Tag Archives: 1960s

Water Bomb

Lego Canadair CL-215

Ah Canada. The United States’ slightly boring neighbour. Home of singing-horse Celine Dion, the catchy pop of Carly Ray Jepsen, and perennial annoyance that is Justin Bieber. Fortunately they also know how to make some cool stuff up there, thanks almost entirely to transportation giant Bombardier.

Founded in the 1930s Bombardier began by making snowmobiles, and have since expanded to build ski-doos, trains, ATVs and aircraft. It’s the latter we have here, in the form of a Canadair CL-215 water-bombing amphibious plane. Designed in the late 1960s to operate at low speeds and in tricky winds, the CL-215 was sold to eleven countries for fire-fighting and search and rescue operations, with 125 units produced until the design was replaced in 1990.

This lovely replica of the Canadair CL-215 comes from previous bloggee Dornbi of Flickr and he’s captured the unusual shoulder-mounted engine configuration of the aircraft brilliantly. There’s more of the build to see at Dornbi’s photostream – click the link above to drop the world’s biggest water bomb.

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Blue Snake

Lego AC Cobra

The second best Anglo-American collaboration (after Fleetwood Mac of course), the AC Cobra has become a car of legendary status. Based on the pretty but humble AC Ace, American racer-turned-tuner Carroll Shelby brokered a deal with Ford to supply their new Windsor V8 engine to the small British company. A giant killer was born, and today the AC Cobra is one of the most sought-after road-racers ever produced. This beautifully replicated Lego version is the work of TLCB regular Ralph Savelberg and there’s more to see of his miniature Cobra on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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British Racing Mean

Lego Ferrari 312 & Brabham BT24 Formula 1 1967

The pig-nosed driver of this Ferrari 312 isn’t taking any prisoners with that move. Under Bernie Ecclestone’s helm Formula 1 would see said combatant confined to the pits for ‘causing a collision’, but this is 1967, and rules were for sissies.

The car the Ferrari has swiped has appeared here at TLCB before, a Brabham BT24, and it’s now pictured alongside the latest build by Flickr’s Pixel Junkie in this wonderfully nostalgic Formula 1 scene.

It’s Brabham that went on to win the 1967 Formula 1 World Championship, despite having a slower car than the Lotus of the time, whilst Ferrari finished a lowly fifth. Ferrari may have lost the battle in ’67, but it is they who won the war, with Brabham fading into history whilst the prancing horse has gone on to win almost twice as many titles as any other team.

Being British we prefer the outcome in ’67 though, so we’ll leave this post with a picture of the Brabham BT24 rightfully back in front of the Ferrari 312, and you can us find at Pixel Junkie’s photostream feeling patriotic.

Lego Formula 1 1967 Ferrari vs Brabham

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“The Most Beautiful Car Ever Made”

Lego Jaguar E-Type

Not our words, but those of one Enzo Ferrari, expressing his admiration for Jaguar’s new sports car at its launch in 1961. Nearly six decades later the E-Type’s legacy is secured thanks to its incredible looks, but at the time the new Jaguar had the world talking for far more than its beauty.

Based upon Jaguar’s three-time Le Mans winner, the E-Type featured disc brakes, independent rear suspension and the highest top speed of any production car at the time. And yet the E-Type cost only about the same a premium saloon car, which meant in today’s terms you could buy a Bugatti Veyron for the price of a mid-spec Audi.

The E-Type was, and still is, quite a car. The result of course is that – whilst prices were reasonable for decades – recently the classic Jaguar has become astronomically expensive, especially early cars such as the one pictured here.

We’ll stick with this one then, built by Flickr’s Senator Chinchilla, and available to view at his photostream here. The Senator has done a grand job capturing the E-Type’s wonderful lines in Lego form, and there’s lots more to see of his recreation of the car Enzo envied via the link above.

Lego Jaguar E-Type

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Cannonball Run

Lego Kirovets K-700A Tractor

This is a Soviet Kirovets K-700A heavy duty tractor, and it’s a vehicle of which we know absolutely nothing. However our trusty friend Wikipedia has come to the rescue and let us know that, amongst other fun facts, Kirovets were once a foundry for cannonballs. Well there you go. That interesting factoid shows just how old the company is though, being established way back in 1789.

This particular Kirovets product was launched in 1962, finally ending production in 2000, and features a turbocharged V8 diesel engine and all-wheel-drive. The Kirovets factory now produces the hateful Dartz T-98 Kombat, so frankly we’d rather they were still making cannonballs, but you can see more of this impressive machine from their back-catalogue courtesy of previous bloggee Jakeof_ at both Brickshelf and his Flickr photostream here.

Lego Kirovets 700 4x4

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Expensive Mistake

Lego Ferrari 250 GT California

This is a Ferrari 250 GT California, one of the most valuable cars ever made (currently fetching around $20million), and this is one crashing backwards over a cliff.

Don’t worry, it wasn’t a real GT California used in ‘Ferris Bueller’s Day Off’, and you can recreate the famous scene with your own plastic replica thanks to Flickr’s Peter Blackert, who has constructed the famous car beautifully in brick form.

Click the link above to see the full gallery, and where you’ll also find a link to Peter’s new book which explains how to build a Ferrari 250 GT California model yourself.

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Eye in the Sky

Lego E-2C Hawkeye Aircraft

This wonderfully weird contraption is a Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft, currently serving in the U.S Navy aircraft carrier fleet. First flying in 1960, the E-2 Hawkeye is not only still in service some five decades later, but is actually still in production, giving it the longest production run of any carrier-based aircraft.

The huge disc atop the Hawkeye is a 24-foot rotating radar dome equipped with long-range radar and IFF systems, the only carrier-based aircraft to possess such technology. This enormous eye/ear allows the E-2 to detect incoming threats long before they become a danger, allowing the carrier upon which it’s stationed to prepare defences.

This remarkably accurate replica of one the the U.S navy’s oddest aircraft comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist, and he’s used some absolutely genius techniques to recreate the Hawkeye’s unique shape. There’s lots more to see at Ralph’s photostream by clicking here – just know that the Hawkeye is sure to see you coming…

Lego E-2C Hawkeye U.S Navy Aircraft

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KRAZY

Lego KrAZ 255 Truck Remote Control

This is a Ukrainian KrAz 255 6×6 off-road truck, launched in the late 1960s by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. The KrAZ factory actually started out making bridges, then combine harvesters, before moving on to military trucks. Communism meant you built what you were told to…

KrAZ were good at trucks though, and in 1971 they were awarded the Order of Lenin (the highest decoration bestowed by the Soviet Union) for their successes, and their products were exported to several countries around the world.

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union KrAZ are no longer under the control of the state, and – a little weirdly – are supplying vehicles to the Ukrainian army to defend Ukraine from invasion by their old masters Russia.

This superb Model Team style recreation of the Soviet-era KrAZ 255 is the work of xxtruck of Brickshelf, making his TLCB debut. Underneath the realistic exterior is a remotely controlled 6×6 drivetrain, working suspension on all wheels, a detailed engine and interior, and functioning head and tail lights.

There’s lots more of the KrAZ 255 to see via xxtruck’s Brickshelf Gallery – take a look via the link above.

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Czechered Flag

Lego Škoda 1100 OHC

Škoda, now successfully part of the Volkswagen empire, are making excellent – if painfully boring – cars. Prior to Volkswagen’s ownership though, they were an automotive joke in Europe, ranked alongside Lada at the bottom of the motoring barrel, a constant reminder of the folly of Communism.

Prior to Communisms’s vice-like grip however, Škoda were actually a thoroughly respectable forward-thinking vehicle manufacturer. This is one of their cars from that time, the absolutely beautiful Škoda 1100 OHC, which is probably as close to a real life version of ‘Speed Racer‘ that we’ll ever see.

This gorgeous mini-figure scale recreation of one of Eastern Europe’s most wonderful automotive efforts comes from previous bloggee František Hajdekr, and not only is there an extensive gallery of images available, František has also included building instructions and a ‘how to’ video so that you can build your very own 1100 OHC too. You can find all of the above at František’s photostream – click the link in the text to check it out.


Lego Škoda 1100 OHC

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Little Red Corvette

Lego Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Little red Corvette
Honey you got to slow down (Got to slow down)
Little red Corvette
‘Cause if you don’t you gonna run your
Little red Corvette right in the ground

Lego Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

This beautiful 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray straight from Prince’s songbook was suggested to us by a reader, and it comes from previous bloggee Dave Slater of Flickr. With one of the most fantastically accurate exteriors that we’ve ever seen at this scale we highly recommend taking a closer look – click the link above to visit the full gallery of superb images.

Lego Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

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Lotus 49B | Picture Special

Lego Lotus 49B

Modern Formula 1 is almost all about aerodynamics. The art of directing airflow around a car seems quite mundane today, but when Colin Chapman first added ‘wings’ to his Lotus 49B in 1968 in order to generate downforce it was a revolution.

As is often the way with innovation, the other teams first tried to ban the Lotus, and then copied it, including its innovative use of the Cosworth DFV engine as a structural component in the chassis, and much of Chapman’s design is still in standard use in F1 today.

Lego Lotus 49B

Chapman’s Lotus 49 won both the Constructor’s and Driver’s World Championships twice, and also lays claim to being the first ever Formula 1 car to feature a racing livery, again – normal now, but a revolution in the 1960s.

This exquisite recreation of one of the greatest (perhaps the greatest) Formula 1 car ever designed comes from previous bloggee Lucas Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) who continues to upload his extensive catalogue of beautiful historic racing cars to Flickr.

Luca’s 1968 Lotus 49B features working suspension, steering, and a beautiful replica Cosworth DFV V8 engine, and you can see more of the build as well as his other incredible creations by clicking the link to his photostream above.

Lego Lotus 49B

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Lotus 43 – BRM H16 | Picture Special

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

Race car building legend Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) has been building his stunning historic racing cars for the best part of a decade. He’s recently uploaded another one of his glorious creations to Flickr (where we hope many more will follow), and thus we’re able to publish it here. It’s also one of the weirder racing cars in Luca’s garage, although it might not look remarkable at first glance.

Any classic racing fan will know of the incredible performances of the Lotus F1 team. Led by Colin Chapman, and powered by the legendary Cosworth DFV engine, the partnership delivered four Driver and five Constructor World Championship titles. However, before the DFV was ready Chapman needed an engine to put into his new 43 Formula 1 car for the 1966 season. He turned to previous Championship Winners BRM, and their unique P75 H16 engine.

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

Yup, H16. Basically two Flat-8 engines stacked on top of one another, yet only 3 litres in capacity. Unfortunately the unusual design was unusual for a reason – reliability. Or lack of it.

Heavy, extremely complicated, and constantly breaking, the BRM engine in Chapman’s Lotus 43 caused it to retire from every race bar one during the 1966 season. However, that one finish was a race win at the United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, showing that when it worked, the Lotus 43 was quick. Really Quick.

The following year in ’67 the new Cosworth DFV 3 litre V8 engine was ready, Ford added their sponsorship to it (in a stroke of marketing genius), and the year after that the DFV starting a Championship Winning streak that went unbroken for seven years.

Lego BRM H16 Engine

BRM’s mental P75 H16 engine was quickly forgotten, although the team continued to produce Formula 1 cars until the late 1970s, and Lotus forged on with a Cosworth partnership that was to become one of the most successful ever seen in the sport.

However, we think the Lotus 43 BRM H16 deserves a little recognition. It was a race winner after all, and for a brief moment two of Britain’s greatest F1 teams combined to produce something, well…  a little bit crap.

RoscoPC’s homage to that disastrous partnership pictured here was first built in 2010 and is now available to view in wonderful detail on Flickr. It features working steering, suspension, beautiful detailing, and – of course – a recreation of one of the maddest engines ever seen in Formula 1.

You can see all of the images of Luca’s incredible Lotus 43 build at his photostream via the link above, and if you’re curious to know what an H16 Formula 1 engine sounds like, click here…

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

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Sacrilege

Lego Ferrari 250 GTO Gasser

And yet… somehow… rather cool. Even so, we’re glad this Ferrari 250 GTO (variants of which are the most valuable cars ever sold at auction) gasser hot rod exists only in Danish plastic.

Previous bloggee Tim Inman possesses the slightly warped mind that created this, and there’s more to see at his Flickr photostream via the link above.

Lego Ferrari 250 GTO Gasser

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Cartoon Scarlet

Lego Captain Scarlet Patrol Car

What do spaghetti-O parasitic aliens fear most of all? Well according to Gerry Anderson, it’s a pointily-styled hatchback with a tail fin stuck on the roof. All is not what it seems though, as the driver of said hatchback has fortunately acquired the aliens’ powers of regeneration, rendering him ‘virtually indestructible’.

Captain Scarlet fought the Mysterons from Mars between 1967 and 1968, and if we’re honest we have no idea whether he and his Spectrum colleagues succeeded in thwarting the alien threat, so vague was the series’ ending. Still, it was miles better than Stingray…

This cheeky cartoon recreation of Scarlet’s Spectrum Patrol Car comes from serial bloggee Redfern1950s, and is beautifully constructed in his trademark style. There’s more to see at Red’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump to puppet-based sci-fi circa 1967.

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Orange Crush

Lego Technic Zil 130

Another day, another find, another Elven catastrophe to tidy up. Following this week’s earlier Elf squashing our workforce has been in a cautious but nevertheless vengeful mood.

And so one of the week’s earlier victims found itself at the controls of a vehicle capable of exacting a hit-and-run based revenge. With the Elves it doesn’t really matter if the perpetrator of a previous act is actually present when the revenge is served, just as long as someone gets squished. And squished they were.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

The vehicle in question is this absolutely wonderful ZiL 130 MMZ 555 tipper truck, in perfectly-suited Porsche 911 GT3 orange, as built by previous bloggee Samolot. In a convenient metaphor for the communist economy that spawned it, the Zil was the ideal tool for crushing the people, or in this case, Elves.

Remote control drive with a remotely controlled four speed gearbox, and a novel linear actuator based steering system give this ZiL 130 a surprising turn of speed, certainly enough to catch out a few slower Elves, whilst all-wheel suspension allowed the truck to roll over them with ease. Unrelated to the smushing, but a cool feature nonetheless, Samolot’s Zil 130 also includes a remotely controlled dumping mechanism powered by a Medium Motor, taking the total motor-count to four.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

Opening doors, a working steering wheel, and an opening hood all feature too, and Samolot has included a level of detail that’s now becoming typical with many Technic builds that moves the theme ever closer to Model Team in terms of aesthetics.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Samolot’s superb ZiL 130 dump truck via Brickshelf, MOCpages and the Eurobricks forum, plus you watch all the working features in action courtesy of the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

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