Tag Archives: SBrick

Making Hay

Lego New Holland TM140 + Claas Quadrant 2200

It’s a gloriously sunny spring day here at TLCB Towers, and whilst it’s nowhere near hay season yet we’re looking forward thanks to Eric Trax and this spectacular New Holland TM140 and Claas Quadrant 2200 baler combo.

Eric’s superb New Holland tractor not only looks fantastic, it’s packed with remote control functionality all of which can be controlled remotely via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick. The drive and steering are driven by Power Functions motors, as are the front and rear hitches and power-take-off.

Lego New Holland TM140 + Claas Quadrant 2200

That PTO sends drive to the Claas Quadrant baler, powering a variety of complicated-looking mechanisms which ultimately culminates in the machine excreting a block of tan pieces (hay) in a manner similar to a horse doing its business. It’s a mighty clever build and one that you can recreate for yourself as Eric has made instructions available too!

There’s much more to see of both the New Holland TM140 tractor and Claas Quadrant 2200 baler at both the Eurobricks forum and via Eric’s Flickr photostream, plus you can watch the models in action via the video below. Click the links above to make hay, whilst we await the outcome of the office sweepstake betting on how long it’ll be before we have to extract a TLCB Elf from the inner workings of that baler…

YouTube Video

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Mystery Box

Lego MAN TGX Van der Vlist Truck

This is Dennis Bosman’s ‘Mystery Box’, and – unlike your Mom – he hasn’t published a single picture of what’s inside it on the internet. Evidence from Area 51? Kim Jong Un’s nukes? A copy of the final season of Game of Thrones? Whatever’s in there Dennis’s box is chained to an enormous ten axle Broshuis trailer pulled by a MAN TGX of unbelievable detail.

Lego MAN TGX Truck SBrick Remote Control

The MAN truck wears the livery of ‘Van der Vlist’ courtesy of superb custom decals, and rides – like the trailer – on non-Lego metal wheels. Underneath the spectacularly detailed tilting cab is a working 6-cylinder piston engine and a full remote control drivetrain, operable via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick.

Lego MAN TGX Truck SBrick Remote Control

The axles of the huge Broshuis trailer steer too, with four Servo Motors providing the power, with each axle’s wheels turning at a different ratio. It’s a magnificent build – possibly one of the finest of the year – and there’s much more to see at Dennis’ MAN TGX Flickr album here, plus you can read our interview with Dennis as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

Lego MAN TGX Truck

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Whitesnake*

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

America has mixed form when it comes to supercars. The excellent Ford GT is at one end, the Corvette is in the middle, being now pretty good but mostly fairly hopeless, and the Dodge Viper… yeh, that’s still crap.

But that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t want a go in one. Especially this variant, the mad ACR edition. With the Viper’s V10 engine tweaked to 645bhp, carbon ceramic brakes, and a seriously extreme aero package the ACR was… well, still nowhere near as good as anything from Europe or Japan.

That didn’t stop it heading to the Nurburgring with aim of claiming the road legal lap record though. Three attempts ended with a wrecked ACR and no record, but it was the fastest road-legal-American-rear-drive-manual-transmission-car to lap the Nurburgring. Possibly because it was the only one to do it.

No matter, because this fully remote controlled Technic Dodge Viper ACR designed by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego) and photographed by Jeff McClain is every bit as good as the real car isn’t. Alongside the remote control drive and steering are working suspension, LED lights, a V10 engine underneath a flipping clamshell hood, and opening doors and tailgate.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s amazing ACR at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to attempt the lap record…

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

*Today’s title song. Don’t pretend you don’t like it.

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Grindr

Lego Technic Red Alert Grinder Tank

It’s been a while since the last act of outrageous Elven violence here at TLCB Towers, but fear not readers, the little scumbags were back in business today. This is Desert752 aka Kirill Mazurov’s ‘Grinder’* tank from the classic video game Red Alert 3, and it’s nuts.

Controlled via bluetooth thanks to no less than three SBricks, Kirill’s Grinder* features ten Power Functions motors, six alone just for drive. A seventh powers the articulated chassis steering, the eighth the boom lift, and a ninth the huge rotating cutter on the end of it.

But what about the tenth you say? Well the lucky Elf that discovered this remote control monstrosity kept that one secret for a bit.

Driving it through the halls of TLCB Towers, Kirill’s Grinder* was frustratingly slow, certainly much too lethargic for the Elf in question to mow down any of its brethren. The other Elves in the office quickly got cocky, taunting the Elf at the controls by standing in front of the approaching tank with its whirling cutter, before jumping out of the way at the last second to much cackling and – we suspect – Elven profanity.

But that tenth motor had yet to be used, and after lulling its colleagues the Elf in control deployed motor No.10. With the secret high-gear engaged the Grinder’s* speed instantly trebled, and the taunters simply couldn’t get out of the way quickly enough.

Fed under the wheels by the cutter, then squashed by the Grinder’s* huge tyres, before being rolled flat by the tracks that followed thereafter, there has probably never been a worse machine to be run over by than this.

We were quite impressed by the Elf at the controls’ subterfuge too, and it’s now enjoying a blue Smartie whilst we have a go with the Grinder* ourselves.

There’s more to see of Kirill’s remote control behemoth at the Eurobricks discussion forum, the complete Red Alert Grinder* gallery can be viewed on Flickr, and you can watch the machine in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

*No, not that Grindr.

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Technic Traction

Lego Traction Engine

We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves this weekend, but they’re bringing back builds of a very classical nature. From the inventively old to the actually old now, and two absolutely beautiful Technic steam tractors from Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe.

An unusual choice for a Technic build we think these – somewhat oddly – qualify for ‘Technic Supercar’ status, being equipped with working steering, brakes, piston and valve gear, and a two-speed transmission.

Head over to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, where you can also find a link to vote for Nikolaus’ design on LEGO Ideas, whilst we figure out how the Elves have been watching ‘Downton Abbey’.

Lego Traction Engine

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Christmas Carnage

Lego RC Tank

With only two days until Christmas most of the Elves here at The Lego Car Blog have returned to the crumbling ruin that is TLCB Towers ready for their enforced ‘break’ over the holidays. This makes the office a noisier and messier place in the build up to their re-caging, and is something we’ve gotten used to over the years, but nothing prepared us for just how much noisier and messier this year would be.

With the office stereo playing Christmas songs loudly on loop we weren’t paying attention to any sounds emitting from the Elves’ cage room or the corridor outside. Mistake.

When we finally did notice that something was amiss, the Elven casualties were higher than anything that had gone before. There were Elves squashed into the carpet, Elves staggering around in circles, and even Elves unconscious on the top of shelves. One Elf though, was probably the happiest we have ever seen an Elf be, and it was at the controls of This.

‘This’ is shadow_elenter‘s ‘Transforming Tank / Howitzer’, a fully remote controlled, eighteen motor and five SBrick behemoth that can do, well… a lot. Take a look via the video below and you’ll understand how the situation here at TLCB Towers unfolded…

With an amazing Howitzer gun capable of deploying remotely and firing a Technic rubber-ended bullet (complete with re-coil), four remotely firing cannons up front, remotely controlled (but non-firing) gatling and anti-aircraft guns, and huge tracks driven by four Power Functions XL Motors, shadow_elenter’s tank is an incredible (if mad) example of the very best Technic engineering.

There’s much more to see of this gloriously unhinged build at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, whilst we undertake a big Christmas tidy up…

Lego RC Tank

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JCB 5CX Wastemaster | Picture Special

Lego Technic JCB Remote Control

Every so often a creation comes along that shifts what we thought possible from LEGO bricks. This is one such creation. Created over the course of a year by Technic-building legend Sariel this is a fully working replica of JCB’s 5CX Wastemaster backhoe, powered by pneumatics, eleven Power Functions motors, and two third-party SBricks.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control Underneath the brilliant Technic exterior are nine motors that drive all four wheels, the three-mode steering (two-wheel, all-wheel and crab), backhoe arm rotation and traverse, and powering a combination of pneumatic cylinders and linear actuators to control both the front and rear arms and their respective buckets. A further two motors power the pneumatic ‘remote control’, compressing the air which travels down twelve separate hoses to the model itself.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control

A motorised remotely rotating driver’s seat and a suite of LED lights from third-party lighting specialists Brickstuff complete the electronics, making this 2.4kg, 75 stud-long masterpiece one of the most technically advanced Technic creations to date. There is much more to see of Sariel’s amazing remote control JCB at the Eurobricks forum, on Flickr, and at Sariel’s excellent website, you can watch it in action via the video below, and if you’d like to build your own model with many of the features of this one we highly recommend LEGO’s own 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 set, which share its wheels and amazing three-mode steering with Sariel’s fantastic creation.

YouTube Video

 

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Magnificent Erection

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

Huib van der Hart’s erection is so big it can’t be photographed. Thankfully he has managed to capture it in a more compact state, but even then it’s still absolutely massive. We’re talking about Huib’s unbelievable 1:16 scale Liebherr LTM 1750 mobile crane in BKV livery; all 18 wheels of it.

Huib’s model is – as you can see here – astonishingly well detailed, but that’s only half the build. Underneath that amazing exterior is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain, with six XL Motors providing drive, seven Servo motors steering all nine axles, and a third-party SBrick providing control via bluetooth. There are also working LED lights throughout plus – of course – this model can get much, much bigger.

There’s a lot more to see of this incredible build at Huib’s Flickr photostream – click the link to make the jump, and ask him if he can try to get it up for a photo.

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

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The Last Paradise

Lego Tracked Container Town

Flickr’s Rat Dude has a very different idea of what constitutes ‘paradise’ to that of TLCB Team. Still, we suppose it’s relative, as compared to a post-apocalyptic wasteland* this roving container town may well be paradise on tracks. Beautifully built, Rat’s ‘Last Paradise’ features remote control drive and a two-speed gearbox controlled via a third-party SBrick bluetooth brick, allowing the town to rove around the halls of TLCB Towers creeping-out the Elves. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of Rat’s wonderful creation on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

Lego Tracked Container Town

*Or TLCB Towers…

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Expedition Zetros II

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Having already posted one awesome Mercedes-Benz Zetros expedition truck earlier in the year we didn’t expect to find another. But like feet, Noah’s animals, and your Mom’s chin, Zetroses it seems, come in twos.

This spectacularly well-engineered Zetros expedition truck comes from previous bloggee jrx and it’s packed with brilliant Technic functionally, with seven Power Functions motors fitted inside, controlled via two SBricks and a LEGO IR Receiver.

Each wheel is driven by an XL motor, a Servo controls the steering, and two further Medium motors power the winch and a retractable awning.

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Fourteen sets of LEDs give jrx’s Zetros working head and tail lights, flashing turn signals, roof-mounted floodlights, and even interior lighting. The model also includes functioning suspension on all four wheels, a fully fitted interior, and an ATV stored on-board.

There’s much more to see of jrx’s excellent expedition Zetros at both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum – click on the links to join the journey, and you can watch the truck in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

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Got a Light?

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

A question we’ve all been asked by those who always seem to be just a little shiftier than ourselves. Flickr’s Dennis Glaasker, aka Brickonwheels, does have a light though. In fact he’s got fifty-two of them!

Thanks to third-party custom lighting specialists Brickstuff, Dennis’s beautiful 1:16 scale Peterbilt 379 features a spectacularly realistic lighting set-up to match the brilliance of the build. Fifty-two LEDs are placed throughout the model with power coming from a battery box hidden within the sleeper portion of the cab.

Dennis hasn’t stopped there either, as whilst the bricks are 100% LEGO many have been chromed for added realism, whilst a third-party SBrick brings programmable bluetooth control to the three Power Functions motors that power the truck.

Built for the Legoworld 2018 event in the Netherlands there’s more to see of Dennis’s 3,000-piece masterpiece at his photostream – Click this link to light up.

Lego Peterbilt 379 Truck

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Super Eight

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

Take that Audi Q7! We hate the Audi Q7, and the other pointlessly-enormous, overly-aggressive, status-symbols-on-wheels in the segment in which it occupies. We’ll happily take one of these though, as if you’re going to have a vehicle that’s impossible to park, won’t fit down a country lane, and drinks fuel, it may as well do all of those things to absolute excess!

This is an articulated 8×8 off-road truck, loosely based on those by companies such as Foremost, and resembling some of the Soviet Union’s more impressively weird machinery. It’s been built by previous bloggee and Technic-building genius Nico71, and it’s an astonishing piece of engineering.

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

Using eight wheels and tyres from the brilliant LEGO Technic Claas Xerion 5000 set, Nico’s truck features all-wheel-drive, with one XL Motor driving the front two axles, and another the rear. None of the axles are steered as the entire truck articulates in the middle thanks to an L Motor and a pair of linear actuators.

Lego 8x8 Off-Road Truck

Each axle is suspended by an ingenious leaf-spring system, there’s an inline-6 engine next to the asymmetrical cab, and a set of four outriggers stabilise the truck for when it’s using the neat folding crane mounted over the articulation point. Powered by another two Power Functions motors this can extend, rotate and winch (see the image below), and like the drive and steering is operable remotely via bluetooth thanks to two third-party SBrick bluetooth bricks.

Lego Technic 8x8 Truck RC

There’s loads more to see of Nico’s ridiculously impressive build at his website, where full technical details and instructions (yes really, so please don’t message us!) are available, plus the complete gallery of images is available to view via Brickshelf.

Nico has also become the sixteenth Master MOCer to be awarded such status here at The Lego Car Blog, joining an impressive roster of builders including Sariel, Crowkillers, Bricksonwheels and Firas Abu Jaber amongst others.

Read Nico’s Lego-building story and and find out how he created his amazing Technic vehicles such as this one via the link to his Master MOCers interview below!

Master MOCers Season 2, Episode 5

Nico71

Lego 8x8 Off-Road Truck

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TLCB Recommends!

Lego Cheerleader Red

Here at The Lego Car Blog we receive all sorts of requests for endorsements. Frankly this is as surprising to us as it probably is to you, because we’re idiots, but nevertheless somehow we’ve found ourselves in a position of power. POWER!!

We may have got a little over-excited at this realisation but don’t worry, we were brought back down to earth when we asked our intern to pose for the picture above, with the result being a new entry into the Mis-Conduct Box and a picture of a mini-figure instead.

Back to the task in hand, and it’s probably time to assemble some of our recommendations into one handy guide. So here they are, TLCB Recommends….

Third-Party Bluetooth Control | SBrick & BuWizz

We’ve tested two third-party LEGO-compatible bluetooth products here at The Lego Car Blog, and we’re pleased to say that both earn a recommendation.

Best for programming: SBrick

SBrick ReviewReviewed here earlier in the year the SBrick controller provides Lego models with bluetooth capability, allowing control via a mobile phone, gamepad, or other device. This has clear advantages over LEGO’s own IR control, being unaffected by bright sunlight, and allowing the receiver to be completely hidden inside a model.

Where the SBrick really scores though is the superb programmable app, allowing the bespoke set-up of a model that surpasses even LEGO’s own Mindstorms robotics sets. We tried the SBrick with the LEGO Technic 42030 Volvo L350F set and were amazed by how easy it was to set up, and how beautifully controllable the Volvo became. It’s a new dimension in Lego robotics.

Best for power: BuWizz

Lego BuWizz ReviewLike the SBrick above, the BuWizz offers all the benefits of bluetooth control, but with the added bonus of a built in battery that can provide up to eight times the power of LEGO’s Power Functions system. The BuWizz brick can be programmed too, although we found this far more limited than the SBrick’s abilities, but really this product is all about power.

The BuWizz bluetooth battery genuinely transforms what Lego models can be capable of, and whilst we suspect far more axles, gears and pins will break a result, their owners will be having riotously good fun in the process! Read our review of the BuWizz brick by clicking here and see how fast your model can go.

Books | No Starch Press

No Starch PressWe’ve reviewed loads of Lego-themed books over the years and most are really very good. Our favourite publishers are the guys at No Starch Press who have brought several top-quality building books to print, including some authored by builders who have featured on these very pages.

You can find all of the books we’ve reviewed via the Review Library, and you can check out NSP’s current range via the link above.

LEGO Set Reviews | Brick Insights

Brick InsightsOur ever-expanding Set Review Library has become (and this is a rare thing at TLCB) something that we’re quite proud of. With one hundred sets, third-party products and books reviewed to date, a few of which were written by you – our readers – it’s as good a place as any to find out whether that eBay seller really can charge that much.

However our reviews are only written by us lot here at TLCB Towers (plus a few from you) and, as mentioned previously, we are idiots. Better then to trust an amalgamation of many reviews before you make a purchase decision, and the brilliant Brick Insights does just that. Pulling review information from multiple sources (of which we’re one) you can quickly see all the reviews for a particular set, the average, highest and lowest scores and much more.

You can read our overview of Brick Insights by clicking here and you can check out the site itself via the link above. Don’t buy another set without it.

Builders | Wait, what?

Lego MicrophoneYup, because we’ve been interviewing the very best Lego vehicle builders on the ‘net in our ‘Master MOCers‘ and ‘Become a Professional‘ interview series.

If you’d like to know how some of the greatest Lego model-makers create their masterpieces, and very probably learn some useless facts about them too, then head over to the Interviews pages via the links above. We’ll be adding more builders to this Hall of Fame very soon too!

Other Stuff | Blogs, Creation Sharing, LUGs and more

We’ve a whole heap of references worth your clicks to be found in the Directory, including the sources our Elves use to find creations, rival blogs, games, Lego User Groups and Friends of TLCB.

Take a look via the link above, and remember that your clicks and page visits here at The Lego Car Blog directly contribute to worthy causes around the world, as our limited advertising revenue is dispersed to those who need it more than we do, and that’s entirely thanks to you.

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The Tankfather

Lego Renault FT-17 Tank RC

Renault may be better known for things like this and this, but it’s a little-known fact that they’re also the inventors of the modern tank. The tank was first used by the British Army in the First World War, but it was horrendously slow, unreliable and a magnet for unwanted attention. Renault took the idea and simplified it, creating a vehicle that was much lighter, more reliable, and featured a fully-armoured 360-degree rotating turret.

Lego Renualt FT-17 Tank

The Renault FT-17 could also be operated by a few of just two, and it thus became a phenomenally successful design. Around 3,000 units were produced in France (mostly in 1918), whilst another 950 were built under license in the United States. Twenty-seven countries/revolutionary armies used the FT-17 over the next thirty years and the design fought in almost a dozen separate wars, which probably says as much about mankind’s propensity for war as it does the brilliance of the FT-17.

Lego Renualt FT-17 Tank

This beautiful Lego replica of the Renault FT-17 has been built by TLCB regular Sariel, who has recreated the world’s first light tank in glorious detail. Inside the stunningly accurate shell are three Power Functions motors, a Micro Motor, and a third-party SBrick programmable bluetooth control brick. Each track is suspended via oscillating bogies and powered by an individual Medium Motor, a third Medium Motor rotates the gun turret, whilst the Micro Motor powers the gun barrel elevation.

It all works perfectly, as demonstrated in the excellent video below, and you can see all the photos and read more about the build at the Eurobricks discussion forum and via Sariel’s Renault FT-17 Flickr album by clicking here.

YouTube Video

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Swedish Excellence

Lego Volvo XC90

As has been documented on these pages before, the current obsession with SUVs is not one shared here in TLCB Towers. However there is an exception. Volvo…

Sold by Ford during their purge in 2010 to stave off bankruptcy, Volvo are now under the ownership of Geely, and – much like Jaguar and Land Rover sold to the Indians by Ford two years previously – the Chinese have done a far better job of managing Volvo than Ford ever did.

By providing cash and economies of scale, but by letting Volvo be Volvo, the cars coming out of Gothenburg are a world apart from the dull badge-engineered knock-offs built under Ford’s stewardship.

The latest XC90 encapsulates this mantra; with superbly Swedish design, engines no larger than 2 litres, using turbocharging, supercharging, and hybrid electric to boost performance, and self-driving technology, Volvo’s flagship SUV is very probably the flagship SUV. Not bad for a company best known for estate cars.

This beautiful recreation of the latest XC90 ‘Excellence’ edition comes from previous bloggee dgustafsson1317, and he’s built the big Volvo brilliantly. A superbly detailed exterior (including bespoke 3D-printed wheels to replicate those on the real car) continues inside with a stunningly accurate interior, made all the more impressive by the need to squeeze in a raft of Power Functions electronic wizardry.

Five motors power the all-wheel-drive system, steering, and the electrically opening tailgate, all of which are operable remotely via a Bluetooth device thanks to a third-party SBrick. The build also features all-wheel suspension, neat brick-built windows, and some excellent custom badges too.

There’s much more of the model to see at dgustafsson’s enormous Volvo XC90 Excellence album on Flickr – click the link above for over fifty stunning images.

Lego Volvo XC90

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