Tag Archives: 1960s

The Clerk

Lego Ford Anglia

Ford’s humble Anglia has enjoyed something of a resurgence thanks to Harry Potter, but it was a neat classic car before J.K Rowling included it her books. Before that of course it was a rather neat modern car, with some pretty distinctive styling for the time. Whilst not a Jaguar, a Singer or a Humber, the little Ford was still a respectable middle-manager-y sort of car, driven by clerks, accountants and bank manager-types throughout the 1960s.

This lovely 5-wide mini-figure scale version of Ford’s popular European sedan comes from regular bloggee _Tyler of Flickr and it’s both built and photographed beautifully. There’s more to see at _Tyler’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

Piazza Italia

Lego Vespa & Fiat 500

This might be the most Italian thing we’ve ever seen. This beautiful scene complete with two of Italy’s most iconic vehicles, the Vespa scooter and the Fiat 500, comes from the very Italian-sounding Gabriele Zannotti and the, er… Greek-sounding Zeto Vince. Whatever, this could only be more Italian with the addition of a pretty girl, and there’s more to see of this excellent collaboration at Gabriele Zannotti’s photostream – click here to take a look.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Meyers Manx

Lego Meyers Manx Beach Buggy

Flickr’s Pixel Fox has appeared here several times with his ever-growing assortment of off-road vehicles. His latest are these, a pair of wonderful Meyers Manx beach buggies.

Designed by a Californian boat-builder named Bruce F. Meyers in the 1960s the Manx took a shortened Volkswagen Beetle chassis and running-gear and added a custom glass-fibre body. Around 6,000 Manxes were built between 1965 and ’71 and the design dominated dune racing, despite the lowly Beetle engine power.

The B. F. Meyers & Co. company disbanded in 1971, by which point a wave of imitators had arisen. However the Meyers original is still held as the definition of the beach buggy and after several decades out of production a new Manx company formed in 1999, meaning you can still buy Meyers’ 1965 design today.

Pixel Fox’s lovely mini-figure scale Meyers Manxes capture the real car brilliantly and there’s more to see of the Manx and his other excellent off-road vehicles at his photostream via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Black on Black

Lego Classic Police Car

A double post today, as two previous bloggees appear here with a pair of black mini-figure scale classics. First up (above) is _Tyler‘s glorious 5-wide Ford Anglia 100E in police specification, complete with a brilliantly authentic 1950s British police officer.

Today’s second black classic comes from Jonathan Elliot who has built a lovely 6-wide ‘anonymous black sedan’ from a similar era. Smart techniques abound on both models and there’s more to see of each via the links above.

Lego Black Sedan

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rent-a-Ride*

Lego Ford Mustang GT350

Back in the 1960s a rather special deal was done. Hertz, recognising the interest in Ford’s new muscle car, signed a deal with Ford, who provided the company with 1,000 specially-painted Mustang GT350s. The cars joined the rental fleet and immediately gave both companies marketing gold, allowing almost anyone to drive the hottest car in America for a day.

Lego Ford Mustang GT350

After the rental arrangement concluded the cars were refurbished (hopefully very throughly!) and sold on as the Mustang GT350-H. Some of these cars survive complete with their iconic black and gold liveries, and they look gloriously cool in today’s world of white and sliver.

This spectacular replica of one of the original 1,000 Hertz Mustangs comes from previous bloggee Pawel Kmiec (better known as Sariel) and it captures the famous livery beautifully.

Lego Ford Mustang GT350

Sariel’s GT350-H isn’t just beautiful on the outside either, as underneath the removable bodywork sits a fully remote controlled drivetrain, with twin Power Functions drive, remote steering, plus a working V8 piston engine and front and rear suspension.

There’s lots more of Pawel’s brilliant Ford Mustang GT350-H to see on Flickr at his photo album, you can read our interview with him as part of the ‘Become a Professional’ series by clicking here, and you watch the model in action via the excellent YouTube video below.

YouTube Video

*Something about your Mom.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Eagle Weslake Mk1 | Picture Special

Lego Eagle Weslake Mk1

The UK and US have a long and successful racing history. The AC Cobra, the Ford GT40, Lola, Chevrolet-McLaren and many more all prove that Anglo-American collaboration can produce an incredible racing car. The Anglo-American Racing Eagle Weslake Mk1 however, did not.

Built by American Formula 1 driver Dan Gurney the Eagle Weslake Mk1 wowed crowds when it debuted at the start of the 1966 season. The car initially raced with Dan at the wheel powered by a Coventry-Climax four-cylinder engine, until it’s purpose-built Gurney-Westlake V12 was ready for the ’67 season.

Often cited as the most beautiful Formula 1 car ever built, if the newly-engined V12-powered Mk1 went as well as it looked it would be a championship winner.

Lego Eagle Weslake Mk1

It didn’t.

Despite obvious speed allowing the Mk1 to qualify at or near the front of the grid almost all season, chronic fragility of the Gurney-Weslake V12 engine meant the car retired from every race bar two. The two races in which it did finish were both podiums though, proving the speed was there and making Dan Gurney one of only three drivers ever to win a Formula 1 Grand Prix in a car of their own making.

However the Eagle-Weslake’s statistics don’t make for great reading. Of the 26 races the Mk1 started the car finished just six, and in three of those it was powered by the old Coventry-Climax engine. By the end of 1968 Anglo-American Racing closed its doors and Gurney returned to the ‘states under the All American Racing banner to continue competing in domestic championships.

Lego Eagle Weslake Mk1 F1

Nevertheless the Gurney-Weslake Mk1 was a race-winner and thus deserves its place in the Formula 1 Hall of Fame. TLCB Master MOCer Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) has recreated the Mk1 in spectacular detail, as he continues to upload his huge back-catalogue of historic racing cars to Flickr.

First built in 2013 (when it appeared here) Luca’s model has been beautifully re-photgraphed, and it features working suspension, functioning steering, and an accurate replica of the unreliable Gurney-Weslake V12 engine. A whole host of stunning images are available to view at Luca’s Eagle-Weslake Flickr album – click here to take a look.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Pukka Porsche

Lego Porsche 911

Is it us or is Porsche’s original 911 becoming increasingly pretty the older it gets? Now looking wonderfully simple, the original Porsche 911 was launched in the early 1960s with an air-cooled 2-litre flat-6 making around 130bhp. By the 1980s 911s were producing almost three times as much power, and they were almost all crap, making the 1960s original the perfect example of ‘less is more’.

Lego Porsche 911

The beautiful 1960s 911 pictured here comes from Flickr’s klingen_guru and it captures the original car brilliantly. Opening doors, front trunk and engine cover reveal wonderfully detailed internals to match the accurate exterior and you can see all the photos at klingen’s photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Porsche 911

Tagged , , , , ,

The Dazzling Knight

Lego 1966 Batmobile

Kapow!! Batman wasn’t always dark and moody. There was a time when he was kitsch, flamboyant, and – let’s face it – more than a little bit camp, and this was certainly reflected in his choice of wheels.

Built by hot rodding legend George Barris the outlandish 1966 Batmobile was based on the 1955 Ford Futura concept car that Barris bought from the Ford Motor Company for the nominal sum of $1. In just three weeks he turned the old concept into what would become one of the most famous TV vehicles of all time, complete with turbo-electric drive (whatever that is), a Bat-scope (ditto), a mobile phone, reverse rocket thrusters, and a remote tracking system.

Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg hasn’t managed to built that lot, but his Lego recreation of Barris’ masterpiece pays tribute to the Dark Knight’s gaudier days in superb style. You can see more of Ralph’s brilliant replica of the 1966 Batmobile, complete with Batman and Robin figures, over at his photostream – click the link above to light the Bat Signal.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Yule Mog

Lego Technic Unimog 406 Remote Control

As you may be able to tell from the falling snow on this page (if you’re visiting at the time of writing), winter has arrived here at TLCB Towers.

This means our microwave will do double duty, both as the sole provider of nourishment for the TLCB Team and as an Elf-defroster, and TLCB vehicle fleet will likely rust even closer to a final drive to the scrapyard. What we need is one of these, a mighty Mercedes-Benz Unimog 406, built from the 1960s all the way up until 1989.

Suggested by a reader (so no Elf smushings today), this spectacular Model Team / Technic replica of the classic ‘mog by Functional Technic packs in just as much winter-beating tech as the real truck, including live-axle suspension, remote control all-wheel-drive courtesy of two XL Motors, steering via a Servo, a Medium Motor powered remotely operable diff-lock controlled by on-board pneumatic valve, a working Medium Motor powered gearbox, and five sets of LED lights.

All that lot is hidden within a wonderfully realistic Model Team-style body and mounted atop four of the huge wheels found within the 42052 Claas Xerion set, giving Functional Technic’s model genuine off-road ability (which you can watch below).

YouTube Video

There’s lots more to see of Functional Technic’s remote control Mercredes-Benz Unimog 406 at his website, including some superb on-location photos plus detailed images of the chassis construction.

There are also downloadable instructions available for some of the mechanisms used within both the Unimog build and Functional Technic’s other creations, including the remotely operable valve, all-wheel-drive system and functioning diff-lock. Head over to www.functionaltechnic.com to see more of the ‘mog and the builder’s other designs.

Lego Technic Unimog 406 Remote Control

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Classic Americana

Lego Christine Plymouth Fury

The relentless pace of uploads by Flickr’s de-marco continues, with his two latest builds delightful slices of classic Americana. Above is a lovely 6-wide Plymouth Fury, before things turned strange courtesy of a Stephen King novel, whilst below is a neat 1960s police car in a rare blue-over-yellow paint scheme. There’s more to see at de-marco’s photostream via the link above, where there are also instructions for each model available!

Lego Police Patrol Car

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Classic Speed

Lego Speed Champions Cars

We have a very happy Elf here at TLCB Towers today, having found no less than six superb cars in one go. All come from Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott who has appeared here several times over the years with his wonderful Speed Champions style replicas. He’s recently photographed six of his most recognisable classics in one shot, and if you’re as automotively nerdy as we are you’ll be identify all six with no problem at all. Head over to Jonathan’s photostream via the link above to see how many you get right!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Anti-Hippy

Lego VW T2 Pick-Up

Dour grey, hard working, utilitarian… not words you’d usually use to describe a 1960s Volkswagen Transporter. Bought as the default vehicle by trendy hippy types looking to be individual (which is gloriously ironic), the VW Type 2 is typically a vibrant and colourful affair used to ferry people to posh festivals.

However this Volkswagen T2 ‘Doka’ by Jonathan Elliott is the very antithesis of the classic Transporter’s normal role in modern Western society, and for that we absolutely love it.

There’s more to see of Jonathan’s 6-wide Volkswagen T2 pick-up at his photostream – click the link above to check it out.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Easy Rider

Lego Easy Rider Motorbike Harley Davidson FLH

‘A man went looking for America. And couldn’t find it anywhere’. The protagonists in Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda’s 1969 cult movie Easy Rider may not have found America, but they found a lot of other things along the way.

Lego Easy Rider Motorbike Harley Davidson FLH

This brilliant Model Team recreation the Harley Davidson FLH motorcycle that Dennis Hopper rode in the film comes from previous bloggee Andre Pinto, and it not only recreates the bike in glorious detail, it’s been appropriately chromed (and flamed!) too. Hit the road in search of free love and LSD* via either Eurobricks or Flickr.

Lego Easy Rider Motorbike Harley Davidson FLH

*Not the second one. 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

The Perfect Porsche

Lego Porsche 911 Classic

This utterly utterly gorgeous creation is a perfect 1:13 scale replica of the original Porsche 911, and we don’t think we’ve ever seen a car built as beautifully as this. Created over the course of a year, Flickr’s Serge S spent the first six months painstakingly refining the design digitally before finally creating the iconic Porsche in real bricks.

Lego Porsche 911 Classic

No parts are painted and everything is 100% LEGO, and best of all (and to answer the inevitable questions we’ll receive here at TLCB Towers!); yes instructions are available! To access these and to view the full gallery of stunning imagery click this link to visit Serge’s photostream. And LEGO, if you’re reading this; give Serge a job. We’ve never wanted a Lego creation more…

Lego Porsche 911 Classic

Tagged , , , , , ,

Dauphamaha

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

Renault’s 1957 Dauphine was not a fast car. Powered by a 845cc inline-4 producing a meagre 32bhp, the Dauphine took 32 seconds to reach 60mph and topped out at just 8mph more. But it looked so pretty whilst doing it.

Described by motoring journalists at the time as “The prettiest four-seater in the world” the Dauphine was an enormous success, being manufactured in twelve different countries and selling over two million units in its 10 year production run – a huge figure for the 50s and 60s. And to be honest it wasn’t even that slow when compared to rivals of the time.

However by modern standards Renault’s little family car is almost dangerously lethargic. French tuner Adrien Faure thought so too, and decided his little Dauphine could do with a bit more power. Four times as much in fact, thanks to a 1200cc Yamaha motorbike engine that he’s fitted beautifully in place of the original ‘Ventoux’ unit.

It’s this car that serial bloggee Senator Chinchilla has chosen to recreate, complete with scraped paint and rust, with this lovely Model Team creation. There’s more to see of the Senator’s replica on Flickr by clicking here, and you can read more about the Yamaha-powered Dauphine on which his model is based visiting the Speedhunters website. It may no longer be all that pretty, but this Dauphine is quick!

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: