Tag Archives: Vintage Car

5920 Redux

One of LEGO’s weirder themes, Dino Island (basically Jurassic Park meets Indiana Jones without paying the licensing) did feature some rather nice vintage vehicles. 5920 was one of them, and TLCB favourite Chris Elliott has rebuilt it in his trademark style; with beautiful attention to detail and gorgeous presentation. Suggested by a reader, there’s more to see of Chris’s 5920 Redux on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

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Benz Patent-Motorwagen

This is the Benz Patent-Motorwagen, first produced in 1886 and widely considered to be the first production motor car. Designed by Karl Benz (and financed by his wife Bertha, what a woman!), the Patent-Motorwagen was powered by a 1 litre single-cylinder engine producing around 3hp. That might not sound much but of course the Patent-Motorwagen was once the world’s fastest production car. And simultaneously the slowest…

Around 25 units were built between 1886 and the early 1890s, and newcomer Jacob Anderson has added one more, with his rather stylish Lego recreation of motoring’s genesis. A neat Victorian-era street completes the build and there’s more to see of his excellent Benz Patent-Motorwagen via the link above.

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My Other Car’s a Beetle. Mostly.

This is a Bugatti Type 57 SC Atlantic, one of the rarest and most expensive cars ever produced. Just four SC Atlantics were built, named for Ettore Bugatti’s friend whose plane crashed into the Atlantic after an engine failure. Today the cars command a price in the millions, so it’s quite cool to see one built (almost) from the parts of a vehicle far more humble, the Volkswagen Beetle (and VW of course who now own the Bugatti marque).

95% of the Bugatti’s pieces come from the Creator 10252 Volkswagen Beetle set (606 of the 640 used), meaning that builder ZetoVince almost qualifies for TLCB’s B-Model Lock-Down Competition. But not quite. Still, it’s an excellent build and one you can see more of at Zeto’s photostream; click the link above to make the jump and take a look, and if you’d like to create your own B-Model and be in with a chance to win an awesome SBrick Plus Pro Pack take a look at the competition by clicking here.

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History Repeating*

The world is currently balanced on a pinhead, with the slightest nudge in any direction sending the global economy into the greatest depression since the, er… Great Depression.

Beginning in 1929 and lasting right up until Germany started getting a bit ‘handsy’ in Europe**, it was the most severe recession the world has ever known. Vehicle sales tumbled – particularly from luxury marques – but there were still cars sold during the period, like this marvellous Austin 12 Burnham.

Like the current trend for SUVs, late ’20s cars were boxy, with high ground clearance and imposing radiator grilles – although this was more for functionality than today’s pointless need for ‘assertive, confident, aggressive’ styling or whatever the marketing types label monstrosities like this as.

This excellent recreation of the Austin 12 comes from Flickr’s 1saac W., who has replicated the 1929 tourer rather well. There’s more of 1saac’s model to see at his photostream – click the link above to take a look, whilst we ponder the worrying circularity of history…

*Today’s glorious title song.

**Thanks to a rise in nationalism, populism, and a desire to ‘make countries great again’. Good thing the world will never repeat that mistake…

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Ageing Orange

Nope, not another Donald Trump joke, but this rather lovely classic British roadster by newcomer MP LEGO Technic Creations. Built for a Eurobricks contest, MP’s creation includes working steering, an inline-four engine, and a rear differential, and there’s more to see at both Eurobricks and Flickr.

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T for Two

It’s been a hot rod heavy few days but we’ll sneak in two more before a bit of a gearshift. This neat pair of Town-scale Model T hot rods comes from Tim Henderson who has captured both ends of the hot rodding scale circa 1973. Both the ‘Resto-mod’ and ‘Fad-T’ replicate their respective trends superbly and there’s more to see of his mini-figure models on Flickr via the link.

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Pole Position

This rather lovely looking automobile is the CWS T-1, the first serially-produced car to be manufactured in Poland. The T-1 was a clever piece of design too, with the entire car using only a single bolt size meaning just one was tool was needed to take it apart completely.

Unfortunately the T-1 had a relatively short life as CWS were swallowed up by the Polish state in 1930, who then signed deal with FIAT. FIAT didn’t like competition much and requested that production of the T-1 cease, and the Polish state agreed, giving FIAT a monopoly that eventually led to such abominations at this and this. Oh well.

This mini-figure scale recreation of the long-forgotten Polish pioneer comes from Mateusz Waldowski of Flickr and there’s more to see of his excellent CWS T-1 at his photostream. Take a look via the link above.

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Blow Me

Mixing Technic, Model Team, and a little bit of spray paint, this gorgeous Bentley 4.5 litre ‘Blower’ was found by one of our Elves on Eurobricks today. Built by newcomer BC Lego it includes working ‘worm gear’ steering, an opening bonnet under which lives a brick-built replica of the 4-cylinder supercharged engine, and one of the most detailed chassis we’ve seen in some time. See more at the Eurobricks forum via the link above where you can find a link to the full gallery and build details.

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They See Me Rollin’

The Rolls-Royce Phantom isn’t just for new money. In fact it’s been around almost as long as the brand itself, with this example being the Phantom II, launched way back in 1929.

The Phantom II came powered by a 7.7 litre straight-six mated to a four-speed gearbox, with semi-elliptical spring suspension and servo-assisted brakes. At the time Rolls-Royce only made the chassis and running gear for their cars, with the customer choosing a body from one of several ‘coachbuilders’, including Park Ward, Mulliner, Hooper and others. We don’t know which bodywork this example by Flickr’s Lennart C (aka Everblack) is wearing, but it looks lovely whatever it is.

There’s more to see of Lennart’s beautiful Rolls-Royce Phantom II at his photostream – click the link above to see how they rolled in the 1930s.

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Brick-for-Tat

This most excellent photo comes from TLCB favourite Pixeljunkie, who has not only built this superb Ford Model A pick-up hot rod, he’s given the mini-figure driver an appropriately mean-looking tattoo too. Although the arm on which it’s been inked may no longer be attached the the driver…

Still, it looks cool. There’s more to see of Pixel’s Model A on Flickr via the link above, and if you don’t understand today’s title reference (because this writer is too English for his own good) click here.

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Our Fine Four Fendered Friend

Oh you pretty Chitty Bang Bang
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang we love you.
And in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang what we’ll do.
Near, far, in our motor car Oh!
What a happy time we’ll spend.
Bang Bang Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,
Our fine four fendered friend!

They don’t make movies like they used to. Ian Fleming and Albert Broccoli’s (of James Bond fame) 1968 musical adventure brought irritating singing children, the terrifying child-catcher (we’ve just realised that he may have had a use after all…), and a spectacular flying car to movie theatres all over the world.

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang has since become one of cinema’s all-time great films, and Flickr’s GunnBuilding remembers it beautifully via this lovely mini-figure scale recreation of our fine four fendered friend. Join the adventure via the link above. Just don’t do any singing.

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Staff Car

The staff cars here at The Lego Car Blog are, as revealed way back in 2013, all Austin Allegros. Not so the Wehrmacht, who got themselves a vehicle much cooler.

This a Mercedes-Benz W31 Type G4, a three-axle, straight-8 engined, all-terrain limousine as used by Nazi senior management for parades, inspections, and the annexation of other countries.

Only 57 Mercedes-Benz W31 G4s were produced, all of which were used as staff cars by the Nazi regime as the model was deemed much too expensive for normal military use.

This most excellent recreation of the G4, complete with neat caricature of a certain moustachioed despot, comes from Flickr’s Redfern1950s, who has captured the vehicle brilliantly in his trademark cartoon style. Head to Red’s photostream via the link above to join the parade.

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I Love Gooooold!

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Goldfinger, Goldmember and… er, Donald Trump would all appreciate this car. But don’t let that put you off, because it’s something rather special.

Just twenty-nine Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadsters were constructed between 1934 and ’36, each weighing around 6,000lbs and powered by a five-litre supercharged straight-eight engine that could propel the car to over 100mph. Independent suspension, 12V electrics, hydraulic brakes, and even safety glass made the Mercedes one of the most advanced cars of the time, and it had a price-tag to match.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

Today any Mercdes-Benz 500K is a seriously sought-after car, with the Roadsters even more desirable due to their extreme rarity, but if you don’t have $10million at your disposal don’t worry – car building legend and TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber has one that’s rather more attainable.

Firas’ 1:16 scale Model Team replica of the 500K Special Roadster took around a month to build, and features opening doors, hood and trunk, a detailed engine, and more gold than Trump Tower. OK, that’s not true, but it’s still a lot of gold. There’s much more to see of Firas’ golden masterpiece at his Flickr photostream – click here to take a look, and to catch up on Firas’ interview here at TLCB click the link in the text above.

LEGO 1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

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Cream Machine

Lego Vintage Racecar

Chris Elliott’s ‘1928 Nike Streamliner’ may be a fictional car of few pieces, but it makes for such a cool photo! Proving talent goes way further than unlimited pieces there’s more to see of Chris’ stunning imagery at his photostream – click here to check it out.

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Mr. T

Lego Ford Model T

In the hundred years since The Great War ended mankind has made all sorts of progress. Antibiotics, space travel, the television, Twitter, the cat pencil sharpener… it’s an amazing list, yet cars are still more or less the same as they were a century ago, and they’re still produced in largely the same way too.

This is the car that defined automobile production for the next 100 years, the phenomenally successful Ford Model T. Produced from 1908 to 1927, around fifteen million units of Henry Ford’s world-changing car were built, meaning that at one time over half of all the cars on the roads anywhere in the world were Model Ts. It’s likely we’ll never see such a dominant product – of any type, let alone a car – again.

This excellent Lego replica of very probably the most important machine ever made comes from previous bloggee Pixel Junkie who has recreated the Model T brilliantly in Lego form. See more at his photostream by clicking here.

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