Tag Archives: Classic Car

Topless CJ

Lego Jeep CJ

Well that’s brought in some clicks. Anyhoo, this neat roof-less Jeep CJ-5 comes from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist, and it captures the real off-roader beautifully in his trademark style. There are lots more images of the topless Jeep available on Flickr – click the link above to take a peek.

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Dauphamaha

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

Renault’s 1957 Dauphine was not a fast car. Powered by a 845cc inline-4 producing a meagre 32bhp, the Dauphine took 32 seconds to reach 60mph and topped out at just 8mph more. But it looked so pretty whilst doing it.

Described by motoring journalists at the time as “The prettiest four-seater in the world” the Dauphine was an enormous success, being manufactured in twelve different countries and selling over two million units in its 10 year production run – a huge figure for the 50s and 60s. And to be honest it wasn’t even that slow when compared to rivals of the time.

However by modern standards Renault’s little family car is almost dangerously lethargic. French tuner Adrien Faure thought so too, and decided his little Dauphine could do with a bit more power. Four times as much in fact, thanks to a 1200cc Yamaha motorbike engine that he’s fitted beautifully in place of the original ‘Ventoux’ unit.

It’s this car that serial bloggee Senator Chinchilla has chosen to recreate, complete with scraped paint and rust, with this lovely Model Team creation. There’s more to see of the Senator’s replica on Flickr by clicking here, and you can read more about the Yamaha-powered Dauphine on which his model is based visiting the Speedhunters website. It may no longer be all that pretty, but this Dauphine is quick!

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

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Honda NSX – Picture Special

Lego Technic Honda NSX

After over a decade out of the supercar game Honda’s new NSX supercar has just gone on sale, a near-600bhp hybrid-powered torque-vectoring computer with wheels. But that’s not the one we have here today.

Launched in 1990 the original Honda NSX was designed to take on the established supercars from manufacturers such as Ferrari, only at a lower price point, and to upset the supercar order through the virtue of it, well, being a supercar that actually worked.

Honda F1 driver Ayrton Senna helped to tune the handling in the final stages of development, and although the NSX was powered by ‘only’ a transversely mounted naturally aspirated 3.0 V6 making 270bhp (albeit with an 8,000rpm redline), it quickly gained a reputation for being one hell of a drivers’ car.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

Lightweight (the NSX was the first mass produced car to be made from aluminium) and beautifully nimble, Honda showed that you didn’t need all-wheel-drive, turbos, or a prancing horse on the hood to build a superb supercar. And unlike pretty much every other supercar at the time the NSX was reliable, because above all else, it was a Honda.

These days something of the original NSX’s simplicity is missing from the latest crop of overpowered, over-assisted supercars – the new NSX included, and arguably the same is true for their Technic equivalents. Packed with Power Functions electric motors, remote control, and bluetooth, we seem to have lost the joy of hands-on mechanics. Luckily for us though, Nico71 has not only recreated one of the finest old-school supercars ever made, he’s done it in a profoundly old-school way too…

Lego Technic Honda NSX

This is Nico’s Technic Honda NSX, and it’s as delightfully manual as the real car. An accurate transversely mounted V6 engine is turned by the rear wheels, which are independently suspended along with those at the front. The front wheels also steer by hand, thanks to a connected steering wheel plus a ‘hand-of-God’ connection mounted on the roof. The pop-up headlights are also manually raised and lowered via lever mounted on the dashboard, and the seats can slide fore and aft manually too. Lastly the doors, hood, rear window, engine cover and glovebox all open by hand, and there isn’t a Power Functions motor in sight.

Nico’s Honda NSX is – much like the real car – a triumph of mechanical engineering, and well worth a closer look. Check out the full details at Nico’s discussion topic at the Eurobricks forum, and you can find all the images, a video of the model’s features and instructions (yes, really, so we we won’t be getting the usual ‘Can I have instructions?’ messages for once!) at Nico’s own excellent website – Click here to take a look.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

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Art Déco Gas Station – Picture Special

Lego Art Déco Gas Station

We regularly post beautiful Lego creations here at The Lego Car Blog. From sports cars to trucks and motorcycles to fighter jets, the produce of the online Lego community is often jaw-droppingly good, and it is of course the very reason that this website exists.

Today though we think we may be publishing the most beautiful vehicle-related creation that we’ve found in our five years of blogging. This is Andrea Lattanzio’s ‘Art Deco Gas Station’, and it is unbelievably perfect.

Lego Art Déco Gas Station

Based on a real-life gas station in Tucson, Arizona, Andrea’s incredible creation returns to the golden age of pumping gas, when stations such as this one were meeting places in their own right, rather than simply tools enabling people to get to the place they want to go.

With two period-correct Shell gas pumps underneath a wonderful curved awning, a fully equipped store, diner, and workshop, Andrea’s build offers more than just a fill up.

Lego Art Déco Gas Station

Three lovely Town scale vehicles feature in the build too; a neat step-side pick-up truck, a gorgeous tan-coloured hot rod coupe, and a brown hot rod roadster receiving some attention in the garage.

There’s a lot more to see of Andrea’s spell-binding build at his Flickr photostream, plus you can read our interview with the builder as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking this link.

Lego Art Déco Gas Station

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Dinotopia*

Lego Technic Ferrari Dino

This gorgeous Technic Ferrari Dino 246 was found by one of our Elves on Flickr today. Built by James Tillson it perfectly captures one of the last curvy Ferraris before the wedges of the ’70s took over sports car design.

With only a 2.4 litre V6 engine (enlarged from just 2 litres in the early cars) the Dino – named after Enzo Ferrari’s son who died tragically young – was one of the few Ferrari models that wasn’t a supercar, and whilst Ferrari’s other non-supercar efforts are often looked down upon the original Dino is still held in high esteem.

James’ recreation of the 246 is a worthy homage to the original car, and there’s lots more to see of his splendid Lego recreation at his photostream by clicking the link above.

Lego Technic Ferrari Dino

*Twenty TLCB points if you know the reference!

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Cool Caravanning

Lego 1956 Pontiac Catalina

If you’re going to tow a shed with wheels behind you to a field where you have to crap in a bucket, you may as well do it in something cool. This 1956 Pontiac Catalina certainly fulfils that brief, and the dinky caravan in tow doesn’t look too bad either. See more of both courtesy of LegoEng on Flickr.

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Supercharged Smushing

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

The Lego Car Blog Elves have a long and chequered history with remote control vehicles. Regularly chased, squashed, and manhandled by one of their number at the controls of an RC creation, they only have themselves to blame. Unless we do it of course.

However if they’re going to be run over by a remotely controlled Lego model it may as well be by a vehicle they like, and we expect this brutal-looking Charger-esque supercharged muscle car is the Elves’ very favourite of all the creations that have  mowed them down.

Built by previous bloggee Paave this RC masterpiece not only looks the part, it’s packed with cool functions too. Remote control drive (by two L Motors) and steering (via a Medium Motor) of course feature, plus rather cleverly the supercharger belt also spins. There’s working suspension front and rear, positive caster angle, opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, and the bodywork is completely removable from the chassis.

There’s lots more to see of Paave’s superb Technic muscle car via MOCpages, Brickshelf and Eurobricks where you can also watch a video of the model’s features in action – click the links to check it out.

Lego Technic Supercharged Muscle Car RC

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Sittin’ Pretty

Lego Datsun 240Z

This TLCB writer is going to poke his head above the metaphorical parapet that is the internet’s comments and state that the prettiest sports car of the 1970s is not a Jaguar, Porsche, or Alfa Romeo… but a Datsun. In particular, this Datsun – the wonderful 1970 240Z.

This lightly JDM-modified 240Z comes from Jonathan Elliott and it captures the Japanese sports car’s curves beautifully. There’s more to see on both Flickr and MOCpages via the links, and you can find today’s title track – by none other than The Datsuns – by clicking here.

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Blue Snake

Lego AC Cobra

The second best Anglo-American collaboration (after Fleetwood Mac of course), the AC Cobra has become a car of legendary status. Based on the pretty but humble AC Ace, American racer-turned-tuner Carroll Shelby brokered a deal with Ford to supply their new Windsor V8 engine to the small British company. A giant killer was born, and today the AC Cobra is one of the most sought-after road-racers ever produced. This beautifully replicated Lego version is the work of TLCB regular Ralph Savelberg and there’s more to see of his miniature Cobra on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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Agent Orange

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

Here’s a car that we’d like to own for real. Toyota’s first generation Celica produced between 1970 and 1977 has become a seriously cool ride, even more so when painted bright orange and lightly modified. This awesome remote controlled Lego version of the 1970 TA22-type Celica comes from LegoMarat of Flickr, and he’s lightly modified his creation too.

Lego 1970 Toyota Celica TA22

With a third-party BuWizz brick installed LegoMarat’s Celica produces up to eight times the power of a model powered by a standard LEGO battery, making his model a seriously quick bit of kit.

There are more images to view on Flickr via the link above, and you can see the real-life Celica TA22 that inspired LegoMarat’s build by clicking here.

Lego Toyota Celica Remote Control

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Cream Tea

Lego Vintage Roadster

This glorious vintage roadster by Flickr’s Galaktek was discovered by one of our Elves today, and we’re pretty sure it is absolutely not their cup of tea. Smooth, restrained, classy… literally none of the qualities that our Elven workforce would choose in a vehicle. But the discovering Elf knows its masters rather well, because it is absolutely our cup of tea. TLCB Staff are a civilised bunch you see.

Lego Vintage Roadster

Unusually coloured in cream and tea hues, Galaktek’s roadster looks the perfect car in which to take a jaunt to the country club for a, well… cream tea. The closest this TLCB writer is going to get to that vision is drinking a can of Red Bull alone in the stationary cupboard, so whilst he partakes in a slightly tragic but harmless fantasy you can check out more of Galaktek’s model at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Vintage Roadster

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Alternate Alternate Creating Alternatives

Lego Creator 31070 Ferrari F40

LEGO’s official 10248 Ferrari F40 set received an excellent review here at The Lego Car Blog. However, it is a set that may be out of reach for many due to its fairly hefty pricing. Well fear not, because Amaman may have the answer.

LEGO’s 31070 Turbo Track Racer set is around half the price of its Ferrari counterpart, but contains all the pieces you need (plus a few you don’t) to build a wonderful Ferrari F40 replica. Amaman’s excellent F40 recreation is accurate enough it could be passed off as an official set in its own right, and when you’re bored with it 31070 provides a wealth of parts to build countless other vehicular creations.

You can check out Amaman’s 31070 Alternative Ferrari F40 on both MOCpages and Flickr, and you can see two alternate 31070 alternates by clicking here and here. Then go and buy the set and see what you can create!

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The People Eater’s Limousine

Lego Mad Max Fury Road People Eater's Limousine

It’s been a while since we featured a vehicle from Mad Max – Fury Road, but thanks to a reader we’re back in the apocalyptic wastelands of George Miller’s 2015 epic. The Elves – despite not finding this creation themselves – are watching a screening of the movie in their cage room, so we can probably expect extreme violence from them tomorrow. In the meantime let’s take a closer look at today’s build.

Based on an AM General M814 military truck with a Mercedes-Benz W123 limousine body mounted atop it, this is the ‘People Eater’s Limousine’. Like all the vehicles from the movie the truck/limo hybrid was built for real, using two salvaged Mercedes-Benz limousines due to be scrapped by a wedding car company.

In the film the truck is used by the Mayor of Gastown as his own personal transportation and can also refine oil on the move, allowing his business to continue earning revenue even while he traverses the desert between Gastown and the Citadel. A smart man then, but he also wears nipple-clamps at all times, so that probably cancels out.

Nipple-clamp wearing businessman aside, this Lego recreation of the People Eater’s Limousine is about an accurate a replica of a Mad Max – Fury Road vehicle as we’ve seen yet, and includes a highly detailed engine, a perfectly replicated interior, and the two oil-refining trailers in tow.

It’s the work of Scott of Flickr and there’s a huge gallery of images available to view at his photostream, which also includes some of the other vehicles from the Mad Max – Fury Road film. Click on the link above to make the jump to Scott’s photostream, and if you want to see what happened to the real vehicle (clue: fire and explosions!) then click here!

Lego Mad Max Fury Road People Eater's Limousine

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Porsche 911 Targa – Picture Special

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

This glorious 1980s Porsche 911 Targa comes from very probably the most talented vehicle-building pairing anywhere on the ‘net. The Avro Brothers have been constructing some of the world’s best Lego vehicles for some time, with this particular model debuting almost a decade ago. The brothers’ classic Porsche 911 Targa is surely one of the most perfectly realistic Lego replicas ever built, and now you can build it too.

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

For once the most frequently asked question of them all here at The Lego Car Blog (‘Can I have instructions?’) can be answered with a resounding Yes, as The Avro Brothers have produced detailed step-by-step building plans which are due to be made available via their new website. In just over 150 pages and just under 900 pieces you could build your own stunning 1980s Porsche 911 Targa. Get started by visiting The Avro Brothers’ Porsche 911 Flickr album via the link above, click on one of the images, and follow the links.

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

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Ferrari Fursday

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

We suppose we could have just waited a day to post this so the title made more sense, but say it with an Essex accent and it’s fine. If you’re an international reader sorry, that reference is probably meaningless…

Anyway, the models! These two superb Speed Champions style Ferraris are the work of Jonathan Elliott of Flickr, and he’s done a thoroughly good job of recreating the mid-’80s Testarossa and mid-’70s 512 BB in 7-wide(ish) form.

If you fancy a closer look click here for more of the Testarossa and here for more of the 512 BB, and if you’re an international reader and you don’t know what an Essex accent sounds like click here and brace yourself count yourself lucky.

Lego Ferrari Testarossa

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