Tag Archives: Movie

42111 Technic Fast & Furious Dom’s Dodge Charger | Set Preview

If you’re ten, you gonna want to keep reading this!…

This is the brand new for 2020 Technic ‘Fast & Furious’ Dom’s Dodge Charger set, a 1,077-piece recreation of the iconic drag racer from the very first ‘Fast & Furious’ movie.

Officially licensed by both Universal’s ‘Fast & Furious’ franchise and Dodge, LEGO’s new 42111 set continues Technic’s increase in visual realism with almost Model Team levels of detail. Fear not though Technic fans, because it’s loaded with mechanical functionality too…

A working V8 engine complete with a spinning supercharger belt, functioning steering, double-wishbone suspension, plus opening hood, doors and trunk (with NO2 bottles inside) all feature, as does a wheelie stand so you can recreate the Dodge Charger R/T’s most famous movie scene.

The new 42111 set is expected to cost around $99 when it goes on sale at the end of April, around a year ahead of the release of next (and ninth) ‘Fast & Furious’ movie. Not counting the spin-offs.

Whatever we feel about that state of cinema that the ‘Fast & Furious’ movies are now the highest grossing films ever, we have to admit that they do inspire a properly cool LEGO set. And we’re not even ten.

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They’ve Saved the Best Trip for Last…

Released in 1990, the final instalment in The Back to the Future trilogy put an end to very probably the most famous movie car of all time. In fact, we suspect many people wouldn’t know the DeLorean DMC-12 is a real car, so synonymous with the movies has it become. It was rubbish though, so that’s probably a good thing. We’ll stick to the movie car, recreated here in ‘Part III’ guise by Flickr’s Łukasz Libuszewski alongside some bemused native Americans. Head to Łukasz’s photostream via the link above for one last trip to 88mph.

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RC RC

Toy Story’s ‘RC’ was one of our favourite characters from the groundbreaking computer-animated movie from 1995, being the toy we always wanted over a Buzz Lightyear or Woody. Flickr’s Levihathan (aka Nico Lego) may have thought so too, as he’s built this delightful Technic RC version of ‘RC’. With Power Functions motors and rear suspension Nico’s recreation looks every bit as fun as the animated original and there’s more to see at the link above.

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It’s Safer in the Cockpit than the Cargo Bay

It’s everyone’s favourite animated space-themed pizza restaurant! We’re not sure that ordering a Pizza Planet delivery would be quite as fun as visiting the restaurant in person and winning a three-eyed alien from the grab machine, but the pizzas sure get a fun ride. Previous bloggee November Juliet has recreated Toy Story’s famous ‘Toyota’ pizza delivery truck in 6-wide form and you can place your order on Flickr via the link above.

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Mad Collab

The Future Belongs to the Mad. Especially when they collaborate. 2015’s ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ thundered into cinemas to surprising critical acclaim. Directed my George Miller (he of Happy Feet fame!), ‘Fury Road’ followed the terribly-named ‘Mad Max: Beyond the Thunderdome’ film released a full three decades previously, and it was bloody brilliant!

It’s not often that TLCB Staff and TLCB Elves are in agreement, but this is a movie that brought harmony between TLCB’s human overlords and its irritating mythical workforce. Until the little turds started reenacting scenes from the film in the corridors of TLCB Towers at least.

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ starred many incredible vehicles, all of which were build for real, and many of these have been recreated in Lego form over the past five years (you can use the search function to find those that have appeared here). However, despite only appearing briefly in the third Mad Max instalment, it’s the V8 Interceptor that has endured as the franchise’s most iconic car.

Based on a 1970s Ford Falcon XB GT Hardtop, the V8 Interceptor appeared in all three movies, and is arguably more associated with the Mad Max story than the fleshy meatbag/s that drove it. This is the version of the Interceptor from the final (for now) film, and it’s been created through the collaboration of builders Mikhail Biktimirov, FX6000, and photographer Nikolay Gamurar.

With remote control drive and steering, working independent front and solid-axle rear suspension, and opening doors and hood, Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s beautifully presented V8 Interceptor is definitely worth a closer look. FX6000 has also made building instructions available too, should you wish to pretend your kitchen floor is post-apocalyptic wasteland and reenact scenes from the movies.

The Elves will certainly be doing that, so whilst we keep a careful eye on proceedings you can see more of Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s brilliant Mad Max V8 Interceptor collaboration at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here.

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Into the Wild

In April of 1992 a young man by the name Christopher McCandless set out across Alaska on foot. With minimal supplies, a rifle, and a new alter ego (Alex Supertramp), McCandless left civilisation behind to live simply off the land in Alaska’s remote wilderness.

After hiking along the snow-covered ‘Stampede Trail’, McCandless discovered the old Fairbanks Bus 142, a 1946 International Harvester K-5 that was one of several that had been outfitted as shelters for a construction crew repairing the trail in the early 1960s.

When the mine that used the trail closed in the 1970s the buses were removed, all apart from Bus 142 which – thanks to a broken axle – was left behind in the wilderness. Already fitted with beds and a wood burning stove, it became McCandless’s new home.

McCandless attempted to leave the area in which the bus was abandoned several times, but the thick Alaskan undergrowth and swollen rivers made progress impossible, and so he returned, trapped in the shelter.

After 113 days, and weighing just 30kg, McCandless died of starvation and poisoning from wild potato seeds, his final diary entry on day 107 simply reading “Beautiful Blue Berries”. Days 108 to 112 contained only unintelligible slashes, whilst day 113 contained nothing at all.

Two weeks later a group of hunters entered Bus 142 looking for shelter, and discovered McCandless’ decomposing body inside a sleeping bag.

McCandless’ tragic story has since become a book and a movie, and the bus – deteriorating more each year – is now an attraction for Alaskan tourists. This beautiful recreation of the International Harvester that became Chris McCandless’ tomb comes from TLCB favourite and Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74), of which there is more to see at his ‘Into the Wild’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to take a trip to the wilderness around Fairbanks Bus 142. Just don’t eat the wild potato seeds.

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Other Runners

Blade Runner wasn’t all about the ‘Spinner‘. Largely forgotten, the movie featured several vehicular oddities that appeared alongside the famous hovercar, each managing to look both futuristic and decidedly sheddy at the same time. Flickr’s keiichi kamei remembers two such designs, the ‘Armadillo‘ van and the ‘Deckard‘ car, each shown here in both civilian and civil service roles.

Previous bloggee keiichi has recreated the designs wonderfully in mini-figure scale, with some ingenious building techniques and custom decals used to enhance the models’ accuracy. Head to the futuristic time of November 2019 (yes, Blade Runner is now set in the past!) via the links above.

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Something Something Darkside

After years of blogging Star Wars creations we’re pretty good at understanding the franchise now. For example we know that this jolly Jedi is off to the beach aboard his hoverbike, where he’ll no doubt use his lite sword to cook up an awesome barbecue for his friends in the Trade Alliance. We have previous bloggee ianying616 to thank for allowing us to show off our immense Star Wars knowledge and there’s more to see of his Technic Jedi Hoverbike at his photostream – click the link above to check it out.

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Metrokab

Vehicles from 1982’s Blade Runner are a popular choice to build from Lego (see here, here, here, and here). OK, one particular vehicle is, but not every car in the movie was a ‘Spinner’. Cue keiichi kamei and this ‘Metrokab’, surely one of the least cool sci-fi vehicles of all time. That might be why everyone builds Spinners we suppose. Anyway, this mini-figure scale Metrokab captures the design from the film brilliantly, with a few custom decals enhancing the realism. Hail a ride via the link above.

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LEGO 76139 1989 Batmobile | Set Preview

Great news for those of you who only work in black! LEGO have revealed their upcoming 76139 ‘1989 Batmobile’ set, at it is really very black indeed. With 3,306 pieces (at least 3,000 of which look to be black), 76139 is one of the largest Superheroes sets to date, and bridges nicely across the DC and Creator car lines.

The model is a faithful replica of the vehicle used in the 1989 Tim Burton movie, and comes with a rotating platform and three slightly superfluous mini-figures (Joker, Vicki Vale (who?!), and Batman himself), which gives away the model’s primary purpose as being a display piece rather than a toy or engineering demonstration. Nevertheless the new set does feature working steering, a sliding cockpit (using a new piece), and pop-up machine guns should Batman decide to go rogue.

The new 76139 ‘1989 Batmobile’ set is expected to cost a around £220/$250 – which is rather a lot – and will go on sale on Black Friday 2019, which seems both appropriate and quite possibly a dark joke considering the price…

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Doof!

‘Mad Max, Fury Road’ certainly had some pretty mad vehicles. The maddest of all was probably this, the gloriously unhinged ‘Doof Wagon’. Essentially a military truck converted into a rolling sound stage complete with a flame-throwing guitarist, the ‘Doof Wagon’ was sort of like the drum guy on a viking longboat, boosting morale via much noise and considerable pointlessness.

Previous bloggee Nicola Stocchi has recreated the wheeled tinnitus machine superbly in Lego, and has even made instructions available should you wish to recreate your own desert chase scene from the movie. Head to Walmart carpark, drop your windows and turn it up via the link above, plus you can check out Nicola’s past ‘Mad Max, Fury Road’ builds to appear at TLCB here.

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Build-a-Batmobile

Batman has had some good, bad and ugly vehicles over the years. By far our favourite is this, the Tumbler from The Dark Knight trilogy, built for real for the movies and managing to be both believable and brilliantly wild at the same time.

This superb mini-figure scale version of Batman’s coolest whip comes from previous bloggee hachiroku24 who has not only recreated the Tumbler perfectly he’s made video instructions available too so that you can build your very own. Head to hachiroku’s photostream via the link above to find the link.

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Brick-Built Bullitt

Possibly the most famous movie chase car ever, Steve McQueen’s ’68 Ford Mustang Fastback created a legacy which still sells cars today. Yup, you can buy a ‘Bullitt’ edition of Ford’s latest Mustang and it’s actually rather good, with a very American 460bhp V8 yet a very un-American ability to actually go around a corner. We’d still rather have a ’68 though, and cross our fingers each time we got to a turn. Flickr’s Simon Przepiorka is the builder behind this excellent 1:24 version and there’s more to see here.

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Hiding in Plain Sight

The words spoken by our favourite alien truck/robot protector at the end of the first Transformers movie, explaining not only his ongoing mission but also setting up the premise for an unending series of increasingly terrible sequels.

Even the Elves have lost a degree of interest in the Transformers franchise now that Megan Fox isn’t involved anymore, however Optimus Prime’s famous quote does allow us to neatly link to today’s creation, built as it is by someone who wishes to remain anonymous. Well, as anonymous as seeing your work blogged here allows. They’re ‘Hiding in plain sight’ at any rate.

This spectacular recreation of the 1973 Marmon HDT-AC 86 ‘cab-over’ semi truck that was the first Optimus Prime comes from a secretive unnamed builder who has captured the real vehicle brilliantly. Whilst not quite transforming, the builder’s truck can also be reconstructed into Optimus’s robot mode, and looks just as good on two legs as ten wheels.

Unlike all our other posts there’s no link to see more, however you can click on the images here to view them in full size and you can use the search bar at the bottom of the page to take a look through the countless Autobot and Decepticon builds that have featured here over the years.

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Revenge of the Fifth

Well travelled, a bit worn out, but still able to take a bit of a pounding*, Bruce Willis’ hover taxi in The Fifth Element wasn’t in quite as good nick at the end of the movie’s chase scene as it was at the beginning. NYPD’s finest were the cause of the damage, with their own hover patrol cars equipped with slightly more weaponry than today’s Ford Crown Vics. Their reckless approach to using it hasn’t changed much though…

This excellent recreation of one of the NYPD patrol cars from The Fifth Element comes from Flickr’s Davdup, whose hover taxi appeared here earlier in the year. Like his previous build brilliant detailing and clever techniques are present throughout, with the model further enhanced by custom decals. Head to Davdup’s Flickr album to give chase.

*Insert your own ‘Your Mom’ joke.

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