Tag Archives: Classic Car

Cigarettes on Safari

Nothing says adventure like lung cancer and breathing difficulties! At least that what was thought back when cigarette brand Camel sponsored the amazing Land Rover rally named after them from 1980 to 2000. Still, with Red Bull and Monster energy drinks sponsoring pretty much every extreme sport these days perhaps we’ve not moved on as much as we’d like to think…

This phenomenal Land Rover Defender 110 in stunning Camel Trophy spec is the work of Manuel Nascimento of Flickr, and it is very probably the finest 4×4 that The Lego Car Blog has featured this year. The iconic off-roader’s exterior has been recreated to perfection, including all the adventuring paraphernalia that accompanied these vehicles through jungles, mountain and deserts, and with accurate branding – including the infamous cigarette advertising – courtesy of superb custom decals.

Underneath the incredible exterior the engineering excellent continues, with working lights operated via a third-party SBrick, Power Functions remotely controlled steering, winch, and four-wheel-drive, working suspension, and a four-speed gearbox. Opening doors, a beautifully detailed interior and a roof-mounted tent also feature, plus Manuel has constructed a lovely desert base to accompany his model.

There’s loads more of this spectacularly built and presented creation to see at Manuel’s Land Rover Defender 110 Flickr album, where you can also find a link to a video demonstrating the model’s features. Light up a cigarette via the link above (no, don’t – but do click the link!).

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SEMA

Founded in 1963, the Specialty Equipment Market Association, or SEMA, has become a giant of the automotive landscape. The annual SEMA show in Las Vegas is now one of the largest automotive events non the planet, attended not just be tuning companies but also by mainstream auto manufacturers, who are embracing a culture that can help their brand image.

Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka has decided to build a Lego homage to the upcoming SEMA show, taking the official 10265 Ford Mustang set as a base and reworking it to achieve the awesome looking wide-body Mustang you see here. Such an approach is perfectly in keeping with SEMA, where standard manufacturer products are modified to often wild extremes, these days occasionally by the actual company that made them in the first place.

We think Simon’s modified Mustang looks spectacular and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link above, plus you can take a look at some of the good, weird, and frankly awful vehicles from last year’s SEMA show by clicking here.

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56

Following on from his Mellow Yellow 1960s sedan publicised here last week, Flickr’s Tim Henderson has followed it up with a classic from the decade earlier. Tim’s 1950s sedan includes all the hallmarks of era’s styling including a chrome grill with prominent fenders, side stripes, and tail fins, and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link above.

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Mellow Yellow

It’s a small scale day here at The Lego Car Blog. Previous bloggee Tim Henderson proves you don’t need a billion bricks to build something deeply cool. See more of his 6-wide ’60s sedan on Flickr via the link.

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Super Stratos Stradale

The Lancia Stratos was not a good road car. Uncomfortable, unreliable, and almost comically badly designed, there’s a reason that Lancia are barely around today (and so sad is their current single offering it’d probably be better if they weren’t. What’s going on Fiat?!). However, the Lancia Stratos rally car was a very different matter…

Powered by a mid-mounted Ferrari V6 the Stratos won three consecutive World Rally Championships, in ’74, ’75 and ’76. It might have won more too, were it not for parent company Fiat switching their focus (and therefore funding) to their own brand in ’77.

Such results have made the Lancia Stratos a hugely sought after car, despite the road variants being pretty rubbish. A better bet (and probably better built) is this Technic version from James Tillson, which recreates the Stratos brilliantly in Lego form.

Like the real car the front and rear bodywork opens, revealing the transversly-mounted V6 engine, working suspension, and functioning steering, with remote control delivered by Power Functions motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery.

There’s more to see of James’ Technic Lancia Stratos in both Stradale and Group B specification on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum – take a look via the links in the text above, plus you can read our review of the BuWizz bluetooth battery that controls and powers it by clicking here.

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Build a LEGO Mustang | Book Review

Lego-building legend Sariel has appeared here multiple times over the years. He’s part our our ‘Become a Pro‘ series, is the author of some excellent Lego books, and his beautiful fully remote controlled Mustang GT350 is one of the the finest models we’ve ever published.

Today we’re privileged to share a piece of work that combines all three of the areas above, as the awesome guys at No Starch Press sent us a copy of their new book written by Sariel; ‘Build a LEGO Mustang‘. And not just any Mustang either, it’s the same glorious 1960s GT350 fastback that first appeared here almost two years ago, with remote control drive and steering, LED lights, a 2-speed transmission, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a V8 engine. So, what’s it like?

Firstly, as with all the No Starch Press Lego products we’ve reviewed, ‘Build a Lego Mustang’ is a very well published book. High quality, glossy, and with excellent full colour imagery throughout. Unlike previous publications though, ‘Build a Lego Mustang’ is not coffee table art, a Lego history, or varied model showcase. Instead it’s an instruction manual, detailing the 420 steps required to recreate Sariel’s Mustang masterpiece.

Running to 110 pages, Sariel’s book provides the building process to create his amazing Ford Mustang GT350 for yourself, using a presentation and process that will be familiar to anyone who has built an official LEGO set. Like LEGO’s own instructions, ‘Build a Lego Mustang’ includes a complete parts inventory at the start, followed by the traditional ‘spot the difference’ steps that turn a pile of bricks into a complete model. Continue reading

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Czech Mate

We are SO BORED of Brexit. Every day, all day, people shouting at one another. Racism, classism, elitism… every ‘ism’ you could wish for in one painfully tedious and never-ending argument.

So whatever your political persuasion (and as Americans make up the largest nationality of our readership we suspect the answer is probably this), here’s a celebration of European achievement in the face of considerable adversity.

This is the Tatra T600 ‘Tatraplan’, an almost spectacularly futuristic design produced by Tatra from 1948 from within a country battered by war and then shackled by the yoke of Communism thanks to a coup d’état that took place in the same year the car launched.

Unfortunately Czech Communism lasted considerably longer than the T600 (right up until the Velvet Revolution of 1989), by which point Tatra had almost completely wound down car production to focus on its (excellent) heavy-duty trucks, but we look upon the quirky Tatra with considerably more favour than the Communist regime that ruled during its production run.

The T600 was a large (six seat) family car powered by a 2-litre flat-four engine, featuring a monocoque chassis and with a wonderful streamlined body. Just over 6,000 units were produced during its three-year production run and the whole TLCB team would take one over a typical modern family car (which are mostly as boring as Brexit) in heartbeat.

This lovely Technic recreation of the Tatra T600 comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, and not only has he captured the car’s beautiful lines rather well in Technic form, he’s also given his model a flat-four engine, working steering, and full suspension underneath. There’s more to see of Kent’s excellent T600 on Flickr via the link above, which is where we’ll be pretending we live somewhere else other than the UK right now….

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Initial D AE86

Just like people, some cars are born into greatness. They might have limited talent and have achieved little, but a family name goes a long way (we’re looking at you Bentley Bentayga and Rolls Royce Cullinan). Others have become great, either through their own endeavour or through blind luck and a random affiliation. This is the story of the latter.

The Toyota Corolla AE86 Sprinter Trueno was a good car in the same way that most Japanese cars of the 1980s were; well priced, fuel efficient, and far more reliable than its American or European counterparts.

And that is where the story should have ended, with the AE86 just another Japanese compact quietly getting on with not breaking down or falling apart. But in 1995 the AE86 got a shot at fame. At ten years old it became the star of a Japanese comic called ‘Initial D’, in which 18-year old Takumi Fujiwara slid sideways up mountain passes delivering food behind the wheel of his father’s AE86 Sprinter Trueno.

By 1999 ‘Initial D’ had become an anime production, viewed not just in Japan but around the world, and Toyota’s humble hatchback – now long out of production – had become a megastar. The popularity of drifting has continued unabated, leading to the AE86 becoming one of the most sought-after and iconic Japanese cars in history.

This superb recreation of the Toyota Corolla AE86 as it appeared in ‘Initial D’ comes from Peter Blackert (aka lego911) of Flickr, who has captured the world-famous car brilliantly in Lego. His design appears in the new book ‘How to Build Brick TV and Movie Cars’, which includes building instructions for the Sprinter Trueno pictured here (along with many other iconic cars) so that you can create your own version at home for drifting around your desk.

Peter’s Toyota Corolla AE86 Sprinter Trueno model is available to view at his photostream via the link above, and you can find the book in which the instructions for this model features by clicking here.

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Paddy Wagon

Apparently police vans are known as ‘Paddy Wagons’ because cops were often Irish (with ‘paddy’ being slang for Irish nationals). Or the people in the back of them were often Irish, we’re not sure. Whatever the reason, it was the name given to this wild Tom Daniel’s-designed show rod from 1968, which became a huge selling plastic toy kit thanks to Monogram models.

This incredible recreation of the iconic hot rod is the work of previous bloggee, Master MOCer, and TLCB favourite Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74), who has captured Tom Daniel’s design wonderfully in his trademark Model Team style.

Head to Andrea’s ‘Paddy Wagon’ Flickr album via the second link above to see more of the build, and you can read his interview as part of the Master MOCers series here at TLCB by clicking on the first.

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Speed Communists

We continue the small-scale theme with this, László Torma‘s ace Speed Champions scale Trabant 601. An unlikely race car, László’s Trabant uses a be-stickered curved brick for the doors which he kept because his son said they were cool (the Elves agree by the way), and thus the Trabbi has a slightly more sporting nature than was originally intended. Clever techniques have been used throughout the build to recreate the communist car’s famous shape and there’s more to see of László’s 601 in both race and road car specification on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

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Little Tow

You don’t need a billion bricks and a personal connection to the staff here at The Lego Car Blog to see you creation appear on this site. A few well-chosen bricks and excellent presentation are all you need. That and a TLCB Elf to wander onto your page, but they’re normally pretty good at finding models, otherwise they don’t get fed.

We have two small-scale examples to prove the case today, the first being this lovely Town-scale tow truck from previous bloggee de-marco. Great photography and a neat brick-built tow hitch count in its favour and there’s more to see of this and de-marco’s other builds on Flickr at the link.

Today’s second slice of simple building comes from fellow past bloggee Pixeljunkie with his gorgeous Datsun 2000 Roadster. More brilliant presentation is in evidence (and if you’re not sure how to take photos like these take a look here) with the model enhanced by some wonderful period-correct stickers. Head to Pixel’s photostream via the link above to see more of his top-notch build.

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Orange Boss

From one Mustang to another now, and also to a boss that manages to look good in orange*. This is the Boss 302, built between 1969 and ’72 for Trans-Am racing homologation and featuring a 5 litre 290bhp V8, and the brakes and suspension from a pushchair. Still, you don’t need those when you’re drag racing at the traffic lights. This one comes from serial bloggee Ralph Savelsberg and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

*Obligatory Trump reference.

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Brick-Built Bullitt

Possibly the most famous movie chase car ever, Steve McQueen’s ’68 Ford Mustang Fastback created a legacy which still sells cars today. Yup, you can buy a ‘Bullitt’ edition of Ford’s latest Mustang and it’s actually rather good, with a very American 460bhp V8 yet a very un-American ability to actually go around a corner. We’d still rather have a ’68 though, and cross our fingers each time we got to a turn. Flickr’s Simon Przepiorka is the builder behind this excellent 1:24 version and there’s more to see here.

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Mechanical Mehari

Citroen are not known for their off-roaders. Ok, these days all they seem to make are – like every car company – SUVs, but they’re about as good off-road as Kim Kardashian is at plumbing.

However Citroen’s roots are far more off-roady than you might think; one of the 2CV’s key objectives was to cross a field without breaking any eggs.

And that’s where this comes in; the delightful 2CV-based Mehari.

Produced from the late ‘60s the Mehari was designed as a utilitarian two-wheel-drive off-roader (although four-wheel-drive versions followed) for civilian and military use, and – just like the models we have here – it was made out of plastic.

The models we have here come from TLCB favourite Nico71, who has recreated the Mehari beautifully in Technic form.

Nico’s design features steering, a removable roof, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and – most importantly – an accurate recreation of the Mahari’s superb suspension system.

There’s loads more to see of Nico’s wonderful build at his website by clicking here, where full details, an extensive image gallery, and building instructions are all available.

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Hummerat

This is a Hummer rat rod, and it’s a vehicle is so manly that if you’re reading this and you’re a girl (what? We get girls here too) you’re probably pregnant. It’s based on a real car and comes from previous bloggee ianying616, who has used train doors, bendy pipes and a whole lot of black to recreate the insanity of the real vehicle. Head to Flickr via the link above to see all seventy-three (73!) images…

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