Tag Archives: Alfa Romeo

Ferrari Before Ferrari

Lego Alfa Romeo P3

‘Scuderia Ferrari’ have been around longer than you might think…

Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1929, Scuderia Ferrari were winning races decades before their own cars would wear the famous prancing horse shield. The young Italian began his career driving for Alfa Romeo in 1920, winning the Coppa Acerbo in 1924. By 1929 Enzo took a step back from racing himself to manage the Alfa Romeo team, which became known as Scuderia Ferrari and wore the crest of Enzo’s friend Count Francesco Baracca, a logo which has now become synonymous with Ferrari cars.

Enzo’s partnership with Alfa Romeo gave his team access to the best racing car of the era, the glorious eight-cylinder supercharged  P3, and they translated this into a string of victories. However by 1938 Alfa Romeo wanted to race under their own name, and an unhappy Enzo decided to leave to build his own cars. Mussolini had other ideas though, and racing was duly halted during the kerfuffle whilst Enzo’s factory was converted to build military tooling.

After the war ended Enzo Ferrari finally got the chance to build and race his own car under his own name, and… Alfa Romeo won absolutely everything – in 1950 Enzo’s Italian rivals won all eleven races. However in 1951 the unbelievable happened; the ex-driver-turned-manager beat his old team, winning the 1951 British Grand Prix and becoming the first team to break Alfa Romeo’s dominance in over a year.

Ferrari would compete in every Formula 1 Championship thereafter, making them the only team in the sport’s history to do so, whilst the once mighty Alfa Romeo exited Formula 1 just a year later.

This wonderful diorama containing one of Scuderia Ferrari’s first race-winning cars (even though it’s not actually a Ferrari) comes from previous bloggee and TLCB regular PixelJunkie, whose stunning recreation of the Alfa Romeo P3 – complete with Scuderia Ferrari crest – is one of the finest mini-figure scale vintage racing cars we’ve seen. There’s more to see of this Ferrari-before-Ferrari on Flickr at Pixel’s photostream – head back to the early 1930s via the link above.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Formula 1 Sucks

Lego Brabham BT46B Fan Car

This is the 1978 Brabham BT46, designed by the legendary Gordon Murray and powered by an Alfa Romeo flat-12 engine, and it was amongst the front runners of the 1978 Formula 1 World Championship, securing a Constructors third place for the Brabham team.

The BT46 won two races in the ’78 season, but its win at the Swedish Grand Prix is one of the most unusual in the sport. You see this is the BT46 ‘B’, a design which raced only once, and which won by over half a minute.

Designed to take on the ‘ground effect’ Lotuses, Murray engineered an engine-powered fan to literally suck the car to the ground. Whilst it was claimed at the time the fan was used to cool the Alfa Romeo flat-12, it became obvious what its true purpose was when the drivers revved the engine, as the BT46B visibly squatted down on the track.

Effectively a reverse hovercraft, the Brabham BT46B dominated the field, which of course meant that like other ingenious developments in Formula 1, it was immediately banned. Because Formula 1 sucks.

The BT46B was never allowed to race in Formula 1 again and Brabham were forced to revert to their non fan-assisted variant, however TLCB regular and Master MOCer Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) remembers one of Formula 1’s cleverest designs with his stunning Lego replica of the one-race-wonder.

Added to his ever growing portfolio of historic racing cars on Flickr, Luca’s BT46B includes working steering, suspension, a flat-12 engine, and – of course – a working fan. There’s lots more to see at Luca’s Flickr Album – click this link if you’re a fan.

Lego Brabham BT46B Fan Car

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Red Spider

Lego Alfa Romeo Spider

Is there a more disappointing automotive brand than Alfa Romeo? We’re going to say no, and the disappointment started with this car.

Launched in 1966, the pretty Pininfarina-designed Alfa Romeo Spider was at the cutting edge of sports car engineering. A twin-cam engine, 5-speed gearbox, and disc brakes all featured, and whilst the Alfa cost nearly as much as an E-Type Jaguar, it found plenty of buyers willing to spend a bit to drive something so gorgeous.

And then Alfa Romeo just kept making it. And making it. And making it. The final Series 4 version of the car (pictured here) was released in 1990, thirty-six years after the Series 1 debuted, wearing a stupid 1990s bodykit and featuring tail-lights robbed from the 164 sedan.

The striking GTV finally replaced the Spider in 1995, but it was a flash in the pan moment for a brand that had traded on the past glories of its badge for far too long. Years of automotive drivel followed, mostly re-badged Fiats in pretty dresses – which wasn’t a good starting point, and Alfa Romeo seemed on the verge of disappearing altogether.

But now something remarkable has happened. Alfa Romeo are back. And not just with a Fiat in a pretty dress. The new Guilia sedan and Stelvio (whisper it)… SUV are receiving properly good reviews, and could finally be the saviours of the brand that we’ve been awaiting for so long. So cross your fingers, and your toes, and try to forget about cars like the Series 4 Spider.

Oh, we nearly forgot! This excellent Model Team recreation of the Series 4 comes from previous bloggee Andre Pinto, and there’s more to see at his photostream by clicking here.

Lego Alfa Romeo Spider

Tagged , , , , ,

Stay Classy

Lego Technic Alfa Romeo 1932

Long time readers (and probably even short time readers) will have worked out that this is not a classy blog. However every so often we put on a shirt, leave the decaying ruin that is TLCB Towers, and sit in a real restaurant to eat something that actually came out of the ground. With metal cutlery and everything.*

Anyhoo, this is one of those moments, as this could well be the classiest creation that we’ve published all year. Built by marthart of Brickshelf it’s a 1932 Alfa Romeo Spider, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. It also has a working engine, steering, leaf spring suspension, and opening doors and hood.

There’s more to see at marthart’s Brickshelf account via the link above. Put on a tie and join us there.

Lego Technic 1932 Alfa Romeo

*As opposed to staying in the office eating Sugar Puffs straight from the bag again.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

The Right Profile

profile-01

Red has produced a monster-sized vintage racing car. Loosely based on a 1932 Alfa Romeo, this car has the aerodynamic streamlining that was all the fashion at the time smooth built in bricks. It also features working steering and an engine that uses so many ray-guns as greebles that it could almost be part of sci-fi SHIPtember.

Red has included multiple views in his uploads but we really liked the straight profile shots, which are an unusual way to present a MOC. Click this link to Flickr to more views and under the bonnet or click this link to hear the song that we stole today’s title from. Meanwhile, here’s the left profile:

profile-02

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Little Wonders

Lego 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C Freccia d'Oro

You don’t need ten thousand bricks to appear on The Lego Car Blog. Around one hundred is plenty, as proven by Flickr’s Johnni with the lovely 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C Freccia d’ora pictured above, and Robert4168 with his superbly inventive micro-scale ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ pirate ship. See more of each via the links.

Lego Microscale Pirate Ship

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I See You Baby…

Lego Alfa Romeo Brera

Is this the most difficult rear-end to make from Lego? Well apart from this one obviously. It’s the work of Alexander Paschoaletto, and you can see more of his Alfa Romeo Brera on MOCpages here.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Outflanked!

JO 01

One of the reasons that we originally created The Lego Car Blog and unleashed the Elves on an unsuspecting world, was our belief that quality vehicle builds were being neglected by Lego bloggers. It is therefore with some pride* that we can announce that one of the “proper Lego blogs” beat us to this beautiful Technic sports car by quite a few days.

Jeroen Ottens has skilfully used Technic panels and flex rods to produce a mid-engine machine with a smooth, curved body. He has based the car around the look of the Alfa Romeo 4C Spider and included some built-in Italian stripes to emphasise this. The car also has full Power Functions features, including a working gear box. Click this link to Jeroen’s Photostream see more.

JO 02

*This is our excuse and we’re sticking to it.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Ferrari Genesis

Lego Alfa Romeo 8C 2600

This is the latest work of racing car genius Bob Alexander and it is, put simply, the most utterly beautiful Lego car we’ve ever seen.

First built in 1931, the Alfa Romeo 8C spearheaded the Italians’ assault on all of the major motor races of the 1930s. Bob’s incredible Lego recreation shown here is the 2600 Scuderia Ferrari version from 1933, driven by Italy’s Tazio Nuvolari and France’s Raymond Sommer. In their hands the 8C won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in ’33, adding a third consecutive Le Mans win to Alfa’s trophy cabinet.

The 8C continued to star in Europe’s motor races until 1938, when the outbreak of war halted everything, and pitched previously collaborative nations, including the winning pair of drivers from 1933, against each another in combat.

You may be wondering why there’s a Ferrari shield on the side of the 8C. Well Enzo Ferrari started out by running racing cars for existing manufacturers like Alfa Romeo before deciding to build his own cars after the Second World War. If you want to see where it all started for Ferrari, this car is that moment.

The Alfa Romeo 8C is therefore one of the most special racing cars ever made, and Bob’s astonishing Lego recreation is a wonderfully fitting tribute to one of the world’s greats. See all the photos on Flickr via the link above.

Lego Alfa Romeo 8C 2600

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Virtually Real – Digital Special

Dodoge Polara 1961

We don’t often feature virtual Lego creations at The Lego Car Blog. The Elves can be a picky bunch and usually prefer something more solid; something that they can really get their teeth into. We’ve tried to train them not to bite but you have been warned!

The 5th July 2013 saw the first birthday of LDD to POV-Ray Convertor. This software created a user friendly method to convert well-built and interesting virtual MOCs into images which look good too. These images can then be processed in Photoshop or GIMP, just like photographs of real bricks. Over the last twelve months builders have refined their choices of settings, achieving increasingly realistic results, and in this Special we’ll showcase some of the best digital creations and builders around today.

Alpha-Guilia-500w

Peter Blackert (lego911) has been extremely busy this month, publishing over 100 images on his Flickr photostream. His stylishly curved and chromed 1961 Dodge Polara, complete with a stylishly curved driver, features at the top of this post. Being made in LDD allows this car to be built in a colour which would be hard (or impossible?) to use in real bricks. Amongst the Cadillacs, Fords, Mercedes and combine harvesters that he has recently posted, is an Alfa Romeo Giulia in full Carabineri livery. These were the standard Italian police car of the 1960’s and feature in the “Italian Job” chases. Peter mentions this being part of his motivation to build this car. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pritty Car*

Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV

Expensive, hard work and very pretty. Italians eh?

Lego911 is back, with this gorgeous ’60s Alfa Romeo GTV. There’s not really much more we can say on this one, because, as with all Alfas, the best thing to do is just look at it. For more pictures visit Lego911’s superb Flickr Photostream.

*Italian Job fans will get this reference

Tagged , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: