Tag Archives: model team

My Other Car’s a Porsche

No, really. Because this amazing looking Lamborghini Murcielago is constructed only from the parts found within the excellent 10295 Creator Expert Porsche 911 set.

Built by Lego-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, who must be some sort of wizard, the pieces from the resolutely curvy Porsche have somehow been re-purposed to recreate the almost entirely trapezoid mid-’00s Lamborghini.

Opening scissor doors, accurate pop-up air-vents, a removable roof panel, and an opening engine cover and front trunk all feature, and this incredible 10295 alternate is available to build yourself thanks to the building instructions released alongside the model.

The complete suite of top-quality imagery can be viewed at Firas’ ‘10295 Lamborghini Murcielago’ album on Flickr, where a link to building instructions can also be found (or click here to jump straight to Firas’ own excellent website store), plus you can read his interview as part of our Master MOCers Series to learn how he builds astonishing models like this one via the second link in the text above.

Two Become One*

This beautiful motorcycle, discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr and another at Eurobricks, took builder Stephan Jonsson over four years to finish. Which is very long time indeed. That said, the resulting creation is almost ridiculously good, combining the best bits of two real-world BMW Motorrad products, the R NineT roadster and the R 1200 GS adventure bike.

Stephan’s hybrid of the two BMW bikes features working steering and suspension, shaft-drive, and one of the best brick-built motorcycle engines we’ve ever seen, complete with a wonderfully shaped exhaust, twin open air-filters, and the correct cables and linkages.

The incredible detailing extends elsewhere too, with even the gold brake callipers linked by lines to the handlebar levers, and there’s lots more to see of Stephan’s stunning BMW motorcycle mashup at both Flickr and Eurobricks. Click the links above to see more of perhaps the most perfect bike ever created in Lego (and perhaps BMW Motorrad should take a look too…).

*Yes, we went there. And if the proper Lego Blogs publicise this creation and they don’t link to a painfully ’90s pop song, they’re not worth reading.

Ford F100

As mentioned in today’s other post, the world has seemingly jumped backwards 50 years to the 1970s. There’s record inflation, war, nothing works, and everyone’s on strike. Having missed the misery of ’70s first time round, this TLCB Writer is wallowing in the resurgence of the aforementioned afflictions via another ’70s vehicle, the humble Ford F100 pick-up truck.

This fantastic 1972 Ford F100 is the work of Jakub Marcisz, who has recreated the classic pick-up beautifully in Model Team scale. A wonderfully detailed working V8 engine, life-like interior, opening doors, hood and tailgate, functioning steering, and some of the best brick-built ‘chromework’ ever ever seen all feature, and there’s lots more to see at Jakub’s photostream.

Join the queue for over-priced petrol next to the picket-line at the link above!

Big Tow

Mining trucks are slow. But even slower are the tracked vehicles that fill them, designed as they are to move very heavy things very short distances.

Which means if you need to relocate an enormous bulldozer or tracked excavator to the other end of the mine, you’d better clear your schedule for the next few weeks.

Which is where this curious machine comes in. Effectively a Komatsu mining truck with a gooseneck hitch in place of the dump body, it can tow the aforementioned mining machines to their new location aboard a specially-designed single-axle TowHaul Lowboy trailer, capable of transporting 250 tons. We bet parking isn’t fun.

This spectacular fully remote controlled recreation of the world’s biggest vehicular trailer comes from previous bloggee Beat Felber, whose converted Komatsu HD785-5 mining truck features motorised drive, steering, and gooseneck hitch, enabling the model to load and tow a huge TowHaul Lowboy trailer and its Komatsu D575A-3 ‘Super Dozer’ load.

There’s loads more to see of the both the Komatsu HD785-5 truck and the TowHaul Lowboy 250 ton trailer behind it at Beat’s Flickr album, and you can watch the whole rig in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video

Do It Yourself

Taking advantage of the new year sales is not something this TLCB Writer is inclined to do. Mr. Bean on the other hand, was very excited at the prospect of grabbing himself a bargain. Cue one of the most brilliant vehicular capers in TV history, wherein an ingenious Bean attempts to transport rather more than he should home via his British Leyland Mini. Flickr’s Tomáš Novák is the latest builder to create a brick-built Bean atop a bright green Mini, and there’s more to see of his homage to TV gold at his photostream. Click the link above to push the mop onto the accelerator!

Tank Hunter

Does anyone else remember that fiendishly addictive early computer game in which the player was tasked with manoeuvring around a seeming infinite plain populated by the outlines of various 3D shapes, hunting and destroying enemy tanks? Just us? OK.

Anyway, perfect cubes and prisms aside, the concept of hunting tanks was based on reality, with specific machines (themselves looking rather like tanks) designed for their destroy enemy counterparts.

This is one such device, the Sturmgeschütz III tank-hunting assault gun, as deployed by Germany during the Second World War (and Syria until 1973).

Handily known as the STuG III, it saw service on almost every front, from Russia to Europe to Africa, and proved very successful at destroying Allied armour.

This excellent fully remote controlled Lego version of the STuG III comes from TLCB favourite Sariel, who – despite the model measuring just 32cm in length and weighing under 1kg – has packed in drive and steering, fully suspended tracks, and an oscillating and slewing gun barrel, all powered by a LEGO battery and controlled via bluetooth courtesy of a third-party SBrick.

There’s more to see of Sariel’s STuG III at his Flickr album of the same name, plus you can watch the model in action via the video below. Go tank hunting across a plain of cubes via the links!

YouTube Video

Weekend in Drag

This a dragline crawler crane, used in open-cast mining for digging really big holes. Built by previous bloggee Beat Felber, this incredible creation is a fully-working replica of one the world’s largest; the 700-ton P&H 2355 diesel-electric dragline that worked the Rix Creek Mine in Australia.

Remotely controlled by three SBricks, Beat’s creation can hoist and drag the bucket, rotate the superstructure, raise the boom, drive and skid-steer, and even raise the two access ladders thanks to seven Power Functions and two Micro Motors.

Four pairs of LEGO LEDs illuminate the floodlights and interior, whilst removable panels give access to the motors and winches within.

It’s a spectacular build, with a fully detailed machine room and interior to match the astonishing working mechanisms, and you can head to the mine via Beat’s ‘P&H 2355’ album to get in drag.

Itsawhat?

This is an Isdera Commendatore 112i. Nope, us neither, but apparently it was a Mercedes-Benz V12-powered supercar numbering just two units.

Futuristic in a way only an early ’90s supercar can be, the Isdera Commendatore 112i was engineered with support from Mercedes, Bilstein, and BBS, featured a gearbox from RUF, active suspension, a space-frame chassis, and even an air-brake.

The long bodywork was designed to go endurance racing, and indeed the car proved to be seriously fast. Unfortunately however, Isdera went bankrupt even faster…

Just one unit was built before Isdera’s insolvency, with a second completed six years afterwards via an enthusiast who bought an unfinished space-frame and the body moulds. Which makes the Isdera Commendatore 112i rarer than your Mom refusing cake.

This magnificent Model Team recreation of the unknown 1993 supercar is the work of TLCB debutant Jakob Semajer-Garic, and features gull-wing doors and engine covers, a replica V12 engine, and some truly incredible chassis detailing.

There’s much more to see of Jakob’s 1,600-piece Isdera Commendatore 112i at his Flickr album of the same name, where you can view over thirty superbly presented images of the model. Click the link above to take a closer look.

Brambleshark

This is the Walchester Brambleshark, and you’d be forgiven for not knowing what it is because it, well… doesn’t exist. But Vince Toulous’ incredible creation is based on the stunning real concept artwork of John Frye, resulting in an inspired machine that is part vintage British Land Speed Record car, part endurance racer, part aircraft.

A suite of curved green, clear Star Wars canopies, and the coolest rear stabilising fins we’ve ever seen create a jaw-dropping shape, and there’s more to see of Vince’s beautiful brick-built concept at his ‘Walchester Brambleshark’ album on Flickr; take a look via the link.

Big Reach

Reach. It’s a word we hear a lot in the running of a world-famous top-quality Lego site. OK, a mildly-known bottom-of-the-barrel Lego site. But nevertheless, we still hear it a lot. Countless messages offering great value reach improvement services are deleted with alarming frequency.

Anyway, today we have great reach, courtesy of TLCB favourite and Lego-building legend Sariel, and this incredible fully remote controlled Liebherr LTC 1045-3.1 mobile crane.

Powered by fourteen motors and three SBricks, Sariel’s crane can extend its reach to well over a meter, with a further half-meter boom extension possible on top of that.

Four Power Functions motors drive the boom’s elevation, extension and winch, another three the cabin boom elevation, extension and tilt, one rotates the superstructure, another folds the mirrors, two more the outriggers, and finally three power the drive and steering.

Over five meters of wires are hidden inside to link the motors, LED lights, LEGO battery, and SBricks, with the total model weighing almost 5kgs and able to lift ¾ kg.

There’s much more of Sariel’s superbly presented creation to see at his Liebherr LTM 1045-3.1 album, you can read how Sariel turned his hobby into revenue via our ‘Become a Lego Professional‘ series, and you can watch this amazing model in action in the video below. Click the links to reach the full content.

YouTube Video

Eruptin’ Bronco

We kick-off 2023 with this; the brand new Ford Bronco, the latest addition to the burgeoning factory hardcore off-road market. In four-door flavour, with removable door panels and a removable roof, there’s little cooler, especially with colours such as ‘Race Red’, ‘Cactus’, ‘Hot Pepper’ and – as pictured here – “Eruption Green’.

We’re not sure which eruptions are green, beyond the child in ‘The Exorcist‘ and this rather spectacular event, but that’s why we’re not in vehicle marketing.

This excellent Model Team / Creator style recreation of the 2022 Ford Bronco in ‘Eruption Green’ comes from Peter Blackert (aka Lego911) – a TLCB LEGO Professional no less – and includes those removable panels, a highly detailed interior, plus an opening hood, tailgate and doors (when they’re attached).

Built as a commissioned model there’s lots more to see at Peter’s photostream. Trigger an eruption via the link above!

Bend & ZNAP

This is an ŁM-50 tracked front-end overhead loader, a Polish device characterised by two curved metal bars that allow the bucket to pass from the front to the rear of the machine over the head of the driver.

Which provides something of a conundrum when recreating it out of Danish plastic, because LEGO don’t make Technic bars in curved form. Or rather, they don’t any more…

Back in 1998 LEGO were in trouble. The perceived threat from electronic toys and rival construction brand K’nex sent the firm down some very dark alleyways, and the darkest of the lot* was Znap.

Essentially a K’nex rip-off, the Znap range lasted just two years across nineteen sets, and its most notable feature was that it had virtually nothing to do with LEGO bricks whatsoever.

It did however feature curved beams, beams that Flickr’s Maciej Szymański has somehow integrated into his superb fully-RC ŁM-50 front-end loader, enabling the bucket to slide over the model just like it does on the real thing.

A suite of third-party CaDa electrics power the movement of said bucket, plus the skid-steer tracks, but seeing as they’re about as genuine LEGO at Znap was, we’ll let it slide.

Excellent attention to detail and top quality presentation complete Maciej’s model, and there’s much more to see (including a video of the model in action) at his ‘ŁM-50’ album. Click the link above to bend and Znap!

*Except for Galidor of course.

**Today’s tenuous title link. You don’t get quality like this at The Brother’s Brick.

Big Vision

TLCB’s car manufacturer of 2022 is Hyundai. Yup, a company once best known for building precisely nothing that any car enthusiast would ever want to own has transformed into a maker of hugely desirable, yet attainable cars.

Capping off Hyundai’s stellar year is this, the N Vision 74, a one-off concept harking back to Hyundai’s first in-house product, whilst simultaneously pointing to the future with an 600+ bhp hydrogen fuel-cell powertrain.

This excellent recreation of the best concept car of 2022 comes from Leo 1 of Flickr, who has captured the retro-futuristic Hyundai brilliantly in Model Team form. Building instructions are available and there’s lots more to see at Leo’s photostream; take a look via the link above, or alternatively shout in the comments how wrong we are about Hyundai no longer being crap and boring.

A Supra Set of Mods

Toyota’s Supra has – thanks to car culture, hype, a certain move franchise, and internet exaggeration – become a legend impossible for anything, even the Supra itself, to live up to.

But get past the internet commenters, and the A90 Supra is really rather good, and as modifiable as its predecessor too.

Flickr’s 3D supercarBricks has recreated the latest Toyota Supra in fine fashion, capturing the exceptionally difficult curves of the car’s form superbly in Danish plastic.

Of course, being a Supra on the internet, it has to be modified too, with 3D duly obliging via a set of wide arches, an enormous rear spoiler, and some phat rims. Extra internet points scored.

There’s more of the build to to see at 3D’s photostream, and you can click the link in the text above to make the jump.

Calsonic Skyline

This is the Calsonic-sponsored Nissan Skyline GT-R R34 from the early-’00s Japan Grand Touring Car Championship, but of course, you probably already knew that.

Whilst Alexander Paschoaletto‘s brilliant Skyline GT-R R34 doesn’t say ‘Calsonic’ anywhere on it, we (and most likely you) would have recognised it anywhere. That’s because this car is burned into our psyche (and retinas) from Gran Turismo, where it has, in various generations, featured as one of the star cars for over two decades.

White 3D-printed wheels, blue bodywork, and a yellow sun-strip have transported us right back to hours of early-’00s pixellated racing, and you can join us at the Deep Forest Raceway courtesy of Alexander’s photostream via the link above.