Tag Archives: Movie

You Spin Me Right Round*

Lego Blade Runner Spinner

There have been countless versions of the ‘Spinner’ police cruiser from the 1982 Philip K. Dick epic Blade Runner built in Lego form, yet builders always seem able to find new ways of perfecting the iconic hover-car. This latest version is the work of Davidup of Flickr who has used LEGO’s large window pieces to great effect to create the Spinner’s canopy. A highly detailed interior lies underneath it and there’s more to see of the complete build at Davidup’s Flickr album – head to the future in 1982 via the link above.

*Today’s appropriately-’80s title song.

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The End is Nigh

Lego WALL-E and Eve

WALL-E; the last surviving cute robot on an abandoned Earth tasked with tidying up the mess we made. Disney-Pixar’s masterpiece melted hearts around the world in 2008, but a decade on in 2018 several pieces of news have emerged over the course of the year that make us sure we’re heading ever closer to the grim reality depicted in the movie.

The world is in the midst of a mass extinction crisis, CO2 output has risen for the first time in 4 years, and our oceans are filling with plastic.

We don’t yet have cute little rubbish-collecting robots like the Wall-E and Eve pairing built by Flickr’s Luis Peña pictured here to help, but there are a few very easy things that we can do to lessen our impact upon our environment. Turn things off, recycle everything we can, and switch Google for Ecosia. Each year around 300,000 visitors arrive here at The Lego Car Blog directly via a search engine. If they all arrived via the tree-planting alternative Ecosia that would be a lot of trees!

To find out more about what The LEGO Company is doing to reduce its environmental impact click here and to see more of Luis’ brilliant Wall-E and Eve builds click the link above.

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The Fastest Hunk of Technic in the Galaxy

Lego Technic Millennium Falcon

Making the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs, defeating the Death Star, rescuing Princess Leia, defeating the Death Star again… the Millennium Falcon has done many things worthy of Star Wars fandom, but the ship has never appeared in Technic form, which is – frankly – all that matters.

Until now that is. Jeroen Ottens received a commission to build a Technic Falcon and he’s done just that, immortalising the modified YT-1300 Corellian light freighter (we Wikipedia-ed it!) in Technic form. There’s a working access ramp, a fully articulated gun turret, and – to the joys of those here at TLCB who have to respond to our mailbox – there are even instructions available too!

There’s more to see of Jeroen’s super starship at both the Eurobricks forum and on Flickr, where a link to building instructions can also be found. Make the jump (in less than twelve parsecs) via the links above.

Lego Technic Millennium Falcon

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Stop-Motion Special

How to Make Lego Stop-Motion Animation Videos for YouTube

Lego stop-motion animation videos can turn you into a YouTube sensation. Discover the tips and tricks the pros use for creating stop motion animation videos.

If you’re reading this, there’s a pretty good chance you’re still obsessed with LEGO. Regardless of how old you are, it probably started when you were a young child. After all, LEGO have been around since 1932. A lot’s changed in the last 86 years, but one thing remains; LEGO are the building blocks of our childhood. In fact, for millions, that passion for the little colourful bricks has extended into our adult years.

Lego Movie Camera

Are you ready to harness that passion and become a Lego Professional? You may be thinking, “How do I do that?” The answer is simple. Create LEGO stop-motion animation and upload it onto YouTube.

Do you think that’s intriguing but sounds a little complicated? Keep reading to find out how easy it actually is.

How to Make LEGO Stop-Motion Animation

So, you want to make your own brick flicks but you don’t know what you need or how to do it. We’ve got you covered.

The first thing you need to get started is – surprise! – a camera. But you’ll also need a YouTube account. Shocked, aren’t you?

Search for “LEGO stop-motion animation” or go to the official LEGO Movie 2 site and check out their trailer. No, it’s not stop-motion, but you can get some pretty cool ideas for your short. Once you have an idea what you want your movie to be about, let the process begin!

1. Gather Everything You Need

You’ll need a LEGO set, a camera, a computer, and your imagination. Seriously, that’s it. With more than 130 different sets sold in the U.S. every year, you’re bound to find one you like. You may even be sitting on a Back to the Future set or a LEGO Batman set that was your source of inspiration for making the movie in the first place.

2. Build Your Set

Yes, your LEGO set, but you’ll have to build your movie set, too. This will be your backdrop for your film, so get creative. Or, don’t. You can use a plain fabric backdrop for a minimalistic approach.

3. Frame Your Shot

Set up your actors, put your camera on a tripod or stand, and frame your shot. This means looking through the lens and making sure everything looks the way you want it to. Doing this now will save you from having to go back and re-shoot scenes because they weren’t centered.

Also, make sure there’s no glare and that you can’t see anything unsightly in the shot, like, that pile of dirty clothes in the corner. Make adjustments as needed. When everything looks good, you’re ready to film.

4. Action!

This is the time-consuming part. Stop-motion animation takes a long time to film. How long? Let’s do the math…

You’re going to want to edit it at 15fps for the best results. That means “frame per second.” So, if you’re dreaming of a five-minute movie, that’s 15 frames per second or 900 per minute. That’s 4,500 shots for a five-minute stop-motion video.

You’ll actually want to take more in case some of the don’t work out. Perhaps then it’s best to start small, maybe no more than a minute, then build your way up as you improve.

Move your actors, but only a little. This is discretionary. The smaller the movement, the more fluid it will look. But, considering you need to take over 900 shots, you can plan on moving the Minifigures two paces or so for each movement. Keep this up until you reach the number of shots you need.

5. Get Ready to Edit… For a While

You can use any stop-motion application on your computer that you can set to 15fps. Use Windows Movie Maker, iMovie – any of them will work and are easy to use.

Upload your photos and put them in your storyboard order. You may decide you don’t need all the photos you took, which is expected. Go ahead and delete them but don’t forget to keep one for your thumbnail. This will let the viewer know what your video is all about.

As a rule of thumb, the best YouTube thumbnails have added graphics like typography. There are programs out there like Adobe Spark that will guide you through this step.

6. Finishing Up

Once you’re done editing and everything looks good, you’re ready to upload your movie.

Bonus Tips

Since your LEGO Minifigures can’t change expressions on their own, you’ll need to do it for them. To do this, you’ll have to swap heads with other Minifigures.

This will add a lot of production time, so you may not want to do it until you get the hang of the Lego stop-motion animation process. If you’re thinking about getting a new LEGO set for your brick flick, be sure to check out our Reviews and remember to always Play Well!

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Floatus

Lego Lotus Esprit Submarine James Bond

James Bond might be a dark and moody character these days (as he was in the books too), but there was a time when spying was a little more… extravagant.

The height of 007 ridiculousness was the late ’70s, when Bond went into space, spent more time on one-liners than actually secret agenting, and – in 1977’s ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ – drove a sports car underwater.

It was a ludicrous scene, but one that cemented both Bond and Lotus into vehicular film royalty. Bond’s Lotus Esprit S1, modified by Q-branch, featured some rather ingenious optional extras, and – as Q always somehow seemed to manage – they were exactly what was required for the mission. What luck eh?

This brilliant recreation of the iconic movie car/submarine was suggested to us by a reader and comes from Luis Pena of Flickr. Luis’ ‘Wet Nellie’ as it was called (stop sniggering at the back!) includes all the cunning features of Q’s finest creation and there’s more to see on Flickr. Dive in via the link above.

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The Road Warrior

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

It’s been a while since the last Mad Max post here at TLCB, but today one of the Elves returned a hero and our smelly little workers are all now crowded around the old TV/VHS combo in their cage room watching Mel Gibson smash stuff up.

We have previous bloggee crash_cramer of Flickr to thank for the relative peace this has brought, and his huge 1:10 recreation of the V8 Interceptor from 1981’s Mad Max II – The Road Warrior.

Underneath the superbly accurate exterior is a working V8 (with supercharger), functioning steering and live axle suspension, courtesy of some custom curved lift-arms.

There’s more to see of crash-cramer’s epic build at his photostream, and if you’d like your own Mad Max Interceptor (albeit rather smaller) then check out the excellent custom kit from Manner-Spielzeug here.

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

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Gadgets are Getting Smaller

Lego Aston Martin DB5 Goldfinger

Every year gadgets get smaller. Well, apart from when Apple – being the innovators that they are – decided that their iPhones should get progressively larger until they resembled televisions, and charge people a premium for doing so.

Anyway, enough about the geniuses in Apple’s phone department, everything else is getting smaller. The first computer filled a whole office, early mobile phones were the size of a suitcase, and the ancient photocopier here in TLCB Towers has an entire room to itself.

The same is true of LEGO’s new 10262 Aston Martin DB5 ‘007’ set. Packed with gadgets and looking mostly like a DB5, 10262 is 1,295 pieces of 007-inspired excellence, yet even it is subject to the rule of technological shrinkage.

Flickr’s Gerald Cacas is the man doing the shrinking as he’s captured the world’s most famous movie car in a model that’s just seven studs wide, and there’s a even a gadget or two included. There’s more to see of Gerald’s 007-in-minitaure at his photostream – click the link above and think small!

Lego Aston Martin DB5 Goldfinger

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Some Like it Hoth

Lego Star Wars Battle of Hoth

It’s a scene that even we’re familiar with; Empire AT-ATs stalking across the snow covered plains of Hoth and towards a Rebel Alliance base soon to be in great peril.

Luke Skywalker, commander of Rogue Squadron and famous for some reason, leads the defence in a company of small Snowspeeders.

And so goes down one of the most memorable battles in the Star Wars franchise, and one that has been recreated beautifully in micro-scale by Flickr’s GolPlaysWithLego. There’s much more of this stellar build to see at Gol’s photostream via the link, where there are also instructions available so you can recreate your very own Battle of Hoth in miniature at home.

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Gigahorse

Lego Mad Max Fury Road Gigahorse

It’s been a while since the last ‘Mad Max – Fury Road’ vehicle featured here at The Lego Car Blog. This means the Elves haven’t watched the movie in ages, seeing as they’re only allowed to do so if they find an appropriate creation.

Cue much Elven celebration today therefore, when one of their number returned to the office with this, a rather excellent recreation of the Gigahorse stacked Cadillac from Flickr’s hachiroku24.

Not only has hachiroku replicated the movie car brilliantly, he’s also made instructions available so you can build one for yourself. Head over to his photostream via the link above for more.

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The LEGO Movie 2 | Official Teaser

The LEGO Movie 2 Preview

Revealed here a few weeks ago, the first official teaser for ‘The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part’ has dropped in advance of the new film reaching cinemas on the 8th of February 2019.  If the teaser is accurately teasing, ‘The Lego Movie 2’ looks both distinctly spacey and yet has a Mad Max vibe too, perhaps due to the ‘two perspectives’ storyline revealed here previously. We can’t wait!

You can watch the new ‘The Lego Movie 2’ official teaser below, plus you catch up on the first The LEGO Movie instalment here, and you can see How It Should Have Ended via this secret link!

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Rock Blunts Scissors

Lego Indiana Jones Tank

And tanks apparently. There was a point in time where tanks and horses fought side-by-side (and against one another) on the battlefield. At first it was definitely better to be on the horse, but so quick was the pace of development that just a few short years later the tank – and the various other machinery designed for us to kill one another more efficiently – had all but eradicated the horse from use in war. Which is good news for horses.

However that didn’t stop Indiana Jones who, in ‘The Last Crusade’ (which sadly proved not be thanks to the dreadful 2008 return), used his hoofed companion to shove a rock down the barrel of a tank cannon.

In reality this would probably just mean you got killed by both a rock and a tank shell, but hey – this is the movies! This glorious recreation of the famous scene from 1989’s ‘Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade’ comes from Flickr’s Joshua Brooks aka JBIronworks who has recreated both the Nazi tank and the scene’s dynamism brilliantly in Lego form.

There’s more to see of mini-figure Indiana Jones’s rock-based sabotage on Flickr via the link above, and in case you want to see the real one doing just the same click here to watch the original scene on YouTube.

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The Lego Movie 2 Preview

The LEGO Movie 2

Warner Brothers’ brilliant The LEGO Movie wowed the animation film world upon it’s release four years ago. Smart, funny, and with an endearing message, critics and filmgoers loved it (as did we). A pretty good The Lego Batman Movie soon followed, which was quickly succeeded by a mediocre The Lego Ninjago Movie… you can see where this could have been heading.

Thankfully Warner Brothers have returned the franchise to its roots, with a sequel to The Lego Movie picking up where the original left off (and hopefully allowing us to forget about that Ninjago one…). Cunningly entitled ‘The Lego Movie 2’, original writers Phil Lord and Christopher Miller return to produce and co-write the next instalment, as do actors Chris Pratt and Elizabeth Banks alongside a plethora of famous talent.

The new movie is expected to explore issues around gender; “[It looks at] what’s different and similar about gender, when a boy plays vs. how a girl plays… Every one of our movies, so far, have been told from the point of view of one kid’s imagination. The LEGO Movie 2 will be the first one told through two kids’ imaginations – Finn and his sister. It’s going to be really interesting juxtaposing those two different visions”. It’s sure going to be fun to see what the city of Bricksburg looks like after Finn’s sister’s Duplo invasion at the end of the original movie.

The Lego Movie 2 is due to reach cinemas in February 2019, exactly 5 years after the original. We will of course bring you a full review upon its release, and we may even be able to take the Elves if our local cinema’s ban is lifted by then.

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Brickheadz to the Future!

Lego Brickheadz DeLorean Back to the Future

LEGO’s new Brickheadz sets have spawned an invasion of brick-headed cuteness, with fan-built characters popping up everywhere. Now they can pop up anytime too, thanks to this delightfully cutesy Brickheaded Delorean DMC-12 by Flickr’s jp_velociraptor in full Back to the Future spec!

Lego Brickheadz DeLorean Back to the Future

Inside the flying time-machine are a Brickheadz Doc Brown and Marty McFly (of course!), and the model can transfer between flying and driving modes as per the movie car too. Click the link above to hit 88mph in the cutest way possible!

Lego Brickheadz DeLorean Back to the Future

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Blackfish

Lego Nautilus Car

Today’s post features a car that is the exact opposite of everything in the staff car park. Extravagant, opulent, unnecessary even… Redfern1950s’ latest creation has more common with TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna than with anything we’re driving.

It comes of course from the movie The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen which was, frankly, not very good. Not so the car, which was built for real in all of its twenty-two foot glory from the remnants of a Ford Cargo truck. It was so real in fact that it really drives, it’s road legal(ish), and a replica recently came up for auction on eBay, although our budget wouldn’t stretch to it.

Lego Nautilus Car

Redfern’s incredible Model Team recreation of Captain Nemo’s ‘Nautilus’ swaps the original white for black (looking a million times more sinister as a result!) and features opening doors and hood, under which is a suitably enormous V12 engine.

There’s a whole lot more to see of this amazing build at Redfern’s photostream – take a look via the link, plus you can see how the original UK-made movie car was built by clicking here and view the recently sold American replica by clicking here.

Lego Nautilus Car

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Something Something Something Dark Side

Lego TIE/x1 Advanced Darth Vader

Ergh, Star Wars… OK, here goes. This is Darth Vader’s TIE/x1 Advanced and… that’s all we’ve got. The proper Lego blogs will probably lose their shit over this build when they find it, so be sure to check them out for a better explanation. In the meantime you can see more of this thoroughly excellent (and commissioned) recreation of Darth Vader’s ride by Jerac at his photostream – Click here to use the force. Or something.

Lego TIE/x1 Advanced Darth Vader

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