Tag Archives: Axis Powers

Dispatched

Lego Dispatch Rider Afrika Korps

If you’re a member of the NRA then everything can be improved with the addition of a gun. High school security? Add a gun. Patriotism? You’ll definitely need a gun. Motorbikes? Much cooler with a gun.

OK, we’ve made that last one up.* Still, Redfern1950s‘ previously featured Dispatch Bike has received a Second Amendment upgrade and even we** admit that it does look cool! Re-purposed in Africa Korps spec it also includes a serious looking cartoon rider, so it can now dispatch people instead of packages.

Click the link above to head over to Redfern’s photostream for all the pictures.

Lego Afrika Korps Bike

*Except we haven’t.

**There is an alternative.

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Sonderkraftfahrzeug 250

Lego Technic Sd.Kfz. 250 Half-Track

A valiant effort from your brain in trying to pronounce that title as you read it. Have another go…

The Sonderkraftfahrzeug or ‘special motor vehicle’ (hereby known as the Sd.Kfz. 250, as even the Germans didn’t like to pronounce it), was a lightly armoured half-track multi-purpose transport used by the German military throughout World War 2.

Armed with a single or double machine gun, the Sd.Kfz. 250 saw duty as a troop carrier, radio vehicle, command transport and reconnaissance car, and could reach almost 50mph.

This rather neat remotely controlled Technic version of the Sd.Kfz. 250 comes from Chawn of Eurobricks, and features working suspension, twin L-Motor drive to both the tracks and the front wheels, and RC steering.

There’s more to see of Chawn’s remote control half-track – including a video of it in action – at the Eurobricks forum – make the jump via the link above.

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Unterseeboot | Picture Special

Lego U-Boat VIIc

Britain in the Second World War was under siege. V1 flying bombs dropped out of the skies, the Luftwaffe bombed cities relentlessly, and a deadly terror lurked unseen under the waves offshore…

Lego U-Boat Submarine

Germany’s U-Boat, shorthand for Unterseeboot (which literally meant ‘under sea boat’ – the allies were definitely better at naming things) was a stroke of genius. Able to destroy a military ship (plus a few civilian ones too…) almost undetected, it must have been a terrifying time to navigate the cold waters of Northern Europe.

Lego U-Boat VIIc

Awfully effective though the U-Boat was, it’s not often we see one in Lego form. Discovered by one of our Elves today, this superb mini-figure recreation of U-Boat VIIc comes from Luis Peña of Flickr. Beautifully constructed inside and out Luis’ model features a wonderfully detailed interior underneath the cleverly sculpted hull, including a submariner using a torpedo for weights training, the captain manning the periscope, and a fully stocked galley complete with rat (aka tomorrow’s dinner).

Lego U-Boat VIIc

It’s a stunning build and we highly recommend visiting Luis’ photostream to see the complete gallery of images. Get ready to dive via the link to Flickr in the text above.

Lego U-Boat VIIc

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Not A Car…

Lego Nakajima Ki-84Eagle-eyed readers of this blog post will have noticed that this is not a car. It is in fact a Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ World War 2 fighter, as flown by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in the last three years of the war. One of the fastest, most formidably armed, and highest flying fighters of the time, the Nakajima Ki-84 was a feared adversary.

Over 3,500 Ki-84’s were produced between 1943 and 1945, although towards the end of the conflict the crippling effects of the war on production meant that defects rose dramatically and quality dropped. After the Allied victory several Ki-84’s were captured, with Indonesia the People’s Republic of China operating the aircraft within their own air forces, and America using two for evaluation.

Lego Ki-84 Hayate Fighter

Today just one Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ fighter survives, an ex-U.S evaluation aircraft now located in the Chiran Peace Museum in Japan. However thanks to previous bloggee and military-building specialist Daniel Siskind we now have double the number of Ki-84’s available to view.

Daniel’s superb mini-figure scale recreation of Japan’s fastest Second World War fighter is a beautifully detailed build and includes authentically replicated Imperial Japanese roundels and tail markings, as well as a custom IJA airman mini-figure shown in the first image above. See more of Daniel’s Nakajima Ki-84 ‘Hayate’ fighter and its custom mini-figure pilot on Flickr by clicking here.

Lego Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate

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Retribution Weapon 2

Lego V-2 Rocket

Today’s creation may look like a jauntily retro space rocket, but it is in fact an Aggregat 4, known affectionately by the Germans during World War 2 as the ‘Vergeltungswaffe 2’, (or V-2 for short). That extravagant title translates as ‘Retribution Weapon’, which is an apt name, because retribution was all the V-2 was designed to do. Which makes it surely one of mankind’s most evil inventions.

But also one of the cleverest. Whilst abhorrent in purpose, the V-2 rocket was brilliant in engineering. It was the world’s first guided ballistic missile (which considering it first few in 1944, when a computer was the size of an office block, is scarcely believable), and also the first man-made object to cross the boundary of space.

That cleverness made it all the more evil though, as the 3,000 V-2 rockets launched from Germany during the Second World War are estimated to have killed over 9,000 people in London, and later other European cities. Another 12,000 concentration camp prisoners died in the making of it, and yet at the end of the war the Allies rushed to capture the designs to accelerate their own missile production.

Thankfully this V-2 is nothing more than a collection of superbly shaped Danish plastic, and it comes from previous bloggee Sunder_59 of Flickr. There are further pictures of Sunder’s perfectly recreated Vergeltungswaffe at his photostream – click the link above to see more of the worst mankind can do.

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Line of Sight

Lego StuG III Ausf G Tank

The crew of this StuG III Ausf G tank are in for a surprise if the photographer behind this first-person image is as heavily armed as they are.

Points* go to Daniel Siskind for this intriguing shot of his wonderfully accurate StuG III tank, and you can see more on Flickr via the link above.

*Redeemable at TLCB Towers for a colouring pencil of your choice and an assortment of paper clips.

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Not a Car

Lego Mitsubishi Zero

But it was made by a car manufacturer, and very probably their most famous product too. This is of course a Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter from the Second World War, and it’s been neatly recreated in Lego form by James C of MOCpages. James’ updated build includes a mini-figure pilot, working landing gear, and custom decals, and there’s more to see on MOCpages via the link above.

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A Red Wolf

ta

The Ta-152 was the ultimate expression of Focke-Wulf’s Fw 190 fighter aeroplane of WW II. The particular version built by Maelven on Flickr is the Ta 152H, optimised for high altitude flight. The modifications included a pressurised cockpit, an increased wingspan and a Junkers Jumo 213E V12 engine with two speed, two stage supercharger and intercooler.

With methanol-water & nitrous-oxide boost, the engine could produce 2,050PS and made the Ta 152 one of the fastest piston engined aeroplanes of the war with 472mph at 41,000 feet. Maelven has displayed his model with its cowling open, displaying the mighty engine. What was the aircraft like to fly? This was described by the world’s most experienced test pilot and fluent German speaker, Capt. Eric Brown RN is this article. For more views of Maelven’s model, click this link.

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Mussolini’s Mech

Lego Dieselpunk Mech

This modified garbage-can arrangement is apparently a Semovente M47 Audax Battle Mech. Created by Flickr’s Marco Marozzi, the Semovente was engineered after an alien ship crashed in Italy in 1933, following which the facist Italian dictator Benito Mussolini put it to work to reverse the losses Italy were facing in North Africa during World War 2.

The mech and its backstory might be fictional, but sadly Mussolini wasn’t, joining forces with Hitler to regain an Italian empire during the Second World War, despite the fact he actually thought Hitler’s ‘Aryan race’ ideas were nonsense. Still, a nice man he was not, brutally crushing all opposition to take absolute power, persecuting the Christian faith, and dividing Italy to create his own Italian Social Republic.

The Italian King finally managed to overthrow Mussolini in 1943, upon which he was jailed – his new puppet state lasting just 19 months. The Germans helped him escape from prison in 1945, but the war was almost over and he was promptly recaptured and executed by Italian Communists.

Had an alien ship really crashed in secret in 1933 though, the outcome of the War, and the future of Europe and North Africa, could have been very different… There’s more to see of Marco’s alternate dieselpunk reality on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

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Not a Car…

Lego Mitsubishi Zero

…but probably the most popular plane to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. Lego builders love the Mitsubishi Zero, and they keep finding new ways to recreate Japan’s most famous fighter. This version comes from MOCpages’ James C, and he’s captured the Zero’s iconic shape beautifully. There’s more to see at his MOCpage – click the link above to fly over.

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Zero

Lego A6M Zero

The Lego Car Blog has featured numerous Mitsubishi A6M Zeros over the years, and Flick’s Daniel Siskind has been refining his mini-figure scale version of the famous fighter aircraft for almost as long. This is his latest version, and it’s pretty much perfect. See more at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Mitsubishi A6M Zero Fighter Plane

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Not an Evo

Mitsubishi A6M Zero Lego

Mitsubishi might be best known for the Lancer Evolution (although we’re not sure if anyone’s actually buying them anymore), but it wasn’t a car that put the Japanese company on the map. It was this, the deadly A6M Zero fighter. This lovely recreation of the classic warplane has been built by Flickr’s LegoUli and you can see more at his photostream by clicking here.

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Three Little Birds

Lego Grumman F4F Wildcat

It’s been a while since we posted a historic warplane here at The Lego Car Blog, so in rectification today we’ve got three! First up (above) is JBIronWorks’ beautiful blue Grumman F4F Wildcat and accompanying diorama. There’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

The second of today’s trio of Word War 2 fighters comes from Daniel Siskind, who has constructed a brilliant mini-figure scale replica of the legendary Supermarine Spitfire. Daniel’s version pictured here is a Mark V in desert camouflage and there’s lots more too see at his photostream – click the link above to make the trip.

Lego Messerschmitt BF-109

The final creation in today’s threesome, representing the Axis Powers – and the nemesis of the Spitfire above, is the formidable Messerschmitt BF-109. This stunning recreation of the famous fighter has been built by Flickr’s Lennart C, and you can see more of his model by clicking here.

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The Last Crusade*

Lego Indiana Jones The Last Crusade Motorcycle

There’s only been one post between Ralph Savelsberg‘s last creation to appear here and this one, but unlike the Indiana Jones movie franchise all of Ralph’s efforts continue to yield excellent results.

His latest model is the BMW R75 military motorcycle and sidecar that starred in the superb 1989 film The Last Crusade, complete with Indiana himself and his father as passenger. There’s lots more to see at Ralph’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Indiana Jones

*If only. Someone please tell George Lucas to stop. Aliens? Really?!

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You Gotta Roll With It

Lego Oasis Airfield FW190

This gorgeous Tunisian World War 2 oasis airfield scene – complete with a magnificent FW190 fighter – is the work of previous bloggee and aircraft genius Sydag. There’s clever detailing everywhere in this build – click the link above to see all the photos in Sydag’s Flickr gallery.

Lego Focke Wolf Fighter

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