Tag Archives: SBrick

Camp Fire

We love repurposed vehicles (or anything else for that matter) here at The Lego Car Blog. Taking something and transforming for a different purpose is not only far less environmentally damaging than making something new, the results are often way cooler. As evidenced by Beat Felber‘s wonderful 1984 Land Rover 110.

Beat’s real-world Land Rover served as an off-road fire engine for about twenty-five years, before it was retired and converted into the superb off-road camper it is today, and Beat has now recreated it in Lego form, capturing his real-life vehicle beautifully.

Underneath the brilliantly life-like exterior – complete with opening doors and hood – is a remotely controlled 4×4 drivetrain powered by an SBrick, with L-Motors driving both axles (each of which is suspended), a Servo the steering, and an M-Motor the high/low gearbox.

It’s a delightful build made all the better by its real-world counterpart, and there’s more to see of both Beat’s Lego Land Rover 110 and the real fire-engine-turned-camper that inspired it via the link above.

Dananananana Bateman!

This is a Bateman Assault Bridge Carrier, an experimental tank-bridge-laying-combo based on the excellently-named ‘Medium Dragon’ Mk.1 artillery tractor that was trialled by the British Royal Engineers in 1926.

It’s one of the more obscure vehicles to appear here then, and it’s been recreated brilliantly by Tarix819 of Eurobricks in a colossal 1:8 scale.

Weighing almost 10kgs, Tarix’s creation features two coil-sprung tracks, each with its own mechanical tensioner and independently powered by an SBrick and three XL motors.

A working V8 engine lives within the armour, and a functioning searchlight is able to light up the obstacle ahead in need of crossing.

And cross an obstacle the Bateman can, as Tarix’s model can deploy the huge bridge mounted on the top of machine. The real Assault Bridge Carrier relied on hand-powered winches (which are also recreated here), but Tarix’s build utilises a Power Functions Medium Motor to complete the model’s suite of remote control functionality.

It’s a monumentally impressive piece of Lego engineering and you can see how Tarix has done it at the Eurobricks discussion form here, and via the brilliant video below.

YouTube Video

Messing Up Afghanistan Since 1978

The news coming from Afghanistan at the moment is heartbreaking. A rare case of successful international cooperation, the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan and subsequent defeat of its Taliban ‘government’ brought freedom, equal-ish rights, and prosperity to millions of Afghans.

It also brought about a fantastically corrupt (although democratically elected) government and the deaths of tens of thousands, but despite this it would be hard to argue that many Afghans – particularly women – weren’t better off for the intervention.

Which makes it tremendously sad that all of those gains (and the blood spilt to achieve them) may now be lost thanks to a hasty politically-motivated Western withdrawal, with the Taliban regaining power even quicker than they lost it twenty years ago.

More tragically, it’s not the first time that foreign powers have put their own politics before the lives of Afghans…

This is a Soviet BTR-80, a remarkable 8×8 amphibious armoured personal carrier, as used in the Soviet-Afghan War.

Back in 1978 a coup in Afghanistan overthrew the presidency, replacing it with the ‘Democratic Republic of Afghanistan’, a puppet Communist government supported by the Soviet Union, which many of the Afghan people resisted via a brutal guerrilla war.

The UN ordered the Soviet Union to withdraw, which they ignored and engaged in a 9 year war in support of the Communist government, razing villages, destroying farmland, laying millions of landmines, and committing rape and torture.

Sanctions and a mass boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics followed, but worse was to come for the Soviet Union, who ultimately lost the war to the Afghan Mujahideen and the international community supporting them, which – many argue – hastened the collapse of the Soviet Union itself.

The BTR-80 used towards the end of the conflict was still a mighty impressive piece of hardware though, and so too is this spectacular fully RC recreation by Sariel.

With eight-wheel-drive, four-wheel-steering, all-wheel suspension, a three-speed gearbox, motorised hatches, a remotely operable gun turret, rotating and lit searchlight, a working winch, and powered propellors all controlled via bluetooth thanks to three SBricks, Sariel’s BTR-80 is an engineering masterclass.

You can watch all of those incredible features in action via the video below, plus there are more stunning images of Sariel’s creation available to view at his ‘BTR-80’ Flickr album. Click here to make the jump to a pointless war in Afghanistan sometime in the late ’80s.

And back to that disastrous piece of Soviet foreign policy; even after the Soviet Union withdrew defeated, peace in Afghanistan was not forthcoming. A civil war continued to rage, taking the death toll to as many as two million Afghans.

Eventually, after years of turmoil, it was the Taliban who ended up in power, which brings us right back to 2001, the international intervention, and now – twenty years later – the rapid undoing of everything that was won.

Donate to Unicef in Afghanistan here.

Big Hero 6

This is a 1950s Berliet T100, a French-built, V12-powered 6×6 truck, with a gross weight of over 100 tons, and it was the largest truck in the world.

Four T100s were built between 1957 and 1959, with three flatbeds (as depicted here) designed to take enormous pieces of equipment off-road to serve oil and gas exploration in Northern Africa, whilst the fourth was outfitted as a dump truck for use in a French uranium mine.

The trucks were powered by a 29.6 litre Cummins engine, supplemented by a smaller Panhard engine used to power the steering and as a generator, and delivered a power figure of between 600 and 700bhp. One T100 was even fitted with an experimental gas turbine for a while, before it reverted back to diesel power.

Nico71’s incredible Technic recreation of the Berliet T100 includes both of these engines, along with a fully working replica of the T100’s 6×6 drivetrain, with three L Motors (one for each axle), all-wheel suspension, and a Medium Motor powering a compressor that can pneumatically lock all three differentials.

A fifth motor drives the steering front axle, with a final M Motor powering a winch mounted at the back of the cab, able to drag equipment up the T100’s ramp for transportation.

All six motors can be operated via bluetooth thanks to a third party SBrick controller, providing Nico’s 1:20 scale 3kg model with an accurate scaled-down representation of the real Berliet T100’s off-road ability.

You can see Nico71’s amazing creation in action via the video below, and you can read full details about both the build and the history of the real 1950s Berliet T100 trucks at Nico’s excellent website, where a complete gallery of images and 550-page building instructions can also be found.

YouTube Video

Know The Drill

We often link to music here at TLCB, but not today, because drill music – named after the power tool that is simply horrific to listen to – sucks.

Thus there’ll be no link to an appropriate drill track at the foot of this post, because you don’t need that in your life, but there will be a link to this; Eric Trax’s remarkable Pottinger Terrasem R3 seed drill.

Towed by a version of his previously featured fully remote controlled, SBrick-programmable New Holland TM140 tractor, the Terrasem R3 both looks and sounds like a sci-fi creation you’d expect to find on the Brothers Brick, but is in fact one of the many mechanised wonders that quite literally feed the world.

A Claas telehandler is pictured below filling the Pottinger with seed (snigger), and there lots more to see of it and the excellent tractor pulling it via Eric’s ‘Pottinger Terrasem R3 seed drill‘ album on Flickr (where you can also find a link to a video of it in action and another to building instructions) via the link above, or via Brickshelf here.

Slowly Sovieting

Some might think today’s title could refer to Russia’s creeping direction under its definitely fairly  democratically elected President, but – fortunately for us as we don’t want to experience Novichok poisoning – it also relates perfectly to this; Sariel’s amazing fully remote controlled pneumatic and motorised Ural 375D 6×6 truck.

Sariel‘s latest astonishing creation is a spectacularly engineered replica of the mighty Soviet military truck, built entirely from Lego pieces, plus a few choice third-party-supplied enhancements.

The first of these is an SBrick bluetooth controller, which allows the four-motor 6×6 drive, steering, servo-powered 3-speed gearbox, three pneumatically locking differentials, and Brickstuff LED lights to all be controlled remotely via a mobile phone or other bluetooth device.

Sariel has further enhanced his model with RC4WD ‘Rock Crusher’ tyres, fitted to Lego rims and mounted to live axle suspension on axles 1 and 3, with pendular suspension on axle 2. A motorised rear winch, working V8 engine, opening doors and hood, and a canvas load cover complete the build, and make Sariel’s Ural one of the most realistic and technically accurate trucks of the year so far.

There’s a whole lot more of this incredible creation to see at the Eurobricks forum, plus the complete gallery of stunning imagery is available to view on Flickr, where there are even a few images that seem to depict a TLCB Elf in shot, but we might be imagining that.

You can also check out a video of the Ural 375D 6×6 in action below, in which the working functions, bare chassis, and a pug named Muffin can all be viewed.

YouTube Video

Contain This

Most of what’s around you (unless you’re reading this on your phone in a field) got to where it is via a shipping container. They might just be big metal boxes, but the entire global economy hinges on their transportation (cue headlines when said transportation stops). This Detroit Diesel-powered Skoda Xena is pulling two such monuments to global capitalism, which Martin Nespor has recreated brilliantly in brick form. A neat three-axle trailer with lifting axles and an extending rear overhang follows the Skoda, which itself features Power Functions and SBrick bluetooth remote control. Excellent custom decals complete the build and there’s more to see at Martin’s ‘Container Semi-Trailer’ album on Flickr; click here to take a look.

Hummers Suck

Categories of people that like Hummer; Under nines. TLCB Elves. Conspiracy-theorising, ‘FREEDOM!’-yelling neanderthals. Middle-eastern oil sheiks. Idiots.

This is a Hummer H2, and we absolutely love it! Not the real car of course, which is total garbage, but this thoroughly excellent fully remote controlled Technic recreation by Eurobricks’ damjan97PL.

The real Hummer H2 was neither capable nor sophisticated, but damjan97’s version is certainly both. Two XL Motors power the 4×4 drivetrain which includes three differentials, independent front and live-axle rear suspension, and Servo steering (which is also linked to the steering wheel).

A working V8 engine resides under the opening hood, all four doors open and lock, the seats adjust via geared racks, and there’s an SBrick programable brick mounted in the cabin providing bluetooth remote control.

It’s as excellent as the real Hummer H2 is terrible and there’s much more to see of damjan97PL’s incredible creation at the Eurobricks forum at the link above, or via the extensive image gallery available on Bricksafe.

Click the links above to join under nines, TLCB Elves, conspiracy-theorising ‘FREEDOM!’-yelling neanderthals, middle-eastern oil sheiks, and this TLCB Writer (an idiot) in taking a look!

Front Loaded

It’s an exciting time to be a TLCB Elf today. One of their number found this; a magnificent Volvo-esque 4×4 wheel loader with full remote control. It comes from FT-creations and it’s packed with functions, all of which can be controlled via bluetooth thanks to a pair of third-party SBricks hidden inside.

An XL Motor drives all four wheels, an L Motor controls the pivoted steering, whilst four more power two on-board compressors that, with the help of two Servo Motors, operate the boom and bucket movements.

It’s all exceptionally clever and allows FT’s model to function just like the real thing.  Which is to say rather slowly.

Of course that means there’ll be no Elf squashings taking place today and instead several of them are happily riding around in the bucket. However we think the bucket of FT’s front loader might have enough elevation to reach the toilet, so whilst we try that out on the unsuspecting passengers you can see more of FT’s ace build at both Eurobricks and Rebrickable, where building instructions are also available.

Brick Built Bimmer

Gosh do we hate the BMW X3. Not a much as the X7, which numerically we hate just over twice as much, but still. However, our thoughts on BMW’s affront to ‘compact’ SUV styling are – like pretty much everything we write – moot, because the X3 has been a phenomenal success for the German brand.

Now seventeen years and three generations in, around two million X3s have been produced, and today we can add one more to that number, courtesy of Jeroen Ottens and the brilliant Technic recreation you can see here.

Powered by two L Motors with a Medium Motor delivering the steering, Jeroen’s X3 can be controlled via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick, which has also been programmed to operate the LED head and tail lights (including indicators), and the Servo controlled drive-mode select, which can send all the power to the rear wheels, 25% front and 75% rear, or 50/50 all-wheel-drive via a centre differential.

It’s an ingenious piece of engineering and there’s more to see on both Flickr and at Jeroen’s website, where building instructions are also available. Click the links to check it out.

Mr. Big Stuff*

This enormous green and cream spiky looking arrangement is a Krone BigX 770 with an EasyCollect 600-2, and it is – if you’re a TLCB Elf – not something that you want to see at all.

Built by Michal Skorupka (aka Eric Trax), the Krone BigX and EasyCollect 600-2 are equipped with no less than three SBrick bluetooth controllers and nine Power Functions motors, providing the model with spectacularly life-like functions, all of which can be controlled remotely via a phone or – in this case – a Playstation controller.

Which is marvellous if you want to cut down some Lego corn, but considerably less so if you’re an Elf asleep on the floor as it enters the Cage Room.

It’s been a while since the last act of remotely controlled violence here at TLCB Towers, so the Elves were gradually becoming more complacent. This of course gave the Elf that discovered this creation a golden opportunity, which it seized by driving the Krone through the Elven Cage Room with the whirling EasyCollect 600-2 easily collecting its sleeping colleagues.

With XL Motor all-wheel-drive and Servo rear axle steering, Eric’s model is almost purpose-built for mashing the maximum number of sleeping Elves. A wide path of destruction was enabled by the deployable harvesting arms, each powered by Medium Motor, with the harvesting mechanism itself driven by an L Motor powered PTO, and another Medium Motor able to raise and lower the whole attachment to the optimum Elf-mangling height.

The Elf at the controls fulfilled its self-appointed Grim Reaper role admirably, with the BigX and EasyCollect only halted due to an Elven body-part jam in the mechanism, following which it fled the scene giggling maniacally.

We now have a lot of clearing up to do, including Elven first aid that may or may not include a few trips to ‘Elf Hospital‘, so whilst we get the Pritt Stick out and attempt to match Elven body parts with their owners you can check out all the details of Michal’s stunning creation on both Flickr and Eurobricks, plus you can watch the Krone BigX 770 and EasyCollect 600-2 in action below.

YouTube Video

*Today’s excellent title song.

The Boss

The muscle car market has gone mad in recent years. Upwards of 700bhp is now available from stock, and whilst many modern muscles cars have now added revolutionary new technologies such as ‘steering’ and ‘suspension’, we suspect actually using all that power is a difficult thing to do. Resulting in happenings like this. And this. And this. And this.

Things were little different back in the late ’60s, when the first power race between muscle car makers began. This was one of Ford’s efforts from the time; the Mustang Boss 429. The ‘429’ moniker stood for the V8 engine’s cubic inch capacity, which translates to seven litres. Seven. Most European cars at the time made do with just over one.

Of course the Boss’s steering, braking and suspension were – in true muscle car tradition – woefully inadequate, meaning that morons-with-daddy’s-money in 1969 could plow their new car into a street light in much the same way as they do today, only without the event being captured on YouTube.

Today though, we’re joining the muscle car crashing fraternity too, thanks to Hogwartus, and this superb SBrick-powered remote control Technic Boss 429.

Driven by two L Motors, with a Medium Motor turning the steering and another controlling the four-speed sequential gearbox, Hogwartus’s creation is a riot to drive. That is until we spun it into a kitchen cabinet. We’ll blame the Mustang-accurate torsion bar rear suspension for that faux-par. The front suspension is independent though, and the model also includes opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, a replica 7-litre V8 engine (that turns via the drive motors), sliding seats, and LED headlights.

There’s more to see of Hogwartus’s stunning Technic ’69 Mustang Boss 429 at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, plus via the truly excellent video below, which must be one of the few Mustang videos on YouTube that don’t end like this.

YouTube Video

Skip This

Trucks such as this one always seem to have fancy names when LEGO produce them. Not at this blog though, where they are simply known as a ‘skip lorry’, seeing as they’re a lorry with an, er… skip. Said skip is usually full of an old bathroom, ripped out of an old lady’s bungalow when the new owners moved in, and all the junk from the neighbourhood lobbed into it by every house within walking distance whilst it was on the road.

Previous bloggee Damjan97PL/damianPLE’s fully RC Technic skip lorry is so realistic we’re surprised it doesn’t come with an old lady’s bathroom in the skip on the back to be honest, but besides that rather glaring omission he’s nailed it.

An SBrick provides bluetooth control for the motorised drive, four-wheel steering, raising/lowering rear axle (with automatic steering detachment when raised), and the skip loading arm, whilst there’s also a working six-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cabin, manually operated stabiliser legs and functioning suspension too.

There’s more of Damain’s remote control skip lorry to see at both the Eurobricks forum and at his Bricksafe gallery – click the links to chuck your rubbish on top of an old lady’s bathroom.

Indefensible

The more we see the new Land Rover Defender (which comes in officially licensed LEGO form too), the more we wish Land Rover had taken the approach of Suzuki, Mercedes-Benz, and now Ford, with their new Bronco, and found a way to update a classic rather than throw the design cues in the bin.

Still, the fact we’re starting to see the new Defender everywhere means our opinion counts for nought, and the heavily-financed Evoques parked outside every $150/month health club will soon be switched for heavily-financed Defenders. Although that may cause a different problem for Land Rover…

We’d choose to leave the health club behind and exercise outdoors, using a proper Land Rover Defender to take us there. This fantastic fully remote controlled Technic Defender comes from previous bloggee ArsMan064, and it captures the spirit of the original Land Rover far better than Land Rover have managed to with their new one.

A third-party SBrick gives ArsMan’s Defender bluetooth control, with two L Motors driving all four wheels and a Medium motor powering the steering, whilst all-wheel suspension, LED lights, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and a beautifully detailed engine bay and interior also feature.

There’s loads more to see of ArsMan064’s Technic Land Rover Defender 90 at the Eurobricks discussion forum, including close-up imagery and a video of the model in action off-road, which you can also find below. Click the link above to leave the health club behind…

YouTube Video

Lego Land Cruiser 76

The Toyota Land Cruiser is the world’s infamous off-roader. Which means in some corners it’s very probably the most infamous vehicle of any kind. This is the 70-Series, produced since 1984 and which is still being manufactured today, specifically the medium-wheelbase ’76’ passenger version, recreated brilliantly in Technic form by previous bloggee Kevin Moo.

Wonderfully accurate on the outside, Kevin’s Land Cruiser is packed with remote control functions too, allowing the model to navigate the wilds of his back garden with ease. A third-party SBrick provides the 76 with programmable bluetooth control, with all-wheel-drive, steering, and LED lights, plus the build includes working suspension, and opening doors, hood and tailgate.

Full details of Kevin’s awesome Toyota Land Cruiser 76 can be found at the Eurobricks forum by Eurbricks discussion forum, where a link to building instructions can also be found so you can build your very own! Click the link above to take a look, or below to see Kevin’s brilliant build in action.

YouTube Video: