Category Archives: Town

From Land to Landfill

The Earth is undergoing a considerable change. Of course it has always changed, thanks to a variable climate and the evolution borne from it, however until recently it’s been in a period of beautiful stability that lasted tens of thousands of years. And then mankind started chopping everything down, digging everything up, and burning it…

The result is a climate changing at a rate that is way beyond the pace that life can adapt to survive, and once the permafrost melts and releases the methane trapped within it, we’re on a one-way train to doomsville.

It’s not too late though, as nature has a remarkable ability to heal itself if given the chance. One way we can limit the damage is to consume less, whether that’s energy, material things, or food. Food production, particularly meat, is the single largest contributor to the destruction of our wilderness. Buying local, and not eating the meat from intensively-farmed, chemical-filled, miserable animals, is both better for us and the planet upon which we live.

Cue Chris Elliott‘s Japanese mobile greengrocer, bringing locally grown produce to your door in a converted minibus. Chris’s beautifully detailed creation includes a range of brick-built veg, breads and pastries, a burst of pink flowers down the side, and even LED lighting. Plus there’s not a battery-farmed chicken in sight.

Reducing consumption doesn’t necessarily mean buying less, as at present an average of 219lbs of food is wasted annually by every American, equating to over a third of all U.S. food production.

Throwing less away, and recycling it when we do (even food), means less chopping down, less digging up, and less burning. Cue Jonathan Elliott‘s excellent Dennis Eagle garbage truck/bin lorry, which is where what we discard usually ends up. Jonathan’s bin lorry captures the real thing superbly, and there’s even a working lift mechanism at the back.

Sadly it only has black and grey bins, but change them for green and blue (or whatever the recycling colours are where you live), and we might just avert the looming catastrophe yet. Click the links above to follow the food from land to landfill, and ask yourself if there’s a better way…

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Hungry Passenger

1saac W.’s brilliant 6-wide Jeep Wrangler first appeared here last week, but if you’re going to build a Jeep Wrangler, there’s only one we’re really interested in…

With a quick update to turn the model to an earlier ‘YJ’ series and the addition of some red stripes, 1saac can now imagine an overweight nerd being eaten alive by a juvenile Dilophosaurus in the passenger set.

Join the fun on Flickr via the link!

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Cream Wrangler

Today’s title might sound like some sort of dairy-based burglar, but we’re actually referring to this most excellent 6-wide Jeep Wrangler TJ by regular bloggee 1saac W, which comes coloured in an unusual cream and light brown combo.

Cunning parts usage including mini-figure hands for mirror brackets, half of a Lego lever for wiper arms, and a whole lot of sideways clear 1×2 plates make this one of the most realistic small scale Wranglers we’ve seen, and there’s more to see of 1saac’s cream 4×4 on Flickr via the link.

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Competition Coupe

Inspired by a drag racing shop local to him, Tim Henderson has recreated this vintage dragster that competed in the ‘Competition Coupe’ class. It’s inspired by the real dragster Lil’ Honker and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

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Book a Service

The lovely vintage workshop scene was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today, and whilst it doesn’t feature any racing stripes it does use no less than sixteen LEGO train track switch pieces throughout the build. See if you can spot them with a trained eye* hidden in Mrs. Miller’s library van and the garage surrounding it courtesy of Jonas Kramm. Click the link to switch* over to Flickr.

*Hah!

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Silver Snail

Small cars are different depending on where you live. Today’s other small car, a revolution in gas-guzzling America, had an engine more than three times the size of France’s equivalent.

France was in a rather different place after the Second World War though. Well, it was in the same place as it is now, but economically and infrastructurally it couldn’t have been more different from America, thanks to seeing the worst of the conflict.

The country therefore needed a small, cheap, reliable car that used the minimum of materials and ‘could cross a ploughed field’, or – we suspect more relevantly – a road network blown to bits by years of war.

With a two-cylinder engine around half a litre or less, easy maintenance, and minimal material costs, Citroen produced nearly 4 million 2CVs over a forty year production run, and – effectively – remobilised France.

This brilliant Town-scale replica of the ‘tin snail’ captures the iconic peoples’ car superbly, and it comes form previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott of Flickr. A myriad of curved plates has been deployed to capture a shape that was easy to make in metal, but fiendishly difficult to create in bricks, and bar the inappropriate tyres (get yourself some ’80s Town tyres Jonathan!) the result is about as good as it’s possible to get at this scale.

There’s more to see of Jonathan’s Citroen 2CV on Flickr, where this build and a host of other brilliant Town vehicles can be found. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Metropolitan Revolution

Cities can be wonderfully diverse places, where different cultures, races, and even languages mix together to create a greater whole. The automotive industry is rather similar, although these days certain quarters see this as some kind of evil globalisation, rather than countries making what they’re best at to, again, create a greater whole.

However back in the 1950s sharing production between countries wasn’t really a thing yet, until Nash came along with their design for a new sort of car (in the U.S. at least), railing against ‘bigger is better’ by making something… smaller. Their revolutionary mindset continued to production, which wouldn’t have been profitable in the U.S.

Instead Nash turned to Austin/Rover in England, who were selected to produce the car on behalf of Nash and fitted it with their own B-Series engine. The car became the ‘Metropolitan’ upon it’s return to the U.S where, in yet more revolutionary thinking, it became the first post-war American car marketed specifically to women.

The Nash Metropolitan received mixed reviews from an American motoring press rather unwilling to try anything that wasn’t sixteen feet long, but these proved to be rather different when people bought the Metropolitan and actually used it, whereupon it surpassed expectations.

It wouldn’t be until the oil crisis of the 1970s that America really took small cars seriously though, and marketing to women was probably further behind that even, yet Nash and Austin’s collaboration had proved the concept some two decades earlier.

Fast forward to today and we seem to be in some sort of ‘Tenet’ style inversion, as ’50s style ‘bigger is better’ and ‘not foreign’ are climbing America’s agenda once again. We’ll stick with the little ’50s Nash Metropolitan though, a revolution ahead, and now perhaps behind, the times…

Oh yeah, Lego… This beautiful little 4-wide recreation of the Metropolitan comes from previous bloggee 1saac W., and there’s more to see at his photostream. Click the link to join the revolution.

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Sunray

We’re effectively children here at TLCB, thus we find bright colours very stimulating, particularly when they’re deployed in a manner such as this. David Roberts‘ ‘Sunray’ takes its cues from the classic video game ‘Wipeout’ and there’s more to see of his superbly liveried anti-gravity racer at his photostream – click the link above make the jump.

*Today’s excellent alternative title song.

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Neon Swooosh!

Which is like a regular ‘Swooosh!’, only with more noble gas. This is Sylon-tw‘s ‘Cyber Neon Circuit’ racer, complete with ginormous glowing engines, a pair of rather interesting looking mini-figure pilots, and the coolest directional road sign we’ve ever seen. Click the link above to join the race!

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Lego Loader


Fuku Saku’s latest vehicle is massive, ungainly, and able to take a big load, but we’ve already done a ‘Your Mom’ line today. Moving on, this is Fuku Saku’s front loader, and much like today’s other post it is quite brilliantly detailed, despite only being Town scale.

There’s a raising bucket arm, pivoting chassis articulation point, and some rather cunning tyre usage too. A wealth of excellent imagery is available at Fuku Saku’s photostream and you can take a closer look by clicking here.

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Lego Lumberjack

Jonathan Elliott’s latest vehicle is large, heavy, and can handle a lot of wood. Just like your Mom. It’s a Mercedes-Benz Unimog U1700, fitted with a Hiab crane, stabiliser legs, and grabby-claw-thingy, enabling it to pluck felled logs from the ground for transport.

Jonathan’s model captures the real deal in beautiful detail, despite being only six(ish) studs in width, and there’s more to see of his brilliantly presented Lego lumberjack on Flickr – click here here to make the jump.

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Dog Years*

This is an M8 Greyhound 6×6 Light Armoured Vehicle (or something close to it, as builder Robson M doesn’t specify!), built by Ford in the 1940s for Allied troops during World War 2.

The British, who like naming their military hardware after animals and the weather, gave it the ‘greyhound’ name, as it could sustain 55mph on reasonable roads, which was very quick for the time. And – at least in this one’s case – it was grey.

Much like a real greyhound though, the M8 wasn’t particularly well armoured, especially underneath, and nor was it very good off-road, despite being a 6×6. However it was useful enough that 8,500 were made, and – again like its namesake dog – many found new homes after being retired from their first military owner, with some M8s still in service around the world as late as the 2000s!

This neat Town scale version captures the M8 Greyhound rather well, with Robson using a few custom decals and a custom machine gun mounted on top to add to the model’s realism. There’s more of Robson’s build to see at his photostream – click the link to make a visit to the dog track.


*Today’s lovely title song.

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Silver Bird

American Airlines have a great paint scheme. Both retro and futuristic, their shiny silver overlaid by a tri-colour stripe is surely one of the best liveries in the industry. This particular TLCB Writer was most excited to get on an AA aircraft for the first time, newly painted in the shiniest of silvers, before realising the interior was last refreshed in the American Civil War. It was a l.o.n.g flight…

Perhaps that’s a metaphor for much of American produce; shiny on the outside, shit underneath. Anyhoo, equally shiny, yet wonderful underneath too, is this spectacular Boeing 757-200 airliner from Flickr’s BigPlanes, complete with the iconic American Airlines livery and a fully-fitted mini-figure interior.

BigPlanes’ 757 also features beautifully working landing gear, moving flaps, and lighting, which – admittedly – worked fine on this writer’s real-world American Airlines flight, but the interior wasn’t a patch on this! There’s much more to see of BigPlanes incredible creation at his ‘American Airlines Boeing 757-200‘ album; click the link to head to the departure gate, before wishing you’d flown Virgin Atlantic instead.

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Galactic Redux

LEGO’s 928 Galaxy Explorer from 1979 has become something of a legend, being recreated endlessly by countless members of the Lego Community. Here’s another, and it’s done so well we’re forgetting we’re supposed to be a car blog for a bit.

Built by Flickr’s Tim Goddard, this Neo-Classic Space ‘Galactic Explorer’ is a spectacular mesh of superb building techniques, complete with motorised landing gear, a working rear hatch, and a smiling Classic Spaceman at its centre.

There’s more to see of Tim’s brilliant 928 redux at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to a future version of the future in 1979.

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We’re Going to Need a Bigger Gun…

Following Mars Corp.’s hunt for dog food ingredients earlier this week, it seems that sources of cosmic meat require slightly more firepower to harvest than originally anticipated.

Cue the ‘Ares Long Range Artillery Platform’, armed with a twin railgun, twelve ‘hammer’ missiles, and a triple-barrel machine-gun. We suspect the meat won’t even need to be mushed up (or whatever the dog food term is) once the Ares has done its thing…

Like the previously featured ‘Mars Corp. Hermes Mobile Command Centre’, Flickr’s BobDeQuatre owns the mind behind this and there’s more to see at his photostream by clicking here. Din-dins!

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