Tag Archives: SBrick

MAN With a Semi

Hah! Penis jokes… Anyway, enough of that, on to the model.

This is a Technic MAN TGA truck by ArsMan064 of Eurobricks, and it’s a rather clever fully remote controlled replica of the real thing. Built from Technic parts ArsMan’s truck is a good match for its life-size counterpart and is packed with Power Functions features, including remote control drive, steering, fifth wheel and a high/low range gearbox, plus LED lights, all controlled by a third-party Bluetooth SBrick.

ArsMan’s MAN also includes a host of mechanical functions, including pendular suspension, opening doors, and a huge semi-trailer with a manually operated tipper. There’s more to see of both truck and trailer at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, and you can watch the rig in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video

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Pick-Up Bricks

Today’s blog-worthy creation comes in two colours (earning the Elf responsible two Smarties as we’re feeling generous), each built by well-regarded Technic builder Madoca 1977 and filled with functional goodness.

Madoca’s ‘Dacoma 4×4’ pick-up truck looks most excellent in either colour, with a wealth of clever Technic engineering concealed inside. This includes remote control 4×4 drive via two L Motors, Servo steering, a high/low gearbox powered by a Medium Motor, LED headlights, working differential locks and suspension, plus opening doors, hood and tailgate.

There’s more to see on Eurobricks, including a video of the truck’s features and a link to building instructions. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Tow Two

Every so often a creation arrives here at The Lego Car Blog Towers that makes us all go ‘…woah!’. This is one of those times. This beautifully presented model is Lucio Switch’s ‘Tow Truck MkII’ and it’s ridiculously brilliant.

As you’d expect for a model of this size (c10K parts and weighing 12.5 kgs) Lucio’s tow truck is motorised and remotely controlled, but before we even start looking at the electric functions there’s a host of non-motorised features to detail. These include all-wheel suspension (independent up front and live-axle at the rear), a fully suspended and pneumatically tilting cab complete with opening and locking doors, pneumatically suspended seats, and a V8 piston engine underneath. Storage lockers open on each side of the truck and five sets of Power Functions LEDs light the head and tail lights.

Which leads us nicely to the motorised functions, all of which are driven by LEGO’s Power Functions system with three on-board batteries hooked up to four third-party SBricks, allowing programable bluetooth control.

Nineteen separate Power Functions motors are present in Lucio’s model, with four XL motors powering the 8×4 drivetrain and three Servos turning the front two steering axles. Next are eight Medium motors, the first of which drives the pneumatic compressor that operates the aforementioned tilting cab and suspended seats.

The remaining seven Medium motors power the rotation and extension of the two enormous front outriggers, the extension of the two rear outriggers, the towing arm, and the rotation of the crane boom, whilst four Large motors power the crane lift, boom extension, and the two independent winches.

The four SBricks allow all of that functionality to be programmed neatly onto a smartphone from which the truck can be controlled remotely via bluetooth (take a look at the video below to see this in action), as otherwise you’d need a very large joystick controller indeed!

It’s one of the most outstandingly impressive Technic creations of 2019 and furthermore Lucio has presented his model beautifully, with superb high quality images and an excellent video demonstrating the truck’s functions. You can watch that video below, and you can see all the images at Lucio’s ‘Tow Truck MkII’ Flickr album here, join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum here, and read full details at Lucio’s own website by clicking here.

YouTube Video

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Remote Control Rubicon

Fancy a dirty weekend? Then take your LEGO with you! At least, that what ArsMan064 of Eurobricks decided to do in entering a Russian trial/trophy event for remote control LEGO vehicles, claiming first place with his superb Jeep Wrangler Rubicon.

Powered by two Large Power Functions motors, with a Medium motor used for steering, an on-board LiPo battery, bluetooth control via a third-party SBrick, and all-wheel suspension and four-wheel-drive, ArsMan’s Jeep is perfectly suited to getting dirty, and if you’d like to give it a go you can, as he’s made instructions for his design available!

Click the link above to visit the Eurobricks discussion forum for all the photos, a video of the Jeep in action, and the all-important link to building instructions.

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Cow Tipping*

This is a Sandvik Toro 60, a sixty-ton 6×4 mining truck. Named after a bull (and the number sixty), the Toro 60 is unusual in that it doesn’t articulate like many mining trucks. This is so that it can withstand a higher payload, but of course with no central articulation there would be a loss of manoeuvrability, so the Toro 60 deploys a clever steering rear axle to ensure it can still turn around in less space than it takes your Mom.

This marvellous Technic recreation of the Sandvik comes from builder Thesuperkoala, who has replicated the Toro 60’s cunning steering thanks to a Power Funcions Servo motor that operates both the front and rear axles. The two rear axles are driven by a Large Motor and the huge tipping bucket can be raised by a large linear actuator, all of which are controlled by a third-party SBrick, allowing activation via bluetooth.

There’s lots more to see of Thesuperkoala’s fully remote controlled Technic Sandvik Toro 60 at his Flickr album, on Eurobricks, and via his own website, plus you watch the creation in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video

*Click here for the urban legend.

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Making Hay

Lego New Holland TM140 + Claas Quadrant 2200

It’s a gloriously sunny spring day here at TLCB Towers, and whilst it’s nowhere near hay season yet we’re looking forward thanks to Eric Trax and this spectacular New Holland TM140 and Claas Quadrant 2200 baler combo.

Eric’s superb New Holland tractor not only looks fantastic, it’s packed with remote control functionality all of which can be controlled remotely via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick. The drive and steering are driven by Power Functions motors, as are the front and rear hitches and power-take-off.

Lego New Holland TM140 + Claas Quadrant 2200

That PTO sends drive to the Claas Quadrant baler, powering a variety of complicated-looking mechanisms which ultimately culminates in the machine excreting a block of tan pieces (hay) in a manner similar to a horse doing its business. It’s a mighty clever build and one that you can recreate for yourself as Eric has made instructions available too!

There’s much more to see of both the New Holland TM140 tractor and Claas Quadrant 2200 baler at both the Eurobricks forum and via Eric’s Flickr photostream, plus you can watch the models in action via the video below. Click the links above to make hay, whilst we await the outcome of the office sweepstake betting on how long it’ll be before we have to extract a TLCB Elf from the inner workings of that baler…

YouTube Video

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Mystery Box

Lego MAN TGX Van der Vlist Truck

This is Dennis Bosman’s ‘Mystery Box’, and – unlike your Mom – he hasn’t published a single picture of what’s inside it on the internet. Evidence from Area 51? Kim Jong Un’s nukes? A copy of the final season of Game of Thrones? Whatever’s in there Dennis’s box is chained to an enormous ten axle Broshuis trailer pulled by a MAN TGX of unbelievable detail.

Lego MAN TGX Truck SBrick Remote Control

The MAN truck wears the livery of ‘Van der Vlist’ courtesy of superb custom decals, and rides – like the trailer – on non-Lego metal wheels. Underneath the spectacularly detailed tilting cab is a working 6-cylinder piston engine and a full remote control drivetrain, operable via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick.

Lego MAN TGX Truck SBrick Remote Control

The axles of the huge Broshuis trailer steer too, with four Servo Motors providing the power, with each axle’s wheels turning at a different ratio. It’s a magnificent build – possibly one of the finest of the year – and there’s much more to see at Dennis’ MAN TGX Flickr album here, plus you can read our interview with Dennis as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

Lego MAN TGX Truck

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Whitesnake*

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

America has mixed form when it comes to supercars. The excellent Ford GT is at one end, the Corvette is in the middle, being now pretty good but mostly fairly hopeless, and the Dodge Viper… yeh, that’s still crap.

But that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t want a go in one. Especially this variant, the mad ACR edition. With the Viper’s V10 engine tweaked to 645bhp, carbon ceramic brakes, and a seriously extreme aero package the ACR was… well, still nowhere near as good as anything from Europe or Japan.

That didn’t stop it heading to the Nurburgring with aim of claiming the road legal lap record though. Three attempts ended with a wrecked ACR and no record, but it was the fastest road-legal-American-rear-drive-manual-transmission-car to lap the Nurburgring. Possibly because it was the only one to do it.

No matter, because this fully remote controlled Technic Dodge Viper ACR designed by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego) and photographed by Jeff McClain is every bit as good as the real car isn’t. Alongside the remote control drive and steering are working suspension, LED lights, a V10 engine underneath a flipping clamshell hood, and opening doors and tailgate.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s amazing ACR at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to attempt the lap record…

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

*Today’s title song. Don’t pretend you don’t like it.

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Grindr

Lego Technic Red Alert Grinder Tank

It’s been a while since the last act of outrageous Elven violence here at TLCB Towers, but fear not readers, the little scumbags were back in business today. This is Desert752 aka Kirill Mazurov’s ‘Grinder’* tank from the classic video game Red Alert 3, and it’s nuts.

Controlled via bluetooth thanks to no less than three SBricks, Kirill’s Grinder* features ten Power Functions motors, six alone just for drive. A seventh powers the articulated chassis steering, the eighth the boom lift, and a ninth the huge rotating cutter on the end of it.

But what about the tenth you say? Well the lucky Elf that discovered this remote control monstrosity kept that one secret for a bit.

Driving it through the halls of TLCB Towers, Kirill’s Grinder* was frustratingly slow, certainly much too lethargic for the Elf in question to mow down any of its brethren. The other Elves in the office quickly got cocky, taunting the Elf at the controls by standing in front of the approaching tank with its whirling cutter, before jumping out of the way at the last second to much cackling and – we suspect – Elven profanity.

But that tenth motor had yet to be used, and after lulling its colleagues the Elf in control deployed motor No.10. With the secret high-gear engaged the Grinder’s* speed instantly trebled, and the taunters simply couldn’t get out of the way quickly enough.

Fed under the wheels by the cutter, then squashed by the Grinder’s* huge tyres, before being rolled flat by the tracks that followed thereafter, there has probably never been a worse machine to be run over by than this.

We were quite impressed by the Elf at the controls’ subterfuge too, and it’s now enjoying a blue Smartie whilst we have a go with the Grinder* ourselves.

There’s more to see of Kirill’s remote control behemoth at the Eurobricks discussion forum, the complete Red Alert Grinder* gallery can be viewed on Flickr, and you can watch the machine in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

*No, not that Grindr.

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Technic Traction

Lego Traction Engine

We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves this weekend, but they’re bringing back builds of a very classical nature. From the inventively old to the actually old now, and two absolutely beautiful Technic steam tractors from Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe.

An unusual choice for a Technic build we think these – somewhat oddly – qualify for ‘Technic Supercar’ status, being equipped with working steering, brakes, piston and valve gear, and a two-speed transmission.

Head over to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, where you can also find a link to vote for Nikolaus’ design on LEGO Ideas, whilst we figure out how the Elves have been watching ‘Downton Abbey’.

Lego Traction Engine

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Christmas Carnage

Lego RC Tank

With only two days until Christmas most of the Elves here at The Lego Car Blog have returned to the crumbling ruin that is TLCB Towers ready for their enforced ‘break’ over the holidays. This makes the office a noisier and messier place in the build up to their re-caging, and is something we’ve gotten used to over the years, but nothing prepared us for just how much noisier and messier this year would be.

With the office stereo playing Christmas songs loudly on loop we weren’t paying attention to any sounds emitting from the Elves’ cage room or the corridor outside. Mistake.

When we finally did notice that something was amiss, the Elven casualties were higher than anything that had gone before. There were Elves squashed into the carpet, Elves staggering around in circles, and even Elves unconscious on the top of shelves. One Elf though, was probably the happiest we have ever seen an Elf be, and it was at the controls of This.

‘This’ is shadow_elenter‘s ‘Transforming Tank / Howitzer’, a fully remote controlled, eighteen motor and five SBrick behemoth that can do, well… a lot. Take a look via the video below and you’ll understand how the situation here at TLCB Towers unfolded…

With an amazing Howitzer gun capable of deploying remotely and firing a Technic rubber-ended bullet (complete with re-coil), four remotely firing cannons up front, remotely controlled (but non-firing) gatling and anti-aircraft guns, and huge tracks driven by four Power Functions XL Motors, shadow_elenter’s tank is an incredible (if mad) example of the very best Technic engineering.

There’s much more to see of this gloriously unhinged build at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, whilst we undertake a big Christmas tidy up…

Lego RC Tank

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JCB 5CX Wastemaster | Picture Special

Lego Technic JCB Remote Control

Every so often a creation comes along that shifts what we thought possible from LEGO bricks. This is one such creation. Created over the course of a year by Technic-building legend Sariel this is a fully working replica of JCB’s 5CX Wastemaster backhoe, powered by pneumatics, eleven Power Functions motors, and two third-party SBricks.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control Underneath the brilliant Technic exterior are nine motors that drive all four wheels, the three-mode steering (two-wheel, all-wheel and crab), backhoe arm rotation and traverse, and powering a combination of pneumatic cylinders and linear actuators to control both the front and rear arms and their respective buckets. A further two motors power the pneumatic ‘remote control’, compressing the air which travels down twelve separate hoses to the model itself.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control

A motorised remotely rotating driver’s seat and a suite of LED lights from third-party lighting specialists Brickstuff complete the electronics, making this 2.4kg, 75 stud-long masterpiece one of the most technically advanced Technic creations to date. There is much more to see of Sariel’s amazing remote control JCB at the Eurobricks forum, on Flickr, and at Sariel’s excellent website, you can watch it in action via the video below, and if you’d like to build your own model with many of the features of this one we highly recommend LEGO’s own 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 set, which share its wheels and amazing three-mode steering with Sariel’s fantastic creation.

YouTube Video

 

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Magnificent Erection

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

Huib van der Hart’s erection is so big it can’t be photographed. Thankfully he has managed to capture it in a more compact state, but even then it’s still absolutely massive. We’re talking about Huib’s unbelievable 1:16 scale Liebherr LTM 1750 mobile crane in BKV livery; all 18 wheels of it.

Huib’s model is – as you can see here – astonishingly well detailed, but that’s only half the build. Underneath that amazing exterior is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain, with six XL Motors providing drive, seven Servo motors steering all nine axles, and a third-party SBrick providing control via bluetooth. There are also working LED lights throughout plus – of course – this model can get much, much bigger.

There’s a lot more to see of this incredible build at Huib’s Flickr photostream – click the link to make the jump, and ask him if he can try to get it up for a photo.

Lego Liebherr LTM 1750 Mobile Crane

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The Last Paradise

Lego Tracked Container Town

Flickr’s Rat Dude has a very different idea of what constitutes ‘paradise’ to that of TLCB Team. Still, we suppose it’s relative, as compared to a post-apocalyptic wasteland* this roving container town may well be paradise on tracks. Beautifully built, Rat’s ‘Last Paradise’ features remote control drive and a two-speed gearbox controlled via a third-party SBrick bluetooth brick, allowing the town to rove around the halls of TLCB Towers creeping-out the Elves. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of Rat’s wonderful creation on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

Lego Tracked Container Town

*Or TLCB Towers…

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Expedition Zetros II

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Having already posted one awesome Mercedes-Benz Zetros expedition truck earlier in the year we didn’t expect to find another. But like feet, Noah’s animals, and your Mom’s chin, Zetroses it seems, come in twos.

This spectacularly well-engineered Zetros expedition truck comes from previous bloggee jrx and it’s packed with brilliant Technic functionally, with seven Power Functions motors fitted inside, controlled via two SBricks and a LEGO IR Receiver.

Each wheel is driven by an XL motor, a Servo controls the steering, and two further Medium motors power the winch and a retractable awning.

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz Zetros Expedition

Fourteen sets of LEDs give jrx’s Zetros working head and tail lights, flashing turn signals, roof-mounted floodlights, and even interior lighting. The model also includes functioning suspension on all four wheels, a fully fitted interior, and an ATV stored on-board.

There’s much more to see of jrx’s excellent expedition Zetros at both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum – click on the links to join the journey, and you can watch the truck in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

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