Tag Archives: Classic Car

600 Redux

Britain feels like it has returned to the 1970s. Inflation is ludicrous, everyone’s on strike, and it’s only a matter of time before brown patterned wallpaper makes a comeback.

Cue Jonathan Elliott, who has also returned to 1971 via this superb remake of one of the first ever LEGO vehicle sets, the 600 Ambulance. Whilst the original set is a somewhat low-res right-angled affair, Jonathan’s remake is a gorgeous, highly detailed, and surprisingly functional model, wonderfully recreating the station-wagon-based ambulances that were commonly used half a century ago.

There’s more to see of Jonathan’s beautifully presented 600 Ambulance Redux at his photostream, and you can head back to the early ’70s with the rest of us via the link above.

Do It Yourself

Taking advantage of the new year sales is not something this TLCB Writer is inclined to do. Mr. Bean on the other hand, was very excited at the prospect of grabbing himself a bargain. Cue one of the most brilliant vehicular capers in TV history, wherein an ingenious Bean attempts to transport rather more than he should home via his British Leyland Mini. Flickr’s Tomáš Novák is the latest builder to create a brick-built Bean atop a bright green Mini, and there’s more to see of his homage to TV gold at his photostream. Click the link above to push the mop onto the accelerator!

Time Attack

We’re back to cars, and what a car to return to our site title for. This is a ’68 Chevrolet Camaro ‘Time Attack’ racer, modified with a twin-turbo V6, side-exit exhausts, aero, and a full roll-cage, all built in miniature in Speed Champions scale.

Flickr’s Stephan Jonsson is the creator behind it, and there’s lots more of the Camaro to see – including excellent imagery showing the highly detailed engine and a radically extreme aero-package – at his ‘1986 Pro Street/Time Attack Camaro’ album. Click the link above to set your time.

Supernova

Whilst both part of the General Motors empire, America’s Chevy ‘Nova’ was rather different to the Vauxhall one we got… Still, we have the cool one today, courtesy of IBrickedItUp and this neat recreation of the third generation Chevrolet Nova SS in Speed Champions scale. Racing stripes and an unnecessary hood bulge add to the image (again, somewhat different to what we got…), and there’s more to see via the link!

To the Tip!

Christmas at TLCB Towers is over for another year, and thus the slightly depressed-looking Christmas tree in the corner of the office can finally be laid to rest. This usually means strapping it to the roof of the office’s Rover 200, driving to the tip, and lobbing it into a giant container of compostable waste.

Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott takes a much more fun approach to tree disposal though, with his Christmas tree dragged behind a Land Rover 109 tow-truck like a wake-boarder behind a power-boat. Or a soon to-be-executed 15th century criminal behind a horse.

The Land Rover is mighty good too, with the exquisite detailing including probably the best small-scale Land Rover tail-lights we’ve ever seen. There’s more of the model to see at Jonathan’s photostream, and you can take a look via the link above whilst we find out if a knackered Rover 200 is up to the job of towing a Christmas tree through the streets.

Model Team Miura

Launched in 1966, the Lamborghini Miura is probably the the world’s first supercar, and was designed by Lamborghini’s engineering team in their spare time, against the wishes of their founder. He changed his mind when he saw their work however, and gave them free reign to complete the car, with styling direction from the great Mercello Gandini.

Powered by Lamborghini’s 3.9 litre V12, transversely mounted behind the cabin, the Miura produced around 345bhp, with later versions upping the figure to almost 400bhp.

Now worth a gagillion dollars, Miuras are one of the most sought-after cars in the world, so the closest any of us here at TLCB will get to one is in Lego form. Fortunately today we can do just that, courtesy of Pingubrick’s beautiful 1,200-piece Model Team recreation of the iconic ’60s Lamborghini.

Opening doors, front and rear clamshells, and a detailed interior and engine bay feature, and there’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the link above to take a look at Pingu’s recreation of Lamborghini’s finest work.

My Other (Muscle) Car is a Camaro

What’s better than a ’69? Two ’69s obviously. Cue Brian Michal, who has taken LEGO’s excellent 10304 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 set and created another ’69 icon, the Ford Mustang Mach 1.

A performance package available on the first generation Mustang, Mach 1s were powered by V8s engines of 5.8, 6.4, or 7.0 litres, were fitted with upgraded suspension (although – we suspect – not nearly upgraded enough), and a 3-speed automatic or 4-speed manual gearbox.

A host of other options were available too, including Ram-Air, a Drag Pack, a ‘Traction Lok’ rear axle, and – as pictured here – a ‘Shaker’ hood. All of which sound marvellous.

Brian’s 10304 alternate captures the ’69 Ford Mustang Mach 1 superbly, with more to see at his Flickr album, where a link to building instructions can also be found should you wish to switch your own ’69 muscle car for another.

And if a ’69 isn’t really your thing, here are a few bonus links to a rather more modern Mustang, a Porsche 911, and a Chevrolet C10 pick-up, also built solely from the 10304 Camaro Z28 set.

Now With Less Asbestos!

Old-timey British car advertisments are hilarious. From the Triumph Herald “That almost never needs greasing!’ to the Sunbeam Alpine with eight consecutive exclamation marks in its strap-line, everything was tremendously exciting in 1959.

Cue Chris Elliott‘s ‘1959 British Family Saloon’, a homage to the cars (and car marketers) of 65 years ago. With echoes of Riley, Ford Anglia, and Sunbeam Rapier amongst many others, Chris’ creation could only be more late-’50s British if its description included the phrase “Keep your daily commutes punctual and stylish!”. Wait, it does? Well that’s a dandy way to describe the feeling that only motoring in the newest 1959 design can give!

Don your Motorway safety felt cap, check your Bowmonk dynometer, and fire up your Eltron ‘Car Kettle and Carfri‘* at Chris Elliot’s photostream via the link above!

*Yes that last link really was a device for boiling water and cooking bacon whilst driving to work. Golly the ’50s were terrific!

Highway Patrol

It’s the early-’80s, and if you’re in the back of a Ford LTD Crown Victoria it means one of two things; you’re either paying a fare to cross a city, or you’ve been busted.

Cue Jakub Marcisz‘s wonderful 1983 Ford LTD Crown Victoria police car, resplendent in a black-on-white highway patrol livery with a red/blue light-bar, rear-facing red lights in the rear window, a detailed V8 engine, and the optional ‘push bar’, so law-enforcement officers can ram you before shooting.

There’s lots more to see at Jakub’s superb ‘Ford LTD 1983’ album on Flickr; click the link above to bust on over, or here to see another LTD Crown Victoria with a few modifications that even the cops don’t get…

On Days Like These*

Questi giorni quando vieni, il bel sole
On days like these when skies are blue and fields are green
I look around and think about what might have been
And then I hear sweet music float around my head
As I recall the many things we left unsaid
And it’s on days like these that I remember
Singing songs and drinking wine
While your eyes play games with mine

SCREECH, CRASH!

Oh yes, we’re a Lego blog. This fabulous Speed Champions scale Lamborghini Miura SV comes from Flickr’s barneius, and there’s more to see at his photostream. *And if you have no idea what the rest of this post is about, click here.

Land Rover Series 1 80″ | Picture Special

This is without doubt the loveliest Lego Land Rover we’ve seen this year. Because the loveliest Land Rover is of course a green Series 1 80″.

Built by recent bloggee FanisLego, this utterly beautiful recreation of the definitive Land Rover captures every aesthetic detail of the wonderful 1950s original, with brick-built leaf-spring suspension, a replica of the simple 50bhp 1.6 litre engine, holes for the power-take-offs (can you imagine a modern Defender including the ability to run farm equipment from the engine!), flipping seats, a folding windscreen, plus opening doors, hood, and tailgate.

Photographed and presented superbly, FanisLego’s Land Rover Series 1 80″ is available to view on Bricksafe, where fifteen stunning images are within in the model’s album. Better yet, a link to building instructions can also be found, so if – like us – you think the Series 1 Land Rover is probably the best vehicle ever built, you can create your very own in brick form.

Head to Bricksafe via the link in the text above, where you can find full build details, the complete image gallery, and a link to building instructions.

Beet This

If you’re a rad So-Cal surfer dude, there is literally nothing cooler than a slammed Volkswagen Beetle with a roof-rack. This TLCB Writer is definitely not a rad So-Cal surfer dude, but despite his doughy Northern European composition, he still thinks this slammed Volkswagen Beetle with a roof-rack is pretty cool. Flickr’s RGB900 is the rad So-Cal surfer dude* behind it and there’s more to see via the link.

*Radical surfness not guaranteed.

My Other Car is a London Bus

You wait ages for a bus and then two Mercedes-Benz 280 SEs come along at once. Or something.

This splendid classic Mercedes-Benz 280 SE is the work of recent bloggee FanisLego, who has built it only from the parts found within the LEGO 10258 Creator London Bus set. There’s a detailed engine and interior, opening doors, hood and trunk, and it can built as either a coupe or a convertible from the same parts source.

There’s more of Fanis’ excellent alternate to see at his ‘Mercedes-Benz 280 SE’ album on Bricksafe and you can take a look via the link above.

Building Broncos

This is a classic 1960s Ford Bronco. And so is this. Yup, we have two brilliant brick-built Broncos today, each of which looks stunningly accurate, and yet the two are constructed entirely differently, such are the infinite possibilities of the LEGO brick.

The blue ’68 Bronco is the work of Michael217, whose Model Team style creation deploys a raft of ‘Studs Not on Top’ techniques to recreate the iconic shape. There are opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Built in exactly the same scale, but using traditional studs-up techniques, is FanisLego’s red ’65 Bronco, which also includes opening doors, a raising hood, a removable hardtop, and a two-piece tailgate, again behind each of which are beautifully detailed internals.

Fanis’ Bronco also deploys a few more ‘Creator’ style techniques, including ‘glass’ for the windows, and the smoothing of nearly every visible stud.

Michael217 has chosen to omit the glass in his windows, but there’s rather more hidden underneath the chassis of his blue ’68, where a complete remote control drivetrain has been packed in. All-wheel-drive courtesy of two L Motors, Servo steering, and all-wheel-suspension all feature, without a hint of the clever engineering within being revealing visibly.

Each Bronco is fantastic example of the versatility of our favourite plastic bricks, using two completely different compositions to deliver an identically scaled highly realistic creation packed with with features.

Both Broncos are presented beautifully on Bricksafe, with Michael’s blue ’68 available to view here (and on Eurobricks too), whilst FanisLego’s red ’65 available to view here. Check out each superb model via the links!

Where’s Harry?

Whilst 1960s America got the Ford Mustang, we got this; the 997cc Ford Anglia 105E. Like the Mustang though, the fourth generation Anglia was phenomenally successful, selling over a million units in an eight year production run. It was just – with a top speed of 73mph and 0-60mph in 27 seconds – a little slower than its American cousin.

One of those million-plus owners was of course Arthur Weasley from the Harry Potter series, who outfitted his light blue Anglia 105E with the ability for magical flight, and cued the creation of a thousand blue brick-built Anglias.

But not today, because regular bloggee 1saac W. has not built the Harry Potter Anglia, rather a normal non-magical one, and we’re all in favour of that.

That’s because unlike say, a DeLorean DMC-12, which was total garbage as a car and only survives thanks to some time-travelling movie modifications, the Anglia was an excellent and widely celebrated little British car long before its starring role in the movie scene where it crashed into the Buggering Birch.

Which means we love this humble white Ford Anglia 105E, devoid of wizards, enchanted flight, and a tree with a lust for violence, and there’s more to see at 1saac’s photostream, where Harry Potter is nowhere to be found.