Tag Archives: Movie

Our Fine Four Fendered Friend

Oh you pretty Chitty Bang Bang
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang we love you.
And in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang what we’ll do.
Near, far, in our motor car Oh!
What a happy time we’ll spend.
Bang Bang Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,
Our fine four fendered friend!

They don’t make movies like they used to. Ian Fleming and Albert Broccoli’s (of James Bond fame) 1968 musical adventure brought irritating singing children, the terrifying child-catcher (we’ve just realised that he may have had a use after all…), and a spectacular flying car to movie theatres all over the world.

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang has since become one of cinema’s all-time great films, and Flickr’s GunnBuilding remembers it beautifully via this lovely mini-figure scale recreation of our fine four fendered friend. Join the adventure via the link above. Just don’t do any singing.

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Movie Bricks

Lego Mustang Movie Set

Movie making causes probably more vehicular destruction than teenagers, the elderly, and NASCAR combined. It seems no car is off-limits, no matter how awful the movie*. It’s not just the cars that make the final cut either, as often different angles, test shots and failed attempts multiply the kill-count far beyond what you see on screen.

TLCB favourite Pixel Junkie gives us a glimpse into the carefully choreographed world of cinematic car killing with this superbly-shot scene involving a mini-figure film crew, two 70’s Ford Mustangs, and one big accident. Being Lego though, Pixel can rebuild his cars and send them in for the wide-angle shot after the crew’s coffee break. Head over to Flickr via the link above to see more of Take 6.

*Yes that really is a real Porsche Carrera GT getting smashed. How they managed to make it look so fake is beyond us…

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Fifth Element in Elements

Lego Fifth Element Taxi

1997’s ‘The Fifth Element’ had it all; alien opera, robotic turkeys, Milla Jovovich, a malevolent cosmic entity, and – of course – flying yellow cabs. This is Bruce Willis’ hover taxi and it comes from Davdup of Flickr who has done a superb job of recreating it in Model Team form. There may not be a super-hot-saviour-of-the-universe in the back seat, but it’s got everything else. Click the link above to hail a ride 250 years in the future.

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Knight in Shining Armour

Lego Batman Batpod

We all know Batman only works in black (and sometimes very very dark grey). After the extravagant campness of his appearances in the ’60s this is something of a relief, but if he were to pick a new colour the Dark Knight could do well to take advice from ianying616 of Flickr.

ianying616 has recreated the amazing Batpod from The Dark Knight trilogy and given it an exterior somewhat shinier than the mat-black original. The result is spectacular and there’s more to see of ianying’s all-chrome Batpod at his photostream. Click the link in his name above to see all of the stunning imagery.

Lego Batman Batpod

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Eleven Thousand Pieces of the Dark Side

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

From our (very) limited knowledge of the Star Wars movie franchise we’ve deduced that the good guys fly things named after letters whilst the bad guys fly things named after shapes. Kind of like an inter-galactic Sesame Street, although we’re not sure Bricknerd would see it that way.

The most powerfully evil of all the bad guys’ flying things are the spherical ones, but the triangles aren’t far behind. This is one such triangle; the ‘Monarch’ Imperial Star Destroyer.

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

Built by Flickr’s 0necase this incredible creation is constructed from around 11,000 LEGO bricks, and measures well over a meter in length. The huge engines are even formed by three LEGO Death Star pieces, amongst the largest in LEGO’s range, in a gloriously circuitous homage to the Empire.

There’s much more to see of this astonishing recreation of the second-most-evil of all the shapes in Star Wars at 0necase’s ‘Monarch ISD’ album – click here to join the Dark Side.

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

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Tiny Tumbler

Lego Batman Tumbler

Still the pinnacle of the Batman franchise, Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dark Knight’ trilogy created easily the best Batmobile in the Caped Crusader’s history (we don’t even recognise ‘Batman V Superman’ as a legitimate movie here in TLCB office). Recreated many times in LEGO form the Tumbler is a favourite among Technic builders. Flickr’s _Tiler though, has built one rather smaller, and it’s magnificent.

Beautifully photographed (and enhanced with non-LEGO tyres at the front and a custom Batman), _Tiler’s Tumbler is probably the coolest mini-figure vehicle we’ve ever seen, and if you you agree you can see more at his photostream via the link above.

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Into the Abyss

Lego Abyss Deep Sea Submarine

Deep sea submarines may be unusual fodder for Lego builders and this site alike, but they’re amazing machines. Designed to travel through an environment even more hostile than space, they’re at the very limit of what mankind can achieve. This small scale Lego version comes from Flickr’s Faber Mandragore, and whilst it might not be able to go to the bottom of the ocean it’ll look really cool in the bath. It’s apparently based upon the ‘Cab 1’ submarine from the movie ‘Abyss’, which… er, we haven’t seen, but no matter because we’ll enjoy it in the bath* nonetheless. Dive in via the link above.

*AKA ‘TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna’

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The Lego Move 2 Review

The Lego Movie 2 Review

It’s been five years since the smash-hit ‘The Lego Movie‘ reached cinemas, garnering Oscar and Golden Globe nominations, winning the Bafta for Best Animated Film, and earning a 95% score on Rotten Tomatoes.

Since then the pretty good Lego Batman Movie and pretty average Lego Ninjago Movie have followed, whilst we’ve waited for a proper sequel to the film that started the franchise.

With Phil Lord and Christopher Miller back in the writers’ chairs, exactly half a decade on the sequel has arrived. But is everything still awesome in Bricksburg?

Synopsis:

‘The Lego Movie 2, The Second Part’ picks up exactly where the first ended, and exactly five years afterwards too, meaning real time and Bricksburg time are aligned. That’s quite important, but more on that later.

Finn, the boy whose imagination built the first story, has had allow his sister access his father’s impressive LEGO collection in the basement. The resultant Duplo invasion has led to the destruction of Bricksburg, and Emmett, Lucy (aka Wildsyle), Uni-Kitty, Batman, and a multitude of minor characters now live in the post-apocalyptic ruins under the constant threat of further invasion.

Emmett – hankering for the life he once knew – builds himself and Lucy a cottage outside the city, and unwittingly attracts the attention of one of the invaders, who promptly kidnaps the rest of the characters a departs through the ‘stairgate’ into another dimension…

The Lego Movie 2 The Second Part Review

TLCB Verdict:

Picking up exactly where the first instalment left off has a certain Back to the Future vibe, one that makes itself more apparent as the film progresses. Much of the original cast reprise their roles, with the addition of a slew of new characters joining them, voiced by Tiffany Haddish, Stephanie Beatriz, Richard Ayoade, and many others.

The animation remains frenetic and joyous, quite unlike any other computer-animated franchise and all the better for it. There’s more time spent in ‘the real world’ too, with Maya Rudolf joining Will Ferrell in parental duties.

There are jokes aplenty, with more perhaps aimed at the adults in the audience than before, and there’s a wealth of movie references, from Mad Max, Mary Poppins, Superman and – as mentioned above – Back to the Future.

It’s this last reference that provides the story with its genius moment. We were wondering how ‘The Second Part’ could capture the twist of the first, and it’s safe to say that it does – with such surprising depth that we suspect it’ll be lost on The Lego Movie 2’s core audience, but we’re glad it’s there all the same.

The Lego Movie 2 Review

Overall ‘The Second Part’ could never hope to appear as fresh and counter-cultural as the original ‘The Lego Movie’ did five years ago. However the ingenious explanation for Bricksburg’s troubles, a decision that Emmett must make that will resonate with every adult watching, and some of the catchiest (and cleverest) songs that cinema has ever created, make The Lego Movie 2 a gloriously enjoyable watch.

Watch it with an eye on the metaphors too, and you’ll be thinking it over for some time afterwards.

★★★★

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Spin Doctor*

Lego Technic Bladerunner Spinner

The iconic Spinner from the 1982 sci-fi epic ‘Blade Runner’ has appeared here in multiple forms over the years. From large scale brick-built versions to smaller mini-figure builds, there’s a spinner for everyone. Except Technic fans, who have – until now – been unrepresented.

Syd Mead’s infamous design has finally been Technic-ed, thanks to previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens who has created this utterly wonderful (and brilliantly motorised) version of the Spinner in Technic form.

With doors that open electrically and a motorised transformation from ground to flight modes, Jeroen’s design is more than a visual treat too. You can watch that transformation in action by clicking here and you can see more of the build on Flickr, where a link to instructions is also available.

Lego Technic Bladerunner Spinner

*We haven’t had a title song in a while. Here’s today’s.

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Digi-Max

Lego Mad Max Fury Road

Today’s find might be digital, but seeing as the Elves have been watching Call the Midwife, Downton Abbey, or some other period drama that’s most un-Elven, we’re willing to post it, as we get nervous when they start doing unexpected things. We can also post it because it shows how a digital creation should be presented. Designed by Nicola Stocchi it’s a rather excellent recreation of the Nux Car from ‘Mad Max – Fury Road’, and good news! Instructions are available! Head over to Flickr for more images and the all-important instructions link whilst we let the Elves watch the movie…

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The Flying Dutchman

Lego Pirates of the Caribbean Flying Dutchman

Ah, ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’. What started as a fun piratical zombie adventure (even if it stole more than a little from ‘The Mummy’) has since become a great rotting hulk who’s primary purpose seems to be providing a vehicle for Johnny Depp to continue his dodgy impression of Keith Richards.

So too ‘The Flying Dutchman’, a ship that started as a mighty race-built galleon but has since become a great rotting hulk who’s primary purpose…

OK, we really don’t like any of the ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ movies after the first two, but to be fair to us, they are complete shit. ‘The Flying Dutchman’ is an interesting visual spectacle though, gradually returning to nature whilst ferrying souls to the underworld or some such nonsense.

The Dutchman’s organic appearance makes it a monumentally tricky ship to recreate from LEGO, but that hasn’t stopped Sebeus I of Flickr, who has taken six years (roughly the same length as the third movie) to construct this spectacular version of the ghostly vessel.

With a complete (and suitably spooky) interior, an ingeniously constructed crew of mini-figure monsters, and with no Johnny Depp in sight, Sebeus’ giant galleon is well worth a closer look. There are dozens of images arable to view at Sebeus’ ‘Flying Dutchman’ Flickr album – click on the link above to take a trip to Davy Jones’ locker.

Lego Pirates of the Caribbean Flying Dutchman

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You Spin Me Right Round*

Lego Blade Runner Spinner

There have been countless versions of the ‘Spinner’ police cruiser from the 1982 Philip K. Dick epic Blade Runner built in Lego form, yet builders always seem able to find new ways of perfecting the iconic hover-car. This latest version is the work of Davidup of Flickr who has used LEGO’s large window pieces to great effect to create the Spinner’s canopy. A highly detailed interior lies underneath it and there’s more to see of the complete build at Davidup’s Flickr album – head to the future in 1982 via the link above.

*Today’s appropriately-’80s title song.

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The End is Nigh

Lego WALL-E and Eve

WALL-E; the last surviving cute robot on an abandoned Earth tasked with tidying up the mess we made. Disney-Pixar’s masterpiece melted hearts around the world in 2008, but a decade on in 2018 several pieces of news have emerged over the course of the year that make us sure we’re heading ever closer to the grim reality depicted in the movie.

The world is in the midst of a mass extinction crisis, CO2 output has risen for the first time in 4 years, and our oceans are filling with plastic.

We don’t yet have cute little rubbish-collecting robots like the Wall-E and Eve pairing built by Flickr’s Luis Peña pictured here to help, but there are a few very easy things that we can do to lessen our impact upon our environment. Turn things off, recycle everything we can, and switch Google for Ecosia. Each year around 300,000 visitors arrive here at The Lego Car Blog directly via a search engine. If they all arrived via the tree-planting alternative Ecosia that would be a lot of trees!

To find out more about what The LEGO Company is doing to reduce its environmental impact click here and to see more of Luis’ brilliant Wall-E and Eve builds click the link above.

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The Fastest Hunk of Technic in the Galaxy

Lego Technic Millennium Falcon

Making the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs, defeating the Death Star, rescuing Princess Leia, defeating the Death Star again… the Millennium Falcon has done many things worthy of Star Wars fandom, but the ship has never appeared in Technic form, which is – frankly – all that matters.

Until now that is. Jeroen Ottens received a commission to build a Technic Falcon and he’s done just that, immortalising the modified YT-1300 Corellian light freighter (we Wikipedia-ed it!) in Technic form. There’s a working access ramp, a fully articulated gun turret, and – to the joys of those here at TLCB who have to respond to our mailbox – there are even instructions available too!

There’s more to see of Jeroen’s super starship at both the Eurobricks forum and on Flickr, where a link to building instructions can also be found. Make the jump (in less than twelve parsecs) via the links above.

Lego Technic Millennium Falcon

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Stop-Motion Special

How to Make Lego Stop-Motion Animation Videos for YouTube

Lego stop-motion animation videos can turn you into a YouTube sensation. Discover the tips and tricks the pros use for creating stop motion animation videos.

If you’re reading this, there’s a pretty good chance you’re still obsessed with LEGO. Regardless of how old you are, it probably started when you were a young child. After all, LEGO have been around since 1932. A lot’s changed in the last 86 years, but one thing remains; LEGO are the building blocks of our childhood. In fact, for millions, that passion for the little colourful bricks has extended into our adult years.

Lego Movie Camera

Are you ready to harness that passion and become a Lego Professional? You may be thinking, “How do I do that?” The answer is simple. Create LEGO stop-motion animation and upload it onto YouTube.

Do you think that’s intriguing but sounds a little complicated? Keep reading to find out how easy it actually is.

How to Make LEGO Stop-Motion Animation

So, you want to make your own brick flicks but you don’t know what you need or how to do it. We’ve got you covered.

The first thing you need to get started is – surprise! – a camera. But you’ll also need a YouTube account. Shocked, aren’t you?

Search for “LEGO stop-motion animation” or go to the official LEGO Movie 2 site and check out their trailer. No, it’s not stop-motion, but you can get some pretty cool ideas for your short. Once you have an idea what you want your movie to be about, let the process begin!

1. Gather Everything You Need

You’ll need a LEGO set, a camera, a computer, and your imagination. Seriously, that’s it. With more than 130 different sets sold in the U.S. every year, you’re bound to find one you like. You may even be sitting on a Back to the Future set or a LEGO Batman set that was your source of inspiration for making the movie in the first place.

2. Build Your Set

Yes, your LEGO set, but you’ll have to build your movie set, too. This will be your backdrop for your film, so get creative. Or, don’t. You can use a plain fabric backdrop for a minimalistic approach.

3. Frame Your Shot

Set up your actors, put your camera on a tripod or stand, and frame your shot. This means looking through the lens and making sure everything looks the way you want it to. Doing this now will save you from having to go back and re-shoot scenes because they weren’t centered.

Also, make sure there’s no glare and that you can’t see anything unsightly in the shot, like, that pile of dirty clothes in the corner. Make adjustments as needed. When everything looks good, you’re ready to film.

4. Action!

This is the time-consuming part. Stop-motion animation takes a long time to film. How long? Let’s do the math…

You’re going to want to edit it at 15fps for the best results. That means “frame per second.” So, if you’re dreaming of a five-minute movie, that’s 15 frames per second or 900 per minute. That’s 4,500 shots for a five-minute stop-motion video.

You’ll actually want to take more in case some of the don’t work out. Perhaps then it’s best to start small, maybe no more than a minute, then build your way up as you improve.

Move your actors, but only a little. This is discretionary. The smaller the movement, the more fluid it will look. But, considering you need to take over 900 shots, you can plan on moving the Minifigures two paces or so for each movement. Keep this up until you reach the number of shots you need.

5. Get Ready to Edit… For a While

You can use any stop-motion application on your computer that you can set to 15fps. Use Windows Movie Maker, iMovie – any of them will work and are easy to use.

Upload your photos and put them in your storyboard order. You may decide you don’t need all the photos you took, which is expected. Go ahead and delete them but don’t forget to keep one for your thumbnail. This will let the viewer know what your video is all about.

As a rule of thumb, the best YouTube thumbnails have added graphics like typography. There are programs out there like Adobe Spark that will guide you through this step.

6. Finishing Up

Once you’re done editing and everything looks good, you’re ready to upload your movie.

Bonus Tips

Since your LEGO Minifigures can’t change expressions on their own, you’ll need to do it for them. To do this, you’ll have to swap heads with other Minifigures.

This will add a lot of production time, so you may not want to do it until you get the hang of the Lego stop-motion animation process. If you’re thinking about getting a new LEGO set for your brick flick, be sure to check out our Reviews and remember to always Play Well!

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