Tag Archives: Batman

LEGO 76240 Batmobile Tumbler | Set Preview

It’s been thirteen years since Christopher Nolan’s ‘The Dark Knight’ re-set the bar for Batman movies. It’s also been thirteen years since the best Batmobile of all time crashed onto screens, and seven since LEGO’s own 76023 Tumbler set first crashed across bedroom floors.

Time therefore for an update, which LEGO have revealed today in the form of the new 76240 Batmobile Tumbler.

76240 looks fairly similar to the first set to recreate the Tumbler, because… well, it is, but the new version includes 200 more pieces for a total parts count of over 2,000. It also features the awesome tyres first released with the 42054 Technic Claas Xerion 5000 – although we’re not actually sure they’re that accurate for the Tumbler – along with LEGO’s new all-black marketing for their adult sets, which is rather appropriate for ‘The Dark Knight’.

The ’18+’ bit is probably just marketing guff though, allowing adults to feel more comfortable purchasing a toy / justifying it to a perplexed partner. “Honestly Barbara, this isn’t for kids. It’s a sophisticated interlocking building system!” “OK, just buy the damn thing. (Sigh….)”.

Nevertheless – and unlike the Batman films that followed ‘The Dark Knight’ trilogy – 76240 looks a good update to bring the Tumbler back to Batman fans in LEGO form, and the new set will be available to buy for around $230/£170 when it reaches stores later this year.

Game of Bricks – Light Kit (76139 1989 Batmobile) | Review

The Lego Car Blog laziness, er… we mean ‘generosity’ continues today, as we’ve passed another impressive looking Game of Bricks lighting kit on to a reader for their thoughts. Greg Kinkaid (aka black_hand_bricks on Instagram) was one of the lucky readers first to respond to our Facebook call, and bagged himself a Game of Bricks kit to light up the huge LEGO 76139 1989 Batmobile set. Read on to find out Greg’s thoughts!

“Where does he get those wonderful toys?” people might ask of me. Well the Batmobile comes from LEGO, but the light emitting from within it – that’s all Game of Bricks. I was offered the opportunity to write a review here at The Lego Car Blog, making this both my first review and my first light kit; the Game of Bricks 76139 1989 Batmobile.

My Game of Bricks light kit arrived in a plain padded envelope, which held a nice sturdy box filled with individually numbered bags. At first I was unsure of how to even begin putting it together, but a link to the online instructions was in my order confirmation e-mail, leading to thorough and well photographed build steps.

Onto the kit, and a tedious process starts at the back of the Batmobile set running wires from the rocket booster, tail lights, as well as the fin lights, and moves forward from there. Much of the set must be disassembled during the installation, with wheels, headlights, side panels, the back panel as well as the intakes all removed, but the result is wires that are very hard to see when the installation is finished. That said, several of the kit’s lights are fitted with 3M tape, so I don’t get the feeling the lighting kit will be reusable if the set is ever disassembled again.

The wiring on the lights seems thin but is stronger than it looks, with some wires twisted together and others a single strand, depending on the number of LEDs attached. All the boards and the battery pack fit nicely within the back end of the set between the rear wheels, and these had command strips so they’re not just floating around. 

Now for the bad bits; The lights in the headlight area and the turrets were tricky to run in-between gaps within the front wheel-wells and through to the bottom of the vehicle. Once they were run to the back of the set I discovered the wires were the exact length of the model. That made it even more difficult, because – whilst the instructional photos showed a bit of slack to pull the board out and easily plug in the lights – instead I had to fat finger the plugs in the lower part next to the axle and hope the lights didn’t pull out of the other end.

The 3M strips I mentioned before didn’t seem to hold up after the recent heat wave and I had to go back in and push them back down. Afterwards the underside looked messy so I used the wire ties that were in the packaging to clean it up, and perhaps this kit would be better to use these in the official installation instructions.

Overall though, even after the frustrating installation, I would recommend the Game of Bricks  lighting kit for those looking to make their LEGO 76139 1989 Batmobile set even more impressive ; visually the end result is amazing.  And in hindsight I should probably have opted for the remote version too, so I wouldn’t have to mess about with the backend to turn it on!

Visit the Game of Bricks Shop here!

Build-a-Batmobile

Batman hasn’t always been dark and moody. There was a time when he was a little more… flamboyant.

These were his wheels from that more festive era; the Lincoln Futura-based, George Barris-designed 1966 Batmobile, and now you can build one too.

Flickr’s Orion Pax has recreated the ’60s television icon brilliantly and he’s released building instructions for his ’66 Batmobile model alongside the stunning imagery. Head to Orion’s photostream via the link above or visit his website here to see more and build your own!

I Only Work In Black…

Mini-figure Batman is looking particularly moody in this shot, no doubt pondering darkness, no parents, and upgrades to his sound system. KitKat1414 is the builder behind it and there’s more to see of his Tumbler and Dark Knight on Flickr here.

Batlift Truck

Ever wondered how Batman moves all his stuff around the Batcave? No, us neither, but Pasq67 has.

Cue Batman’s Fenwick forklift truck, which – considering it only operates out of sight in the Batcave – has been unnecessarily restyled to make it more Batty.

It also appears to be used only to transport large quantities of brooms (Batbrooms?) for some reason, but we know very little about comic book superheroes so who are we to argue.

See more on Flickr via the link!

Dark Knight Distancing

Batman’s job has got a lot easier lately. Gone are the days of people holding up banks (they’re closed), robbing stores (closed), even walking out of a restaurant without paying (closed). Instead the Dark Knight is enforcing social distancing rules and breaking up groups of teens in the park. Still, at least he’s still got the Tumbler, which means he remains unbelievably cool. This brilliant Lego version comes from Riskjockey, there are instructions available, and you can see more on Flickr. Click the link above to order that old lady to stop hoarding toilet paper.

Slaughter is the Best Medicine

The Dark Knight got pretty much everything right, becoming probably the best superhero movie of all time. Gritty, visceral, and darkly intelligent, it even pulled off that hardest of action movie prerequisites, the car chase.

The streets of Gotham became slightly more crashy thanks to the Joker, and the enormous fairground semi-truck deployed to conduct an audacious kidnapping.

Previous bloggee The Eleventh Bricks has done superb job recreating the Joker’s vehicle of choice, including accurate decals on the trailer complete with an extra ‘S’ added to the tag-line. Head to Eleventh’s photostream via the link above to put on your happy face.

UniBatty

Is it just us, or is a bright pink Batmobile infinitely scarier than a black one?

It’ll be driven by the type of girl who’ll scream ‘This song is about meeee!’ at least twice a night, have an exhaustive Facebook album entitled ‘Randoms’, put a ‘Powered by Fairydust’ sticker on the trunk of their car, and claim you’re the crazy one for not wanting to come over for her cat’s birthday, before crying uncontrollably about how you don’t care enough… OK, that may have got a little personal, but you know what we mean. Pink cars are terrifying.

That hasn’t stopped The Brothers Brick’s own Chris Doyle from, er… ‘enhancing’ the official 76139 DC Comics 1989 Batmobile set though, with a new pink paint job, smiling star wheels, Unikitty at the controls, and very probably a ‘Powered by Fairydust’ sticker on the back.

Chris hasn’t stopped there either, uploading an album sixty photos strong (just like Karen’s ‘Randoms’ album… sorry, that got personal again), with Unikitty-ed versions of several of the Dark Knight’s rides. He’s gonna be pissed.

Click this link to take a look, where we definitely won’t be joining you for fear of getting sucked into another one of Karen’s ‘Sex and the City’ marathons…

Holy Guacamole Batman!

Batman may have been a bit… camper back in the ’60s, but Adam West was considerably more violent, at least if this Technic recreation of the ’66 Batmobile is anything to go by. Created by previous bloggee James Tillson it features working steering, a flame afterburner, a rocket launcher, and a ‘chain slicer’; basically a giant circular saw that appears out of the front like something from Robot Wars. That’ll leave a mark…

Head to James’ Flickr photostream or the Eurobricks discussion forum to see more.

Bat Dozer

In TLCB’s home nation it is illegal to disturb bats. We’re not sure why bats specifically, but nevertheless you can go to jail if you annoy them. The same applies if you eat a swan. We’re a weird nation.

Still, probably better that than this, which we expect Batman uses when he’s really pissed off. With styling from Batman’s, er… camper years, Alec Hole‘s jet-powered Bat Dozer looks just the vehicle for when the Dark Knight has had enough of nighttime noise and decides to clear the streets of drunken miscreants. Head to Alec’s photostream via the link above and give Batman a wide berth…

LEGO 76139 1989 Batmobile | Set Preview

Great news for those of you who only work in black! LEGO have revealed their upcoming 76139 ‘1989 Batmobile’ set, at it is really very black indeed. With 3,306 pieces (at least 3,000 of which look to be black), 76139 is one of the largest Superheroes sets to date, and bridges nicely across the DC and Creator car lines.

The model is a faithful replica of the vehicle used in the 1989 Tim Burton movie, and comes with a rotating platform and three slightly superfluous mini-figures (Joker, Vicki Vale (who?!), and Batman himself), which gives away the model’s primary purpose as being a display piece rather than a toy or engineering demonstration. Nevertheless the new set does feature working steering, a sliding cockpit (using a new piece), and pop-up machine guns should Batman decide to go rogue.

The new 76139 ‘1989 Batmobile’ set is expected to cost a around £220/$250 – which is rather a lot – and will go on sale on Black Friday 2019, which seems both appropriate and quite possibly a dark joke considering the price…

Build-a-Batmobile

Batman has had some good, bad and ugly vehicles over the years. By far our favourite is this, the Tumbler from The Dark Knight trilogy, built for real for the movies and managing to be both believable and brilliantly wild at the same time.

This superb mini-figure scale version of Batman’s coolest whip comes from previous bloggee hachiroku24 who has not only recreated the Tumbler perfectly he’s made video instructions available too so that you can build your very own. Head to hachiroku’s photostream via the link above to find the link.

Batwing

Batman has piloted a lot of vehicles over the years. Some were excellent, some, er… let’s just say they they fit into the ‘Robin’ category. This one of those, the ‘Batwing’ from the Tim Burton-directed movie of 1989.

First appearing in the Batman comics in the 1930s the ‘Batwing’ is more accurately called the ‘Bat Plane’ (‘Batwing’ was actually a name given to a pointless spin-off character), and originally looked like a fairly normal aircraft before its wild 1989 reincarnation in the form of the Caped Crusader’s logo.

It’s the Tim Burton version that’s the most famous (although definitely not the best), and it’s been recreated rather wonderfully by Riskjockey in the image above. Head to Flickr via the link to see all the photos, and you can watch the original trailer for the 1989 movie in which the ‘Batwing’ stars by clicking here.

Technic Tumbler

Batman has had many vehicles over the years, however our favourite by some considerable margin is the Tumbler from The Dark Knight trilogy. Several full-size Tumblers were built for real to star in the movie (you can even see one in action here), and The Dark Knight’s dark ride has inspired a few Lego versions too. Today’s by newcomer Dominik Novak is a neat addition, being fully Technic, fairly small-scale, and thoroughly excellent looking too. Dominik’s Tumbler features a detailed cockpit, Hand-of-God steering and working suspension, and there’s more to see on both Flickr and Eurobricks via the links.

Knight in Shining Armour

Lego Batman Batpod

We all know Batman only works in black (and sometimes very very dark grey). After the extravagant campness of his appearances in the ’60s this is something of a relief, but if he were to pick a new colour the Dark Knight could do well to take advice from ianying616 of Flickr.

ianying616 has recreated the amazing Batpod from The Dark Knight trilogy and given it an exterior somewhat shinier than the mat-black original. The result is spectacular and there’s more to see of ianying’s all-chrome Batpod at his photostream. Click the link in his name above to see all of the stunning imagery.

Lego Batman Batpod