Tag Archives: Vintage Car

Party Animals!

Lego Ford Model T Party Animals

Things are getting wild down on the farm! This menagerie of drunken farm animals doesn’t look dissimilar to the last party we had here at TLCB Towers. If you replace the Ford Model T with a wheelie chair. And the farm animals with a near-comatose TLCB staff writer. And the riotous abandon with remorseful crying. And ‘party’ with ‘drinking alone’.

Anyway, enough about this blogger’s Friday night, this wonderful scene comes from Paul (aka Brick Baron) of Flickr and it was built for this year’s BrickCon Lego convention. There’s more to see of his colourful party animals at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump!

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

Barn Find Bugatti

Lego Barn Find Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix

It’s every petrolhead’s dream to unearth an amazing classic car, unknown to the world for decades, hidden away in an unopened garage, workshop or barn.

It’s TLCB Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74‘s dream too, so he’s decided to build his very own barn find, depicting the moment a farmer reveals the old Bugatti racing car that’s been sleeping untouched for half a century beside his hay.

This particular barn find would be sure to raise some global interest, with Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix’s fetching around $1.5million at auction. Do you think he’ll sell it? Head over to Andrea’s photostream to ask the farmer really nicely.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Class A

Lego Ford Model A

This gloriously sinister scene comes from Pixel Junkie of Flickr, whose Ford Model A convertible and muted grey street gives us the shivers. Of course the driver could be on his way to pick up his girlfriend from work and take her for ice cream, but it’s more interesting to imagine something much darker…

Whatever is going on there’s more to see at Pixel’s photostream via the link above, where there are some lovely details to be found including the use of spears and daggers as metalwork plus a beautifully simple yet instantly recognisable postbox.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

B-Model

Lego Ford Model B Hot Rod

This lovely hot rodded ’32 Ford Model-B ‘3 window’ coupe appeared on Flickr over the weekend, built by previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott. Featuring some very cunning parts orientation there’s more to see at Jonathan’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton – Picture Special

Lego Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton

This astonishing creation comes from one of our very favourite builders, TLCB Master MOCer and published author Dennis Glaasker aka BricksonWheels. It’s a 1935 Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton, one of the most expensive and luxurious cars ever made.

Lego Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton

With a supercharged 6.8litre straight-eight engine producing 320bhp (a huge figure for 1935) the SJ Phaeton cost around thirty times that of a regular car, and today commands a price well into the millions. Driven by movie stars and the social elite, just 36 Duesenberg SJs were made before the Great Depression and the Second World War put an end to the production of super-luxurious vehicles.

Lego Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton

Dennis Glaasker’s incredible Lego recreation of the 1935 SJ Duel Cowl Phaeton is a near-prefect replica of the original car, and contains over 5,000 pieces, many of which have been professionally chromed, and 5,200 pieces in both open and closed roof configurations.

Lego 1935 Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton

A host of brilliant images are available to view via Dennis’ Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton Flickr album, plus you can read more about the build at the Eurobricks discussion forum and you can read our interview with builder as part of the Master MOCers Series by clicking here.

Lego 1935 Duesenberg SJ Dual Cowl Phaeton

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Cream Tea

Lego Vintage Roadster

This glorious vintage roadster by Flickr’s Galaktek was discovered by one of our Elves today, and we’re pretty sure it is absolutely not their cup of tea. Smooth, restrained, classy… literally none of the qualities that our Elven workforce would choose in a vehicle. But the discovering Elf knows its masters rather well, because it is absolutely our cup of tea. TLCB Staff are a civilised bunch you see.

Lego Vintage Roadster

Unusually coloured in cream and tea hues, Galaktek’s roadster looks the perfect car in which to take a jaunt to the country club for a, well… cream tea. The closest this TLCB writer is going to get to that vision is drinking a can of Red Bull alone in the stationary cupboard, so whilst he partakes in a slightly tragic but harmless fantasy you can check out more of Galaktek’s model at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Vintage Roadster

Tagged , , , ,

In the Bank

Lego Brooklands 1935

It’s time for some history here at TLCB, because we are – at heart – complete nerds.

The world’s first purpose-built racetrack (or what’s left of it) lies not far from TLCB Towers. The Brooklands race circuit opened in 1907, built partly for manufacturers of the newly emerging auto-industry to test their cars, and partly because driving really quickly is bloody good fun.

Measuring just under 3 miles long the Brooklands track was built from uncoated concrete banking, which in places reached 30ft high, and was simply unimaginably steep, far steeper than any modern banked circuit. With no safety barrier at the top and cars routinely getting airborne over the bumpy concrete the spectacle was incredible, and crowds topped a quarter of a million in the circuit’s hay-day.

The outbreak of the First World War saw Brooklands requisitioned by the War Office, as the site also included an aerodrome, becoming the UK’s largest aircraft manufacturing centre by 1918. The end of the war saw motor racing return the the track, alongside the continuation of aircraft manufacturing, but when Hitler decided that Germany hadn’t quite finished with Europe yet motor racing at the track ceased for good.

During the Second World War the Brooklands site became the hub of Hawker fighter and Wellington bomber manufacturing, amongst other aircraft, and the track’s survival as a piece of British heritage sadly, but necessarily, came second to the war effort. Trees were planted on the track to disguise it from German bombers, and whole sections ripped up to expand the runways.

By the end of the war the track was in a poor state, and the site was sold to Vickers-Armstrong to continue operations as an aircraft factory, at one time laying claim to being the largest aircraft hanger in the world. However as the UK’s aircraft manufacturing industry declined the Brooklands site was gradually sold off, becoming a business park, a supermarket, and the Mercedes-Benz World driving instruction track.

Today not much of the original circuit remains, but what does is managed by the Brooklands Museum, who are endeavouring to preserve possibly the most important motor racing, aeronautical and war-time manufacturing site in the world. A recent heritage grant aims to return both the aero-buildings and the famous Finishing Straight to their former glory, and a section of the incredible concrete banking is still standing. You can even take a car on it if you’re feeling brave.

If you’re in the UK and you get the chance to visit the Brooklands Museum we highly recommend it, but for our readers further afield you can get an idea of the insanity of the vintage racing that once took place there courtesy of this lovely scene recreating Brooklands circa-1935 by Flickr’s Redfern. There’s more to see of his 1930s Maserati, its racing counterpart, and his wonderfully recreated Brooklands banking his photostream. Click the link above to step back in time.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Not Rod

Lego Ford Model A Tudor

Ford’s Model T is undoubtedly the most remarkable car in history. The world’s first mass-produced car, constructed using the world’s first production line*, built in at least 12 countries, and with production spanning eighteen years, the Model T was at one point more popular than all the other cars on sale worldwide put together.

With a 50% global market share, Henry Ford had a quite a daunting task to replace it, so – to use a phrase of the time (probably) – he dilly-dallied for ages, allowing competitors to catch-up and erode his company’s position.

Finally, at the end of 1927, the Model T’s replacement was ready. The new Model A was a huge jump over the old T, with twice the power, a 50% higher top speed, and – more importantly – conventional driver controls.

The Model A went on sale in December 1927, and just over a year later a million had been sold. 6 months after that the figure passed two million, and by the time production ceased in 1932 almost 5 million Model As had been produced across nine different body styles.

This version is one of the most common, the ‘Tudor’ sedan, recreated wonderfully in mini-figure scale by TLCB favourite _Tiler.

Unusually, _Tiler hasn’t hod-rodded his Model A, leaving it instead as Henry Ford intended. A staple of the hod rodding scene, due its popularity and readily available parts supply, the Model A probably exists in greater numbers today as a hot rod than it does in its production form.

However there’s something very cool about seeing an original un-modded A, and you can check out more of _Tyler’s, along with his collection of hot rods, via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Blow Job

Lego Blower Bentley

LegoGallifrey‘s ‘blower’ Bentley is not a new build, but it is superb, and it’s been recently updated to include even more period realism, plus – and most importantly – it allows us to post a smutty title.

Built between 1927 and 1931, the Bentley 4½ litre was designed to take on the European performance cars of the time, and with a supercharger fitted (or ‘blower’ as it was known), power jumped by over 100bhp to 240, allowing Bentley to set several speed records, including a recorded 138mph at Brooklands.

Only 55 of the 720 Bentley 4½ litres built received a supercharger and they command truly astronomical prices today, so if you want one LegoGallifrey’s version is probably as close as you’ll get. Head over to Flickr via the link above to take a closer look.

Lego Bentley 4 1/2 Litre Blower

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

A Little Blow

Lego Hot Rod Blown

Charlie, powder, coke, dust, snow, nose candy…. all of interest to your Dad in the ’80s, but not the sort of blow we have here. This beautifully shot Town-scale hot rod from serial bloggee _Tiler features one of the smallest supercharged engines we’ve ever seen. In fact it looks to be mostly supercharger and not much engine at all, but who are we to argue with the Blow to Bang ratio when it looks this cool. Join us at the line via the link above.

Tagged , , , ,

Big Black Rod*

Lego Technic Ford Model-A Hot Rod

Another day, another Elf returns to TLCB Towers in the hope of a meal token. A token said Elf was duly granted, because this Ford Model-A ‘five window’ hot rod is right up our alley.

Featuring a wealth of Technic functionality Jonathan Elliott‘s hot rod is definitely worthy of the Technic category, but to be honest we’re not really looking at the working functions because the outside is Just. So. Damn. Cool.

There’s only one image available at present, but nevertheless you can still check it out at Jonathan’s Flickr photostream by clicking the link in the text above.

*That’s in your internet history now. Heh heh heh.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Brown-low

Lego Hot Rod

TLCB’s favourite Town-scale hot rod builder is back, as Flickr’s _Tyler has added another beautiful creation to his already impressive collection. There’s more to see of his latest hot rod and his previous works at the link above.

Tagged , , ,

Art Lego

Lego 1939 Delahaye 136

France probably lays claim to our least favourite car in the looks department. The first generation Peugeot 308 was built at the very lowest point of French automobile design, being both painfully dull and yet somehow also managing to resemble a deep-sea fish that’s washed up on the shore.

Thankfully those dark days have passed as the French have re-discovered some of their joy de vivre, so we’re holding out hope that French car design can come full circle, and give us something like this again.

The fantastically luxurious 1939 Delahaye 136 was an utterly gorgeous machine, and probably took the art deco school of design further than any other car has ever managed. Sadly production was cut short by Hitler being a dick, and unfortunately post-war France then had no place for a vehicle manufacturer as opulent as Delahaye, with the brand quietly slipping away in the 1950s.

We remember when French design ruled the roads thanks to previous bloggee Lino Martins, who has recreated the Delayhaye 136’s incredible art deco shape beautifully in standard LEGO bricks. There’s more of his spellbinding creation to see at his photostream – click the link above to visit France circa 1939.

Lego Delahaye 136

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Back in Black

Lego Technic Hot Rod

TLCB regular Horcik Designs is back with another excellent Technic creation. His latest is this neat V6-engined hot rod, complete with a rear differential and working steering.

Lego Technic Hot Rod

Horcik’s hot rod looks good (and simple) enough to be an official Technic set, and certainly improves on LEGO’s own effort. See more on Flickr at the link above, or click here to visit the discussion at Eurobricks.

Lego Technic Hot Rod

Tagged , , ,

Today’s Programme is Brought to You by the Letters ‘T’ and ‘U’

Lego Ford Model T

Some wise words from Sesame Street, which has been playing on the old TV in the Elves’ cage room to help them learn to spell. A human hand hidden inside some fuzzy felt with eyes stuck on top is clearly an effective learning aid, as following Elmo’s alphabetical directive the Elves have returned with two letter-based finds today!

Our ‘T’ creation (above) comes from Flickr’s Jonas Obermaier, a neat 1920s Ford Model T pick-up in mini-figure scale. Mini-figures who are up to no-good we think, as any 1920s vehicle near a ‘Keep Out’ sign usually spells trouble. Find out what they’re up to at the link above.

Today’s ‘U’ creation (below) was also found on Flickr, and comes from Joshua Brooks. It too is mini-figure scale, and it’s apparently a UT-60D U-Wing fighter from one of the many Star Wars battles in which some plucky pilots try to thwart a giant evil space station. It could therefore be from literally any Star Wars story as far as we know, so for a fuller back-story (and to check out what is a really lovely creation) click the link above or wait for it to appear on a blog that’s nerdier than this one.

Lego UT-60D U-Wing Star Wars

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: