Tag Archives: 6-wide

Exploding Chevy

Lego Chevrolet Bel Air

Ford may be best known for exploding cars (their crown of evil now claimed by Volkswagen), however today’s vehicular-explosion applies not to a ‘70s Ford Pinto but to a classic ’50s Chevrolet Bel Air. Not in the Ford ‘let’s-try-to-cover-up-that-one-of-our-cars-detonates-in-an-accident’ kind of way though, rather the very cool ‘let’s-see-what’s-inside’ kind.

This brilliant exploded Chevy comes from previous bloggee PixelJunkie of Flickr, whose lovely ’55 Bel Air has appeared here before as part of an excellent garage scene. Pixel’s clever explosion not only looks great, it also effectively displays the ingenious techniques used within the build, and there more to see at Pixel’s photostream by clicking here.

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Mr. T

Lego Ford Model T

In the hundred years since The Great War ended mankind has made all sorts of progress. Antibiotics, space travel, the television, Twitter, the cat pencil sharpener… it’s an amazing list, yet cars are still more or less the same as they were a century ago, and they’re still produced in largely the same way too.

This is the car that defined automobile production for the next 100 years, the phenomenally successful Ford Model T. Produced from 1908 to 1927, around fifteen million units of Henry Ford’s world-changing car were built, meaning that at one time over half of all the cars on the roads anywhere in the world were Model Ts. It’s likely we’ll never see such a dominant product – of any type, let alone a car – again.

This excellent Lego replica of very probably the most important machine ever made comes from previous bloggee Pixel Junkie who has recreated the Model T brilliantly in Lego form. See more at his photostream by clicking here.

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Royally Posh

Lego Bugatti Royale

Long before the Veyron, Chiron and Volkswagen ownership, Bugatti made some very posh cars. So posh in fact that the people who owned them didn’t drive the car themselves, and they didn’t even give their driver a roof, so that he would know his place.

This is one such car, the Bugatti Royale, of which just seven were produced. Powered by a 12.7litre straight-8 and measuring 21ft in length (significantly larger than even a modern-day Rolls Royce Phantom) the Royale was released just as the Great Depression hit, and it was a gigantic flop. Of the seven made only three were sold to paying customers, although to be fair to Ettore Bugatti he did apparently refuse to sell one to the King of Albania on account of his poor table manners.

This lovely Town-scale recreation of the Royale comes from ER0L of Flickr and there’s more to see at his photostream via think above. If your table manners are good enough.

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The Unknown Off-Roader

Lego ARO 244

Today’s post is a car that we’d never heard of, despite more than 300,000 being produced over nearly forty years and it being sold in over one hundred countries. Back to school for TLCB Team…

This is the ARO 24-Series, a Romanian 4×4 launched in 1969 and sold, after many revisions, right up until 2006 when the company finally folded in rather weird circumstances.

ARO began by building a relicensed version of the Soviet GAZ-69 military 4×4 in the late-1950s before designing their own vehicles such as the 24. The 24-Series was a huge export success; over 90% of production was exported before 1989, with the model also built in Portugal and Italy.

After thirty-five years of production the Romanian government decided to sell ARO to an American businessman who planned to import the 24-Series to the US. He managed to convince 200 dealers to pay $75,000 each for franchise rights, and then pressured them to send more money for vehicles. The dealers refused insisting they pay on delivery, and the venture collapsed.

The Romanian government then learned that the buyer had sold the tooling and assets, and that the documents used to purchase ARO were falsified. They sued in 2006 and the import company fired all its employees, sold its headquarters and disappeared. It was a strange ending to a rather good car, one that was an unusual communist success story killed by capitalist greed.

Today’s creation depicts a second generation 24-Series and has been superbly built by previous bloggee Pixel Fox of Flickr. There’s more to see of his excellent Romanian 4×4 by clicking here, and you can discover his ever-expanding back-catalogue of brilliant mini-figure scale off-roaders by visiting the full album here.

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Dirty Photo

Lego Workshop

Much has been written in the nerdier corners of the online Lego Community about keeping your Lego bricks in the best condition. Put them in the dishwasher. Use baking soda on yellowed white pieces. Keep them away from sunlight. Don’t open the box…

We’re don’t exactly share this school of thought here at The Lego Car Blog, preferring to, you know, use our bricks. Flickr’s PixelJunkie has gone one step further though, and deliberately dirtied his Danish plastic.* We can hear the incredulous tutting from the aforementioned nerds from here… Good.

The creation resulting from Pixel’s liberal application of grime is gloriously realistic, with a ’50s Chevrolet/Frazer-Nash-ish type vehicle suspended above its chassis during restoration inside a wonderfully real-looking workshop, complete with hoist, tools, pallets and lots of dirt!

Click the link above to put on your overalls and get dirty with PixelJunkie on Flickr.

*It might be digital dirt – we’re not sure – but our statement still stands. Get your bricks dirty; it’s more fun that way.

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Blue Wonder

Lego Mercedes-Benz Blue Wonder

Race transporters used to be much more interesting than a DAF with a huge box trailer on the back…

This is the Mercdes-Benz ‘Blue Wonder’, built in the mid-1950s to transport the team’s racing cars (plus a few customer cars too). Based on a lengthened Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing chassis, and powered by the same engine, the Blue Wonder was billed as the fastest transporter in the world.

Sadly the original vehicle was scrapped in ’67, although Mercedes have since built a replica, and so has previous bloggee pixeljunkie of Flickr, whose Mercedes-Benz W196 Formula 1 car appeared here earlier in the week and now resides on the deck of the truck.

There’s more to see of Pixel’s fantastic model at his photostream – click the link above to transport yourself back to 1955.

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Brown ’77

Lego Ford Granada Mk1

After berating old fat Fords yesterday, here’s, er… an old fat Ford. And we absolutely love it. This is a Ford Granada, a hugely successful car for Ford of Europe in the 1970s and ’80s. Built in Germany and the UK the Granada sold in the hundreds of thousands in a bewildering variety of engines, trim levels and body styles across three generations.

However as Granadas got older (and rustier) they, like all things, became near worthless. This meant they found a new calling on the banger track, where they were (and still are) highly prized for their speed and strength, and thus have been obliterated in terrifyingly vast numbers. When the handful left are worth a fortune in a few years time we’ll look back and wonder how we let it happen…

Here’s one Granada that won’t end its days on the track, a gloriously brown Mark 1 estate complete with a seventies beige interior and a roof-rack for family holidays to the seaside. It’s the work of Mateusz Waldowski of Flickr and there’s much more to see of this superb creation at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Ford Granada Mk1

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Disco Inferno

Lego Land Rover Discovery

Land Rover may be most famous for the Defender, but it’s this car that ensured the brand’s survival. Launched in 1989 in three and five door body styles, and with 4-cylinder petrol, 4-cylinder diesel, and a V8 engine options, the Discovery took the fight to the Japanese brands dominating the mid-size SUV market. It worked too, and the design stayed in production for almost a decade.

This 6-wide recreation of the Series 1 Discovery comes from TLCB favourite Pixel Fox, and he’s done a magnificent job replicating the early-’90s off-roader in Camel Trophy spec. The lions appear to like the look of it too, or could that be the delicious mini-figures they’re more interested in? Head over to Pixel’s photostream to find out, and you can hear the today’s title track by clicking here (and don’t pretend you don’t like it…)

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Rally to the Maxi

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

It’s the early 1980s, and everything has gone ‘Turbo’. Sunglasses, deodorant, razors… all of them could be found in ‘Turbo’ form, thanks to cars such as this one; the nuts Renault 5 Maxi Turbo.

Based on Renualt’s road-going hot hatch, the Maxi Turbo made almost 350bhp from its tiny 1.4 litre engine in rally form, enough to win the Monte Carlo Rally in its first outing in the World Rally Championship in 1981.

Ultimately the Renault 5 Maxi Turbo was quickly surpassed by the arrival of all-wheel-drive machines from Audi, Lancia and Peugeot, but it had left its mark, and a good road-going 5 Turbo is a sought-after car today.

This Speed Champions recreation of the Maxi Turbo comes from Fabrice Larcheveque who has recreated the car rather neatly in 6-wide form. Resplendent in an authentic livery courtesy of custom decals (and a bit of paint) there’s more to see of Fabrice’s 5 on both MOCpages and Flickr. Click the links to don your Turbo sunglasses and take a look.

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

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Old Tip

Lego Vintage Truck

This delightful vintage tipper truck was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr today. It comes from Versteinert MOC and it’s packed with brilliant detailing, including chassis details normally overlooked at this scale, such as an exhaust, spare wheel, gas tank, prop-shaft and even a differential casing. There’s a whole lot more to see at Versteinert MOC’s Flickr album – take a look via the link above.

Lego Vintage Truck

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Hip to be Square

Lego Semi Truck

This might be the squarest thing we’ve seen since the last Brothers Brick report from Brickfair. However, contrary to that it is somehow also rather cool. This lovely 6-wide cab-over-semi (or just a normal truck to European readers) comes from prolific bloggee de-marco of Flickr. As is usual for his builds, cunning SNOT (Studs Not On Top) techniques are used throughout, and if you’re wondering how you can build models like this one de-marco has made instructions available so you can see for yourself! Click the link above to check out the model in de-marco’s photostream where you can also find a link to the instructional video.

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2,733

Lego Porsche 911

Jonathan Elliott’s brilliant Porsche 911 design has appeared here before, but a shot showing it in three variants – including a gorgeous new Singer-esque commissioned piece – was too good to pass up! Plus today’s title gives us a tenuous link to this. See more on Flickr by clicking here.

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What’s in a Name?

Lego Mitsubishi Shogun Pajero

This is the Mitsubishi Pajero. Or not, depending on where you live. Mitsubishi’s toughest 4×4 was originally named after the pampas cat (Leopardus Pajeros), but the word means something entirely different in many Spanish-speaking countries…

TLCB Towers are not situated in a Spanish-speaking country, but nevertheless the big 4×4 is called something different here too. The Shogun, as it’s known in our market, was one of the founders of the modern SUV craze, but has long since been left behind by more car-like rivals. In fact we can’t remember the last time we saw a new-ish Shogun on the road.

We do still occasionally see early ones though, as they keep going forever. This lovely 6-wide mini-figure scale model of a late ’80s Shogun comes from previous bloggee Pixel Fox, adding to his already impressive line-up of Lego 4x4s. Take a look via the link above.

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Insert Obscure Reference

Lego Vintage Car

This is the 1927 Csikós Bismuth Sport Coupe, and it’s one of the strangest automotive stories of the 1920s.

Founded by a Hungarian monk in 1919, Csikós started by producing gear assemblies. A chance meeting with Giovanni Agnelli – the founder of FIAT – on a skiing trip in Italy saw the two bond over a mutual hatred of Communism and love of starfish, and an agreement was made to exchange FIAT engine technology for Csikós gears.

The result was Csikós’s first car, based loosely on a FIAT 501. Moderate success at home and in Italy gave the company the confidence to design their own car from scratch and the Bismuth was launched a few years later. Powered by a supercharged inline-4 of 3.7 litres, the Bismuth had a top speed in excess of 70mph and found fame with the Federation il Automobile Racing de Turin (FART).

Such success was short-lived though, as the company’s founder was killed in a freak land-yacht accident just four years later. Without leadership vehicle production slowed until the factory was requisitioned by the Nazis during the Second World War.

Today the factory is gone, replaced by Hungary’s national aquarium where – in memory of Csikós – the starfish tank still bares their company name.

1927 Csikós Bismuth

Except we made all of that up.

Flickr’s Chris Elliott is the inventor of the 1927 Csikós Bismuth Sport Coupe, and now that we’ve completely butchered whatever backstory there may have been you can see more at Chris’s photostream by clicking the link above! We’ve had a lot of sugar today.

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Class of ’71

Lego Speed Champions Seventies Supercars

Not to rub Jonathan Elliott’s nose in it, but 1971 was a long time before this TLCB writer was born. Nevertheless he’s still able to determine the make and model all four of Jonathan’s brilliant Speed Champions scale seventies supercars, so well do they recreate their real-world counterparts. See if you can guess all four and then head to Jonathan’s photostream to get your score!

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