40 Creator set arrives in August of 2015 and contains over 1,150 pieces, a few of which are new and unique to the set, including the wheels, tyres and windshield. There’s an opening engine cover to reveal a detailed V8 engine, opening doors, clamshell front section, pop-up headlights and a detailed interior.

Aimed at ages 14+ the LEGO Creator Ferrari F40 won’t be cheap (RRP is estimated to be around $90/£70), but that’s quite a lot cheaper than the real car. Plus you can park it on your desk.

As is often the way a Set Review for 10248 may follow – in the meantime you can remind yourself of the previous iconic vehicles in the Creator line-up by clicking on the links in the text above.

Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

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